Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 21, 2021 7:00pm-7:31pm GMT

7:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines at seven: belgian police fire water cannon and tear gas at protesters in brussels marching against coronavirus restrictions. ole gunnar solskjaer has been sacked as manchester united's manager after three years, following a had run of results. i think it was always going to happen, wasn't it? he spent all that money and it's just not good enough. the change is necessary. the taxi driver from the liverpool terror attack says it's a "miracle" he is alive, and thanks the public for their �*amazing generosity�*. the queen has celebrated the double christening of her two
7:01 pm
missing chinese tennis star pung sch—why holds a video call with the president of the international olympic committee telling him she's safe and well. and in formula one lewis hamilton closes the gap with max verstappen to just 8 points with a win in qatar police have clashed with protesters in the belgian capital brussels after tens of thousands of people marched against recently tightened coronavirus restrictions. some protesters threw fireworks at police officers, who hit back with tear gas and water cannon. the protesters are mainly opposed to the use of covid passes, which prohibit the unvaccinated from entering venues such as restaurants or bars.
7:02 pm
it comes after another night of violent protests in the netherlands against further covid lockdown restrictions there. anna holligan reports. another demonstration of the discontent seeping through dutch society. galvanised by calls on social media, groups gathered in the hague, young men hurled rocks and fireworks at police, they torched bikes and targeted an ambulance. an emergency order was issued by the mayor. it took hours to restore calm. at least 19 people were detained and similar scenes erupted elsewhere. these small explosive demos are being held in the context of rumbling frustrations about the current and possible future restrictions considered essential to fight record high of covid cases. this week a far worse than expected almost 150,000 new infections were detected.
7:03 pm
earlier the dutchjustice minister said he believes the virus being used as a cover, an excuse to use extreme violence, and made the distinction between the mostly peaceful protests and purely criminal behaviour. translation: these i are not demonstrations. these are attacks on police and firefighters. more than 50 arrests have been made and many more will follow. among the rules implemented here last weekend, cafes, bars, restaurants and supermarkets have to close by 8pm. but the country's top virologist has warned these rules are not yet having an impact on the infection rate here in the netherlands and beyond in other countries with competing visions on how best to fight this virus. and there was more evidence of this in brussels today. at least 35,000 people turned out to protest in the belgian capital.
7:04 pm
more trouble and turmoil. police used water cannon and tear gas against part of the crowd. the world health organization has called for an intensification of covid measures. with varying vaccine rates and stubbornly high degrees of hesitancy, getting the shots in may be part of the solution but won't cure the wider distrust and division exacerbated by the health crisis. anna holligan. bbc news, in the hague. with me now is brussels—based journalist jack parrock. thank you forjoining us. what is a thank you for “oining us. what is a situation like — thank you forjoining us. what is a situation like in _ thank you forjoining us. what is a situation like in brussels - thank you forjoining us. what is a situation like in brussels tonight l thank you forjoining us. what is a situation like in brussels tonight? | situation like in brussels tonight? it appears that it has now calmed down. wejust it appears that it has now calmed down. we just heard the message from the police in brussels to say that the police in brussels to say that the tunnels that the protesters were fighting against the police in are all now open again and that
7:05 pm
circulation on that main road in the centre of brussels is now flowing again for traffic. we have seen throughout the day that the protests started at around 1:30pm local time, big eruptions of violence into specific locations. —— in two specific locations. —— in two specific locations. —— in two specific locations. then they moved into the european court of brussels. we understand there were 35,000 people on the streets. there have been a number of arrests made and indeed a number of police officers are known to have been injured. we don't have the numbers exactly yet on how many. 50. don't have the numbers exactly yet on how many-— on how many. so, a really substantial _ on how many. so, a really substantial protest. - on how many. so, a really substantial protest. who i on how many. so, a really i substantial protest. who are on how many. so, a really - substantial protest. who are the protesters? police reported initially that the action was peaceful. obviously, it turned violent. our other elements joining these protests, absolutely intent on causing trouble? it is these protests, absolutely intent on causing trouble?— causing trouble? it is hard to say et who causing trouble? it is hard to say yet who was _ causing trouble? it is hard to say yet who was the _ causing trouble? it is hard to say yet who was the cause _ causing trouble? it is hard to say yet who was the cause of - causing trouble? it is hard to say yet who was the cause of these l yet who was the cause of these troubles, but we do know that people who are out on the streets, this
7:06 pm
protest was about this being enough, was their chant, mainly related to the covid safe ticket, the sort of covert passport that you have to fool delete might prove you are fully vaccinated or recovered from the virus in order to access restaurants etc. it has taken a slightly longer in belgium to bring that in but these people are very much against that, saying it shouldn't be forced, vaccinations shouldn't be forced, vaccinations shouldn't be forced on people. we don't know exactly which factions came in here, but we do know that brussels, the capital region in belgium, has a much stronger anti—vaccination section of the society than in the northern, flemish region, the dutch speaking region, and in wallonia, the french—speaking region. here in brussels, just over 56% of people are vaccinated, not that 70% margin
7:07 pm
that everyone wants to reach with vaccinations, and there is a real sort of strong anti—vaccination feeling and sentiment here. one thing to note it as well is that on friday when the government did announce stricter measures of — they are going to make children wear masks in school, for instance — it didn't go straight to the stronger lockdown is like we are seeing in and out and austria.— and out and austria. what will politicians _ and out and austria. what will politicians do _ and out and austria. what will politicians do to _ and out and austria. what will politicians do to try _ and out and austria. what will politicians do to try to - and out and austria. what will politicians do to try to bring i and out and austria. what will. politicians do to try to bring the situation under control, or to at least attempt to do that? how can they possibly address the concerns of these protesters while at the same time dealing with rising covid cases. ., , same time dealing with rising covid cases. . , ., ., ., cases. that is the million-dollar question- _ cases. that is the million-dollar question. right _ cases. that is the million-dollar question. right now, _ cases. that is the million-dollar question. right now, there - cases. that is the million-dollar question. right now, there are. question. right now, there are around 30,000 cases a day on average for belgian, a country ofjust over 11 million people. and they know that they need to get this under control. they want to make sure that, firstly, the rates are coming down. they have reinvented
7:08 pm
home—working for that these four days of the week, unless they are exempt, to try and get those numbers down, but the crucial thing is also to try and get people vaccinated, and that is the government plan, to increase vaccination rates to make sure people don't get hospitalised if they do get the virus.— if they do get the virus. thanks brin . in: if they do get the virus. thanks bringing us _ if they do get the virus. thanks bringing us up-to-date, - if they do get the virus. thanks bringing us up-to-date, jack. l the health secretary sajid javid says the covid jab booster programme should prevent the uk from experiencing the spike in cases seen in the netherlands and in some other european countries. boosters are being extended to the over—40s in england from tomorrow. mrjavid said there are no plans to put any european countries back on the travel ban list — but the situation is being constantly reviewed, as danjohnson reports. this is the european backlash to tightening lockdowns, restricted freedoms, even mandated vaccinations, all in response to a wave of rising covid cases. sajid javid, the health secretary... but here in the uk, the health secretary this
7:09 pm
morning said we wouldn't be going down the same route, with the focus instead on the boosterjab campaign. well, we are extending it from tomorrow, actually, to people in the age group, a0 to a9, and we will keep under review how that might be extended in the future. and we're seeing record numbers of people come forward, but i would urge everyone to, if they are eligible to do so, to come forward, because that's the best way we can look forward to the kind of christmas that we all want to see. there's no plan to restrict travel. the feeling is the delta variant may be spreading through europe, but it's already here. our vaccination rates are high, but one of the scientists behind the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine was asked, are we getting close to herd immunity? well, it depends what you mean by herd immunity. if you mean stopping the virus so it can no longer spread, that's not going to be a thing. unfortunately, this virus is going to be with us for the decades ahead. if you mean slowing it down, then that's something which the vaccines are already doing.
7:10 pm
we know the pandemic has hit some people harder than others. and the health secretary thinks he's found one reason why. these pulse oximeter devices used to measure oxygen in the blood give more accurate readings from white skin. so there'll now be a review to make sure medical equipment�*s equally effective whatever your skin colour. it's absolutely crucial that those who use pulse oximeters- in their practice, or provide them to the public, - take skin pigmentation - into account when considering effectiveness amongst users. this is not to say that. pulse oximeters are bad. what we are saying is that. more care needs to be taken when looking at the readings from these devices. - but, as parts of europe lock down and close up again, and the christmas markets are quiet, the short—term question here is whether we can stay free from further covid restrictions. dan johnson, bbc news. well, let's look at the situation
7:11 pm
in the uk in more detail, with the latest government coronavirus figures. they show there were just over 40,000 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. on average, 41,029 new cases were reported per day in the last week. 61 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 147 covid—related deaths were recorded every day. and on vaccinations, more than 15 million people have now had their booster injection. manchester united have sacked their manager ole gunar solskjaer following yesterday's 4—1 defeat at watford. he'd been in charge for almost three years but the club has suffered a string of poor results, and is currently seventh in the premier league. our sports correspondentjane dougall reports from old trafford. a dark and dismal day for him
7:12 pm
and manchester united football club. even he seemed to know this would be his last game in charge. a club legend like ole gunar solskjaer could have been forgiven for losing 4—1 to watford but after is only disappointing results the patients of the fans had been pushed to their limits. the boys are in a terrible place in their heads right now. of course they are disappointed. they've let themselves down, we have let ourselves down. and the fans down. it's hard to stand there and explain that but that's football. anyway, we have to take the flak for it. the manner in which they loved and left even the players bemused. the manner in which they lost left even the players bemused. it was embarrassing for me, to be honest. it is unacceptable for this club, the level of players that we have. so it is another nightmare. it prompted crisis talks with club
7:13 pm
owners, the glazerfamily, and manchester united fans woke up to the news that their manager had gone. finally. ole out. i think it was always going to happen. he started off well. at the start and then obviously the last seven of games he's only won two. he spent all that money and he's just not good enough so a change is necessary, isn't it? many had wished for him to succeed. as a player he helped the team of the way to winning the treble in 1999, his famous goal in the champions league final cementing him as a cult hero. and that was acknowledged by the club. they said ole will always be a legend at manchester united and it was with regret that we have reached this difficult decision. while the past few weeks have been disappointing that should not obscure all the work he has done over the past three years. but in that time, he produced no silverware and for a club with high expectations like manchester united, that was not acceptable. the dream of the super sub with a late reprieve was not to be.
7:14 pm
the taxi driver who survived the liverpool terror attack has said it's a miracle he's alive and that no one else was injured in the terror attack. david perry and his wife rachel have issued a statement through police thanking the public for their "amazing generosity" and thanking hospital staff. the explosion outside liverpool women's hospital killed emad al swealmeen. the missing chinese tennis star peng shuai has said she's safe and well in a video call with the head of the international olympic committee. the news comes as videos showing her at a junior tennis tournament have been released by chinese state media. the athlete hasn't been seen in public since she made accusations of sexual assault against a senior chinese politician. our china correspondentjohn sudworth has the latest. this appears to be the first solid evidence of peng shuai's whereabouts since she made her allegation. released by chinese state media operatives, you can hear her name
7:15 pm
being announced. and then a smile and a wave, seemingly meant to send a message, "all is well." but there are few allegations more sensitive in china than the one of sexual assault levelled against a man as senior as former vice premier zhang gaoli. and previous material released by state media meant to show that peng shuai is not being held under duress has only fuelled further speculation. i don't think this thing is going to end any time soon, which is why i think in the next few days we can expect more of these quite bizarre and suspicious proofs of life from chinese state media because they're starting to realise that this is getting out of control. peng shuai is also reported to have held a video conference, conference with the head of the international olympic committee in which sue says she is safe and well
7:16 pm
but once her privacy respected but that too is unlikely to satisfy those calling of a boycott of the winter olympics. —— in which she says. the government failed to fulfil any of the human rights—related promises it had made to get the games and we can see that the situation on the inside of the country has deteriorated significantly. one really wonders if players now even feel safe to go and compete there. olympics officials insist politics should be kept out of sport. the trouble for china peng shuai has put them in front of centre of court. john sudworth, bbc news, taipei. the headlines on bbc news: belgian police fire water cannon and tear gas at protesters in brussels marching against coronavirus restrictions ole gunnar solskjaer has been sacked as manchester united's manager after three years, following a bad run of results
7:17 pm
missing chinese tennis star peng shuai holds a video call with the president of the international olympic committee telling him she's safe and well. the government's plans to reform social care in england — which would see a lifetime cap of £86,000 on what you have to pay — are expected to be voted on by parliament tomorrow. there's growing concern on the government backbenches about whether the plans are fair to homeowners living in the north and less affluent areas. i'm joined by our political correspondent iain watson. looking into that first of all, take us to the heart of the issue looking into that first of all, take us to the heart of the issue at stake here. us to the heart of the issue at stake here-— us to the heart of the issue at stake here. ., ., , stake here. the government has wanted to reform _ stake here. the government has wanted to reform social- stake here. the government has wanted to reform social care - stake here. the government has wanted to reform social care for| wanted to reform social care for some time, usually at hits the buffers. it is genuinely easier said than done. there are two and so is among his mps at the moment, the first over this £86,000 limit on social care. beyond £86,000, the
7:18 pm
state would then step in. some people are saying, £86,000 represents perhaps 100% of the value of a home in parts of the north of england, and 10% of the value of a home in the south—east, so it doesn't look like levelling up. the government said people can effectively defer payments for social care costs until after death. nonetheless, it would still mean people in parts of northern england would have far less to leave to members of the family than those in the south—east. labour have said it is not levelling up at daylight robbery. there is underlying unease on the conservative benches, and what has made that needs turning to discontent is a further move by the government, and this is what mps will vote on tomorrow night, and thatis will vote on tomorrow night, and that is that people who need a little bit of social care cost help from the council will have to wait longer before they get to 100% of
7:19 pm
care cost paid. this is after the announcement on hs too and so on and it will not looking —— look like levelling up, according to some. people publicly and privately who have been at senior levels in the conservative party are trying to borisjohnson to think again. is boris johnson to think again. is this discontent going to translate into any rebellion from a significant number of mps? tomorrow labour are inviting _ significant number of mps? tomorrow labour are inviting tory _ significant number of mps? tomorrow labour are inviting tory mps - significant number of mps? tomorrow labour are inviting tory mps with - labour are inviting tory mps with concerns to vote with them. as far as i'm picking up, i'm told there will not be a huge rebellion tomorrow. there will be some, but you have to look at quality as well as quantity. for example, at least five former cabinet ministers are expressing concerns. one today said he is minded to vote against. another gave the care minister of very hard time behind closed doors. others have said to me this is how they think it will work — people will express their discontent tomorrow, but in terms of the parliamentary timetable, it's not necessary for the government to be
7:20 pm
defeated tomorrow. it will go to the lords, face a barrage of criticism there and come back to the commons. in the intervening period, some of these seniorfigures say in the intervening period, some of these senior figures say they will try to twist boris johnson's these senior figures say they will try to twist borisjohnson's arm and getting to think again. pressure from the backbenches could be crucial. as one put it, they might not be a roar of disapproval tomorrow, but the rumblings will continue. . —— there might not be. the queen has attended a private ceremony to celebrate the christenings of two of her great—grandchildren in windsor this evening. mike and zara tindall�*s son lucas was christened alongside the son of princess eugenie and her husband jack brooksbank —, august philip. the sighting is four days after her first public appearance since a hospital stay last month, which caused her to miss remembrance sunday. midwives are calling for urgent help, claiming maternity services have reached "crisis point". hundreds joined protests across the uk to highlight the issue.
7:21 pm
the government says it is "committed to patient safety" and wants to make the nhs "the safest place in the world to give birth". jim wheble reports. with two healthy children and dog keith in tow, lara and rui's family are happy and settled but to this day memories of her first traumatic birth still linger, a birth she believes made worse by a locum midwife due to staff shortages which the hospital apologised for. they said, we're so sorry, the care that you got wasn't what we would normally have given here and we don't know who that midwife was, because they hadn't heard of her and i think that's it, because she wasn't part of the team. that experience inspired her tojoin today's march with midwives protest in parliament square, one of 50 happening across the uk, calling out a maternity crisis. a recent study by the royal college of midwives suggested that 60% of midwives are thinking of leaving. and also in the crowd,
7:22 pm
new mum for a second time around, tv presenter rachel riley, accompanied by the team of midwives who helped her. all my friends are a similar kind of age and a lot of them are having children at the moment, and a couple of them particularly have had really bad experiences recently and reading the stats on how underfunded and how understaffed the nhs is at the moment, i can now understand why these things have happened which have serious health implications for them. we aim to have one midwife looking after one person in labour at the moment and we are seeing more and more that we are not able to cover that staffing wise. the government know there is a problem. they are spending £95 million on a recruitment drive to try and get 1200 more midwives. they also said that there are more midwives in the nhs now than there have been at any time in its history. but that's not the full picture. in the latest report from the nursing and midwifery council, they found the numbers leaving the job at the highest level since 2017, a trend many midwives seem to be feeling the effects of now.
7:23 pm
jim wheble, bbc london. spotify has stopped automatically shuffling albums, at the request of adele. the singer says artists "create albums with care and put thought into the track listing for a reason". the streaming service announced its approval by tweeting: "anything for you." it comes days after the release of the london—born singer's album 30 — her first in six years, which was inspired by her divorce. in a moment we'll be speaking to a presenterfrom kiss fm about the move from spotify, but first let's have a quick listen. # go easy on me, baby # i was still a child # didn't get the chance # to feel the world around me # i had no time to choose what i chose to do...# joining me now is kaylee golding, music critic and presenter at kiss fm.
7:24 pm
lovely to have you with us this evening at bbc news. so, is this a surprise move by adele and i if i? i think it is a surprise, but now that it has happened, we have been waiting six years for this, so it makes sense that she would not want it all to be shuffled back to be listened to how she created it. i think it is beautiful that spotify are agreeing to do this. let’s are agreeing to do this. let's compare _ are agreeing to do this. let's compare another _ are agreeing to do this. let's compare another type - are agreeing to do this. let's compare another type of - are agreeing to do this. let's i compare another type of artist, are agreeing to do this. let's compare another type of artist, a novelist. somebody doesn't pick up a book and read chapter 64 chapter three, for example. it's not they like for like comparison, i know, but it is different, isn't it, when it comes to an album? people will always have their favourite tracks they want to return to again and again. they want to return to again and aaain. , , ., ., , again. yes, i understand that, buti feel like you _ again. yes, i understand that, buti feel like you can _ again. yes, i understand that, buti feel like you can search _ again. yes, i understand that, buti feel like you can search for - again. yes, i understand that, buti feel like you can search for one - feel like you can search for one single if you just want one direct
7:25 pm
song, but the whole purpose is for you to listen to the whole album in full. let's take beyonce's lemonade. i can't think of listening to that album and not understanding the story from start to finish. it is important that adele are spoken up for the industry and said, look, we work on albums and put a lot of effort into it, so please listen to it in full and hear our story, a journey. she has given so much of emotion and honesty in this album, so i feel like it makes so much sense. listening to it in full is just really beautiful. in sense. listening to it in full is just really beautiful.— just really beautiful. in that sense, just really beautiful. in that sense. you _ just really beautiful. in that sense, you think— just really beautiful. in that sense, you think it - just really beautiful. in that sense, you think it is - just really beautiful. in that sense, you think it is like . just really beautiful. in that sense, you think it is like a | sense, you think it is like a novelist writing a book and the reader picking it up and reading it chronologically, from chapter one forward? for chronologically, from chapter one forward? ., , , forward? for sure, definitely, especially _ forward? for sure, definitely, especially when _ forward? for sure, definitely, especially when it _ forward? for sure, definitely, especially when it comes - forward? for sure, definitely, especially when it comes to l forward? for sure, definitely, - especially when it comes to people who write their own music and who tell stories within their music. they really are storytellers. that's what songwriters are. i they really are storytellers. that's what songwriters are.— what songwriters are. i feel like it's the same — what songwriters are. i feel like it's the same thing, _ what songwriters are. i feel like it's the same thing, personally. j it's the same thing, personally. just to be absolutely clear, is this just adele's album we are talking about or will it apply to other people's albums as well? currently,
7:26 pm
it is adele's — people's albums as well? currently, it is adele's album, _ people's albums as well? currently, it is adele's album, but _ people's albums as well? currently, it is adele's album, but my - it is adele's album, but my prediction is that more artists. to request it, and i hope so, because i think it will make artist put more time and effort back into albums and understand the importance of track listings, because i think we have started to lose that in music. i think it will bring that back, which will be really nice. talk think it will bring that back, which will be really nice.— will be really nice. talk to us about the — will be really nice. talk to us about the relative _ will be really nice. talk to us| about the relative importance will be really nice. talk to us - about the relative importance of the album versus those hit singles from an album? 50. album versus those hit singles from an album? �* album versus those hit singles from an album? ~ , ., , album versus those hit singles from an album? ~ , ., ~ ., an album? so, adele is always known for talkinu an album? so, adele is always known for talking about _ an album? so, adele is always known for talking about and _ an album? so, adele is always known for talking about and sharing - an album? so, adele is always known for talking about and sharing her- for talking about and sharing her love story, and the thing is, she is quite private with her personal life usually, she is very guarded, but within her music, she has really told everything, she has really poured her heart out. we even hear from her son, asking questions about the divorce and all of it, so it's important for us to listen to the story from the beginning, from the heartbreak to how it affects our friendships, how it affected her family, how she thought she was free, she was ready to go back to
7:27 pm
realising that she is still heartbroken. it is a whole story, and love is a story, at the end of the day, and that's why it's important. d0 the day, and that's why it's important-— the day, and that's why it's important. the day, and that's why it's imortant. ,., ~ , , important. do you think this is auoin to important. do you think this is going to bring _ important. do you think this is going to bring in _ important. do you think this is going to bring in even - important. do you think this is going to bring in even more i important. do you think this is l going to bring in even more fans important. do you think this is - going to bring in even more fans for adele beyond the absolutely devoted fans she has, legions of them, obviously, the people who might be the more casual listeners, if i can call them that, and just listen to the big hit singles? do you think it will draw in more people to hear the story she is telling with her music? for sure. story she is telling with her music? forsure. i story she is telling with her music? for sure. i think it will really increase their appreciation of the full album. increase their appreciation of the fullalbum. it increase their appreciation of the full album. it is easy to fall into the trap as consumers to just listen to a single, listen to that big song, listen to easy on me and just that. but i think this will help them appreciate the story. [30 that. but i think this will help them appreciate the story. do you think other _ them appreciate the story. do you think other music _ them appreciate the story. do you think other music services - them appreciate the story. do you think other music services might l think other music services might follow spotify�*s lead? i think other music services might follow spotify's lead?— think other music services might follow spotify's lead? i hope so. i don't think _ follow spotify's lead? i hope so. i don't think they _ follow spotify's lead? i hope so. i don't think they will, _ follow spotify's lead? i hope so. i don't think they will, but - follow spotify's lead? i hope so. i don't think they will, but i - follow spotify's lead? i hope so. i don't think they will, but i really l don't think they will, but i really hope so, and i hope more artists
7:28 pm
begin to request this. it willjust improve music, i think. it begin to request this. it will 'ust improve music, i think.�* begin to request this. it will 'ust improve music, i think. it may be a usp for spotify _ improve music, i think. it may be a usp for spotify and _ improve music, i think. it may be a usp for spotify and others - improve music, i think. it may be a usp for spotify and others may - usp for spotify and others may follow it. , —— follow their lead. thank you forjoining us. thousands of people have gathered in the champs elysees in paris for the first time in two years to see the avenue's famous christmas lights being switched on. last year the country was under a strict lockdown because of coronavirus but 12 months later, thousands thronged the world famous boulevard to see the festive decorations. it comes as the french government reports covid—19 infections rising at an alarming rate. it says new daily covid cases are close to doubling over the past week. now it's time for a look at the weather with phil. as the picture suggests, sunday has been a bright, fresh day across many parts of the british isles, certainly a cooler feel
7:29 pm
than we've had of late, and that's the feature that you'll notice going through the next few days as well. in the short term, some isolated showers for some areas. they will tend to fade away as we get on through the next few hours or so. and overnight we'lljust be left with a few across this far southeastern quarter. cold weather fronts just pushing in across the far north of scotland, keeping the temperatures up with an associated cloud here. but further south, with the skies clearing quite markedly, i think we'll end up with quite a widespread frost in many inland areas. so it's a bright, fresh start to the new day on monday for southern scotland, much of england and wales, northern ireland, till the clouds up here and always that bit cloudy across the north of scotland with bits and pieces of rain coming through or what is not going to be more of a westerly breeze. so maybe notjust feeling as cold as it did do through the course of sunday, but still a high of only ten.
7:30 pm
hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: belgian police fire water cannon and tear gas at around 35,000 protesters in brussels marching against coronavirus restrictions. ole gunnar solskjaer has been sacked as manchester united's manager after three years, following a bad run of results. the taxi driver from the liverpool terror attack says it's a "miracle" he is alive, and thanks the public for their "amazing generosity". missing chinese tennis star peng shuai is reported to have said she's safe and well in a call with olympic officials.

42 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on