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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 19, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a us teenager who shot dead two people and injured another during racialjustice protests last year has been found not guilty of murder in a trial that polarized america. belarus�*s authoritarian leader, alexander lukashenko, speaks exclusively to the bbc. he admits that his forces may have helped migrants cross into the european union, and that he won't stop people from reaching the border. translation: i told the eu i'm not going to detain - migrants on the border, hold them at the border, and if they keep coming from now on, i still won't stop them. as coronavirus cases surge in europe, austria is reimposing a national lockdown and making vaccinations compulsory. and kamala harris becomes the first woman ever to hold us presidential powers whilejoe biden had
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a medical procedure. hello and welcome. a us teenager who shot dead two people and injured another during racialjustice protests in wisconsin last year has been found not guilty of murder. kyle rittenhouse had argued that he was repeatedly attacked and had acted in self—defence. mr rittenhouse and the men he shot are all white. prosecutors said that the teenager had behaved like an armed vigilante who provoked several violent encounters. our correspondent nomia iqbal reports from the city of kenosha. a dangerous vigilante, or someone acting in self—defence? after 26 hours, thejury decided
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kyle rittenhouse�*s fate. we the jury find the defendant, kyle rittenhouse, not guilty. the 12 men and women of the jury accepted the teenager's claim that he killed out of fear for his safety. somehow, some way, those 12jurors found that he was innocent. outside court, the political divisions this case has caused were clear. you attack me, i have the right to defend myself, that's was what kyle was on trial for that was here acquitted. are you telling me that if two guys come up to you and accost you, you can't defend yourself? that's what was on trial today. there is no way in a land of law where a person can shoot three people, killed two of them and be acquitted. there's no way.
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the shooting happened against the backdrop of nationwide protests over racism and police brutality, following the murder of george floyd. in kenosha, another black man, named jacob blake, had been shot by police seven times and on the third night of riots, kyle rittenhouse entered the city. he said he came to provide security. in a series of confrontations, he shot dead joseph rosenbaum, who chased after him into this car park. he then killed another man, who ran after kyle rittenhouse, thinking he was an active shooter. a third man survived. police later arrested the teenager and charged him with murder. at his trial, there were tears, challenges... when you point the gun at someone else, that's going to make them feel like they're about to die, right? that's what you wanted him to feel.
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no! ..shouting by thejudge... don't get brazen with me! ..and a controversial defence by his team, in regards to the shooting of jacob blake. other people in this community have shot somebody seven times and it has been found to be ok. my client did it four times in three quarters of the second to protect his life from mr rosenbaum. i'm sorry, that's what happened. this case has become a big flash point on gun rights. some see kyle rittenhouse as a hero. for others, he's a reckless teenager and a symbol of a gun culture out of control. nomia has the reaction from outside the court. the reaction has been division. this case has pulled together some of the most explosive issues.
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their civil rights process servers who said if kyle rittenhouse had been black and had shot at three white people, the police would have behaved very differently that night. the national guard is on standby just in case there is any violence. president biden has reacted. he has said that the verdict will leave many americans feeling very angry and concerned, including himself, but he has urged people to respect the verdict. kyle rittenhouse has reacted. he says he is remorseful and wants to get on with his life, but for others, it may not be so easy. the family of one of the men shot dead had said that this not guilty verdict sends a dangerous message that any armed civilian can show up in any town and justify shooting people. so, this political divide that we know exists in america on gun control and gun ownership has tonight got even deeper. outside the courthouse,
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emotional speeches in reaction to the verdict are ongoing. here's hannah giddings, the partner of 26—year—old anthony huber, who was fatally shot by kyle rittenhouse. it's hard to find the exact words to say in _ it's hard to find the exact words to say in this— it's hard to find the exact words to say in this situation. i don't think that any— say in this situation. i don't think that any of— say in this situation. i don't think that any of us who were directly involved — that any of us who were directly involved in— that any of us who were directly involved in what happened last year are realty— involved in what happened last year are really that surprised. we know that this _ are really that surprised. we know that this system is a failure. we know— that this system is a failure. we know that — that this system is a failure. we know that the system doesn't serve people _ know that the system doesn't serve people like us or, really, anybody who was— people like us or, really, anybody who was not directly involved in the system _ lisa bloom is trial attorney who has been following the case. she gave me her take on the verdict. i think it's very dangerous to take what _ i think it's very dangerous to take what happened _ i think it's very dangerous to take what happened in— i think it's very dangerous to take what happened in the _ i think it's very dangerous to take what happened in the trial- i think it's very dangerous to take what happened in the trial on a l i think it's very dangerous to take . what happened in the trial on a very specific— what happened in the trial on a very specific set — what happened in the trial on a very specific set of — what happened in the trial on a very specific set of facts _ what happened in the trial on a very specific set of facts and _ what happened in the trial on a very specific set of facts and enlarge - what happened in the trial on a very specific set of facts and enlarge it . specific set of facts and enlarge it to a political— specific set of facts and enlarge it to a political message. _ specific set of facts and enlarge it
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to a political message. the - specific set of facts and enlarge it to a political message. the law. specific set of facts and enlarge itj to a political message. the law of self-defense _ to a political message. the law of self—defense protects _ to a political message. the law of self—defense protects anyone - to a political message. the law of self—defense protects anyone if . to a political message. the law of. self—defense protects anyone if they feel that _ self—defense protects anyone if they feel that they— self—defense protects anyone if they feel that they are _ self—defense protects anyone if they feel that they are threatened, - self—defense protects anyone if they feel that they are threatened, if - feel that they are threatened, if their— feel that they are threatened, if their life — feel that they are threatened, if their life or— feel that they are threatened, if their life or bodily— feel that they are threatened, if their life or bodily integrity - feel that they are threatened, if their life or bodily integrity is i their life or bodily integrity is being — their life or bodily integrity is being threatened. _ their life or bodily integrity is being threatened. you - their life or bodily integrity is being threatened. you can. their life or bodily integrity is . being threatened. you can shoot their life or bodily integrity is - being threatened. you can shoot and you can _ being threatened. you can shoot and you can kill— being threatened. you can shoot and you can kill in— being threatened. you can shoot and you can kill in that _ being threatened. you can shoot and you can kill in that situation. - being threatened. you can shoot and you can kill in that situation. this - you can kill in that situation. this was a _ you can kill in that situation. this was a case — you can kill in that situation. this was a case where _ you can kill in that situation. this was a case where almost - you can kill in that situation. this was a case where almost the - was a case where almost the entirety of the _ was a case where almost the entirety of the incidents _ was a case where almost the entirety of the incidents was _ was a case where almost the entirety of the incidents was caught _ was a case where almost the entirety of the incidents was caught on - of the incidents was caught on video. and _ of the incidents was caught on video, and the _ of the incidents was caught on video, and the jury— of the incidents was caught on video, and the jury could - of the incidents was caught on video, and the jury could look| of the incidents was caught on l video, and the jury could look at the video. — video, and the jury could look at the video, they— video, and the jury could look at the video, they deliberated - video, and the jury could look at the video, they deliberated for. video, and the jury could look at. the video, they deliberated for 25 hours _ the video, they deliberated for 25 hours and — the video, they deliberated for 25 hours and determined _ the video, they deliberated for 25 hours and determined each - the video, they deliberated for 25 hours and determined each of- the video, they deliberated for 25j hours and determined each of the three _ hours and determined each of the three people _ hours and determined each of the three people who _ hours and determined each of the three people who kyle _ hours and determined each of the. three people who kyle rittenhouse shot, _ three people who kyle rittenhouse shot. he _ three people who kyle rittenhouse shot. he shot — three people who kyle rittenhouse shot, he shot in _ three people who kyle rittenhouse shot, he shot in self—defense. - three people who kyle rittenhouse shot, he shot in self—defense. he i shot, he shot in self—defense. he was being — shot, he shot in self—defense. he was being threatened _ shot, he shot in self—defense. he was being threatened with - shot, he shot in self—defense. he was being threatened with rocks, | shot, he shot in self—defense. he i was being threatened with rocks, he was being threatened with rocks, he was being _ was being threatened with rocks, he was being chased, _ was being threatened with rocks, he was being chased, a _ was being threatened with rocks, he was being chased, a gun _ was being threatened with rocks, he was being chased, a gun was - was being chased, a gun was hrandished _ was being chased, a gun was brandished upon _ was being chased, a gun was brandished upon him, - was being chased, a gun was brandished upon him, and i was being chased, a gun wasj brandished upon him, and so was being chased, a gun was - brandished upon him, and so the jury determined _ brandished upon him, and so the jury determined self—defense _ brandished upon him, and so the jury determined self—defense applied - brandished upon him, and so the jury determined self—defense applied andj determined self—defense applied and he was _ determined self—defense applied and he was not _ determined self—defense applied and he was not guiltv _ determined self—defense applied and he was not guilty. that _ determined self—defense applied and he was not guilty. that does - determined self—defense applied and he was not guilty. that does not - he was not guilty. that does not mean _ he was not guilty. that does not mean that— he was not guilty. that does not mean that people _ he was not guilty. that does not mean that people are _ he was not guilty. that does not mean that people are now - he was not guilty. that does not mean that people are now free i he was not guilty. that does not. mean that people are now free to take guns— mean that people are now free to take guns and _ mean that people are now free to take guns and runaround - mean that people are now free to take guns and runaround and - mean that people are now free to take guns and runaround and be i take guns and runaround and be vigilantes— take guns and runaround and be vigilantes because, _ take guns and runaround and be vigilantes because, if— take guns and runaround and be vigilantes because, if they- take guns and runaround and be vigilantes because, if they do, l take guns and runaround and be . vigilantes because, if they do, and if they— vigilantes because, if they do, and if they shoot, _ vigilantes because, if they do, and if they shoot, the _ vigilantes because, if they do, and if they shoot, the jury _ vigilantes because, if they do, and if they shoot, the jury will - vigilantes because, if they do, and if they shoot, the jury will look - if they shoot, the jury will look very— if they shoot, the jury will look very ca refullv _ if they shoot, the jury will look very carefully at _ if they shoot, the jury will look very carefully at what - if they shoot, the jury will look very carefully at what they - if they shoot, the jury will lookj very carefully at what they did. if they shoot, the jury will look - very carefully at what they did. you make a very _ very carefully at what they did. make a very important point. the contacts was the shooting of jacob blake. it sparked some very violent
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protests and damage to properties. the groups had come into the town they said to help defend people, and they said to help defend people, and the prosecution seem to be in effect, kyle rittenhouse provoked the violent reaction he got threatened by. that could be the situation that could be used as a defence, and all you have to do is say you felt threatened, and it's for the prosecution to disprove that you felt threatened, which is difficult. ., �* , you felt threatened, which is difficult. . �*, . ., �*, difficult. that's correct, and it's much easier — difficult. that's correct, and it's much easier to _ difficult. that's correct, and it's much easier to win _ difficult. that's correct, and it's much easier to win a _ difficult. that's correct, and it's much easier to win a case. - difficult. that's correct, and it's| much easier to win a case. then difficult. that's correct, and it's i much easier to win a case. then it would _ much easier to win a case. then it would he — much easier to win a case. then it would he in — much easier to win a case. then it would he injust— much easier to win a case. then it would be injust california - much easier to win a case. then it would be injust california or- would be injust california or new york— would be injust california or new york -- _ would be injust california or new york —— self—defense _ would be injust california or new york —— self—defense case. - would be injust california or new york —— self—defense case. the . york —— self—defense case. the bottom — york —— self—defense case. the bottom line _ york —— self—defense case. the bottom line is _ york —— self—defense case. the bottom line is the _
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york —— self—defense case. the bottom line is the jury- york —— self—defense case. the bottom line is the jury did - york —— self—defense case. the bottom line is the jury did not i bottom line is the jury did not believe — bottom line is the jury did not believe that— bottom line is the jury did not believe that kyle _ bottom line is the jury did not| believe that kyle rittenhouse, bottom line is the jury did not - believe that kyle rittenhouse, then 17 years— believe that kyle rittenhouse, then 17 years old. — believe that kyle rittenhouse, then 17 years old, walking _ believe that kyle rittenhouse, then 17 years old, walking around - believe that kyle rittenhouse, then 17 years old, walking around with l believe that kyle rittenhouse, then 17 years old, walking around with a | 17 years old, walking around with a large _ 17 years old, walking around with a large automatic— 17 years old, walking around with a large automatic weapon, _ 17 years old, walking around with a large automatic weapon, was - 17 years old, walking around with a large automatic weapon, was the i large automatic weapon, was the one who incited _ large automatic weapon, was the one who incited violence. _ large automatic weapon, was the one who incited violence. the _ who incited violence. the prosecution _ who incited violence. the prosecution argued - who incited violence. the prosecution argued that i who incited violence. the - prosecution argued that people thought— prosecution argued that people thought he _ prosecution argued that people thought he was _ prosecution argued that people thought he was an _ prosecution argued that people thought he was an active - prosecution argued that people i thought he was an active shooter, especially— thought he was an active shooter, especially after _ thought he was an active shooter, especially after the _ thought he was an active shooter, especially after the first _ thought he was an active shooter, especially after the first shooting. j especially after the first shooting. they were — especially after the first shooting. they were trying _ especially after the first shooting. they were trying to _ especially after the first shooting. they were trying to protect - they were trying to protect themselves _ they were trying to protect themselves and _ they were trying to protect themselves and protect - they were trying to protect - themselves and protect others, but themselves and protect others, but the jury— themselves and protect others, but the jury did — themselves and protect others, but the jury did not _ themselves and protect others, but the jury did not agree _ themselves and protect others, but the jury did not agree with - themselves and protect others, but the jury did not agree with that. - the jury did not agree with that. lisa help — the jury did not agree with that. lisa help blumaan_ the jury did not agree with that. lisa help blumaan the _ the jury did not agree with that. lisa help blumaan the acquittall the jury did not agree with that. l lisa help blumaan the acquittal of —— lisa bloom. take a look at these pictures from the dutch city of rotterdam. police have fired warning shots during a demonstration by people opposed to the partial lockdown in the netherlands. local media said water cannon was also used to disperse a crowd of several hundred which had set fire to police vehicles. the netherlands reimposed restrictions last weekend for three weeks in an attempt to subdue rising coronavirus infections.
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the crowds have largely dispersed. these are the pictures and rotterdam now. you get some sense of the damage that's been cause. city workers trying to tidy up the streets after this protest got a little bit out of hand. no reports, i'm pleased to say, on the crowd dispersed relatively quickly. a lot of tension over restrictions. a long way away from austria where a full lockdown is due to begin on monday. in a sign of how serious central europe's covid surge has become, austria is to make it a legal requirement to get vaccinated from february. it's also becoming the first european union country to reimpose a nationwide lockdown. the austrian chancellor, alexander schallenberg, told a news conference that the lockdown would begin on monday, and last a maximum of 20 days. in the uk, infection rates
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are still high, but falling, according to the latest data, as our health editor hugh pym reports. looking ahead to christmas, but before then, the austrian people are facing bleak winter weeks with a 20—day lockdown from monday. they will only be allowed to leave home for work, exercise or shopping for essentials. and vaccination against covid will become compulsory in february. translation: despite months of persuasive efforts, - despite media campaigns, despite all discussions, we did not manage to convince enough people to get vaccinated. at the start of the week, austria planned restrictions on those who hadn't been jabbed, but infections carried on rising, and now a tougher set of measures. translation: idon't- actually mind being at home, i have a job which i can do from home, doesn't bother me much, but i will miss the cafe.
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translation: there is no other way, even though i don't like it. _ in literature, you can read that - pandemics last at least three years, and we should avoid that. so, will germany follow austria with lockdown restrictions? ministers said nothing was being rolled out and rising case numbers had created a national emergency. while uk daily cases relative to the population haven't surged, germany's have accelerated and are now not far behind. the netherlands and austria have imposed different forms of lockdown as their infection rates soared. so, what does this mean for the uk? some argue that more immunity is being built up after previous infections and the rest of europe is now following. maybe they are actually experiencing what some parts of the uk experienced a little bit earlier in the autumn with delta, with things opening up, and with the vaccines not fully kicking in, particularly for people in mid—life, that may be the pattern. i wouldn't assume we are going to follow the same trajectory
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as europe or watch it very closely, and obviously there is concern. the latest infection surveyed from the office of national statistics suggests that in england last week, one in 65 people had the virus, lower than the previous week. in wales, it was one in 55, also down. in scotland, with one in 95 people, case rates were said to be broadly level. in northern ireland, with one in 65 people, the trend was said to be uncertain. experts say the future path of coal that is hard to predict, much will depend on the vaccine roll—out. the scottish government says it certificate scheme has contributed to a small rise and take—up among young people, and it may be extended. as in all the uk's nations, case data will be watched as closely as ever. hugh pym, bbc news. well, i spoke to doctor burkhard gustorff. he works in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine at klinik ottakring,
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which is a hospital in vienna. i asked him how his hospital is coping with the influx of patients. actually, we are very busy in our hospitals all over austria. the situation is very, very strength in austria. the situation is on stable level, and we are very busy with covid—i9 patients and all the other intensive care patients. what covid-19 patients and all the other intensive care patients.— covid-19 patients and all the other intensive care patients. what is the exerience intensive care patients. what is the experience of— intensive care patients. what is the experience of patients _ intensive care patients. what is the experience of patients that - intensive care patients. what is the experience of patients that you - intensive care patients. what is the experience of patients that you are | experience of patients that you are seeing? are the ones who are being given treatment in hospital people who have not been vaccinated, or is it not as simple as that?— it not as simple as that? it's very sim - le. it not as simple as that? it's very simple- about — it not as simple as that? it's very simple. about 8096 _ it not as simple as that? it's very simple. about 8096 to _ it not as simple as that? it's very simple. about 8096 to 8596 - it not as simple as that? it's very simple. about 8096 to 8596 of- it not as simple as that? it's veryj simple. about 8096 to 8596 of the simple. about 80% to 85% of the patients in the icu units are not vaccinated, so this is a real problem of nonvaccinated patients. the government has made a decision
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to make vaccination mandatory. you've got i think a 65% national rate of vaccination. but the mandatory bit doesn't take effect until next february. it kind of feels a bit late.— until next february. it kind of feels a bit late. , �* ., ., feels a bit late. yes, i'm a doctor, but i 'ust feels a bit late. yes, i'm a doctor, but i just can't _ feels a bit late. yes, i'm a doctor, but ijust can't tell _ feels a bit late. yes, i'm a doctor, but ijust can't tell you. _ feels a bit late. yes, i'm a doctor, but i just can't tell you. 9896 - but ijust can't tell you. 98% of doctors in my department are vaccinated. there is an important increase of vaccination, so the curve is now going up, and i hope, and we all hope, we all hope vaccination will increase. some eo - le vaccination will increase. some peeple think — vaccination will increase. some peeple think it _ vaccination will increase. some people think it is _ vaccination will increase. some people think it is un-austrian l vaccination will increase. some | people think it is un-austrian to people think it is un—austrian to force this. how do you feel about that debate? taste force this. how do you feel about that debate?— that debate? we had this debate alread for that debate? we had this debate already for a _ that debate? we had this debate already for a long _ that debate? we had this debate already for a long time, - that debate? we had this debate already for a long time, and - that debate? we had this debate
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already for a long time, and we i already for a long time, and we have not to donate it any more. i think the important thing is being a doctor, where is this fight with all the teams, and all are exhausted. we hope that most of the population will be vaccinated, and this is a clear sign to go towards protection of all people. talking to me a little earlier. let's get some of the day's other news. a large study carried out in the united states has found that pregnant women infected with the coronavirus are twice as likely to have a stillborn child, although the risk is still very small. the us centers for disease control and prevention examined data from more than a million deliveries from the first 18 months of the pandemic. counter—terrorism detectives investigating the explosion outside liverpool women's hospital in england last weekend have revealed that the bomb contained ball bearings as shrapnel and could have caused significant injury or death if it had detonated properly. it's still not clear why the device
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exploded, killing the bomber, emad al swealmeen, in the back of a taxi. stay with us on bbc news because still to come... the outcry over missing chinese tennis star peng shuai intensifies — as the women's tennis association threatens to pull out of china. benazir bhutto has claimed victory in pakistan's general election, and she's asked pakistan's president to name her as prime minister. jackson's been released on bail of $3 million after turning himself in to police in santa barbara. it was the biggest demonstration so far of the fast—growing european antinuclear movement. the south african government has announced that it's opening - the country's remaining whites—only
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beaches to people of all races. - this will lead to a black—majority government in this country and the destruction of the white civilisation. part of the centuries—old windsor castle, one of the queen's residences, has been consumed by fire for much of the day. 150 firemen have been battling the blaze, which has caused millions of pounds worth of damage. this is bbc news. the latest headlines... a us teenager who shot dead two people and injured another during racialjustice protests last year has been found not guilty of murder in a trial that polarized america. belarus's authoritarian leader, alexander lukashenko, has spoken exclusively to the bbc. he admitted that his forces may have helped migrants cross into the european union, and said he won't stop people
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from reaching the border. the united nations hasjoined calls for china to give proof that missing tennis star peng shuai is safe and well. she hasn't been heard of since alleging was sexually assaulted by a former senior minister in the chinese government. tennis officials have dismissed an e—mail supposedly sent by her saying the allegations were untrue and that she is all right. our sports correspondent, natalie pirks, has the story. she is a tennis star in china, a former doubles world number—one who won wimbledon. but now, the united nations has added its voice to the clamour of bodies all wanting to know the same thing — where is peng shuai? two weeks ago in a social media post, peng shuai made serious sexual assault allegations against former vice premier zhang gaoli. "like an egg hitting a rock, or a moth to the flame caught in self—destruction, i'll tell the truth about you," she said. within half an hour,
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the post had gone — and so had she. then an e—mail surfaced, addressed to the chairman of the women's tennis association, claiming to be from her, saying she hadn't meant the allegations and was just "resting at home". but they're not buying it and are prepared to pull lucrative matches from china if they don't get proof she's safe. i don't want to see this get pushed under the rug or on the side, because at the end, there's bigger issues in some people's minds as to what's going on. i think the focus has to be on peng in this situation. 23—time grand slam singles champion serena williams has tweeted she is "devastated and shocked", adding, "this must be investigated and we must not stay silent." she's not alone. we would like, actually, to hear, like, a video from her, or something. like real proof that, yes, she's all right. the eyes of the world will be on beijing in february for the winter olympics. but so far, the international olympic committee is only saying this requires quiet diplomacy.
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the ioc must fuel its claims - and responsibilities in this case, and demonstrate that athletes really are at the heart of sport. _ it has significant leverage - and influence to exert in this case, especially with the beijing olympics just around the corner now. - in a country where few are allowed to challenge senior authorities without paying the price, concern grows by the hour for peng shuai's safety. natalie pirks, bbc news. the england and wales cricket board has promised far—reaching action to tackle racism after talks amongst the game's senior officials. it follows azeem rafiq's revelations of racism when he played for yorkshire. today, a former england player, alex hales, apologised for causing offence after a photo emerged of him dressed up in black make—up at a party in 2009. our sports correspondent, laura scott, reports. after another turbulent week, cricket's latest response to its racism crisis, crisis talks at the oval today as the game joined forces in tackling the discrimination problem.
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what do you want to get from the meeting? just clarity and togetherness, i suppose. does cricket have a racism issue? well, we've got a lot work to do, no doubt. last night, alex hales became further embroiled in the scandal after a photograph emerged showed him dressed in a racially offensive way at a fancy dress party in 2009. he said his appearance was a tribute to the late rapper, tupac shakur, but apologised in a video message. i deplore all forms of racism and discrimination. i've been lucky enough to play around the world in different backgrounds, with players of different races and cultures. earlier this week, there was praise for azeem rafiq, as the whistle—blower gave testimony to mps about his experience of racism in cricket and spoke of his hopes that speaking up would bring about change. i'm very determined that this is going to be looked back asj the moment where not only sport, but society as a whole went -
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in a different direction i to what it's been going. but the player has been forced to front up to his own mistakes, apologising after facebook messages from 2011 surface showing him using anti—semitic language. in a statement, he said... he later apologised for another racially offensive social media post. rafiq's own use of discriminatory language has been described as awkward by thejewish leadership council, while others say it only serves to highlight the scale of the problem within cricket. today came an acceptance within the game that collective action is the only way to resolve this crucial issue. in a joint statement following the meeting, cricket chiefs said they'd been shocked, shamed and saddened by rafiq's experiences, and committed to wide—ranging and tangible action. you talk about initial steps.
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the issue of racism and discrimination in cricket is nothing new. what makes this plan different to previous plans? i think that will be the proof will be in how we deliver it. this will be the first time the game has come together to take such urgent and direct action. despite some counties having suggested a possible vote of no confidence, harrison said he'd been backed today. english cricket has come up with a broad direction of travel, acknowledging the sorry state of the game needs addressing quickly. but with the soul and survival of the sport at stake, they must now translate those intentions into meaningful action. laura scott, bbc news. kamala harris has become the first woman in american history to become acting president of the united states. she took over briefly as head of state and commander—in chief while president biden had a medical procedure under anaesthetic. the president's press secretary, jen psaki, said ms harris was in white house during mr biden's colonoscopy, which was carried out as part of an annual physical check—up.
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earlier, president biden departed walter reed national military medical center en route to the white house and has now resumed his presidential duties. which included pardoning the presidential turkey because it's thanksgiving coming up and just two days. our senior north america reporter anthony zurcher has the latest. last november, kamala harris became the first woman vice president in us history. it was only a matter of time before she became the first us president. joe biden is the first president. joe biden is the first president to have handed out powers like this. george w. bush did in the early 2000, ronald reagan did it, george h w bush did it, so with biden undergoing the physical and the fact that colonoscopies are routine for someone of his age, it was not surprising that he invoked the 25th amendment, which governs
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incapacitated presidents can temporary hand overpowers to kamala harris. �* ., , , temporary hand overpowers to kamala harris. . . , , �*, temporary hand overpowers to kamala harris. ~ . , , �*, ., harris. and apparently, he's a healthy and — harris. and apparently, he's a healthy and vigorous - harris. and apparently, he's a - healthy and vigorous 78-year-old. healthy and vigorous 78—year—old. bye—bye. good morning. it's been a mild november for many of us so far, and once again on friday we were seeing temperatures peaking way above the average for the time of year. in fact, in aberdeen, we saw a high of 17 celsius. and in aberdeenshire, generally, there was a lot of blue sky and sunshine, particularly in the morning. but let's just fast—forward a few days. all is set to change, notjust in aberdeenshire, but a cold northerly wind will bring a dramatic change to the feel of the weather i suspect right across the country. so, get out and enjoy saturday's weather if you can. still under this influence of high pressure, still relatively mild ahead of this frontal system that's going to continue to bring some outbreaks of rain out of scotland into northern ireland, gradually drifting towards northwest england and north wales. a very weak affair by then,
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some scattered sharp showers tucking in behind. now, ahead of that weather front, we will continue to see some well broken cloud with some glimpses of sunshine, with highs of 12 celsius. but behind it, those temperatures are starting to fall away, and there will be plenty of frequent showers with that brisk northerly wind. the real cold air, though, is set to arrive during saturday into sunday. as it weather front continues to sink its way steadily southwards, it's going to drive that northerly wind direction right across the country, and you really will notice the difference to the feel of the weather when you wake first thing on sunday morning. in fact, in rural sheltered areas of scotland, we are going to see a touch of frost, but the temperatures are going to fall away further. so, on sunday, yes, there'll be lots of sunshine around, but a brisk northerly wind just taking the edge off the feel of the weather, and it could drive in plenty of coastal showers from time to time, with perhaps some of those showers just filtering a little bit further inland across south east england. top temperatures on sunday, a little more subdued,
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8—10 celsius as a maximum. now, as we move out of sunday into monday and tuesday, we have still got that high pressure with us, still under the blue colours, that cold air circulating around that high pressure with that northwesterly flow. so, basically, as we go through the week, it does look likely that the colder weather is set to stay with us, perhaps not quite as cold on wednesday and then colder still towards the end of the week. that's when we run the risk potentially of a few wintry showers into the far north.
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this is bbc news, the headlines...
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a us jury has acquitted kyle rittenhouse on charges that he murdered two men and attempted to kill a third during chaotic racialjustice protests in wisconsin last year. his trial polarised america, highlighting divisions around contentious issues like gun rights. the president of belarus, alexander lukashenko, has told the bbc it is "perfectly possible" that belarusian security forces have helped migrants try to cross the border into poland. he denied inviting the migrants to belarus. austria has become the first country in western europe to go back into full lockdown as covid infections surge again. all austrians will be required to get vaccinated from february next year. kamala harris has become the first woman in american history to become acting president of the united states. she took over for 85 minutes as head of state and commander—in—chief, while president biden had a medical procedure.

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