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tv   BBC News at Ten  BBC News  November 19, 2021 10:00pm-10:31pm GMT

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tonight at ten, austria becomes the first country in europe to make covid vaccinations compulsory — as infection rates on the continent continue to rise sharply. austria will return to a national lockdown next week — while christmas markets in parts of germany are cancelled because of what ministers there call a national emergency.
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but in the uk there are hopes relatively high vaccination rates and the booster programme could make a difference. i wouldn't assume we are going to follow the same trajectory as europe, but we are watching very closely and obviously there is concern. we'll be live in vienna with the latest. also in the programme... in an exclusive bbc interview, the man known as europe's last dictator — president lukashenko of belarus — says he won't stop the flow of migrants through his country. we of migrants through his country. the jury find the d rittenhouse we the jury find the defendant kyle rittenhouse not guilty. cleared of murder — american teenager kyle rittenhouse — who shot dead two people last year during protests against racial injustice. and after the former yorkshire cricketer azeem rafiq gave evidence of racial abuse — the sport's top officials promise �*tangible action�* to tackle racism. and coming up on the sport
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on the bbc news channel, just weeks away from the start of the ashes, tim paine has stepped down as australia captain over explicit texts sent to a female colleague. good evening. higher covid rates in europe are bringing tighter restrictions in many countries. austria has become one of the few countries in the world to make it compulsory for people to get vaccinated — and there'll be a lockdown there from monday. in germany, the health minister says there's now a national emergency and a lockdown can't be ruled out. here in the uk, infection rates are still high, but falling — according to one new study, as our health editor hugh pym reports. looking ahead to christmas, but before then, the austrian people are facing bleak winter weeks with a 20—day lockdown from monday.
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they will only be allowed to leave home for work, exercise or shopping for essentials. and vaccination against covid will become compulsory in february. translation: despite months of persuasive efforts, - despite media campaigns, despite all discussions, we did not manage to convince enough people to get vaccinated. at the start of the week, austria planned restrictions on those who hadn't been jabbed, but infections carried on rising, and now a tougher set of measures. translation: idon't- actually mind being at home, i have a job which i can do from home, doesn't bother me much, but i will miss the cafe. translation: there is no other way, even though i don't like it. _ in literature, you can read that - pandemics last at least three years, and we should avoid that. so, will germany follow austria with lockdown restrictions? ministers said nothing was being rolled out and rising case numbers had created
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a national emergency. while uk daily cases relative to the population haven't surged, germany's have accelerated and are now not far behind. the netherlands and austria have imposed different forms of lockdown as their infection rates soared. so, what does this mean for the uk? some argue that more immunity is being built up after previous infections and the rest of europe is now following. maybe they are actually experiencing what some parts of the uk experienced a little bit earlier in the autumn with delta, with things opening up, and with the vaccines not fully kicking in, particularly for people in mid—life, that may be the pattern. i wouldn't assume we are going to follow the same trajectory as europe or watch it very closely, and obviously there is concern. the latest infection surveyed from the office of national statistics suggests that in england last week, one in 65 people had the virus, lower than the previous week.
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in wales, it was one in 55, also down. in scotland, with one in 95 people, case rates were said to be broadly level. case rates were said in northern ireland, with one in 65 people, the trend was said to be uncertain. experts say the future path of coal that is hard to predict, much will depend on the vaccine roll—out. the scottish government says it certificate scheme has contributed to a small rise and take—up among young people, and it may be extended. as in all the uk's nations, case data will be watched as closely as ever. hugh pym, bbc news. our europe correspondent bethany belljoins us now from vienna. so, bethany — many people in austria have refused to get vaccinated: what's been the reaction to the news that they now have to get the jab? frustration and anger, i think sums it up. this move to make people have
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their covid vaccination is very controversial here, austria is the first country in europe to contemplate such a move and the government says it is because the vaccination rate is simply too low. it is estimated that around two thirds of australians are fully vaccinated. the government says that it is constitutional to have a compulsory vaccination, but opposition parties here are really protesting about this. the far right freedom party is organising a demonstration tomorrow. it has campaigned very much on a platform of vaccination scepticism and they say they will continue to fight this on the streets and in the courts. other austrian say it is simply time for everybody to get vaccinated. thank you very much. here the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk, show there were a4,000
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new infections recorded, in the latest 24—hour period — that's nearly 4,000 more cases than last friday. so, an average ofjust over 40,000 cases were reported per day, in the last week. more than 8,000 people were in hospital with covid as of yesterday. there were 157 deaths, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test meaning the average number of deaths over the past seven days was 148. the total number of people who've died with covid, now stands at 143,716. on vaccinations, just over 88% of people aged 12 and over, have now received a first dose. and 80% have been double jabbed. and more than 14.2 million people have received their boosterjab. the president of belarus,
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alexander lukashenko, has said that he will not stop the flow of thousands of migrants through his country as they try to enter the european union. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, president lukashenko admitted that his armed forces may actually be helping migrants cross the heavily—guarded border into poland. our correspondent steve rosenberg spoke to him at the presidential palace in minsk. it is not often you get the chance to meet the man who has been labelled europe's last dictator. the west says alexander lukashenko is using migrants as a political weapon. we confronted him with claims his troops have been cutting border fences to help migrants into the eu. translation: our guys are helping the migrants get into polish territory? it is perfectly possible. i think that is absolutely possible. maybe somebody help them. i won't even look into this. thousands of migrants have been coming to belarus to try and slip into europe.
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alexander lukashenko denies bringing them here, but he warned the eu six months ago. you told the eu that belarus had been stopping migrants and but now they would have to catch them themselves. the migrants took that to mean belarus is open to them. translation: i told the eu i am not going to detain migrants on the border, hold them at the border and if they keep coming from now on, i still will not stop them, because they are not coming to my country, they are going to yours, the west up talking to us and working with us. if you do not want to, then fine, we will sort this problem out ourselves as best we can. this was belarus last year. alexander lukashenko under intense pressure, accused of rigging and election and stealing the presidency.
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if, as you claim, you won 80% of the vote, then why is it that crowds of people came onto the streets? not to congratulate you on your crushing victory, but to accuse you of stealing their votes. it doesn't make sense! translation: there is no sense in your head, steve, or in the heads of your masters. alexander lukashenko launched a brutal post—election crackdown on his critics and in civil society. we saw protesters being beaten and we saw young people coming out of detention centres with injuries on the bodies. translation: 0k, 0k, iadmit it. you admit it? people were beaten at the detention centre, but there were police beaten up as well and you did not show this. anyone who speaks out against you, who opposes you, you call a traitor or an enemy, why?
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translation: they haven't betrayed me, steve, they have betrayed belarus. sincejuly, 270 ngos have been shut down in belarus. translation: i'llansweryour question with no bother. we will masasscre all the scum that you, the west, have been financing. oh, you are upset that we have destroyed all your structures, your ngos and all those that you have been paying for? europe does not see alexander lukashenko as a legitimate president. he claims not to care. a pariah in the west, he knows there is always president putin's russia to fall back on. steve rosenberg, bbc news, minsk. an american teenager who shot dead two people during protests against racial injustice in wisconsin last year has been found not guilty of murder. in a trial that polarised opinion in the united states,
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kyle rittenhouse argued that he'd feared for his life and acted in self—defence. prosecutors said he had behaved like an armed vigilante. the case has provoked a heated debate about gun ownership. our correspondent nomia iqbal reports from the city of kenosha. the defendant will rise and face the jury. a dangerous vigilante, or someone acting in self—defence? after 26 hours, thejury decided kyle rittenhouse's fate. we the jury find the defendant kyle rittenhouse not guilty. the 12 men and women of the jury accepted the teenager's claim that he killed out of fear for his safety. somehow, some way, those 12jurors found _ somehow, some way, those 12jurors found that _ somehow, some way, those 12jurors found that he — somehow, some way, those 12jurors found that he was _ somehow, some way, those 12jurors found that he was innocent. - outside court, the political divisions this case has caused were clear.
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you attack me, i have the right to defend myself, but was what kai was on trial for that was here acquitted. are you telling me that if two guys come up to you and caused you, you cannot defend yourself? that is what was on trial today. yourself? that is what was on trial toda . , ., ._ yourself? that is what was on trial toda . , ., ., ., ., today. there is no way in a land of law where — today. there is no way in a land of law where a _ today. there is no way in a land of law where a person _ today. there is no way in a land of law where a person can _ today. there is no way in a land of law where a person can shoot - law where a person can shoot three people. _ law where a person can shoot three people, killed two of them and be acquitted — people, killed two of them and be acquitted. there's no way. the shooting happened against the backdrop of nationwide protests over racism and police brutality, following the murder of george floyd. in kenosha, another black man, named jacob blake, had been shot by police seven times and on the third night of riots, kyle rittenhouse entered the city. he said he came to provide security. in a series of confrontations, he shot dead joseph rosenbaum, who chased after him
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into this car park. he then killed another man, who ran after kyle rittenhouse, thinking he was an active shooter. a third man survived. police later arrested the teenager and charged him with murder. at his trial, there were tears, challenges... when you point the gun at someone else, that's going to make them feel like they are about to die, right? that's what you wanted him to feel. no! shouting by thejudge... don't get brazen with me! and a controversial defence by his team, in regards to the shooting of jacob blake. other people in this community have shot somebody seven times and it has been found to be ok. my client did it four times been found to be ok. my client did it fourtimes in been found to be ok. my client did it four times in three quarters of the second to protect his life. from mr rosenbaum. i'm sorry, that what happened. this case has become a big flash
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point on gun rights. some see kyle rittenhouse as a hero, for others he is a reckless teenager and a symbol of a gun culture out of control. nomia is in kenosha for us tonight — this is a case that's been followed across america — what's been the reaction tonight to this verdict? the reaction has been division. this case has pulled together some of the most explosive issues in america, the right to bear arms, protest, racial injustice. there were civil rights protesters outside the courthouse who said if kyle rittenhouse had been a black teenager and had a shot at three white people the police would have behaved very differently that night. the national guard is on standby just in case there is any violence. president biden has reacted, he said the verdict will leave many americans feeling very angry and concerned, including himself, but he's urged people to respect the
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verdict. kyle rittenhouse has reacted, he said he is remorseful and wants to get on with his life. for others it may not be so easy. the family of one of the men shot dead that night have said that this not guilty verdict sends a dangerous message that any armed civilian can show up in any town and justify shooting people. this political divide that we know exists in america on gun control, and gun ownership, has, tonight, got even deeper. ownership, has, tonight, got even deeer. . ~ ownership, has, tonight, got even deeer. ., ~ ownership, has, tonight, got even deeer. . ~' , ownership, has, tonight, got even deeer. . ~ , . the double child killer colin pitchfork has been arrested and sent back to prison, two months after he was released on licence, having served 33 years of a life sentence. pitchfork was jailed in 1988 after admitting the rape and murder of two 15 year olds girls, lynda mann and dawn ashworth. it's understood he's been returned to prison for breaching his licence conditions.
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the england and wales cricket board has promised far reaching action to tackle racism after talks amongst the game's senior officals. it follows azeem rafiq's revelations of racism when he played for yorkshire. today, a former england player, alex hales, apologised for causing offence, after a photo emerged of him dressed up in black make—up, at a party in 2009. our sports correspondnent laura scott reports. after another turbulent week, cricket's latest response is crisis talks at the oval as the game joined forces in tackling its discrimination problem. what do you want to get from the meeting? clarity and togetherness, i suppose. does cricket have a racism issue? well, we have work to do, no doubt. last night alex hales became further embroiled in the scandal after a photograph emerged showed him dressed in a racially offensive way in 2009. he said his appearance was a tribute
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to the late rapper, tupac. but apologised. i deplore all forms of racism and discrimination, i have been lucky enough to play around the world, with players of different races and cultures. earlier this week, there was praise for azeem rafiq, as he gave testimony to mps about his experience of racism in cricket and spoke of his hopes that speaking up would bring about change. i'm very determined that this is going to be looked back aaj the moment where not only sport, but society as a whole went - in a different direction. —— i'm very determined that this is going to be looked back as . the moment where not only sport, but society as a whole went - in a different direction. but the player has been forced to front up to his own mistakes, apologising after facebook pages from 2011 emerged showing him anti—semitic comments.
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he later apologised for another offensive social media post. azeem rafiq's own use of discriminatory language has been described as awkward by thejewish leadership council. others say it only shows the scale of the problem within cricket. today came an acceptance within the game that collective action is needed to resolve this crucial issue. in a joint statement, cricket chiefs said they were shocked and shamed and saddened by azeem rafiq's experience. you talk of initial steps, the issue of racism in cricket is nothing new, what makes this plan different to previous plans? i think that will be the proof in how we deliver it. this will be the first time the game has come together to take such urgent action.
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despite some counties having suggested a vote of no confidence, harrison said he has been backed. english cricket has come up with a broad direction of travel. but with the survival of the sport at stake, they must translate those intentions into action. andrew marr has announced he is leaving the bbc after 21 years, saying he is keen to get his "own voice back". the 62—year—old journalist said he would now focus on writing and presenting political and cultural shows for the radio giant global and writing for newspapers. the united nations hasjoined calls for china to give proof that missing tennis star peng shuai is safe and well. she hasn't been heard of since alleging was sexually assaulted by a former senior minister in the chinese government. tennis officials have dismissed an e—mail supposedly sent by her saying the allegations were untrue and that she's all right. our sports correspondent natalie pirks has the story. she is a tennis star in china,
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a former doubles world number one who won wimbledon. ..receiving now trophies from the duke of kent... but now, the united nations has added its voice to the clamour of bodies all wanting to know the same thing, where is peng shuai? two weeks ago, in this social media post, peng shuai made serious sexual assault allegations against former vice premier zhang gaoli. translation: like an egg hitting a rock or a moth to the flame - courting self—destruction, i'll tell the truth about you, she said. within half an hour, the post had gone and so had she. then an e—mail surfaced addressed to the chairman of the women's tennis association claiming to be from her saying she hadn't meant the allegations and was just resting at home. but they aren't buying it and are prepared to pull lucrative matches from china if they don't get proof she is safe. i don't want to see this get pushed under the rug or around the side
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because at the end there is maybe bigger issues in some peoples minds as to what's going on. i think the focus has to be on peng in this situation. 23—time grand slam singles champion serena williams has tweeted she is devastated and shocked adding, this must be investigated and we must not stay silent. she's not alone. we would like actually like to hear a video from her or something, like real proof that she is all right. the eyes of the world will be on beijing in february for the winter olympics, but so far the international olympic committee is only saying this requires quiet diplomacy. the ioc must fulfil its claims and responsibilities in this case and demonstrate that athletes really are at the heart of sport. it has significant leverage and influence to exert in this case, especially with the beijing olympics just around the corner now. in a country where few are allowed to challenge senior authorities without paying the price, concern grows by the hour
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for peng shuai's safety. natalie pirks, bbc news. the culture secretary, nadine dorries says people are afraid to say what they think on social media as it's been �*hijacked' by left wing campaigners. in herfirst television interview since being appointed she insists she doesn't want to start a culture war. today she announced a further £100 million for the culture recovery fund, to help theatres and other venues in england recoverfrom the pandemic. nadine dorries has been speaking to our culture editor, katie razzall. she's got a newjob. how does the crown fit? she's got a new “ob. how does the crown fit? ,., , she's got a new “ob. how does the crown fit? , , she's got a new “ob. how does the crown fwh the i she's got a new “ob. how does the i crown fwh the new crown fit? does it suit me? the new culture secretary, _ crown fit? does it suit me? the new culture secretary, nadine _ crown fit? does it suit me? the new culture secretary, nadine dorries, l culture secretary, nadine dorries, famously outspoken herself online, she has attacked left—wing snowflakes who she says are suppressing free speech. her appointment was met with criticism from some within the creative industries. the closest you get to
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culture is if you eat a pot of yoghurt, what about that? this image that has been — yoghurt, what about that? this image that has been painted _ yoghurt, what about that? this image that has been painted of _ yoghurt, what about that? this image that has been painted of me, - yoghurt, what about that? this image that has been painted of me, just - that has been painted of me, just isn't true. that has been painted of me, 'ust isn't true. ., ., ., ~ ., isn't true. you are talking about left-win: isn't true. you are talking about left-wing snowflakes _ isn't true. you are talking about left-wing snowflakes and - isn't true. you are talking about left-wing snowflakes and their. left—wing snowflakes and their agenda, that's quite aggressive. there are some people who politicise that. campaigners who hijacked the space young people would like to occupy to talk about some serious issues, some on the left hijacked that space, that's to my comments are targeted at.— are targeted at. liverpool, the treat are targeted at. liverpool, the great atlantic _ are targeted at. liverpool, the great atlantic port _ are targeted at. liverpool, the great atlantic port of - are targeted at. liverpool, the great atlantic port of the - are targeted at. liverpool, the| great atlantic port of the north are targeted at. liverpool, the i great atlantic port of the north of englandm — great atlantic port of the north of england... she great atlantic port of the north of encland... ,, .,, great atlantic port of the north of encland... ,, ,,. ._ great atlantic port of the north of encland... ,, ,,. ., , ., ., england... she as secretary and a bestselling _ england... she as secretary and a bestselling novelist _ england... she as secretary and a bestselling novelist whose - england... she as secretary and a bestselling novelist whose books| england... she as secretary and a i bestselling novelist whose books are based on her upbringing in a deprived part of liverpool. she liverpool. she says she went hungry as a child and shared schools to go to school —— shared shoes to go to to school -- shared shoes to go to school. , . , ., ., ~ ., , ., school. every decision we take has a filter. that is, _ school. every decision we take has a filter. that is, does _ school. every decision we take has a filter. that is, does this _ school. every decision we take has a filter. that is, does this policy i filter. that is, does this policy help those from socially deprived areas to access both arts and culture and sport? we
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areas to access both arts and culture and sport? we express our solidarity... she _ culture and sport? we express our solidarity... she got _ culture and sport? we express our solidarity... she got a _ culture and sport? we express our solidarity. .. she got a sneak- solidarity... she got a sneak review solidarity... she got a sneak preview of — solidarity... she got a sneak preview of the _ solidarity... she got a sneak preview of the new - solidarity... she got a sneak preview of the new play. i solidarity... she got a sneak| preview of the new play. this theatre is one of 925 cultural organisations in england, the majority outside the capital, that she has today announced will share more than £100 million from the government plus agricultural recovery fund. it's the latest instalment to help them through the pandemic. —— government's culture recovery fund. the pandemic. -- government's culture recovery fund-— recovery fund. the funding we are doinu now recovery fund. the funding we are doing now is _ recovery fund. the funding we are doing now is to — recovery fund. the funding we are doing now is to help _ recovery fund. the funding we are l doing now is to help people through the recovery period.— the recovery period. nadine dorries has taken on _ the recovery period. nadine dorries has taken on the _ the recovery period. nadine dorries has taken on the beast _ the recovery period. nadine dorries has taken on the beast in _ the recovery period. nadine dorries has taken on the beast in the i the recovery period. nadine dorries has taken on the beast in the tv i has taken on the beast in the tv jungle. it's the media jungle she's taking on now. she decides the price of the bbc licence fee over the next five years. she's long been a critic. ., .., ., five years. she's long been a
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critic. ., ., ., ., critic. you could hear the almond milk lato critic. you could hear the almond milk lato cops — critic. you could hear the almond milk lato cups fall— critic. you could hear the almond milk lato cups fall on _ critic. you could hear the almond milk lato cups fall on the - critic. you could hear the almond milk lato cups fall on the floor i milk lato cups fall on the floor when i got thejob. d0 milk lato cups fall on the floor when i got the job.— milk lato cups fall on the floor when i got the job. when i got the 'ob. do you want the bbc to when i got the 'ob. do you want the sac to survive — when i got the job. do you want the bbc to survive question _ when i got the job. do you want the bbc to survive question of - when i got the job. do you want the bbc to survive question of course, l bbc to survive question of course, i'm british and it's the best of british. —— almond milk latte cups. that's why we need to have discussions about how we enable it over the long term to remain that global institution. she is the tenth culture secretary in ten years and says the reaction to her appointment was snobbish and sexist. will her actions in the role change minds? the bbc�*s children in need appeal has raised over £39 million in tonight's star—studded show from salford. popstar ed sheerin performed his new single to kick off the programme — hosted by mel giedroyc and graham norton. the three hour telethon also saw a number of gameshow skits — including 0ti mabuse and stephen fry taking theirturn in graham norton's red chair. and an unlikely first date
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between soap stars from eastenders and coronation street. that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good night. good evening. it's been another mild day. in fact, we had 17 degrees across aberdeenshire because we're bathed in these south—westerly atlantic winds. but it is going to change through the course of saturday and sunday as we get that arctic air in. so, for what remains of the evening, it's largely dry, just misty and drizzly in the west, but you can see the heavy rain advancing on our cold weather front in the north. so, quite wet for northern and western scotland by the end of the night. quite mild, though, a few spots down to 6—7 degrees celsius, a little bit of mist and fog in the gaps, which will lift during the course of saturday morning. then we'll see some brightness developing, but there's quite a lot of drizzly rain in some coastal and hillier areas, and then on this weatherfront, some more significant
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rain coming southwards. behind it, temperatures will actually drop during the day, back down to around about average, with some sunshine, but also some showers. and those showers will filtrate further southwards on sunday, as will the cold air. it will feel much colder for all, particularly accentuated by the brisk wind, even in southern areas. this is bbc news,
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the headlines... a us jury has acquitted kyle rittenhouse on charges that he murdered two men and attempted to kill a third during chaotic racialjustice protests in wisconsin last year. his trial polarised america, highlighting divisions around contentious issues like gun rights. the president of belarus, alexander lukashenko, has told the bbc it is �*perfectly possible' that belarusian security forces have helped migrants try to cross the border into poland. he denied inviting the migrants to belarus. austria has become the first country in western europe to go back into full lockdown as covid infections surge again. all austrians will be required to get vaccinated from february next year. kamala harris has become the first woman in american history to become acting president of the united states. she took over for 85 minutes as head of state and commander—in chief while president biden had a medical procedure.

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