Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 21, 2021 10:00pm-10:31pm GMT

10:00 pm
the belgian capital brussels becomes the latest european city to see mass protests over government anti—covid measures. violent scenes, as some threw fireworks at the police, who intervened with tear gas and water cannon. tens of thousands have taken to the streets in recent days, as several european countries tighten up after a sharp rise in covid cases. we'll be looking at
10:01 pm
the implications of the situation in europe for the uk. also tonight... manchester united sacks its manager ole gunnar solskjaer, after a string of poor results. i have given everything for this club. the club means everything to me, and together, we are a good match, but, unfortunately, i couldn't get the results that we needed, and it's time for me to step aside. mps are set to vote tomorrow on the government's plans for social care, amid concerns about their fairness. the missing chinese tennis player peng shuai tells olympic officials in a video call that she's safe and well. good evening. the belgian capital brussels was today the latest european city to see unrest over tightened coronavirus restrictions. tens of thousands of people marched in protest — some threw fireworks at police officers, who intervened with tear gas and water cannon. belgium hasjust brought
10:02 pm
in new measures, in the face of a sharp rise in infections. the protesters are mainly opposed to the use of covid passes, which ban the unvaccinated from entering bars and restaurants. protests have also ta ken place in austria, italy and croatia, and in the netherlands, there is now a third night of unrest. our europe correspondent anna holligan has this report from the hague. chanting. another day of unrest, unsettling end other european capital. this is brussels tonight. what began as an organised, peaceful march quickly turned nasty. some protesters threw fireworks at police, others targeted their vehicles. officers intervened with tear gas and water cannon. belgium hasjust brought in new rules in response to a sharp uprise in infections.
10:03 pm
demonstrators are mainly angry about the use of covid passes, which stops the unvaccinated from entering venues, such as restaurants or bars. some object to plans to make vaccinations mandatory for health workers. translation: we know that the virus is there, l but we leave it to people to decide whether or not be vaccinated. translation: i came to give my i opinion about freedom of expression and individual choice, and really to be able to respect everyone's choices. the netherlands witnessed the most extreme violence this weekend. rotterdam was rocked by rioters. police opened fire, shooting at the crowd with live rounds, in response to what they described as a life—threatening situation. vandals torched bicycles in the hague. the justice minister believes organised criminals may be behind this. translation: these are not demonstrations, most - of these are attacks - on police and firefighters. more than 50 arrests have been made
10:04 pm
and many more will follow. _ these startling demos, happening too in austria, croatia and denmark, reflect rumbling frustrations about the evolving covid restrictions, considered essential to bring down record high infection rates. and yet here, the netherlands's top virologist has warned the rules introduced last weekend aren't yet having any impact on the number of new cases, which will raise concerns in countries across the continent dealing with competing visions on how best to emerge from this worse than expected fourth wave of the coronavirus. the world health organization has urged governments to redouble their efforts and reinforce the basics. average 48% of the european population is wearing a mask indoor. any percentage above that
10:05 pm
will have immediate effect. with varying vaccine rates, getting the shots in is seen as critical, but they won't cure the distrust or divisions seeping through some european societies. and there is more trouble here in the netherlands tonight. small groups of people destroying things in the northern city of groningen, and reports of unrest elsewhere too. the course the catalyst for all of this remains, and other countries are watching and wondering whether this latest disturbing symptom may be coming their way. man? this latest disturbing symptom may be coming their way.— be coming their way. many thanks, anna holligan. _ be coming their way. many thanks, anna holligan, our— be coming their way. many thanks, anna holligan, our correspondent. | the health secretary sajid javid says the covid jab booster programme should protect the uk from the spike in cases seen in parts of europe. boosters are being extended to the over—40s in england from tomorrow. mrjavid said there are no plans to put any european countries back on the travel ban list, but the situation is being
10:06 pm
constantly reviewed, as our health correspondent naomi grimley reports. as covid and politics collide in europe, does the uk need to worry about the prospect of more winter restrictions? sajid javid, the health secretary... the health secretary, for his part, is putting his faith in the now expanded booster programme. well, we are extending it from tomorrow, actually, to people in the age group 40—49, and we will keep under review how that might be extended in the future, and we are seeing record numbers of people come forward, but i would urge everybody, if they are eligible, to come forward, because that is the best way we can look forward to the kind of christmas we all want to see. many experts think there is the prospect of a fairly normal christmas in the uk, whatever may be going on in neighbouring countries. we have actually had some spread going on since the summer and so, i think it's unlikely that we are going to see the very
10:07 pm
sharp rise in the next few months that we have seen... in a sense, we are ahead of that. we are already ahead of that. with this particular virus, the delta variant. from tomorrow austria will be put back into lockdown, though much of that is due to its vaccination rates not being high enough. this graph shows in a bit more detail the difference between the uk and austria. since the summer, when restrictions were eased, the uk has seen consistently high caseloads, whereas austria managed to keep a lid on infections further into the awesome, only to then see a further spike, overwhelming hospitals and ushering in a new lockdown. so, has the uk at least found a measure of stability to built up immunity? that form of stability unfortunately comes with a cost, and that's 1,000 deaths per week. of course, that's a relatively high number of deaths, and really, the question is how much is an acceptable level
10:08 pm
going forward over particularly this winter period? following a half term lull, case numbers are taking up again. we will soon be mixing more in the festive season, too. and we don't yet know how keen the ito—somethings will be to take up their boosters. not for the first time in this crisis, the future is uncertain. naomi grimley, bbc news. well, let's look at the situation in the uk in more detail, with the latest government coronavirus figures. they show there were just over 40,000 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. on average, 41,029 new cases were reported per day in the last week. 61 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. on average in the past week, 147 related deaths were recorded every day. and on vaccinations, more than 15 million people have now had their booster injection.
10:09 pm
manchester united have sacked their manager, ole gunar solskjaer, following yesterday's 4—1 defeat at watford. he'd been in charge for almost three years, but the club has suffered a string of poor results, and is currently eighth in the premier league. our sports correspondentjane dougall is at old trafford for us. the clock has been taking ole gunnar solskjaer for some the clock has been taking ole gunnar solskjaerfor some time the clock has been taking ole gunnar solskjaer for some time now, the clock has been taking ole gunnar solskjaerfor some time now, it began in earnest after their humiliating 5—0 defeat to liverpool here at old trafford, then the loss to bitter rival manchester city, then this white one defeat to watford. saoirse has been given more time than many premier league managers because he is so loved at this club but there is only so much time for sentiment. commentator: this has been a dark and dismal day for him, _ and manchester united football club. he knew time had run out. even a club legend like ole gunnar solskjaer
10:10 pm
couldn't be excused for yet another heavy defeat. assistant coach michael carrick takes over temporarily, so one last walk towards the fans as their manager. speaking to the club's television channel today, after being told he would not be continuing in his role, a heart—broken solskjaer accepted he had to leave. i have given everything for this club. the club means everything to me, and together, we are a good match, but unfortunately i couldn't get the results that we needed, and it's time for me to step aside. michael's going to be in charge. michael, i have the utmost respect. i love michael to bits. i'm becoming emotional now, because he is top, and... no, they'll be fine. i'll watch them and support them. the recent poor run of form had prompted crisis talks with club owners the glazer family, and manchester united fans woke up to the news that their manager had gone. i think it was alwaysgoing i
10:11 pm
to happen, really, wasn't it? started off really well at the start, and then, obviously, the last seven games, i think he's only won two. he spent all that money and he'sjust not good enough, so the change is necessary, isn't it? he's a legend. in my heart, he has a big place in my heart, a legend. - not a good coach, unfortunately, but a great player. _ he will always have a big place in my heart. - many had wanted solskjaer to succeed. as a player, he helped united on their way to winning the treble in 1999. his famous late goal in the champions league final cementing him as a cult hero. and that was acknowledged by the club. they said... but, during that time, solskjaer produced no silverware. unacceptable, for a club with expectations, and players with high demands. this time, the dream of the super—sub of saving the day wasn't to be.
10:12 pm
so who will replace or shy? carrick will take place in the next few games and then an interim manager will be appointed until the end of the season but who is in the frame for the permanent position? reportedly a former real madrid manager zinedine zidane all the current paris saint—germain manager maurizio pochettino, but whoever takes the helm at this club, it seems manchester united are prepared to wait for the right person. jane dou~all, to wait for the right person. jane dougall. many — to wait for the right person. jane dougall, many thanks. the government's plans to reform social care in england, which would see a lifetime cap of £86,000 on what you have to pay, are expected to be voted on by parliament tomorrow. there's growing concern on the government backbenches about whether the plans are fair to homeowners living in the north, and in less affluent areas. our political corresponent iain watson is here. what's at issue here?
10:13 pm
there are two main concerns. first of all, there is that limit on the cost of personal and social care in england and where it is set. so at £86,000, this could represent the whole value of some people public home in parts of northern england, leaving very little to pass on to their family after the cost of care, whereas it may only be representative of ten or 20% of the value of a home in south—east england. some people have said this does not look like levelling up. tomorrow night it is expected the government will also ask for a vote on plans to see some less affluent people having to wait even longer for that cap to kick in. i'm not expecting them to lose that vote but i think the quality as well as quantity of conservative criticism is significant, five former cabinet ministers expressing it concerns. some said it may not be a roar of
10:14 pm
disapproval but rumblings in conservative ranks will continue and they are hoping that borisjohnson will then be forced into doing a u—turn. will then be forced into doing a u-turn. , ., the missing chinese tennis star, peng shuai, has told the international olympic committee she is "safe and well", during a video call with its president, thomas bach. the athlete hasn't been seen in public since she made accusations of sexual assault against this senior chinese politician, several weeks ago. china is due to host the winter olympics in just over two months' time. the international outcry over peng shuai's disappearance led to chinese state media this weekend releasing a video of her at a junior tennis tournament, and also out with friends. but human rights watch said pictures weren't evidence of her safety. we are extremely sceptical about the voracity of it, about peng shuai's safety. or her well—being.
10:15 pm
the sudanese prime minister abdalla hamdok has been reinstated. he made his first appearance on national tv since the coup nearly a month ago, to sign a political deal with the military generals who had ousted and arrested him. our africa correspondent andrew harding has more. how's this being seen? andrew, how is this being seen? good evening, the british government has good evening, the british government hasjust_ good evening, the british government hasjust announced it is backing this deal. — hasjust announced it is backing this deal, joining many other countries _ this deal, joining many other countries who are hoping this is a way for— countries who are hoping this is a way for sue — countries who are hoping this is a way for sue dann to step away from further_ way for sue dann to step away from further instability, perhaps even from _ further instability, perhaps even from civil— further instability, perhaps even from civil war. and it was extraordinary to see earlier today that prime — extraordinary to see earlier today that prime minister of sue dann emerging from a month of house arrest _ emerging from a month of house arrest to— emerging from a month of house arrest to say better to compromise than more — arrest to say better to compromise than more bloodshed and he has a point _ than more bloodshed and he has a point there. his problem, sue dann's problem _ point there. his problem, sue dann's problem is _ point there. his problem, sue dann's problem is that the public is not buying — problem is that the public is not buying this deal. they fear that the generals. _ buying this deal. they fear that the generals, people who have looted sue
10:16 pm
dann for— generals, people who have looted sue dann for generations, people who have killed dozens of protesters on the streetsjust in the last few days, — the streetsjust in the last few days, and _ the streetsjust in the last few days, and we saw some of that defiance — days, and we saw some of that defiance from the public, some of the anger— defiance from the public, some of the anger in the public in the last few days, — the anger in the public in the last few days, they believe that the generals — few days, they believe that the generals are trying to get away with this and _ generals are trying to get away with this and that they will insist on autocracy, _ this and that they will insist on autocracy, and that they will ultimately betray sue dann's revolution, so the protests are going — revolution, so the protests are going to — revolution, so the protests are going to continue.— revolution, so the protests are going to continue. andrew, thank ou. the opposition in venezuela is taking part in regional and local elections for the first time in years, having boycotted them up till now, amid fears that the vote might be rigged. this time, president nicolas maduro has made concessions, inviting eu observers, and allowing opposition members onto the board that oversees elections. but there's widespread scepticism that any significant political change will take place, in a country where three—quarters of the population lives in extreme poverty, despite venezuela having the world's largest oil reserves. our south america correspondent katy watson now reports
10:17 pm
from the oil capital, maracaibo. singing. an ode to venezuela and an over chore to the world. president nicolas maduro pulled out all the stops to look good in these elections. this week, winning a guinness world record for the largest orchestra. this in a country better known for its record inflation. this was a clear display of soft power, a message to the world that it is feeling pretty confident about these elections. but few musicians here in venezuela share that confidence. daniel worked for the renowned national orchestra school, but as with so many governmentjobs, he never got paid.
10:18 pm
translation: it's government jobs, he never got paid. translation:— translation: it's been four years and i can't afford _ translation: it's been four years and i can't afford a _ translation: it's been four years and i can't afford a piano. - translation: it's been four years and i can't afford a piano. there i and i can't afford a piano. there are other priorities, like eating. day 2 day living here in venezuela. we have a huge responsibility, especially today. keen to shake his status as international pariah, president maduro invited the eu to observe the vote. for many, it provides reassurance was doubly micro a lot of them actually appreciate our presence, they think that our presence, they think that our presence would make the process more transparent. this is once the beating heart of the country's oil riches. now it is a playground for its poor. oil production has been reduced to a trickle, some of which is seeping out the ageing pipes, and destroying the beauty that's left. this lake is to sustain venezuela. you got the oil rigs in the back, they used to be a healthy fishing industry, people used to swim in
10:19 pm
this lake, and now it's totally dead. it is sticky underfoot and the stench is unbearable. yanis has been fishing since he was a boy but his livelihood has been destroyed. nicolas maduro named us sanctions for the country's collapse. there is no doubt they have made the economic crisis far worse, but yanis says the government has to take some responsibility. translation: before they exnrowiated — responsibility. translation: before they expropriated this, _ responsibility. translation: before they expropriated this, you _ responsibility. translation: before they expropriated this, you could - they expropriated this, you could see boats working. there weren't as many oil spills. all this was beautiful. now it is just a cemetery. yanis feels abandoned, as do most people who live from the lake. power cuts keep them in the dark here. the disused player is often their only guide. but yanis is voting for change —— the disused flares. time for the sport now.
10:20 pm
with all the sport now, here's karthi gnanasegaram at the bbc sport centre. thank you. with just two races left this season lewis hamilton is now only eight points behind formula 1's championship leader max verstappen after winning the qatar grand prix. verstappen finished in second place was not hamilton wore a rainbow coloured helmet, saying formula 1 is duty—bound to raise awareness of human rights issues at qatar's maiden grand prix. patrick geary reports. so much hangs over qatar as a sporting venue. our gestures of diversity and inclusion compatible with its record on human rights? should it be hosting a grand prix, and next year a football world cup? the race began with a crucial penalty and the chance for lewis hamilton. he was on pole, leading driver max verstappen, trying to redeem his demotion to seventh. with hamilton safely clear, the first question was how close could verstappen get to him? within five laps, he was second. a square of
10:21 pm
even he would admire. this would be a battle of wits and pits. valtteri bottas left his tire on too long, a blazing trail team—mate hamilton safely avoided. in wearing his rainbow helmet he has made a point about this grand prix. maqueda hamilton on top in qatar! in about this grand prix. maqueda hamilton on top in qatar! in winning it, his own 25 _ hamilton on top in qatar! in winning it, his own 25 of _ hamilton on top in qatar! in winning it, his own 25 of them _ hamilton on top in qatar! in winning it, his own 25 of them in _ hamilton on top in qatar! in winning it, his own 25 of them in the - hamilton on top in qatar! in winning it, his own 25 of them in the driver l it, his own 25 of them in the driver standings. verstappen they were second and take the fastest lap. the gap between them is eight points with two prix is left. the race is on. time to pop up the room if you don't want to know the football results. manchester city moved up to second place in the premier league after a comfortable 3—0 win over everton. while antonio conte celebrated his first league win of the season as tottenham's manager with spurs coming from behind to beat leeds 2—1. a martin boyle first half hat—trick gave hibernian a 3—1win over rangers in the scottish league cup semi—final. hibs will face celtic
10:22 pm
in next month's final. ireland had a comprehensive 53—7 win over argentina to bring rugby union's autumn nations series to a close. ireland scored seven tries at the aviva stadium to claim a clean sweep of victories in their three internationals with impressive wins over argentina, new zealand and japan. england's women have made it 18 test wins in a row, with yet another victory this time, over the usa. and it was a dominant performance with england scoring 15 tries in an 89 points to nil win. the olympic champion, alexander zverev has won tennis's end of season atp finals title. the world number three beat the us open champion danill medvedev in straight sets. joe salisbury would have become the first british player to win the atp finals doubles title, but salisbury and his american partner, rajeev ram lost to the french pair nicola mahut and pierre—hugues herbert, also in straight sets.
10:23 pm
and the open champion, collin morikawa has made history, becoming the first american golfer to win the european tour's race to dubai after victory at the season ending dp world tour championship. that's all the sport. thank you. more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. good night.
10:24 pm
hello. this is bbc news. we will be having a look at the front pages of tomorrow's newspapers and the moment plus the weather for the week ahead but before that, writing of a different kind. spotify has stopped automatically shuffling albums, at the request of adele. the singer says artists "create
10:25 pm
albums with care and put thought into the track listing for a reason". the streaming service announced its approval by tweeting: "anything for you." it comes days after the release of the london—born singer's album 30 — her first in six years, which was inspired by her divorce. kaylee golding is a music critic and presenter at kiss fm. what does she make of the singer's request? have a listen. i think the whole purpose is for you to listen to the whole album in full. like, let's take beyonce's lemonade. i couldn't imagine listening to that album and not understanding the story by listening from start to finish. so i think it is very important that adele has spoken up for the industry and said, "look, we work on our albums, we put a lot of effort into it, so please listen to it in full and hear our story, hear our journey." she has poured out so much of her emotion and given so much of her honesty in this album, so i feel like it makes so much sense. listening to it in full is just really beautiful. currently it is for adele's album. but i think...
10:26 pm
my predictions anyway are that more artists will start to request it. and i hope so because i think it will make artists put more time and effort back into albums and understand the importance of track listing, because i feel like we have started to lose that a little bit within music. so i think that that will bring that back, which will be really nice. adele is always known for talking about love and sharing her love story. the thing is, she is quite private with her personal life, usually she is very guarded, but within her music, she has really told everything, she has really poured her heart out. i mean, we even hear from her son asking questions about the divorce and all of it. so it is important for us to listen to the story from the beginning, from the heartbreak to how it affects her friendships, how it affected our family, how she thought that she was free, she was ready now she is a divorcee, to going back to realising that she is still heartbroken. it is a whole story. love is a story at the end of the day, and that is why it is important. and we ll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers sian griffiths — the education editorfor
10:27 pm
the sunday times and liam thorpe — the political editor for the liverpool echo, liam thorpe. that's coming up after the headlines. but first it's time for a look at the weather with phil avery. welcome to our latest look at how the week will pan out across the british isles. in the shorter term a high of 17 celsius as recently as friday in aberdeenshire but later this week that location could be looking at a daytime high of five celsius so something already going on will continue the next few days. we have moved into a cooler regime and that is how we start the week with trapping a fair amount of cloud in its circulation across the british isles but if it should have cleared you are on the way to a frosty start and that will be the way for much of england and wales on monday. the high and not doing
10:28 pm
enough to keep the fronts that pay from the north of scotland so relatively mild by day and night. seasonal average around about nine celsius so struggling to get to that sort of mark. we will do of the skies stay clear so a bit of frost across the midlands and into eastern parts of wales but where you keep the cloud it will keep the temperature above frost limits. a lot of cloud on tuesday and still quite a dry day with the high pressure not1 million miles away. cloud at its thickest across northern parts of scotland and just a spot of rain. this could be the mildest day of the week with highs of 8—11 for the favoured few but the cloud of the day persists into the first half of wednesday so frost potential limited at this stage. he said rather pointedly because we have a weather front set to work its way through scotland and northern ireland in the course of today and ahead of it fair amount of
10:29 pm
clout and this is a repeat of the saturday just gone. clout and this is a repeat of the saturdayjust gone. a little bit of sunshine ahead of the weather front and much more than a way of sunshine, eventually across scotland and northern ireland but a rash of showers as the wind begins to veer back towards the north and north—west and behind that expected to see quite widespread frost given the absence of meaningful cloud. that means a bright start to the day across the northern half of the british isles and increasingly so as the front slips towards the channel but as the wind direction will be northerly and north—westerly across scotland things pretty cold and cold enough to convert the showers into some snowfall across higher ground and then a real plethora of showers following behind the weather front as it continues itsjourney following behind the weather front as it continues its journey across the british isles through the course of friday and again the temperature really struggling after the chilly start across the northern half of the british isles, a maximum today of 4—5. friday and saturday the
10:30 pm
weather very much dominated by low pressure which will sit somewhere in the north sea. isobars tightly packed and a piercing north—westerly wind rattling showers across northern and western parts of the british isles at this stage. given that it has been called for a couple of days at the very least with some night—time cello as well, some showers will convert quite readily quite far south into something wintry across the higher ground and then into the start of the forthcoming week, rather as we have seen at the start of the week the isobars beginning to bend back at these for a time through sunday and monday towards more of a westerly so relatively mild here but as soon as the low moves away we could be back into the north and north—westerly and cold again.

45 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on