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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 20, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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called "an orgy of violence" — after protesters took to the streets to demonstrate against coronavirus restrictions. the netherlands is one of a number of places in europe to reimpose a lockdown because of a surge in cases. megan paterson reports. rotterdam last night. these were the scenes in the netherlands�* second largest city.
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protesters rioting over lockdown restrictions clashed with police. officers used water cannon, fired warning shots and then live rounds. two people were shot and wounded and the protest condemned by rotterdam's mayor as an orgy of violence. translation: on several. occasions police officers had to draw their weapons to defend themselves. some aimed shots were fired. at least seven were injured. restrictions in the netherlands began on monday and will be in place for another two weeks at least. countries across europe are facing a sharp increases in covid cases. in austria a 20—day lockdown will start next week. working from home will be ordered and only essential shops will stay open. in february vaccinations will become compulsory.
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we have a fairly low vaccination rate in the population and the waning of immunity hits austria now six months after we started our vaccination programme and that is unfortunately right at the beginning of the winter season where people are moving indoors. germany fears a national health care emergency. the government is set to introduce restrictions for unvaccinated people. a full lockdown not ruled out. such a dramatic surge in cases is not being experienced in the uk. a number of factors at play. many countries in europe were faced with delta a little bit later so they are dealing with it now and some of them opened up slightly later than we did so that is a factor. the second one is there is differences in vaccines. your have high levels of non—vaccine uptake in some populations in some european countries. high infection rates in the past have helped build up immunity in the uk. now the push to increase booster jab take up continues. the incentive for many, the avoidance of tougher restrictions being introduced elsewhere. megan paterson, bbc news. president biden has urged americans to avoid "violence and destruction"
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after a teenager who shot dead two people during racialjustice protests was cleared of murder in wisconsin. kyle rittenhouse said he'd acted in self—defence last august. the president also said... "while the verdict in kenosha will leave many americans feeling angry and concerned, myself included, we must acknowledge that the jury has spoken." from wisconsin, nomia iqbal sent this report. the defendant will rise and face the jury and harken to its verdicts. a dangerous vigilante, or someone acting in self defence? after 26 hours the jury decided kyle rittenhouse�*s fate. we, the jury, find the defendant, kyle rittenhouse, not guilty. the 12 men and women of the jury accepted the teenager's claim he killed out of fear for his safety. somehow, some way, those 12jurors found that he was innocent. shouting.
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outside court the political divisions this case has caused were clear. you attack me, i have the right to defend myself. that is what kyle was on trial for and that is what kyle has been found acquitted of. there is no way in the law in the land of law where a person can shoot three people, kill two of them, and be acquitted, there'sjust no way. the shooting happened against the backdrop of nationwide protests over racism and police brutality following the murder of george floyd. in kenosha another black man named jacob blake had been shot by police seven times and on the third night of riots kyle rittenhouse entered the city. he said he came to provide security. in a series of confrontations he shot dead joseph rosenbaum
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who had chased after him into this car park. he then killed another man who ran after rittenhouse thinking he was an active shooter. a third man survived. police later arrested the teenager and charged him with murder. for many conservative groups kyle rittenhouse is now seen as a hero, but for many liberal groups he is the face of a gun culture out of control and they are worried by being cleared of the charges what it might mean now for future protests. can americans turn up with a gun but not face any consequences? nomia iqbal, bbc news, kenosha. a record number of people died while detained under the mental health act in england during the coronavirus pandemic. that's according to early estimates from the independent regulator the care quality commission. the figures come amid concerns that staffing shortages are compromising patient safety in psychiatric wards and across the nhs. patrick baker reports — and a warning — his report contains flashing images. after struggling with his mental health throughout most
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of his teenage years, 17—year—old charlie millers became increasingly unwell during the second half of 2020. he went downhill in thejuly time. he was then sectioned. charlie spent the next few months in and out of the mental health unit at prestwich hospital in manchester. in early december last year, he returned to the ward following a night at home. i dropped him off at quarter to eight at night. he was in really good spirits and then i got a phone call at quarter to ii to say that they were doing cpr on him. during the course of that evening charlie had made four attempts on his life, the last of which proved fatal. a confidential nhs report into charlie's death said that due to sickness absence being reported that day there was no qualified nurse rostered on duty for the night shift. the nurse in charge agreed to cover the shift. she had worked from 9am to 4pm and returned at 7pm.
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in a statement the nhs trust that runs prestwich hospital expressed its deepest sympathies but said it would be inappropriate to comment further until the coroner's inquest has concluded. between 2012 and 2019 an average 273 people died each year while detained in hospital or being supervised in the community under the mental health act in england. but early estimates for the first year of the pandemic suggest a record high, with 490 people dying between march 2020 and march 2021. i think staff shortages are compromising patient safety in every part of the nhs at the moment. we have a workforce crisis and it's time we completely overhauled the way we decide how many doctors and nurses we are going to train for the future. the department of health and social care said there are now record numbers of doctors and nurses working in the nhs. they said they are investing £2.3 billion a year by 2023—24
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to transform mental health care and will bring forward plans to reform the mental health act. charlie's mum samantha says she is still waiting for a clear explanation about how her son could have lost his life in the very place that was meant to keep him safe. a full inquest into charlie's death starts next year. with all the sport now, here's chetan pathak at the bbc sport centre. there'll be no eddie howe in the newcastle dugout today after he tested positive for covid, but two other premier league managers will be present for theirfirst games with steven gerrard's aston villa playing brighton, and dean smith's norwich at home to southampton. 0ne match is under way, and the leaders chelsea are 2—0 up at leicester in the 1230 kick off. and just one game in the women's super league today, late on it's manchester 4, aston villa 0. in rugby union's autumn internationals scotland
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currently lead japan 5—0, whilst later wales take on australia and england face south africa in a replay of the 2019 world cup final. as ben croucher reports. before the sun sets on international rugby in 2021, time for one last hurray. time for any gun to banish the memories of drama in yokohama and that world cup final against south africa.— and that world cup final against south africa. , ., south africa. revenge? there is no score to settle _ south africa. revenge? there is no score to settle but _ south africa. revenge? there is no score to settle but you _ south africa. revenge? there is no score to settle but you just - south africa. revenge? there is no score to settle but you just have i south africa. revenge? there is no score to settle but you just have to| score to settle but you just have to read the comments post game, they had just beaten from the start. we will see on saturday. for had just beaten from the start. we will see on saturday.— will see on saturday. for the -la ers will see on saturday. for the players on — will see on saturday. for the players on the _ will see on saturday. for the players on the picture - will see on saturday. for the players on the picture will i players on the picture will decide the outcome the build—up has been dominated by those who will not be there. south africa's director of rugby is banned after intimidating match officials. england dropped a wealth of talent pre—autumn and have injuries which means an inexperienced pack willing to take on a south african front row known
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as the squad. on a south african front row known as the squad-— as the squad. these are my boxing boots. as the squad. these are my boxing boots- when _ as the squad. these are my boxing boots- when i— as the squad. these are my boxing boots. when i have _ as the squad. these are my boxing boots. when i have the _ as the squad. these are my boxing boots. when i have the one - as the squad. these are my boxing boots. when i have the one i- as the squad. these are my boxing boots. when i have the one i am . boots. when i have the one i am always ready. can the fight club defuse the bomb squad? we will give it a good try, shall we? it will defuse the bomb squad? we will give it a good try, shall we?— it a good try, shall we? it will not be eas . it a good try, shall we? it will not be easy- having _ it a good try, shall we? it will not be easy. having not _ it a good try, shall we? it will not be easy. having not played - it a good try, shall we? it will not be easy. having not played at - it a good try, shall we? it will not be easy. having not played at all| it a good try, shall we? it will not i be easy. having not played at all in 2020 south africa have already seen off the lions, wales and scotland in 2021 and as one pundit explained they want their swansong to hit all they want their swansong to hit all the right notes.— the right notes. from a south african perspective _ the right notes. from a south african perspective just - the right notes. from a south l african perspective just wanting the right notes. from a south - african perspective just wanting to finish this tour off well and making sure they can go home with their head held high and hopefully set up for a cracker of a game on saturday. south africa are world number ones and the mean world champions but for one last autumnal afternoon at twickenham they will have the chance to show the world why. ben croucher, bbc news. there's growing concern over the whereabouts of chinese tennis player peng shuai, who hasn't been seen since making
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sexual assault allegations against a former chinese government official two weeks ago. 0vernight, these photos of her emerged online — but the authenticity of the post is being questioned. the women's tennis association says it won't hold any events in china next year without proof she's safe. and it's been confirmed that unvaccinated tennis players won't be allowed to compete at the australian open injanuary. there'd been conflicting statements over the restrictions. defending champion novak djokovic has not yet revealed his vaccination status. you can follow the latest on day three of golf�*s dp world tour championship on the bbc sport website, where rory mcilroy�*s top of the leaderboard in dubai with a one shot lead. that's all your sport for now, back to you. finally, a host of celebrities appeared for last night's children in need appeal. a whopping 39 million...
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more than £39 million was pledged, higher than last year's figure on the night. the money will go towards supporting thousands of charities and local projects around the uk. that's it. the next news on bbc one is at the earlier than usual time of four o'clock. goodbye! hello. you're watching the bbc news channel. protests against lockdowns and vaccine mandates are taking place in cities across australia. the rallies are part of a planned international day of protest at coronavirus restrictions. 0ur correspondent phil mercer is in sydney with more on the rallies. well, they're going on from coast to coast in the western australian
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state capital of perth, her to sydney, the country's biggest city, and also in brisbane, adelaide and in melbourne as well. thousands of people have gathered at these demonstrations and there are reports that there have been counter—protests by people supporting australia's vaccination policies, so this is clearly a very divisive issue here in australia. but if you look at the statistics, australia is approaching 85% of the eligible population fully vaccinated, so this is a country that is embracing the vaccination policies of the state and federal governments. but there is a concern among a minority of people, those people who've taken to the streets, about vaccine mandates for health workers, for aviation workers, as well as some teachers. but, safe to say, it's a very noisy day across many australian cities as these people come out to vent their frustrations, not only against the vaccination
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policies but also covid—19 lockdowns as well. but it is worth stating that australia's state and federal governments have been insisting that the vaccinations are safe and they are a route out of lockdowns and a path towards greater freedoms for millions of australians. despite some countries re—introducing covid restrictions, ski resorts are gearing up for the start of the winter sports season. suzanne kianpour reports. a cautious return to the slopes. mountains of hope after covid—19 brought the ski season in europe to a screeching halt in 2020. at the val thorens resort in france, workers share a range of emotions. translation: there's 'oy, there's enthusiasm. h yes, it's a bit of all that — yes, indeed. and then relief — little bit of all that.
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there's little bit of all that. economic optimism, too. translation: there's economic optimism, too. translation: it's there's economic optimism, too. translation:— translation: it's a big relief to eve one translation: it's a big relief to everyone because _ translation: it's a big relief to everyone because winter - translation: it's a big relief to everyone because winter sports | everyone because winter sports results — everyone because winter sports results provide a lot of work and we were _ results provide a lot of work and we were looking forward to seeing customers here. it�*s were looking forward to seeing customers here.— were looking forward to seeing customers here. it's not a total return to _ customers here. it's not a total return to normal, _ customers here. it's not a total return to normal, though. - customers here. it's not a total return to normal, though. in i return to normal, though. in germany, masks are mandatory in most places and only the vaccinated, recovered, or those with proof of a negative covid—19 test can buy ski passes, but that doesn't curb their enthusiasm. translation: it’s passes, but that doesn't curb their enthusiasm. translation: it's rather cold outside so — enthusiasm. translation: it's rather cold outside so i _ enthusiasm. translation: it's rather cold outside so i would _ enthusiasm. translation: it's rather cold outside so i would wear _ enthusiasm. translation: it's rather cold outside so i would wear a - enthusiasm. translation: it's rather cold outside so i would wear a scarf i cold outside so i would wear a scarf anyway _ cold outside so i would wear a scarf anyway so — cold outside so i would wear a scarf anyway so it — cold outside so i would wear a scarf anyway so it is— cold outside so i would wear a scarf anyway so it is not— cold outside so i would wear a scarf anyway so it is not as _ cold outside so i would wear a scarf anyway so it is not as bad _ cold outside so i would wear a scarf anyway so it is not as bad as- cold outside so i would wear a scarf anyway so it is not as bad as it i anyway so it is not as bad as it could — anyway so it is not as bad as it could he _ anyway so it is not as bad as it could be it _ anyway so it is not as bad as it could be. it doesn't _ anyway so it is not as bad as it could be. it doesn't make i anyway so it is not as bad as it l could be. it doesn't make things worse _ could be. it doesn't make things worse it— could be. it doesn't make things worse it was— could be. it doesn't make things worse. it was not _ could be. it doesn't make things worse. it was not bearable. i could be. it doesn't make things worse. it was not bearable. by. worse. it was not bearable. contrast, germany's austrian neighbours go into complete lockdown from monday. another setback for the nation where one of its ski resorts was the epicentre of a coronavirus outbreak at the start of the pandemic in 2020 at the ever popular
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ischgl, thousands of people from 45 countries claim to have been infected. now, several lawsuits have been filed against the state and well elsewhere results began to open, welcome tourists winter holiday, the government in vienna struggles to keep up. suzanne kianpour, bbc news. as we've been hearing, a health regulator has estimated that a record 490 people died in england while detained under the mental health act, during the first year of the pandemic. the initialfigures from the care quality commission have fuelled concerns that patient safety in psychiatric wards — and across the wider nhs — is being jeopardised by staff shortages. the department of health said record numbers of doctors and nurses are now working in the nhs. let's get reaction to this. joining me now is alexa knight, associate director at the charity rethink mental illness. this charity offers mental health services as a charity in england. welcome. thank you very much for joining us. when you break down the
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figures, taking out the number of covid—19 deaths in them, the number of deaths of people being treated under the mental health act increased by 20% during the pandemic. what are your thoughts on that? ., ~ , ., ~ �* , pandemic. what are your thoughts on that? ., ~ _, ~ 3 ., that? thank you. i think there's a few things _ that? thank you. i think there's a few things that _ that? thank you. i think there's a few things that we _ that? thank you. i think there's a few things that we need - that? thank you. i think there's a few things that we need to i that? thank you. i think there's a few things that we need to look l that? thank you. i think there's a | few things that we need to look at here. i mean, people are treated under the mental health act when they are really very unwell with their mental health and very vulnerable so it's absolutely essential that they are safe and supportive during that time, so a rising number of deaths is very concerning. i think there's probably three things to look at. the regulator has said that some of these deaths might be directly attributed to covid—19, so we need to look carefully at what infection control measures were put in place at the end of the pandemic and learn lessons from that. i think secondly we know that people who have severe mental illness can also suffer from poorer physical health as well, conditions like heart disease and
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asthma, and people with mental illness are expected to get a health check for their physical health every year with their gps but we know that only a third of people having those checks at the moment so really we need a much more concerted effort in primary care. and finally, we do know that their artwork. it is both in the hospital settings but also in community mental health and in mental health social care and those services are really critical, too, in keeping people well and out of hospital so i think we need to look at all of those things. find of hospital so i think we need to look at all of those things. and how much of an — look at all of those things. and how much of an issue _ look at all of those things. and how much of an issue do _ look at all of those things. and how much of an issue do you _ look at all of those things. and how much of an issue do you think i look at all of those things. and how much of an issue do you think the l much of an issue do you think the staff shortages are when it comes to people who have been cared for under the mental health act? weill. people who have been cared for under the mental health act?— the mental health act? well, it is likel that the mental health act? well, it is likely that the _ the mental health act? well, it is likely that the number _ the mental health act? well, it is likely that the number of - the mental health act? well, it is likely that the number of issues l the mental health act? well, it is| likely that the number of issues at play but this is definitely something that we need to look at. we know that there are shortages across the health care profession and i think that mental health is no different there. because these people are at a very vulnerable stage being treated under the mental
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health act it is vitally important that they get the right staff and support when they need it. haifa that they get the right staff and support when they need it. how much of a factor or — support when they need it. how much of a factor or not _ support when they need it. how much of a factor or not do _ support when they need it. how much of a factor or not do you _ support when they need it. how much of a factor or not do you think- support when they need it. how much of a factor or not do you think the i of a factor or not do you think the lockdown terms were on people who are being treated under the mental health act in addition to these other factors? health act in addition to these otherfactors? i mean, not being able to see loved ones, not being able to see loved ones, not being able to see loved ones, not being able to go out, that was impacting on everybody heavily. to think it might have had a particularly difficult impact on people in those circumstances? it difficult impact on people in those circumstances?— circumstances? it could well have done. i circumstances? it could well have done- i mean. — circumstances? it could well have done. i mean, we _ circumstances? it could well have done. i mean, we know— circumstances? it could well have done. i mean, we know that- circumstances? it could well have j done. i mean, we know that most people who have a mental illness had reported that their illness got worse during covid—19 we know that the people who are detained under the people who are detained under the mental health act that seeing friends and family and having their supporters very, very important so it is very possible that that has also been a factor. 50 it is very possible that that has also been a factor.— it is very possible that that has also been a factor. so what do you think the response _ also been a factor. so what do you think the response needs - also been a factor. so what do you think the response needs to i also been a factor. so what do you think the response needs to be i also been a factor. so what do you i think the response needs to be know to what is coming through in the care quality commission was 's findings? i care quality commission was 's findinus? ~ , ., ., findings? i think it is great that the regulator — findings? i think it is great that the regulator has _ findings? i think it is great that the regulator has shone -
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findings? i think it is great that the regulator has shone a i findings? i think it is great that the regulator has shone a light| findings? i think it is great that i the regulator has shone a light on these numbers. it is really important that we know what the facts are so that we can act. i think the government needs to act quickly to review what is behind these numbers and you continue to reinvest in the mental health workforce, both in hospital settings but also, as i say, in community settings and in social care as well. has your charity had... what has happened with the, sort of, responsibilities for your charity through the course of the pandemic? could you repeat that question? i just wondered what had happened with the responsibilities landing on the shoulder of your charity during the pandemic? shoulder of your charity during the andemic? , ,., ., , shoulder of your charity during the andemic? , ,., .,, ,._ shoulder of your charity during the andemic? , ,., .,, , ~' ., pandemic? yes, so as i say we know that people — pandemic? yes, so as i say we know that people have _ pandemic? yes, so as i say we know that people have felt _ pandemic? yes, so as i say we know that people have felt their _ pandemic? yes, so as i say we know that people have felt their mental i that people have felt their mental health had got worse during the pandemic and we offer a variety of things like peer—to—peer work support groups, we have helplines and they are busier than ever but we do urge people to come forward because there is help available and together we can make sure that
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people's mental health is protected. alexa night, thanks very much indeed forjoining us. alexa night, thanks very much indeed forjoining us— alexa night, thanks very much indeed forjoining us._ thank i forjoining us. thank you. thank ou. thank you. in response to staff shortages, the department of health and social care has told us they are "on track to deliver 50,000 more nurses by the end of this parliament." they say there will be further investment and they will be bringing forward plans to reform the mental health act shortly "to ensure anyone in a mental health crisis is treated with dignity and respect." single—use plastics such as plates and cutlery, as well as polystyrene cups, could all be banned in england under new plans being considered by the government. it is estimated that only 10% of such items are recycled. 1)according to estimates, in england alone, we get according to estimates, in england alone, we get
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through 1.1 billion single—use plates every year. in addition to that, 4.25 billion single use pieces of cutlery — the vast majority of which are plastic — are also used. disposable coffee cups have been a long standing problem — the uk throws away two and half billion of those every year. professor rashid gatrad is a member of the royal college of paediatricians, and founded the campaign group, world against single use plastics. he explained the scale of the problem. whilst you have been on the air, just a minute or so, you would have realised that there are 1 million plastic bottles flown away. so, every minute, 1 million plastic bottles are thrown away, as indeed are plastic bags which, again, are a scourge of plastic throughout the oceans which kill a lot of not only marine animals but eventually will come to haunt us as human beings. and we are talking here about the government looking at banning certain single—use plastic items. how important is government action versus what people are doing themselves as they become more aware of the issues?—
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of the issues? thing, obviously, everything _ of the issues? thing, obviously, everything starts _ of the issues? thing, obviously, everything starts at _ of the issues? thing, obviously, everything starts at home, i of the issues? thing, obviously, everything starts at home, so i of the issues? thing, obviously, i everything starts at home, so once you start recycling the recyclables, and i think the government should be stricter with culprits to make sure they actively label what is recyclable and what isn't and also throughout the country they should also be uniform colours of what goes into a recycling bill and what doesn't because at the moment there is confusion. each area has got its own colours of bins, so that should happen, but worldwide 80% plus countries do not actually have a whist collecting system. so that is something else that they would need support on because we ourselves will do our bit but i think this is a global issue, as indeed as climate change. global issue, as indeed as climate chance. ~ ., ., ., , change. when we look at alternatives to lastic change. when we look at alternatives to plastic and — change. when we look at alternatives to plastic and things _ change. when we look at alternatives to plastic and things that _ change. when we look at alternatives to plastic and things that cannot i change. when we look at alternatives to plastic and things that cannot be . to plastic and things that cannot be recycled, and other materials get used to single use items, are there,
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sort of, unforeseen consequences potentially arising from that in terms of the materials that are used, what is used to source those materials and any other potential impacts? i materials and any other potential im acts? ~ ,., ., , impacts? i think important thing is it aoes impacts? i think important thing is it goes back _ impacts? i think important thing is it goes back to _ impacts? i think important thing is it goes back to industry _ impacts? i think important thing is it goes back to industry designing l it goes back to industry designing materials is important because once designing in a way where a lease amount on no plastic is used first wallace has got to go to the roots but having said that there were some plastics and plastic symbols and seven types of plastic symbols, as you know. some plastics are easier to recycle and others are not and what we do is we collect plastic thatis what we do is we collect plastic that is more difficult to recycle such as the one in spectacles, and we call this project let us make a spectacle project where a lot of the miss england finalist last year joined me collecting these from various opticians and we sent it to various opticians and we sent it to various other countries so be using plastic is also very important apart
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from recycling it and is obviously important and obviously bioplastic is on the horizon but expensive so that would be an alternative to normal plastic that we are using at the moment. it normal plastic that we are using at the moment-— the moment. it is a relatively recent addiction, _ the moment. it is a relatively recent addiction, the - the moment. it is a relatively recent addiction, the use i the moment. it is a relatively recent addiction, the use of l recent addiction, the use of throwaway items. not so long ago people might have gone around with cutlery, carrying cutlery, cuts, cuts, these bottles, take bottles back to shops within the use. what about going back to that? that would be a huge shift. i about going back to that? that would be a huge shift-— be a huge shift. i think that is something — be a huge shift. i think that is something seriously - be a huge shift. i think that is something seriously we i be a huge shift. i think that is something seriously we will l be a huge shift. i think that is i something seriously we will have to think of because our planet is in trouble from various angles and i think viewers may well have heard of the nine planetary health boundaries and we have exceeded if you have them already so i think really overall our concept should be such that we should be perhaps going
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back... is a medical person, going back... is a medical person, going back to glass syringes. what is wrong with them? so we could actually have those sterilised rather than using millions of plastic syringes that we have thrown away and because they're contaminated with body fluids they have to be incinerated. so, yes, we have to be incinerated. so, yes, we have got to go back to glass bottles, the milk for example, so we have got to go back a little bit. what about babies nappies, which are a big problem because they cannot be recycled that easily? we might have to go back to terry nappies. those of the things as human beings we have got to think because we are in trouble. ., , ,., , ——professor rashid gatrad. regular trains are returning to the dartmoor line in devon — for the first time in almost 50 years. from today, great western railway services will run between
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okehampton and exeter. it's part of a government scheme to restore abandoned railway lines. john maguire reports. when the railway arrived in okehampton, the town through a huge street party to celebrate. that was 150 years ago. the next century saw crowds gather for other important occasions, to name trains and to send the town sun is off to war. and even the line's closure in 1972, part of the beeching cuts, was marked with some ceremony. today, the festivities continue as scheduled passenger services return, in the world for years of campaigning. back in the summer, we filmed the new tracks being laid. fantastic. this is the moment, isn't it, really, when the track gets put down, the new track and it is going to be shortly, hopefully, a trained exeter. ., ., ., , ., , exeter. how long have you been workin: exeter. how long have you been working on _ exeter. how long have you been working on this? _ exeter. how long have you been working on this? well, - exeter. how long have you been working on this? well, i - exeter. how long have you been working on this? well, i arrived | exeter. how long have you been i working on this? well, i arrived on okehampton _ working on this? well, i arrived on okehampton in — working on this? well, i arrived on okehampton in 1805 _ working on this? well, i arrived on
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okehampton in 1805 and _ working on this? well, i arrived on okehampton in 1805 and ice i working on this? well, i arrived on okehampton in 1805 and ice of i working on this? well, i arrived on okehampton in 1805 and ice of it l okehampton in 1805 and ice of it going _ okehampton in 1805 and ice of it going largely derelict then and that was when _ going largely derelict then and that was when i first became interested in it _ was when i first became interested in it. , , , ., in it. the line is the very first to be 0 en in it. the line is the very first to be open as _ in it. the line is the very first to be open as part _ in it. the line is the very first to be open as part of _ in it. the line is the very first to be open as part of the - in it. the line is the very first to i be open as part of the government's restoring your railway scheme but this week we have seen controversy and anger elsewhere with the scrapping of the hs2 link to leeds and the northern powerhouse line between leeds and manchester. the restoration of the dartmoor line was made easier by the fact that after closing to passenger services it continued to be used in transporting railway ballast from a nearby quarry. it also van is a heritage railway but now it has been upgraded. —— ran as. it railway but now it has been upgraded. -- ran as.- railway but now it has been upgraded. -- ran as. it is not as eas as upgraded. -- ran as. it is not as easy as you _ upgraded. -- ran as. it is not as easy as you think. _ upgraded. -- ran as. it is not as easy as you think. it _ upgraded. -- ran as. it is not as easy as you think. it has - upgraded. -- ran as. it is not as easy as you think. it has been . upgraded. -- ran as. it is not asj easy as you think. it has been in good _ easy as you think. it has been in good condition— easy as you think. it has been in good condition but— easy as you think. it has been in good condition but there - easy as you think. it has been in good condition but there is i easy as you think. it has been in good condition but there is a - easy as you think. it has been in. good condition but there is a huge amount_ good condition but there is a huge amount of— good condition but there is a huge amount of work. _ good condition but there is a huge amount of work. we _ good condition but there is a huge amount of work. we have - good condition but there is a huge amount of work. we have done i amount of work. we have done 11 miles_ amount of work. we have done 11 miles of— amount of work. we have done 11 miles of track_ amount of work. we have done 11 miles of track insulation - amount of work. we have done 11 miles of track insulation in - amount of work. we have done 11 miles of track insulation in the i miles of track insulation in the past _ miles of track insulation in the past four— miles of track insulation in the past four weeks. _ miles of track insulation in the past four weeks. it _ miles of track insulation in the past four weeks. it has - miles of track insulation in the i past four weeks. it has actually been _ past four weeks. it has actually been one — past four weeks. it has actually been one of— past four weeks. it has actually been one of the _ past four weeks. it has actually been one of the fastest - past four weeks. it has actually been one of the fastest track. been one of the fastest track installations— been one of the fastest track installations in— been one of the fastest track installations in network- been one of the fastest track installations in network raili installations in network rail history _ installations in network rail histo . , history. misses the new track construction _ history. misses the new track construction machine, - history. misses the new track construction machine, an - history. misses the new track - construction machine, an impressive piece of kit around a quarter a mile
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long. you can see what is happening is a grade on top one is back, grab the sleepers, brings it to the front of the train and then raise them in a perfectly straight line on the bed with the two tracks on top. it will run at a rate of around 400 metres per hour. and in the belly of the beast it is ryan's job to keep the machine, well, on track. my position is to make sure _ machine, well, on track. my position is to make sure it _ machine, well, on track. my position is to make sure it is _ machine, well, on track. my position is to make sure it is somewhere - machine, well, on track. my positioni is to make sure it is somewhere near and usually i am pretty good so you have to constantly monitor the height of your plank so they don't hit your sleepers, the spacing of the veil behind you and obviously the veil behind you and obviously the line itself. 50 the veil behind you and obviously the line itself.— the line itself. so it is a concentration _ the line itself. so it is a concentration game? . the line itself. so it is a - concentration game? yeah, big the line itself. so it is a _ concentration game? yeah, big time. after week when _ concentration game? yeah, big time. after week when the _ concentration game? yeah, big time. after week when the government - concentration game? yeah, big time. after week when the government has been accused of reneging on promised rail improvements in the north of england reopening this line may seem a small step but it is a giant leap for people here. the passengers will use it in the community that will
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serve. john maguire, bbc news, devon. let's leave you with these remarkable pictures from china. it's a partial lunar eclipse — the longest lasting in over 600 years. the entire event lasted about three and a half hours. amateur astronomers set up cameras and special observation devices around the country. it could also be seen from japan, chile and the united states. it'll be 648 years until there's another eclipse that lasts as long. now it's time for a look at the weather phil avery. hi,joanna. ithink hi, joanna. i think we have gotten like to come if you want a stargazing that that will come at a price. at this time of year, if the sky is clear, well, it means a pretty cold night and generally speaking as we get on the weekend into week things are going to turn colder as the mild air that has waived many of us over the last few days means the side and it is a straight nobody for sunday so make the most of the relatively mild
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conditions across and

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