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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 21, 2021 12:00pm-12:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the women's tennis association says videos released by chinese media showing missing player peng shuai, including one at a tennis tournament, don't prove she's genuinely free. ole gunnar solskjaer has been sacked as manchester united's manager, after senior figures at the club met last night.
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manchester united ole gunnar solskjaer has left the club after the 4—1 defeat at watford on saturday. it was the latest in a series of poor results in which the team won only one of their last seven games. in a statement, the club said... he took over as caretaker manager in december 2018 after the sacking ofjose mourinho. three months later, he signed a three—year deal to become the permanent manager. but the club still have no trophies to show for it, and he will now leave. with a look back at solskjaer�*s time as manager, here'sjoe lynskey. for manchester united, he was the coach with the connection, the playing icon who became manager. no—one hoped the end
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would be like this. this has been a dark and dismal day for him and manchester united football club. in ole gunnar solskjaer�*s last match, his team were beaten 4—1 by watford, the end of a run of seven league games with one win and now three humiliations. last month, manchester united lost 5—0 at home to liverpool and at the same ground were beaten by manchester city. defeats to bitter rivals have caused the most damage. the boys are in a terrible place in their heads. of course they are disappointed, they let themselves down. we have let ourselves down, the fans down, and it is hard to stand here and explain that. but that is football, and we have to take the flak for it. solskjaerjoined united 25 years ago. he was the striker whose late goals meant so much. the super sub has done it again!
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in 2018, he became temporary manager, and their form was so good he was the standout choice. but as permanent boss, there have been no trophies. last season, they reached the europa league final, but this club wants more. this was meant to be the year it came good, with the superstar signings to make them title winners. cristiano ronaldo scored twice on his debut, but even his goals have not stopped this dismal run. now even the players don't hold back. it was embarrassing for me, to be honest. it is not acceptable for this club and the level of players that we have. it is another nightmare. since 2013, everything has changed. united now seek a fifth permanent boss since sir alex ferguson left. as a player under him, solskjaer won six league titles.
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he was the super sub who changed things from the bench. but as a coach, too much has gone wrong and this time for solskjaer, there is no late turnaround. joe lynskey, bbc news. joining me now is luke edwards, football writer for the telegraph. thank you very much forjoining us. what is your reaction to this news? i'm not surprised, let's put it that way. there have been far more shocking sackings already this season in the premier league than this one. i think the beginning of the end was probably the home thrashing by liverpool. i think ole gunnar solskjaer was fairly fortunate to survive that to be honest. i think that was the beginning of the end. it says a lot about the mismanagement of those above him that he has limps on for a number of weeks. we have had an international break, which is normally a good time to appoint a new manager orfind one. in the meantime, the likes of antonio conte have gone to spurs. the problem is that manchester united have go far higher than the manager, but i think ole gunnar solskjaer, the writing
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has been on the wall for a while now. and ijust think it is time for him to go, i think everybody knew it was time for him to go. it is a surprise it has taken so long. you see the problems _ surprise it has taken so long. you see the problems go far higher than him, what about where else to go in terms of why the performances on the pitch are not matching up with what you would expect from the players who are on the pitch? i you would expect from the players who are on the pitch?— who are on the pitch? i think that is a very interesting _ is a very interesting question, because up until this season, in my profession as a footballjournalist and pundit, you could say that ole gunnar solskjaer had done a fairly good job at manchester united but there had been every season, they finished second last season and got to the final of the europa league which they lost, which was a pretty dismal defeat to villa real. in the summer, they signed raphael varane, sancho and ronaldo, the team and squad should be better than last season, and that progression needed to be seen. instead, it has gone
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backwards. ultimately in football when that happens, it is always at the manager's door, the blame, they will always bejudged on results. this season, results have not been good enough. that group of players that manchester united have and their wage bill of £387 million, one of the highest in the premier league, that group of players is far higher than the result is that they have been getting recently. itjust looks like a bit of a mess, there doesn't seem to be direction, idea or tactic. as i say, they have gone backwards, and when that happens the manager gets the blame. but the players need to have a hard look at themselves as well because they have let solskjaer down and they have let manchester united down as well. what manchester united down as well. what does a new manager _ manchester united down as well. what does a new manager need to do? and is there an obvious contender for you? is there an obvious contender for ou? ., ., , ., , is there an obvious contender for ou? ., ., , you? for me, the obvious contender was antonio — you? for me, the obvious contender was antonio conte, _ you? for me, the obvious contender was antonio conte, who _ you? for me, the obvious contender was antonio conte, who was - you? for me, the obvious contender was antonio conte, who was out - you? for me, the obvious contender was antonio conte, who was out of i was antonio conte, who was out of work after leaving inter milan, but
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tottenham have snapped him up. they have acted decisively and they have gone to get the outstanding manager who was out of work. manchester united have blundered there because that if they had got rid of ole gunnar solskjaer after the liverpool game when many thought they should, they could have got antonio conte. i think this talk of an interim manager coming in until the end of the season, which of course solskjaer was initially appointed as an interim manager afterjose mourinho, i think there is talk of zinedine zidane, but i think brendan rodgers the leicester city manager is probably, he would be my preferred candidate. i think he deserves another chance at one of the big english clubs, he did a greatjob at celtic, and south of the border in the premier league he has done a good job at leicester. i'm not sure how much further he can take less debt now, and i would not be surprised if manchester united make a move for brendan rodgers. he missed out on the title at liverpool, a former liverpool manager but i'm not sure if it would count against him. he has been at
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the two clubs as in brendan rodgers knows the premier league and he gets more out of the players that he has at his disposal. solskjaer was not getting enough out of the players at his disposal. and let's not forget that manchester united still have some wonderful players and they should be far better than they are. brendan rodgers would be great. an outside candidate and a man and a manager i admire greatly is erik ten hag at ajax. he has done a wonderful and brilliantjob at ajax and constantly having to sell the best players, that he is probably the outstanding manager in europe at the moment. i don't think you would leave ajax in the middle of the season, that they would be my preferred two candidates. luke edwards, thank _ preferred two candidates. luke edwards, thank you. _ as the netherlands battles record coronavirus infections, there's been a second night of rioting over new restrictions. hundreds of people lit fires and pelted the police with rocks and fireworks in the hague.
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it follows friday night's violence in rotterdam, when at least 50 people were arrested, and several others received gunshot wounds. our correspondent in the hague, anna holligan, reports. explosion another dutch city rocked by discontent. in the hague, protesters burned bicycles and pelted police with stones and fireworks. officers used horses, dogs, batons and bikes to chase them away. earlier, anti—vax demonstrators brought their beats to the southern city of breda. while most dutch people accept the need for tighter rules, the distrust is spreading. we have to live with corona, because it's not — people want to live, right? that's my opinion and that's why we're here with all the people. the night before, there were rampages in rotterdam. riot police fired live rounds. three demonstrators were hit and taken to hospital. it's still unclear if their injuries were caused by police gunfire.
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restrictions in the netherlands began last saturday and will remain until at least the start of december. the streets here are peaceful right now, but pockets of discontent exist across the country, and the atmosphere remains volatile. the netherlands is among several european countries battling record infection rates, and many governments are considering or implementing tougher measures targeting the unvaccinated. in austria, supporters of the far right freedom party marched against mandatory coronavirus vaccinations. a 20—day lockdown will begin next week. denmark's capital copenhagen witnessed discord, too. germany fears a national healthcare emergency. new rules are expected for those who haven't had theirjabs. the world health organization has again sounded the alarm, calling for anti—coronavirus measures to be stepped up
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as a matter of urgency. implementing the basic measures like masks — average 48% of the european population is wearing a mask indoors. any percentage above that will have an immediate effect, much more attention to be paid to ventilation, and finally, to new treatment protocols which have to be standardised. as the fourth wave crashes across the continent, countries are struggling to ease pressure on the health services and the streets. anna holligan, bbc news, in the hague. the director of the oxford vaccine group, professor sir andrew pollard, says he doesn't believe the spike in cases in europe is likely to be repeated in the uk soon. if we look at what is happening in other countries, they are just experiencing the start of another
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wave and spread of infection. the reason why the virus spreads is a combination of changes in social distancing, whether that is lockdown measures or mask wearing, plus the immunity of the population. we have actually had some spread going on since the summer, and so i think it is unlikely that we are going to see a very sharp rise in the next few months. joining me now is dr margaret harris from the world health organization. currently working on a project in cavill in afghanistan. we will talk about afghanistan in a moment, but you are here mainly to talk about covert. tell us first of all how concerned you are about europe. we have concerned you are about europe. - have been concerned for some time about the spikes in many countries of europe, all the countries across the european union. they have all seen rises, the sum of those are very severe rises. the really
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critical thing is the hospital is getting overloaded and filling up to a point where the hospital system begins to be unable to cope. austria has taken the _ begins to be unable to cope. austria has taken the decision _ begins to be unable to cope. austria has taken the decision because - begins to be unable to cope. austria has taken the decision because of i has taken the decision because of its concerns around cases to make the vaccine mandatory, what is your view of that? we the vaccine mandatory, what is your view of that?— view of that? we always find that where the community _ view of that? we always find that where the community wants - view of that? we always find that where the community wants to i view of that? we always find that| where the community wants to be vaccinated and has access to vaccination, and has access and answers to their questions, that is the most effective way. it is clear some governments have got to a point where they feel they need to put in other measures, but we as who do find that the most effective measures are always those that really are implemented in the community and have the community buy in stop and the vaccine is available in stop and the vaccine is available in europe to those who want it and
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publish and not taking it up. do you think it does _ publish and not taking it up. do you think it does become _ publish and not taking it up. do you think it does become more - publish and not taking it up. do you | think it does become more arguable that there should be more wider use of vaccine passports? 50. that there should be more wider use of vaccine passports?— of vaccine passports? so, all kinds of vaccine passports? so, all kinds of strategies _ of vaccine passports? so, all kinds of strategies to _ of vaccine passports? so, all kinds of strategies to help _ of vaccine passports? so, all kinds of strategies to help people - of strategies to help people appreciate the reason for getting vaccinated, the main reason is it protects you from a severe disease and death, keeps you out of hospital, stops you from dying. those are very, very good reasons to get vaccinated. unfortunately, there has been a huge, what we call infodemic as well, and unfortunately large numbers of people have listened to information that really is notjust wrong, it is harmful and is notjust wrong, it is harmful and is killing people. in is notjust wrong, it is harmful and is killing people.— is killing people. in terms of the number of _ is killing people. in terms of the number of deaths, _ is killing people. in terms of the number of deaths, the - is killing people. in terms of the number of deaths, the who - is killing people. in terms of the number of deaths, the who is l is killing people. in terms of the - number of deaths, the who is warning of potentially 500,000 new deaths across europe by the spring. how have you arrived at that figure? those figures are based on
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modelling, and of course based on people not taking the measures that we know work. the measures that work as a mask wearing, staying out of crowded places where ever you can, that means working from home where you can, trying to avoid being in places with poor ventilation, really having ventilation in all the places you are using and avoiding crowding on public transport wherever possible. and of course testing, testing, testing. we are not seeing testing, testing. we are not seeing testing in all countries, continuing to do the contact tracing. there is a lot of things that can be done to avert that. lastly of course the vaccination, finding out who is not vaccinated and finding ways to help them get vaccinated. let’s vaccinated and finding ways to help them get vaccinated.— them get vaccinated. let's talk about kabul, _ them get vaccinated. let's talk about kabul, if— them get vaccinated. let's talk about kabul, if that _ them get vaccinated. let's talk about kabul, if that is - them get vaccinated. let's talk about kabul, if that is ok. - them get vaccinated. let's talk about kabul, if that is ok. you | them get vaccinated. let's talk . about kabul, if that is ok. you are there looking at the health services, tell us more about the work you are doing there and what theissues work you are doing there and what the issues are. $5 work you are doing there and what the issues are.— work you are doing there and what the issues are. as you no, after the taliban takeover _ the issues are. as you no, after the taliban takeover in _ the issues are. as you no, after the
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taliban takeover in august, - taliban takeover in august, essentially what was a very donor— based and a— economy and community, it is without financial support financial support and the banking systems are struggling to pay anyone. all the hospitals and health facilities, people have not been paid for months, supplies are not there. we are the who and unicef have taken over the primary care system for the next three months to get people paid, to get the supplies out to all the health facilities, get fuel, because it gets very cold. people are freezing. all of those things are critical to get out to people. we have some emergency funding from what is a funding system but we really do need the world to focus and come and help afghanistan, not turn its back on afghanistan. in afghanistan, not turn its back on afghanistan-— afghanistan, not turn its back on aft hanistan. , ., .., afghanistan. in terms of the medical assistance that _ afghanistan. in terms of the medical assistance that people _ afghanistan. in terms of the medical assistance that people need, - afghanistan. in terms of the medical assistance that people need, how. assistance that people need, how would you describe how things have
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been as far as them being able to get whatever it is that they need? certainly even prior to the change of power, things were not doing well. there was a big drought and essentially the economy was a stumbling and struggling. so we have got severe malnutrition, we have assessed at least 3 million children assessed at least 3 million children as already in acute or severe malnutrition. if they don't get the help they need, we are looking ati million of those children dying. but we are also looking at all people from old to young likely to be severely immunocompromised because they are starving and because it is freezing. so we are really upping vaccination campaigns, we are having a measles vaccination campaign. we are vaccinating against covid. but we have to do so much more. one last thing i would like to say is that
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doctors and nurses, the cleaners in the hospitals are still coming to work despite being not knowing how they are going to feed their families, because they are committed to helping their own people. imilieu to helping their own people. when ou talk to helping their own people. when you talk about _ to helping their own people. when you talk about the _ to helping their own people. when you talk about the dangers - to helping their own people. when you talk about the dangers for children in particular and people in general being immunocompromised because of what they are having to deal with, what is life expectancy now in afghanistan? i deal with, what is life expectancy now in afghanistan?— now in afghanistan? i don't have those numbers _ now in afghanistan? i don't have those numbers in _ now in afghanistan? i don't have those numbers in front - now in afghanistan? i don't have those numbers in front of - now in afghanistan? i don't have those numbers in front of me, i now in afghanistan? i don't have l those numbers in front of me, but i can tell you that the gains in lives saved, children underfive, we have been having babies improved tremendously in the last week. what we don't want to see is a reversal of that, we want to see and improving. the life expectancy and the infant mortality and the maternal mortality is still not at a great level. they have improved enormously, but we don't want to see
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those gains that have been achieved reversed and people in an even worse situation. ., ., ., , situation. doctor margaret harris from the world _ situation. doctor margaret harris from the world health _ situation. doctor margaret harris - from the world health organization, thank you forjoining us. the mystery surrounding the whereabouts of the missing chinese tennis star peng shuai has taken another twist. a new video has been posted online which appears to show the 35—year—old at a youth tennis tournament in beijing. the women's tennis association says the footage, released on sunday by state media, is insufficient and does not address their concerns over her safety. the former doubles world number one had not been seen or heard from publicly since she posted online accusing the former vice—premier zhang gaoli of coercing her into sex. the video was shared on social media site twitter by a reporter from the global times in china. peng is seen signing oversized tennis balls for children at the at the fila kidsjunior tennis
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challenger finals, a tournament organised by china open. but the authenticity of these images has not been independently verified. james reynolds has the latest. this unverified video was posted by the editor of a state—run newspaper. the footage claims to show peng shuai, in the white top, having dinner last night at a beijing restaurant with her coach and friends. the tennis player is shown listening, but not speaking. the video raises many questions. the clip starts with someone off screen saying "now is the perfect time. ok, now is perfect." then there's a two—second pause, and then the coach goes into this remark in which he hammers home that it is november 21st. so it seems incredibly scripted, and even they didn't cut out the director's cue at the very beginning of the video. so the whole thing is incredibly bizarre, but creepy and sinister. the same editor then posted this video, purporting to show peng shuai, who's second on the left, being introduced this
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morning at a youth tennis tournament in china's capital. the state media also released these unverified and undated stills on friday. but this rapid accumulation of state—provided material does not convince the increasing numbers who are calling for independent proof. in a statement released last night, the foreign office said... peng shuai, a winner of two grand slam doubles tournaments, including wimbledon, is well—known on the tennis circuit. the women's tennis association has threatened to cancel its many events in china unless it can assure itself of her well—being. james reynolds, bbc news.
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the uk health secretary sajid javid has said some people may have died as a result of potential racial bias in the design and use of some medical devices. the government has launched a review following research suggesting that, during the pandemic, patients from some ethnic minorities have been at greater risk of receiving inaccurate results from oximeters, which measure oxygen in the blood. joining me now is dr habib naqvi, director of the nhs race and health observatory. thank you forjoining us. is this something that you have been aware of? it something that you have been aware of? , ., , , .., , of? it is, who this review because one of the founding principles of the nhs is equality. and the possibility that a bias, even unconscious, could lead to poorer health outcomes is totally unacceptable. it needs to be looked at with a level of urgency. within the observatory, we carried out a review back in april of this year which highlighted some of the
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issues, the inaccuracies, potential inaccuracies in readings for people with darker pigmentation. that review was _ with darker pigmentation. that review was earlier _ with darker pigmentation. that review was earlier this year, but issues around boxing metres have been raised since the late 1980s. they were introduced in the late 19805. they were introduced in the late 1980s. how much of an understanding has there been of that, if it has been flagged up for so long? —— oximeters. at, been flagged up for so long? -- oximeters— been flagged up for so long? -- oximeters. �* ., , . ,, ., oximeters. a review dates back to the 1990s and _ oximeters. a review dates back to the 1990s and indicates _ oximeters. a review dates back to the 1990s and indicates that - oximeters. a review dates back to the 1990s and indicates that more detailed analyses and independent assessments are needed to help determine the element of medical devices, ensuring that all health devices, ensuring that all health devices are accurate and effective for all of our communities. but devices are accurate and effective for all of our communities.- for all of our communities. but in terms of what — for all of our communities. but in terms of what has _ for all of our communities. but in terms of what has gone, - for all of our communities. but in i terms of what has gone, potentially lives may have been lost, and a sajid javid says it is so, during the pandemic because devices to
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measure oxygen in someone's that are not effectively. the measure oxygen in someone's that are not effectively-— not effectively. the review will help hepefullv _ not effectively. the review will help hopefully to _ not effectively. the review will help hopefully to answer - not effectively. the review will help hopefully to answer that, | not effectively. the review will - help hopefully to answer that, then we can focus on that. what we do know is that research indicates black people are quite as likely as white people to catch coronavirus. from an asian background you are five times more likely than white counterparts to be infected, that is why it is absolutely crucial that those who use these will provide these to the public, take skin pigmentation into account for the effectiveness amongst users. this is not to say that oximeters are bad, we need are saying that more care needs to be taken when looking at the readings from these devices. [30 the readings from these devices. do you think that the issues around these devices and skin pigmentation could mean that deaths among ethnic
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minorities were higher? you say the chances of getting it in the first place were high, but when it came to the medical care? was there also that element?— that element? that is a great possibilitv- — that element? that is a great possibility. that _ that element? that is a great possibility. that is _ that element? that is a great possibility. that is what - that element? that is a great possibility. that is what we i that element? that is a great. possibility. that is what we are hoping this independent review will look at. and to determine. find hoping this independent review will look at. and to determine.- look at. and to determine. and of course it will— look at. and to determine. and of course it will not _ look at. and to determine. and of course it will not just _ look at. and to determine. and of course it will notjust be - look at. and to determine. and of course it will notjust be an - look at. and to determine. and of course it will notjust be an issue | course it will notjust be an issue in this country, they are used everywhere. in this country, they are used everywhere-— in this country, they are used everywhere. in this country, they are used eve here. ~ , , ., , everywhere. absolutely, and it is about looking — everywhere. absolutely, and it is about looking at _ everywhere. absolutely, and it is about looking at the _ everywhere. absolutely, and it is about looking at the causes - everywhere. absolutely, and it is. about looking at the causes around these devices. we know that our nhs is perhaps the most visible expression of a shared social contract between people. and people have faith interest in this essential institution. at the same time, we cannot be blind to these imperfections. what we can do is make our nhs even more inclusive and fair and make make our nhs even more inclusive and fairand make it make our nhs even more inclusive and fair and make it betterfor all of our communities. fair and make it better for all of our communities.— fair and make it better for all of our communities. doctor, thank you ve much our communities. doctor, thank you very much for— our communities. doctor, thank you very much forjoining _ our communities. doctor, thank you very much forjoining us. _ our communities. doctor, thank you very much forjoining us. the - very much forjoining us. the director of the nhs race and health
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observatory. people in theirforties in england will be able to book a covid booster jab from tomorrow. health officials suggest 500,000 people will be immediately eligible for the shot, having had their last dose six months ago, others can pre—book. 16 and seventeen—year—olds will also be invited to sign up for a second jab. louisa pilbeam reports.
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the booster is really important in giving extra protection over and beyond the two doses that people have already had. of course, it is very effective at boosting that long—term protection against the severe disease of covid. if you are invited to get the booster, it is really important at that point to get it as soon as possible. 16 and 17-year-olds _ get it as soon as possible. 16 and 17-year-olds can _ get it as soon as possible. 16 and 17-year-olds can now— get it as soon as possible. 16 and 17-year-olds can now book - get it as soon as possible. 16 and 17-year-olds can now book theirl 17—year—olds can now book their second java using the national booking service. the next stage in the vaccination programme comes as covid cases soar across parts of europe. louisa pilgrim, bbc news. shoppers are being warned that some retailers may not have enough stock for black friday this week, because of supply chain issues. the uk's online retail association, the imrg, says problems getting goods from china and a shortage of drivers and warehouse staff mean
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stock might not arrive on time. our business correspondent caroline davies has more. we know that the cause of the last 20 months have been difficult to retailer. the pandemic because of stop start in the supply chain, backlogs at ports and on top of that, difficulties in some cases and getting hgv lorry drivers to be able to transport the goods to wherever they are needed. on top of that, we are building up to black friday, which is a big day in the shopping calendar where retailers slashed the prices of some of their goods in order to encourage people to purchase in the run—up to christmas. it was something that started in the usa and has come over to the uk in recent years. but some tech retailers are already concerned that there may be some disruption due to delays in deliveries. that is according to the imrg which is the uk's online retail association. retailers will often buy goods well in advance of black friday, may be months in advance, and often bulk buy them so they can sell them at a discount and still make a profit. however, if those goods are delayed
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by 4—6 weeks, that means they may have to pay change their promotional campaigns to whatever they do have in stock and is available to sell. according to the group's insight director, asia is a real pinch point for goods coming out of asia. some companies may be able to find a workaround, they may have deep pockets to be able to do that. but others, he says, may find themselves in a difficult position. he also says that there are some retailers worried that they may find —— not find staff in their warehouses or hgv drivers to transport their goods. having said that, just because some products may be a bit more difficult to come by, he still says there will be plenty of tech products on the shelves. it isa it is a different feeling day compared to yesterday. yesterday we had temperatures at a0 degrees but today colder air across all of the uk, more sunshine than in
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recent days that scattered showers as well, particularly in the east. eastern scotland and england seen plenty of those showers. it should try most of scotland during the day but the coast of england keeping the showers. furtherwest, it is but the coast of england keeping the showers. further west, it is looking largely dry, perhaps an isolated shower close to the irish sea coast. heading on into the evening hours, most of the showers tend to ease away. it becomes largely dry. we'll see a feed of rain showers in the english channel. temperatures overnight, if you degrees either side of freezing for most of us. certainly a frost first thing on monday. monday with slightly less colder air, some patchy rain here and a few showers for the far south and channel islands. dry elsewhere with long spells of sunshine but not feeling particularly warm with highs of 7-10. feeling particularly warm with highs of 7—10. goodbye for now.

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