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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 21, 2021 8:00pm-8:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news, the headlines at eight. belgian police fire water cannon and tear gas at around 35,000 protesters in brussels marching against coronavirus restrictions. the queen has celebrated the double christening of her two great grandsons and a private ceremony in windsor. the taxi driver from the liverpool terror attack says it's a "miracle" he is alive, and thanks the public for their �*amazing generosity�*. missing chinese tennis star peng shuai holds a video call with the president of the international olympic committee telling him she's safe and well. 0le gunnar solskjaer has been sacked as manchester united's manager after three years, following a bad run of results.
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good evening and welcome to bbc news. police have clashed with protesters in the belgian capital brussels after tens of thousands of people marched against recently tightened coronavirus restrictions. some protesters threw fireworks at police officers, who hit back with tear gas and water cannon. the protesters are mainly opposed to the use of covid passes, which prohibit the unvaccinated from entering venues such as restaurants or bars. it comes after another night of violent protests in the netherlands against further covid lockdown restrictions there. anna holligan reports. another demonstration of the discontent seeping through dutch society.
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galvanised by calls on social media, groups gathered in the hague, young men hurled rocks and fireworks at police, they torched bikes and targeted an ambulance. an emergency order was issued by the mayor. it took hours to restore calm. at least 19 people were detained and similar scenes erupted elsewhere. these small explosive demos are being held in the context of rumbling frustrations about the current and possible future restrictions considered essential to fight record high of covid cases. this week a far worse than expected almost 150,000 new infections were detected. earlier the dutchjustice minister said he believes the virus being used as a cover, an excuse to use extreme violence, and made the distinction between the mostly peaceful protests and purely criminal behaviour. translation: these i are not demonstrations. these are attacks on police
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and firefighters. more than 50 arrests have been made and many more will follow. among the rules implement it here last weekend, cafes, bars, restaurants and supermarkets have to close by 8pm. but the country's top virologist has warned these rules are not yet having an impact on the infection rate here in the netherlands and beyond in other countries with competing visions on how best to fight this virus. and there was more evidence of this in brussels today. at least 35,000 people turned out to protest in the belgian capital. more trouble and turmoil. police used water cannon and tear gas against part of the crowd. the world health organization has called for an intensification of covid measures. with varying vaccine rates and stubbornly high degrees of
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hesitancy, getting the shots in may be part of the solution but won't cure the wider distrust and division exacerbated by the health crisis. anna holligan, bbc news, in the hague. earlier i spoke to the brussels—based journalist jack parrock, who gave me the latest details about the protests tonight. it has now calmed down. wejust it has now calmed down. we just had the message from the police in brussels to say that the tunnels that the protesters were fighting against the police in are now all open again and circulation on the main road in the centre of brussels is now flowing again for traffic. we have seen throughout the day the protest started at about 1:30pm. big eruptions of violence in two specific locations that started relatively early on that process and
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they have also moved into the european quarter of brussels. we understand there were 35,000 people on the streets and a number of arrests made and indeed a number of police officers rumoured to have been injured. we don't have the numbers yet on how many. fix, been injured. we don't have the numbers yet on how many. a really substantial — numbers yet on how many. a really substantial protest. _ numbers yet on how many. a really substantial protest. who _ numbers yet on how many. a really substantial protest. who are - numbers yet on how many. a really substantial protest. who are the i substantial protest. who are the protesters? police reported initially that the action was peaceful but it turned violent. 0ur peaceful but it turned violent. our other elements joining these protests intent on causing trouble? it is hard to see yet exactly who was the cause of these troubles but we do know the people out on the streets, enough was the chant, mainly being related to the covid passport will you have to prove you are fully vaccinated and tested or recovered from the virus in order to access restaurants, etc. it is taking slightly longer in belgium to
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bring that in but these people are very much against that saying that it shouldn't be forced, vaccinations shouldn't be forced on people. we don't know exactly which factions came in but we do know brussels, the capital region has a much stronger anti—vaccination section of the society than in the northern flemish region, the dutch speaking region and then the french—speaking region. flanders has 81% of people fully vaccinated while others only 70% while here in brussels it isjust over 56% so not that 70% margin that everyone wants to reach her vaccinations. and there is a real strong anti—vaccination feeling and sentiment here. one thing to note is that on friday when the government announced stricter measures, to make children wear masks in schools, it didn't go all the way to the
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stronger lockdown is what we have seenin stronger lockdown is what we have seen in the netherlands and in austria. 50 seen in the netherlands and in austria. ., ., , austria. so what are politicians auoin to austria. so what are politicians going to do _ austria. so what are politicians going to do to _ austria. so what are politicians going to do to try _ austria. so what are politicians going to do to try to _ austria. so what are politicians going to do to try to bring - austria. so what are politicians going to do to try to bring the l going to do to try to bring the situation under control, to at least attempt to do that? how can they address the concerns of these protest hours while at the same time deal with rising covid cases. that is the million _ deal with rising covid cases. that is the million dollar _ deal with rising covid cases. twat is the million dollar question, that is the million dollar question, that is the million dollar question, that is the issue. right now there are around 13,000 cases a day on average from belgium, a country ofjust over 11 million people, and they know they need to get it under control and they want to make sure that firstly the rates are coming down, so they have re—implemented home—working for these four days of the week for everybody unless they are exempt to get the numbers down but the crucial thing is to get them vaccinated, that is the government planned to increase the vaccination rate to make sure they are not getting hospitalised if they do get the virus. and we'll find out how this story —
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and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers — our guestsjoining me tonight are education editor for the sunday times sian griffiths and also political editor, liverpool echo, liam thorpe. the health secretary sajid javid says the covid jab booster programme should prevent the uk from experiencing the spike in cases seen in the netherlands and in some other european countries. boosters are being extended to the over—40s in england from tomorrow. mrjavid said there are no plans to put any european countries back on the travel ban list — but the situation is being constantly reviewed, as danjohnson reports. this is the european backlash to tightening lockdowns, restricted freedoms, even mandated vaccinations, all in response to a wave of rising covid cases. sajid javid, the health secretary... but here in the uk, the health secretary this
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morning said we wouldn't be going down the same route, with the focus instead on the boosterjab campaign. well, we are extending it from tomorrow, actually, to people in the age group, a0 to a9, and we will keep under review how that might be extended in the future. and we're seeing record numbers of people come forward, but i would urge everyone to, if they are eligible to do so, to come forward, because that's the best way we can look forward to the kind of christmas that we all want to see. there's no plan to restrict travel. the feeling is the delta variant may be spreading through europe, but it's already here. 0ur vaccination rates are high, but one of the scientists behind the 0xford—astrazeneca vaccine was asked, are we getting close to herd immunity? well, it depends what you mean by herd immunity. if you mean stopping the virus so it can no longer spread, that's not going to be a thing. unfortunately, this virus is going to be with us for the decades ahead. if you mean slowing it down, then that's something which the vaccines are already doing. we know the pandemic has hit some
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people harder than others. and the health secretary thinks he's found one reason why. these pulse oximeter devices used to measure oxygen in the blood give more accurate readings from white skin. so there'll now be a review to make sure medical equipment�*s equally effective whatever your skin colour. it's absolutely crucial that those who use pulse oximeters- in their practice, or provide them to the public, - take skin pigmentation - into account when considering effectiveness amongst users. this is not to say that. pulse oximeters are bad. what we are saying is that. more care needs to be taken when looking at the readings from these devices. - but, as parts of europe lock down and close up again, and the christmas markets are quiet, the short—term question here is whether we can stay free from further covid restrictions. dan johnson, bbc news. well, let's look at
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the situation in the uk in more detail, with the latest government coronavirus figures. they show there were just over 40,000 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. on average, 41,029 new cases were reported per day in the last week. 61 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 147 related deaths were recorded every day. and on vaccinations, more than 15 million people have now had their booster injection. one of the biggestjobs in football management has become vacant — after manchester united sacked 0le gunnar solskjaer. he's been in charge for almost three years but the team has suffered a run of poor results, with a 4—1 defeat at watford yesterday. joe lynskey looks back on solskjaer�*s time at manchester united.
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for manchester united, he was the coach with the connection, the playing icon who became manager. no—one hoped the end would be like this. in 0le gunnar solskjaer�*s last match, his team were beaten 4—1 by watford, the end of a run of seven league games with one win and now three humiliations. last month, united lost 5—0 at home to liverpool and, on the same ground, were beaten by manchester city. defeat to bitter rivals have caused the most damage. the boys, of course, they're disappointed. they've let themselves down and the fans down. it's hard to stand here and explain that, but that's football, and we have to take the flak for it. solskjaerjoined united 25 years ago. he was the striker whose late goals meant so much. super sub has done it again! in 2018, he became temporary manager and their form was so good, he was the standout choice. but, as permanent boss,
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there have been no trophies. this was meant to be the year it came good. cristiano ronaldo scored twice on his debut, but even his goals haven't stopped this dismal run. now even the players don't hold back. it was embarrassing. we don't know what to do with the ball, we don't know how to defend properly, we are conceding a lot of goals. yeah, it's another nightmare. since 2013, everything's changed. united now seek a fifth permanent boss since sir alex ferguson left. as a player under him, solskjaer won six league titles. but, as a coach, too much has gone wrong and, this time for solskjaer, there is no late turnaround. joe lynskey, bbc news. let's get more on this from manchester united fanatic, natalie burrell! natalie, thank you forjoining us on bbc news this evening. what do you make of the sacking? do you think it was the right decision? i think it
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was, it was sort of inevitable, the writing on the wall from the liverpool game. it is upsetting because he is a club legend and sort of stabilise the club but he is just not good enough and the results have not good enough and the results have not been good enough in the squad we have got now we expect them to be at the top and it does not come about, but disappointing to see a legend like 0le gunnar solskjaer lose his job. i can tell from what you're saying that you feel wistful about it, saying he will leave by the front door because he thinks everyone will know he has given everything for manchester united? everything for manchester united ? 100%. everything for manchester united? 100%. when he came in, it was sort of like it is now, players not really playing at his best but he has got the best out of the players and i think it isjust has got the best out of the players and i think it is just unfortunate the way it has panned out. he has built a good squad. they have not
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done enough and they said these players would do this, and ifeel like whoever comes in, this is going to happen. you have to get things right at the top, football people need to make the football decisions and that is not really happen for a while at manchester united. 50 and that is not really happen for a while at manchester united. so why do ou while at manchester united. so why do you think — while at manchester united. so why do you think the _ while at manchester united. so why do you think the dynamic _ while at manchester united. so why do you think the dynamic didn't - do you think the dynamic didn't work? was to do with solskjaer and the team or somewhere else in the structure? i the team or somewhere else in the structure? ~ , ., ,., the team or somewhere else in the structure? ~ , ., ., ., structure? i think it is about to do with everything _ structure? i think it is about to do with everything. potentially - structure? i think it is about to do with everything. potentially his i structure? i think it is about to do | with everything. potentially his are not good enough and the top players need better training potentially but i think we structure needs looking at. we are hearing not a lot of people on the board are football people, they are just only now hiring a director of football, darren fletcher is in but i think we need more people who understand what it means to be manchester united and i want to see gary neville given a
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chance to change things around at the top but i don't think that will ever happen. the top but i don't think that will ever happen-— the top but i don't think that will ever hauen. , ., , , ., ever happen. there is a suggestion, orthe ever happen. there is a suggestion, or the idea — ever happen. there is a suggestion, or the idea being _ ever happen. there is a suggestion, or the idea being floated, _ ever happen. there is a suggestion, or the idea being floated, that - or the idea being floated, that manchester united are looking to appoint an interim manager to the end of the season. what do you think about that? would you prefer to see a new manager appointed rather than go with an interim appointment? i think itjust shows go with an interim appointment? i think it just shows they don't think itjust shows they don't really have a clue. it sounds a bit harsh but it shows the scrambling around and not knowing what to do. why not give michael carrick interim until they want a mauricio pochettino or the ajax manager or zidane. it seems to be names floating around twitter rather than having a clear plan at this time. it is not very good as a united fan at
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the minute. is not very good as a united fan at the minute-— is not very good as a united fan at the minute. ~ ., , the minute. apart from gary neville, who miaht the minute. apart from gary neville, who might you _ the minute. apart from gary neville, who might you like _ the minute. apart from gary neville, who might you like to _ the minute. apart from gary neville, who might you like to see _ the minute. apart from gary neville, who might you like to see in - the minute. apart from gary neville, who might you like to see in the - the minute. apart from gary neville, who might you like to see in the top| who might you like to see in the top job? i who might you like to see in the top “ob? ., ,., ,, who might you like to see in the top “ob? ., ,., _ who might you like to see in the top “ob? ., , .. ., job? i would probably say riccio pochettino. _ job? i would probably say riccio pochettino, he _ job? i would probably say riccio pochettino, he could _ job? i would probably say riccio pochettino, he could do - job? i would probably say riccio pochettino, he could do great . pochettino, he could do great things, like you said, ajax manager or zidane, they have won european cups. you need an experienced european manager who is strong enough to take control of that dressing room. maybe get rid of a few players who weren't performing a feeling like they deserve a bit more. this is manchester united and they should be playing for the badge no matter who is in charge. [30 they should be playing for the badge no matter who is in charge.- no matter who is in charge. do you think when — no matter who is in charge. do you think when they _ no matter who is in charge. do you think when they manager - no matter who is in charge. do you think when they manager goes - no matter who is in charge. do you think when they manager goes like this and especially somebody like solskjaer with his history with the club that it really makes the players sit up and think? that we have to take a fresh approach and do better? i have to take a fresh approach and do better? ., , ., , ., better? i hope it does. there are a lot of players _ better? i hope it does. there are a lot of players now _ better? i hope it does. there are a lot of players now who _ better? i hope it does. there are a lot of players now who have - better? i hope it does. there are a lot of players now who have come | better? i hope it does. there are a i
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lot of players now who have come out on social media and said, sorry, a legend of this club can't get it right with very good players, it sort of feels, a bad mood amongst fans that go weekend, week out. you can tell from listening to him that he does care and does the best. you just sort of thing, why can't they put in these good performances? they did it last year and got to second, got to the final of the european cup so why can't they do it this season with even better players. it baffles me and a lot of fans. sol with even better players. it baffles me and a lot of fans. so i don't know, hopefully a strong manager will get the best out of them. really good to hear your thoughts. thank you for your time this evening. the taxi driver who survived the liverpool terror attack has said it's a miracle he's alive and that no one else was injured in the terror attack. david perry and his wife rachel have issued a statement through police thanking the public for their "amazing generosity" and thanking hosital staff. the explosion outside
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liverpool women's hospital killed emad al swealmeen. the missing chinese tennis star peng shuai has said she's safe and well in a video call with the head of the international olympic committee. the news comes as videos showing her at a junior tennis tournament have been released by chinese state media. the athlete hasn't been seen in public since she made accusations of sexual assault against a senior chinese politician. 0ur china correspondentjohn sudworth has the latest. this appears to be the first solid evidence of peng shuai's whereabouts since she made her allegation. released by chinese state media operatives, you can hear her name being announced. and then a smile and a wave, seemingly sent to send a message, "all is well." but there are few allegations more sensitive in china than the one of sexual assault levelled against a man as senior as former vice premier zhang gaoli.
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and previous material released by state media meant to show that peng shuai is not being held under duress has only fuelled further speculation. i don't think this thing is going to end any time soon, which is why i think in the next few days we can expect more of these quite bizarre and suspicious proofs of life from chinese state media because they're starting to realise that this is getting out of control. peng shuai is also reported to have held the video confidence, conference with the head of the international olympic committee in which sue says she is safe and well but once her privacy respected but that too is unlikely to satisfy those calling of a boycott of the winter olympics. the government failed to fulfil any of the human rights—related promises it had made to get the games and we can see that the situation on the inside of the country has deteriorated significantly.
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0ne really wonders if players now even feel safe to go and compete there. 0lympics officials insist politics should be kept out of sport. the trouble for china is that these allegations are of such a sensitive nature that it finds itself in a bit of a bind. peng shuai has put them in front of centre of court. john sudworth, bbc news, taipei. the government's plans to reform social care in england — which would see a lifetime cap of £86,000 on what you have to pay — is expected to be voted on by parliament tomorrow. there's growing concern on the government backbenches about whether the plans are fair to homeowners living in the north and less affluent areas. 0ur political correspondent iain watson outlined the issue earlier this evening. governments have tried to reform social care for quite some time and usually it has hit the buffers on the steps of downing street. when he became prime minister, borisjohnson said he would sort this out. but i think it is genuinely easier said than done. there are two concerns among some of his mps at the moment. the first is the overarching concern about this £86,000
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limit on social care. beyond £86,000, the state would then step in. but some people are saying, look, £86,000 represents perhaps 100% of the value of a home in some parts of northern england and perhaps as little as 10% of the value of a home in the south—east of england, so that it doesn't look like levelling up. the government said people can effectively defer payment for the social care costs until after death. nonetheless, it would still mean that people in certain parts of northern england are far less to leave to their family perhaps than people in the south—east. labour's already getting stuck in on this to say it is not levelling up, it is daylight robbery. there is this underlying unease in the conservative benches. and what has made that unease turn into discontent is a further move by the government, and this is what mps will be voting on tomorrow night, and that is that people who need a little bit of help with their social care costs from their council, they are going to have to wait even longer before they reach that £86,000 limit before they get 100% of their care costs paid. again, there are worries that this
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is not, after the announcement on h52 and so on, that this is not going to look like levelling up. and for that reason, a range of people, both publicly and privately, who have been at very senior levels in the conservative party, are trying to get borisjohnson to think again. the queen has attended a private ceremony to celebrate the christenings of two of her great—grandchildren in windsor this evening. mike and zara tindall�*s son lucas was christened alongside the son of princess eugenie and her husband jack brooksbank, august philip. the sighting is four days after her first public appearance since a hospital stay last month, which caused her to miss remembrance sunday. spotify has stopped automatically shuffling albums, at the request of adele. the singer says artists "create albums with care and put thought into the track listing for a reason". the streaming service announced its approval by tweeting: "anything for you." it comes days after the release of the london—born singer's album 30 — her first in six years,
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which was inspired by her divorce. kaylee golding is a music critic and presenter at kiss fm. i asked her whether she was surprised by adele's request. i think it is a surprise, but now that it has happened, it makes so much sense. i mean, artists spent so much time to create albums. i mean, we have been waiting six years for this, so it makes sense that she wouldn't want it all to be shuffled, she wants it to be listened to how she created it. and i think it's great that spotify are agreeing to do this. so, let's compare another type of artist, a novelist, say. 0bviously somebody doesn't pick up a book and read chapter six before they read chapter three, for example. it is not a like—for—like comparison, i know, but it's different, isn't it, when it comes to an album? because people will always have favourite tracks that they want to return to again and again. yes, i understand that, but i feel like you can search singly for one single, if that is what you want. it's just one direct song. but i think the whole purpose is for you to listen
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to the whole album in full. like, let's take beyonce's lemonade. i couldn't imagine listening to that album and not understanding the story by listening from start to finish. so i think it is very important that adele has spoken up for the industry and said, "look, we work on our albums, we put a lot of effort into it, so please listen to it in full and hear our story, here our journey." she has poured out so much of her emotion and given so much of her honesty in this album, so i feel like it makes so much sense. listening to it in full is just really beautiful. so, in that sense, you think it is like a novelist writing a book and then the reader picking that up and reading it chronologically from chapter one forward. forsure, definitely, especially when it comes to people that write their own music and it comes to people that tell stories within their music. and they really are storytellers, that is what song writers are, they are storytellers. so i feel like it is the same thing, personally. ok, so is this, just to be absolutely clear, is this just adele's album we are talking about, is this going to apply to other people's albums, as well? so, currently it is for adele's album.
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but i think... my predictions anyway is that more artists will start to request it. and i hope so because i think it will make artists put more time and effort back into albums and understand the importance of track listing, because i feel like we have started to lose that a little bit within music. so i think that that will bring that back, which will be really nice. yeah, just talk to us about the relative importance of the album versus those hit singles from an album. so, adele is always known for talking about love and sharing her love story. the thing is, she is quite private with her personal life, usually she is very guarded, but within her music, she has really told everything, she has really poured her heart out. i mean, we even hear from her son asking questions about the divorce and all of it. so it is important for us to listen to the story from the beginning, from the heartbreak to how it affects her friendship, how it affected our family, how she thought that she was free, she was ready now she is a divorcee, to going back to realising
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that she is still heartbroken. it is a whole story. love is a story at the end of the day, and that is why it is important. so, do you think this is going to bring in even more fans for adele beyond the absolutely devoted fans that she has, legions of them, obviously? you know, the people who might be the more casual listeners, if i can call them that, and just listening at the moment to the big hit singles, do you think that is going to draw in more people to hear the story that she is telling with her music? for sure. i think it will really improve their appreciation of the full album. it is really easy to fall into the trap as consumers and to just listen to a single, just listen to that big song, just listen to easy on me and just leave it at that, but i think that this will get people to actually listen to the full album and get them to appreciate the story. and do you think other music services might follow spotify�*s lead? i hope so. i do not know if they will, but i really, really hope so, and i hope that more artists begin to request this. it willjust improve music, i think.
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the time is fast approaching it 30 pm. now it's time for a look at the weather with phil avery. hello, as the picture suggests, sunday has been a bright, fresh day across many parts of the british isles, certainly a cooler feel than we have had of late. and that is the feature that you will notice going through the next few days, as well. in the short term, some isolated showers for some areas. they will tend to fade away as we get on through the next few hours or so. 0vernight, we willjust be left with a few across this far south—eastern quarter. cold weather fronts just pushing on across the far north of scotland, keeping the temperatures up with an associated cloud here. but further south, with the skies clearing quite markedly, i think we will end up with quite a widespread frost in many inland areas. so, there is a bright and fresh start to the new day on monday for southern scotland, much of england and wales, northern ireland, too, although it clouds up here. and always that bit cloudier across the north of scotland
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with bits and pieces of rain coming through on what is now going to be more of a westerly breeze. so maybe notjust feeling as cold as it did do through the course of sunday, but still a high of only 10.
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hello, good evening. this is bbc news. the headlines for you... belgian police fire water cannon and tear gas at around 35,000 protesters in brussels marching against coronavirus restrictions. 0le gunnar solskjaer has been sacked as manchester united's manager after three years, following a bad run of results. the queen has celebrated the double christening of her two great—grandsons in a private ceremony in windsor.
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the taxi driver from the liverpool terror attack says it's

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