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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 20, 2021 8:00pm-8:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 8pm. each the world health organisation says it is very worried about the rise in covid cases in europe, saying the disease is once again the continent's biggest killer and warns the uk against complacency. success today does not mean success tomorrow, because no country is an island. more than 50 people have been arrested, after protests over new covid restrictions in rotterdam erupted into rioting last night. record numbers of migrants crossing the channel prompts a government review. missing chinese tennis star peng shuai has been seen in unverified new footage released by state media — dining with friends and her coach in a restaurant.
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a public consultation starts on a potential ban on single—use plastics like disposable cutlery and polystyrene boxes in england. good evening. the world health organisation has called for an urgent tightening of measures across europe to halt spiralling transmission rates of the virus. it has warned that 500,000 more deaths could be recorded by march unless urgent action is taken. let's have a look at how the uk is performing in comparison to other european countries. so based on figures we had two days ago... this graph shows a rolling seven—day average of daily cases, per million people, in italy,
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germany, and here in the uk. but look what happens when we include the netherlands and austria. we can see how the numbersjump to more than double those rates for the uk and germany. with cases surging in parts of europe, my colleague martine croxall, spoke to dr hans kluge — the world health organisation's regional director for europe. he pointed out that while cases are high, authorities know how to handle the situation and what measures to implement. we are definitely worried. of the good news is, that we know what to do. let's look at the positive side, portugal, spain, they are recently implementing what we call a vaccination plus. they are vaccinating and boosting and also implementing the basic measures like masks, average 48% of the european population is wearing a mask indoors
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and any percentage above that will have an immediate effect, much more attention to be paid to ventilation and viability, to new treatment protocols which have to be standardised. we are hearing that austria wants to make vaccinations mandatory. how wise is that when you've already seen people out on the streets protesting about the new lockdown that they are imposing? vaccination centres, confidence, complacency and convenience. mandatory vaccination has to be really a last resort. you have to be sure that all the axis values are removed but i do think, it is time to have a legal and societal debate about mandatory vaccination. not likely to take place until next year, the mandatory vaccinations. we've got several weeks
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of winter to get through. what are you hoping that you will see? how are you encouraging different countries to respond to these rising numbers of? europe has missed the boat, unfortunately and so, all the efforts have to focus on keeping mortality down. they even have 7200 deaths a day it means covid—19 is back in the number one cause of mortality and that is why we need the vaccination, the booster, the clinical treatment protocols and the means for covid—19 passports. it is not limiting liberty, it is a collective tool to avoid more painful lockdown. we look at the experience of the united kingdom, for example, what might other countries learn from the uk because this country did manage to get the vaccines fast and may be blabbing the third boosterjob.
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—— manage to get the vaccines fast and many people are having the third boosterjob. the vaccination will definitely be a success story but in every country, there is good things and there is countries that could've done something better. but the success today does not mean success tomorrow because no country is an island. so in that sense, the uk is also better off by implementing strict public health social measures to keep the situation as it is for to further improve. what would you advise the british government to do that it has not done in the past or the future because it has a huge amount of criticism about the number of cases that we've had the sheer number of people that have died here. so back to the basics. vaccination, masks, clinical
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protocols and of course, it has to be based on the national situations and so a continuous risk, but do not lift the guards too early. we should've learned that lesson. in the netherlands, the mayor of rotterdam has condemned what he's called an orgy of violence after protestors took to the streets to demonstrate against coronavirus restrictions. the netherlands is one of a number of places in europe to re—impose a lockdown because of a surge in cases. from there, our europe correspondent, anna holligan, reports. rotterdam, the netherlands second city. scarred by a night of rage. riot police came from across the country to try to quell the uprising.
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they fired warning shots and then live rounds. in response to scenes condemned by rotterdam's mayor as an orgy of violence. translation: on several occasions, police officers had to draw— their weapons to defend themselves. some aimed shots were fired. at least seven were injured. restrictions in the netherlands began last saturday and will be in place for another two weeks at least. the streets are peaceful now but the atmosphere across the country remains volatile. the netherlands is battling record infection rates and the government is considering new restrictions targeting the unvaccinated. in austria today, supporters of the far right freedom party marched against mandatory coronavirus vaccines. a 20—day lockdown will start next week, working from home will be ordered and only essential shops
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will stay open. germany fears a national health scare emergency. new measures are expected for those who haven't had theirjabs, a full lockdown is still on the cards. the uk is not yet seeing such a dramatic surge in cases. the uk has not yet seen such a dramatic surge in cases. and these are some of the reasons why. many countries faced delta a bit later, so they're dealing with it now and some of them opened up later than we did~ _ and there is differences in vaccines. you have high levels of non—vaccine uptake in some populations in some european countries. high infection rates in the uk ensure the push to encourage people to get their boosterjabs continues. the incentive for many, the avoidance of harsher rules like those enforced elsewhere.
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here in the uk, we've received the official daily figures from the government. they show that as of today, a further 150 people have died within 28 days of testing positive for covid—i9. that brings the uk total to 143,866. and there've been a further 40,941 lab—confirmed cases. more than 25% of the population have had their booster or third vaccine dose, according to the official data, bringing the total number to just over 14.6 million. and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. our guestsjoining me tonight are benjamin butterworth, late editor and senior reporterfor the i and former pensions minister, conservative peer, baroness roz altmann. there's to be a review into how to prevent migrants
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crossing the english channel to the uk. it follows months of pressure on the government over record numbers of people making the journey, as our political correspondent, iain watson explained. quite simply, the government has got to be seen to be doing something, because so far this year there have been 24,000 crossings in the channel and that is three times higher than last year, so there is some political pressure on the government. they pledged, of course, to take back control of the border but only yesterday the labour leader was tweeking borisjohnson�*s tale over this, saying that he was promising but he cannot deliver. obviously there has to be a new initiative, but i am told that the prime minister himself, of course, is frustrated by the continuing crisis and what he wants to see is a cross—departmental focus on this issue, just like there is on tackling covid and he has nominated steve barclay as his problem solver. that might seem to be a bit of a poisoned chalice, but he is set to get to work, i am told, in the next week
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or so and talk to different departments to see what they can do, but also come up with some potential policy recommendations, if any more are needed. that said, i am not entirely convinced that they will be able to do what some other big initiatives have failed to do so for. the £54 million deal with france, for example, that was meant to stop migrants from setting sail in the first place and the government said it stopped many thousands of potential crossings, but of course, as you mentioned, we are still having record numbers and they have also tried various other ideas which have not yet come to fruition, including perhaps processing people offshore, but what the critics are saying is really necessary is a much deeper dig into the reasons why people feel they have to migrate, why they are leaving their areas in the north and east africa and so on and coming to britain in the first place and it is not enough just to stop the boats, but we need to look at the reasons why people would be coming to these shores in the first place. single—use plastics such as plates and cutlery, as well as polystyrene cups, could all be banned in england under new plans being considered by the government. it is estimated that only 10%
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of such items are recycled. according to estimates, in england alone, we get through 1.1 billion single—use plates every year. in addition to that, 4.25 billion single use pieces of cutlery — the vast majority of which are plastic — are also used. disposable coffee cups have been a long standing problem — the uk throws away two and half billion of those every year. earlier, we heard from the friends of the earth's plastics campaign lead, camilla zerr, who explained how replacing single use plastic, has been done successfully elsewhere. not all plastic should be gotten rid of. actually, some plastics are actually essential for health purposes, for people with disabilities and many other reasons, so what we are saying is we need to get rid of those unnecessary single use plastics that very easily could be replaced by a reusable alternative or a refillable alternative and that is possible,
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because there are countries where it is already the case and we know that it has been in the past 20 years or so that we have seen this surge of single use plastic items when actually what we used to use are way more reusable. there are reusable bottles, reusable coffee cups, reusable containers to go and refill, for example, your pasta or your rice at the supermarket. that is something that is absolutely possible. a record number of people died while detained under the mental health act in england during the coronavirus pandemic. that's according to early estimates from the independent regulator, the care quality commission. the figures come amid concerns that staffing shortages are compromising patient safety in psychiatric wards and across the nhs. patrick baker reports. and a warning — his report contains flashing images. after struggling with his mental health throughout most of his teenage years,
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17—year—old charlie millers became increasingly unwell during the second half of 2020. he went downhill in thejuly time. he was then sectioned. charlie spent the next few months in and out of the mental health unit at prestwich hospital in manchester. in early december last year, he returned to the ward following a night at home. i dropped him off at quarter to eight at night. he was in really good spirits and then i got a phone call at quarter to 11 to say that they were doing cpr on him. during the course of that evening charlie had made four attempts on his life, the last of which proved fatal. a confidential nhs report into charlie's death said that due to sickness absence being reported that day there was no qualified nurse rostered on duty for the night shift. the nurse in charge agreed to cover the shift. she had worked from 9am to 4pm and returned at 7pm.
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in a statement the nhs trust that runs prestwich hospital expressed its deepest sympathies but said it would be inappropriate to comment further until the coroner's inquest has concluded. between 2012 and 2019 an average 273 people died each year while detained in hospital or being supervised in the community under the mental health act in england. but early estimates for the first year of the pandemic suggest a record high, with 490 people dying between march 2020 and march 2021. i think staff shortages are compromising patient safety in every part of the nhs at the moment. we have a workforce crisis and it's time we completely overhauled the way we decide how many doctors and nurses we are going to train for the future. the department of health and social care said there are now record numbers of doctors and nurses working in the nhs. they said they are investing £2.3 billion a year by 2023—24 to transform mental health care
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and will bring forward plans to reform the mental health act. charlie's mum samantha says she is still waiting for a clear explanation about how her son could have lost his life in the very place that was meant to keep him safe. a full inquest into charlie's death starts next year. the headlines on bbc news... the world health organisation says it is very worried about the rise in covid cases in europe —saying the disease is once again the continent's biggest killer and warns the uk against complacency. success success today does not mean success tomorrow because no country is an island. more than 50 people have been arrested, after protests over new covid restrictions in rotterdam
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erupted into rioting last night. the metropolitan police say they've arrested 30 people during a demonstration which blocked lambeth bridge in central london. the protest was held in support for nine activists from the climate change group, insulate britain, who were recently jailed for breaching an injunction banning their road blockades. transport for london was banned several order in order to prevent people stopping traffic and those in breach of the injunctions could be found in contempt of court and face a maximum penalty of two years in prison or an unlimited fine. that's news just coming prison or an unlimited fine. that's newsjust coming in now. videos have emerged purporting to show missing chinese tennis star
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peng shuai out for dinner with her coach in beijing. peng shuai disappeared after making sexual assault allegations against a former chinese vice—premier, two weeks ago. the videos have been released by chinese state media which claims they were filmed today. it's the latest attempt by china to prove the tennis star is safe and well. so how did we get to this point? on november 2nd, peng shuai accused a former vice premier of coercing her into sex on the social media site, weibo. her personal feed was then censored, and she was not seen or heard in public for two weeks. then, on the 17th of november, chinese state media attribute an email to the tennis player, in which she says she is safe, and the allegations are �*not true'. two days later pictures emerge on chinese state media
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appearing to show peng shuai with a caption saying �*happy weekend'. but doubts are cast on the validity of the photos and email, and women's tennis association says events in china next year will be cancelled without proof that she's safe. then today two short video clips emerged, also on chinese state media, purporting to show her out for dinner with her coach and friends. the wta says it's glad to see the videos, but that it remains �*unclear if she is free'. let's get more on this from cindy yu, who is broadcast editor at the spectator and host of the spectator�*s chinese whispers podcast. thank you forjoining us here at bbc news. it is that claim of her being free, isn't it, and these calls, not only from the tennis community but
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there have been calls from the united nations, from the white house as well, pressure is growing. yes. as well, pressure is growing. yes, ressure as well, pressure is growing. yes, pressure is _ as well, pressure is growing. yes, pressure is growing _ as well, pressure is growing. yes, pressure is growing and _ as well, pressure is growing. yes, pressure is growing and it - as well, pressure is growing. is: pressure is growing and it is snowballing in a way that i don't think chinese censors when they first took down peng shuai's statement on her account thought would happen. nobody ever thought, statement on her account thought would happen. nobody everthought, i think, that one sportswoman�*s private life and a censorship that comes after that would grow into something like this. but, clearly, they have completely miscalculated that and i don't think this thing is going to end anytime soon which is why i think in the next few days, you can expect more of these quite bizarre and suspicious proofs of life from chinese state media because they are starting to realise that this is getting out of control. but none of that will stop the speculation, until peng shuai's allegations are properly looked into. , ., _ allegations are properly looked into. ,., . , allegations are properly looked into. ,., ,., into. obviously concerns for her welfare. into. obviously concerns for her welfare- why — into. obviously concerns for her welfare. why are _ into. obviously concerns for her welfare. why are there - into. obviously concerns for her| welfare. why are there concerns into. obviously concerns for her- welfare. why are there concerns for her welfare? what has happened in the past? the chinese state has form
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on this. , . , the past? the chinese state has form on this. , ., , ., the past? the chinese state has form on this. , .,, ., ., on this. yes, it has form on disappearing _ on this. yes, it has form on disappearing high-profile . on this. yes, it has form on - disappearing high-profile people for disappearing high—profile people for a certain amount of time. then they come back and they do some kind of scripted apology. last year, we saw that with an actress. and the ali baba billionaire has also taken a back—seat after miscalculated, as he made lodged at chinese regulators last year as well. there are also people who never really reappear so there is one businesswoman who has not appeared for years. and her husband, ex—husband now, has written a memoir about that this year. and she resurfaced just before that was properly published, to say i am still alive but she is still in state custody, essentially. nobody knows where people go when they disappear. and for high—profile people, they tend to come back but it is just a lack of communication, the lack of any transparency or any of this that makes people very
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concerned. and of course, peng's allegations are so serious that it is incredibly sensitive, what she is saying. so she occupies a politically sensitive spot right now. ., ., now. you mention there, communication _ now. you mention there, communication between | now. you mention there, - communication between people now. you mention there, _ communication between people who have been missing. in terms of the video that we have seen released today, obviously, we are not showing this on the bbc news because we haven't been able to independently verify it. what do you make of that? does china really think that people would be reassured to see that? i mean, it isjust a completely mean, it is just a completely different world, i think, to us when we first see that, it is like, what is going on here? that is so suspicious. but it is an idea of plausible deniability. if you say to people who are already sympathetic to the government's because, they can say, look, she is there, and if you don't want to believe it, you don't want to believe it. so, it is able to have that counter that that
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is what they are doing. the video itself is incredibly amateurish. as i pointed out on my twitter account, the clip starts with someone off—screen saying, now is the perfect time. ok, now is perfect. then, a two second pause and then the coach goes into this remark in which he hammers home that it is november thejoint affairs which he hammers home that it is november the joint affairs tomorrow, so he gets that date in. it seems incredible scripted, and even though they didn't cut out the direct above my queue at the beginning of the video. the whole thing is incredibly bizarre but creepy and sinister. hosp bizarre but creepy and sinister. how closel is bizarre but creepy and sinister. how closely is the _ bizarre but creepy and sinister. how closely is the story _ bizarre but creepy and sinister. how closely is the story being followed in china itself? it is closely is the story being followed in china itself?— in china itself? it is very difficult _ in china itself? it is very difficult to _ in china itself? it is very difficult to follow - in china itself? it is very difficult to follow this i in china itself? it is very difficult to follow this in | in china itself? it is very - difficult to follow this in china because all references to peng shuai about this have been erased from chinese social media and her statement was taken down within two minutes of it being out. that wasn't fast enough screenshots to go around the world, and for a time, chinese social media was also talking at this, through very other ways, like
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using her initial stash her initials to refer to her, but even that has been censored now. if you don't spend time on social media or you don't spend that much time on it, then the information, you know, shut down is pretty exhaustive.— down is pretty exhaustive. cindy, this is sport. _ down is pretty exhaustive. cindy, this is sport, business _ down is pretty exhaustive. cindy, this is sport, business china, - down is pretty exhaustive. cindy, j this is sport, business china, this is a global sport, so there is going to be a lot of money involved here. steve simon at the wta himself has said that he is willing to lose millions of dollars of worth of business in china if peng is not fully accounted for and her allegations not properly investigated. there are sponsorship deals, wimbledon, for example, has a sponsorship deal with the chinese mobile phone company. do you think the wta is likely to follow through with their threats of a boycott? i hope so, i hope so. they would be one of the first sporting associations to really do that. a few years ago, the nba, the
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americans got into trouble for pandering to china on politically sensitive issues and the wta hasn't shied away from that. they didn't have to make this thread. steve simon didn't have to bring it to theirs. so, i hope that they do follow through on that. if it is clear that peng shuai is not safe. but i think the chinese state realises now that they need to wrap this up, there is so much backlash and it is going to keep growing and they will have two, you know, they will essentially have to roll peng shuai out, they will have to reinstate some of her freedoms. i think, eventually, they may even have to consider looking at the allegations and the person involved, the man that she accused of, and maybe he is the person whose head has to well, metaphorically speaking, in order that list it all go away. speaking, in order that list it all uoawa . , ., , y go away. obviously, the united nations human _ go away. obviously, the united nations human rights - go away. obviously, the united nations human rights office - go away. obviously, the united i nations human rights office have called for an investigation with full transparency. i was going to
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ask you just how likely is that going to be? but, ultimately, this is becoming a bit of an embarrassment for china. when we look back in the past, allegations like this, i suppose, would never have gone public. is there something new for them?— new for them? well, i think in early 2000, and — new for them? well, i think in early 2000, and in _ new for them? well, i think in early 2000, and in the _ new for them? well, i think in early 2000, and in the 90s _ new for them? well, i think in early 2000, and in the 90s as _ new for them? well, i think in early 2000, and in the 90s as well, - new for them? well, i think in early 2000, and in the 90s as well, this. 2000, and in the 90s as well, this kind of extravagant lifestyle that communist officials lead, whether it is corruption or extramarital affairs, those stories were actually quite commonplace and the party had a reputation for being corrupt, what xijinping did was anti—corruption drive and since then, those stories have been much less prominent. maybe thatis have been much less prominent. maybe that is because these officials are now better behaved, because they are scared of being done for corruption, or it is because xijinping isjust much better at chucking it down, which is why this peng shuai allegation is just so sensitive. it also touches on the meat to movement
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which is budding in china in the aftermath of several sex scandals earlier this year, a chinese film star was arrested after it was found she had been sexually assaulting women. when the tables are turned, when the government was happy enough to arrest him, when the tables are turned pay close ranks, that is why it is such a difficult spot them. —— a chinese film star was arrested after it was found he had been sexually assaulting women. octopuses, crabs and lobsters can feel pain and will be recognised as sentient beings in law. the government will now add the animals to the list of those protected in a new bill designed to ensure future laws have high animal welfare standards. a study by the london school of economics found that there was strong scientific evidence that these animals have the capacity to experience pain, distress or harm. drjonathan birch was the principal investigator on that government commissioned study —
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he spoke to me a little earlier and explained more about the findings. well, we were asked to review the evidence for sentience in certain molluscs such as octopuses, squid, cuttlefish and some crustaceans such as crabs, lobsters, crayfish and we reviewed over 300 scientific studies and came to the conclusion that the evidence that these animals are capable of feeling pleasure and pain was strong and, crucially, strong enough to justify including them within the scope of animal welfare laws. ok, so what does this now mean, because obviously we eat these animals? what are the implications? well, including an animal within the scope of animal welfare law does not stop you eating it. in fact, all vertebrates are currently already protected under animal welfare law. itjust means that there are limits to what you can do to that animal, or at least there should be limits and people do things sometimes to crustaceans like crabs
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and lobsters that are rather extreme things and it is sensible, i think, to think about introducing some legislation in this area. how did you prove that they can feel the same as vertebrates? it isn't a question of proving, it is about evidence, finding strong evidence and to look for strong evidence, we look at the brain, we look at how complex the brain is, how large, what it is capable of and we look at behaviour as well. we asked, does the animal behave in the way a human would in response to injury? does it react in the way that human would when given painkillers? all of these things are signs, pieces of evidence that help us assemble a case. so, i suppose what this means then is we have to look at more humane now it's time for a look at the weather with phil avery. hello. we're just seeing first signs of a much advertised change in our weather fortunes where sunday produces a much cooler feeling day across all parts
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of the british isles. first signs of the cold air already getting up into the north of scotland but as we get on through the night and into sunday the weather fronts will allow a northerly flow to dominate right across the east. and that transition will happen for many overnight. we will keep some showers going across northern and eastern parts of the british isles. one or two drifting through the irish sea. in between with these skies clear and there isn't so much of a noticeably north wind will end up with a touch of frost. so it's a chilly, bright, really sunny start to the day provided you're not picking up on all of the showers across the eastern side of the british isles with the odd one again coming through the irish sea. in between there's a lot of sunshine but it really won't do anything for the temperatures. single figures for many, a high of 10 or 11.

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