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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 22, 2021 10:00am-1:00pm GMT

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' hundreds of hundreds of years ' hundreds of years we advantage. for hundreds of years we maintain that pace up until the beginning of the 20th century. we were producing more coal, is nothing more i learn, building more ships... asjohnson is addressing the cbi conference. as johnson is addressing the cbi conference-— as johnson is addressing the cbi conference. . ., , ._ , conference. there are many ways in which we have _ conference. there are many ways in which we have first _ conference. there are many ways in which we have first mover— conference. there are many ways in | which we have first mover advantage and today i want to tell you and the cbi how britain is going to wind in the new green industrial revolution, provided we act and act now. —— britain is going to win. i've had some wonderfuljobs in my life but among the most purely head on a stick i would rank motoring correspondent of go. i drove ferraris, maseratis, you name it, i drove it and i learnt to admire the incredible diversity of the uk's
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specialist motor manufacturing sector which is the biggest in the world. i spent hours listening to the porridge —like sound of the biggest engines as i put my foot down and burned away at speeds i would not confess to my protection officers. i only tried two electric vehicles. an extraordinary wheeled rabbit hutch which was so tiny you could plug it sideways and i tried the first tesla for sale in this country. it expired in the fast lane of the 40, i'm sad to say. they've got a lot better. a few years later i tried to get london motorists to go electric and we put charging points around the city. i must confess they were not a soaraway success and stood forlorn like some
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piece of unused outdoor gym equipment. ten years after that, the tipping point has come. uk sales of evs are now increasing at 70% a year. in 2013 we are ending the market for internal combustion engines ahead of other european countries and that companies are responding. nissan has decided to make an enormous effect on new electric vehicles and there is now a massive new gigafactory for batteries. around the world, these cars are getting ever more affordable. at glasgow two weeks ago, the tipping point came as motor manufacturers representing a third of the world market, including the eu and america, announced they would go electric by 2035. of course, glasgow was far bigger and more important than that. 250 years after
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we launched the first industrial revolution, we are showing the world how to power past coal. when i was a kid, 80% of our electricity came from coal. i remember those huge barges taking cult up the thames to battersea power station. and those four chimneys belching fumes into the face and lungs of the city. by the face and lungs of the city. by the time i became mayor, battersea was a wreck, closed for being too polluting, good for nothing except the final shoot—out in gangster movies. in 2012, we were still 40% dependent on coal. today, only ten years later, coal supply is less than 2% of our power and by 2024 it will be down to zero. battersea is a hive of cafes, restaurants, hotels and homes thanks to the vision of the former mayor. every time i made that point to leaders in glasgow about the speed of the switch that
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we've made from coal, i can see them thinking about it and i can see them thinking, right, 0k. maybe this is doable. when i was a kid, 0% of our energy came from wind and it seemed ludicrous to imagine we could light and heat our homes with a technology that dated from the ninth century persia, i think. that dated from the ninth century persia, ithink. look that dated from the ninth century persia, i think. look at the coast of the north—east. row after row stretching out into the north sea, beautiful white males as we claim a new harvest, rich and green. 0n new harvest, rich and green. on sundays we derive almost half of this country's energy needs with the biggest offshore wind production anywhere in the world and growing the whole time. and that tipping point having been reached, the pace of change is going to accelerate
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like any tesla because evs may not burble like doves but they have so much talk that they move off the lights faster than a ferrari. we are now embarked upon a new teapot and injust a few now embarked upon a new teapot and in just a few years time, after almost a century of using roughly the same technology, we are going to change radically. we are going to change radically. we are going to change radically. we are going to change radically our cars, trucks and buses, ships, boatss, trains, planes, domestic heating systems, farming methods, industrial processes, power generation and much else besides. i can tell you that driving that change won't be government, it won't even be business, although business and government together will have a massive influence, it will be the consumer. it will be the young people of today, the disciples of david attenborough. notjust in this country but around the world, who
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can see the consequences of climate change and will be demanding better from us. i predict that in a few years time, it will be as offensive to the global consumer to open a new coal—fired power station as it is to get on a plane and light up a cigar. as the world reaches this pivotal moment post glasgow, it's vital we recognise notjust the scale of the challenge but the opportunity now for british tennis and industry. in the end, it is you. —— british business and industry. it is business and industry. it is business people who will fix this problem. governments don't innovate, governments don't produce new products and get out and sell them in the marketplace. although governments can spend tens if not hundreds of billions, we know that the market has hundreds of
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trillions. we also know that government has a vital role in making that market and framing the right regulation and to make sure that you, british business succeeds in this new world we set up a ten point plan for government leadership, a new decalogue that i produced a year ago when i came down from sinai and said to my officials, the new ten commandments, that thou shalt develop. offshore wind, nuclear power, zero emission vehicles, green public transport, cycling and walking, green ships, green buildings, carbon capture and storage, nature and trees, green finance. for each of those objectives we are producing a road map so that you are in the private sector can see the opportunities ahead. so as to acquire new homes
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and buildings to have evs charging points with another 145,000 to be installed thanks to these regulations. we are investing in new projects to turn wind power into hydrogen and a net zero strategy is expected to trigger about 90 billion of private sector investment, driving the creation of high wage, high skilled jobs across the uk as part of our mission to unite and level up across the country. not just in the green industrial revolution of course but in all sectors of the economy. and to help you and to build the platform, to give you the advantage you need, we are now waging a cross whitehall campaign to solve our productivity puzzle and to rebalance our lopsided economy. fixing our infrastructure with investment on a scale not seen since the victorians and we must
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begin with energy and power generation. if we're going to allow our manufacturing industry to succeed, we must the unfairness that uk high energy intensive manufacturing pace so much more than our competitors overseas and that's why we are going to address the cost of our nuclear power —— it pays so much more than our competitors overseas. we are all paying for the historic underinvestment in nuclear power. which country first split the atom? which country had the first civilian nuclear power plant? it was this one. while we allowed ourselves to be left behind, you tell me. when investing in big nuclear power plants and in small nuclear reactors as well and consulting on classifying this essential technology as green investment so that we can get more investment flowing in and ahead of the eu.
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lenin once said that the commonest revolution was soviet power plus the electrification of the whole country. i hesitate to quote lenin before the cbi but the coming industrial revolution is green power plus the electrification of the whole country. we are electrifying our cars, our rail, last week we announced three new high—speed lines cutting the time from london to manchester by one hour and creating a new crossrail of the north, cutting the time from manchester to leeds from 55 to 33 minutes, a crossrail for the midlands cutting journey times from birmingham to nottingham from one hour and 40 minutes to 26 minutes. these plans are more ambitious than some of the coverage has perhaps adjusted. to solve this country's transport problems, you can't endlessly carve
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your way through virgin countryside. you have to upgrade and to electrify you have to use the tracks that already exist and bring them back into service. we are doing the... putting in lines that were taken out sadly in the last century. and you have to put in at transport networks as well. clean buses, you have to improve 4000 new green buses we are putting in and you have to fix the roads as well. we can't be endlessly hostile to road improvements and we have to do it now. i know there are some people who think that working habits have been remade by the pandemic and that everyone be working only on tuesday and wednesday and thursday in an acronym i won't repeat. i don't want to be
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dogmatic about this but i have my doubts. it's notjust that young people need to be in the office to learn and to compete and to pick up social capital. there are sound evolutionary reasons why mother nature doesn't like working from home. i prophesy that people will come back, they will come back to the office and they will come back on the roads and in the rail but people also want choice. that's why we must put in the gigabyte broadband, as we are, from 7% coverage when i became prime minister to 65% at the beginning of next year. with safer streets, great local schools, fantastic broadband... for disney.
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—— forgive me. people will have the confidence to stay nearer the place they grew up and business will have they grew up and business will have the confidence to invest. and then of course, there is one thing that business once in this country needs far more than 100 supersonic rail links, far more than broadband and thatis links, far more than broadband and that is skills. and the people that you all need to starve your businesses. it's an astonishing fact that the 16 to 18—year—olds in this country are getting 40% less time than our competitors in the oecd —— that you will need to staff your businesses. when investing in fe
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colleges, in apprentices, in the know—how and confidence of young people. as everybody knows, 80% of the 20 to 30 workforce already in work, we're giving every adult who needsit work, we're giving every adult who needs it the chance to get a level three skill, £3000 for a lifetime skills guarantee. we supporting boot camps for everything from it to entrepreneurship. at this pivotal moment we are taking advantage of our new freedoms to deliver freeports, free trade deals and to regulate differently and better. to lengthen our lead in all the amazing new technologies of the 21st century. ai, cyber, quantum computing and all the rest and all the applications of those technologies to the areas in which we excel. biotech, meditech, nano tech, green tech. you sound like 15th century mexico. that is what
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this country is doing. there are only three nations in the world that have produced more than 100 tech unicorns and they are... let me see if you've been paying any attention. which three nations have produced more than 100 tech unicorns? correct. the united states and the united kingdom. the wonderful thing about the more than 100 uk tech unicorns is that they are dispersed now far more evenly across the whole uk than the tech unicorns of some of our rival or competitor economies. that's a fantastic thing. we want to see the dispersal of this growth and development across the uk. that's why the uk has doubled investment in scientific research and we want to see the benefits of that research across the whole of the country. in the end, and this is the most important message of all, there are
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limits to what governments can do. i just want to be absolutely clear about this. we had the financial crisis of 2008 where government had to intervene on a massive scale, then covid went government had to intervene on a massive scale, but government cannot fix everything and government cannot fix everything and government sometimes should get out of your hair. government should make sure that there is less regulation andindeed sure that there is less regulation and indeed taxation. the true driver of growth is not government, it is the energy and dynamism and originality of the private sector. tony, yesterday i went, as we all
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must, to peppa pig world. hands up if you've been to peppa pig world. not enough. i was a bit hazy but i would find at peppa pig world. but i loved it. it's very much my kind of place. loved it. it's very much my kind of lace. �* , place. laughter it has _ place. laughter it has safe - place. laughter . it has safe streets... place. laughter _ it has safe streets... discipline in schools... heavy emphasis on new mass transit systems, even if they are a bit stereotypical about daddy pig- are a bit stereotypical about daddy pig. the really interesting thing for me about peppa pig world was the power of uk creativity. who would have believed that a pig that looks like a hairdryer or a cat so like hairdryer, a pig that was rejected by the bbc, would now be exported to 180 countries with theme park space
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in america and china as well as in the new forest. and a business that's worth at least 6 billion to this country. £6 billion. and counting. i think that is pure genius, don't you? no vital civil servant would conceivably have come up servant would conceivably have come up with peppa pig. my final message to you as we stand on the brink of this green industrial revolution and we prepared to use our regulatory freedoms in what i believe would be a very strong post—covid rebound, we are blessed notjust with capital markets and the world's best universities and incredible pools of liquidity in london and the right time zone, right language and opportunity across the whole country, we are also blessed with
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the amazing inventive power and range of british business. and that, above all, is what fills me with confidence, members of the cbi, for the days ahead. thank you for your kind attention this morning. applause thank you, prime minister, and if vou're _ thank you, prime minister, and if you're watching at peppa pig world we'd be _ you're watching at peppa pig world we'd be delighted to welcome you here _ we'd be delighted to welcome you here. we've got a few questions from the audience, some pre—submitted questions _ the audience, some pre—submitted questions which are moderate and i know_ questions which are moderate and i know you _ questions which are moderate and i know you want to take questions from the press _ the press. studio: we will leave the cbi the press. — studio: we will leave the cbi annual conference, the prime minister addressing the conference there. the theme about levelling up, he lost his place at one point but picked up again to discuss the issues of levelling up in this country and also the importance of
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electrification and rolling out green moves, of course coming after cop26. there have been distressing scenes as five people have been killed — and dozens injured — after a car drove at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin. more than 20 people — half of them children — were taken to hospital following the incident. it's understood police are not treating the incident as terrorism — and believe the suspect may have been fleeing another crime scene. a "person of interest" is in police custody. let's go live now to milwaukee, and cbs reporter adam rife. what's the latest? hello. there is concern that _ what's the latest? hello. there is concern that those _ what's the latest? hello. there is concern that those totals - what's the latest? hello. there is concern that those totals could i concern that those totals could change. five people dead, 40 people injured but so many people were taken to hospital by their family and friends and say those totals may be adjusted and we are waiting on the severity of many of those injuries as well. the police department, fire chief and mayor couldn't update us on all of those
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injuries. a very disturbing scene in the community of waukesha, 70,000 people live there, 20 minutes to the west of milwaukee. an suv at 4:39pm local time ploughed through the back end of the parade, walking forward, and this suv came barrelling through the back end of the parade. it didn't stop, it ran over so many people and then took off. they found the suv abandoned a short distance away and a short time later that person of interest was taken into custody but most unsatisfying is we may not know the motive of that person. even if we did it doesn't justify this action of course. we are waiting for an update from police and the city in seven hours' time. it is a little after 4am local time. it is a little after 4am local time so we'll wake up to many different pieces of information as we try to get that from at least six
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different hospitals. has we try to get that from at least six different hospitals.— different hospitals. has terrorism been completely _ different hospitals. has terrorism been completely ruled _ different hospitals. has terrorism been completely ruled out? - different hospitals. has terrorism been completely ruled out? we l different hospitals. has terrorism - been completely ruled out? we asked those questions _ been completely ruled out? we asked those questions and _ been completely ruled out? we asked those questions and they _ been completely ruled out? we asked those questions and they weren't - those questions and they weren't addressed directly. we had three different news briefings and those questions were asked to make sure we could cross them off the list. they didn't address it particularly and i know a lot of reporters in the room were upset we didn't hear a yes and no. there have been rumours on social media that many are working to confirm not only the identity of the person of interest but also some of the criminal history that might be part of this gentleman. once we can confirm i think will be able to piece it together but we aren't able to speculate, it is just supposition. we want to try and make sure we can tell the community this isn't part of a larger issue. police have said there is no threat right now. ~ . �* , have said there is no threat right now. ,~ ., , now. what's absolutely clear is the seed at now. what's absolutely clear is the speed at which _ now. what's absolutely clear is the speed at which that _ now. what's absolutely clear is the speed at which that vehicle - now. what's absolutely clear is the speed at which that vehicle drove l speed at which that vehicle drove through this very busy area. it's shocking to see how quickly was moving when we look at the pictures.
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this was the 58th annual holiday christmas parade in waukesha, last year it was cancelled because of coronavirus. you can imagine how excited people were to come out and kick off the holiday season. there were elderly people, there is a dance troupe called the dancing grannies, a high school marching band, semi—youth groups, children dressed in costumes ready to celebrate. —— so many youth groups. you see the car whizzing by at a speed that is difficult to judge because we are watching some of those videos slowed down to get a better look at the driver. the speed at which it went through and then just to know that person didn't slow down and just kept going. thank just to know that person didn't slow down and just kept going. the belgian capital brussels has become the latest european city to see unrest over tightened coronavirus restrictions. tens of thousands of
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people marched in protest and there were 40 arrests. these disturbances follow protests in a number of european countries, and there was a third night of unrest in some dutch cities as anna holligan reports. another day of unrest, unsettling another european capital. this is brussels. what began as an organised, peaceful march quickly turned nasty. some protesters threw fireworks at police. others targeted their vehicles. officers intervened with tear gas and water cannon. belgium hasjust brought in new rules in response to a sharp rise in infections. demonstrators are mainly angry about the use of covid passes, which stops the unvaccinated from entering venues, such as restaurants or bars. some object to plans to make vaccinations mandatory for health workers. translation: we know that the virus is there, l but we leave it to people to decide
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whether or not to be vaccinated. translation: i came to give my i opinion about freedom of expression and individual choice and really to be able to respect everyone's choices. the netherlands witnessed the most extreme violence this weekend. rotterdam was rocked by rioters. police opened fire, shooting at the crowd with live rounds in response to what they described as a life—threatening situation. vandals torched bicycles in the hague. these startling demos happening, too, in austria, croatia and denmark reflect rumbling frustrations about the evolving covid restrictions, considered essential to bring down record high infection rates. and there's more trouble here in the netherlands. small groups of people destroying things in the northern city of groningen and reports of unrest elsewhere too. it's mostly peaceful now but the catalyst
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for this still exists, and many countries are watching and wondering whether this latest disturbing symptom may be coming their way. with varying vaccine rates, getting the shots in is seen as critical, but they won't cure the distrust or divisions seeping through some european societies. anna holligan, bbc news in the hague. a full national coronavirus lockdown has come into force in austria. it's the first country in europe to announce such a step, as covid cases surge. it's also making vaccinations compulsory from february. joining me now is peter willeit, professor of clinical epidemiology at the medical university of innsbruck. thank you forjoining us. what are theissues thank you forjoining us. what are the issues around why the cases are rising so much in austria? the 64%
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of the total population of austria being vaccinated is a factor being mentioned, but it's not that different from other countries. thank you for having me. so, it is true that its in austria but the number of infections have been rising exponentially. we have about 1% of the population are being infected every week with some regions being affected more severely. yes, ithink regions being affected more severely. yes, i think one major factor is the low vaccine coverage we have in austria but this is coupled with... the booster vaccination required for many people who were vaccinated in the spring. the government declared the pandemic overin the government declared the pandemic over in early summer when vaccine coverage was still too low. 50. over in early summer when vaccine coverage was still too low. so, who in the population _ coverage was still too low. so, who in the population is _ coverage was still too low. so, who in the population is eligible -
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coverage was still too low. so, who in the population is eligible for- coverage was still too low. so, who in the population is eligible for a i in the population is eligible for a vaccine and people just not taking it up? what's the issue?— vaccine and people just not taking it up? what's the issue? there are many different _ it up? what's the issue? there are many different factors. _ it up? what's the issue? there are many different factors. so, - it up? what's the issue? there are many different factors. so, at i it up? what's the issue? there are many different factors. so, at the l many different factors. so, at the moment, 69% are vaccinated with one days, 61% with two. some of the issues are that especially over summer, there were campaigns to clarify questions and address any of the remaining concerns people might have about the vaccine. we also have a big issue with a lot of conspiracy theories that people are taking up and this is also exploited further by different political parties and the most prominent here is the austrian freedom party that uses these concerns to help mobilise people. i think we are still having
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discussions about solid scientific facts, whereas actually we should be communicating there more clearly to the general public. but communication - the general public. but communication is i the general public. but communication is kind of over, when the country says actually now is the point at which you have to have the vaccine, no choice.— vaccine, no choice. exactly. this is also why the _ vaccine, no choice. exactly. this is also why the step _ vaccine, no choice. exactly. this is also why the step has _ vaccine, no choice. exactly. this is also why the step has been - vaccine, no choice. exactly. this is also why the step has been taken l vaccine, no choice. exactly. this is. also why the step has been taken in austria. we do have the 20 day lockdown now, that affects all people, but this is coupled with mandatory vaccination starting in february. i think this is something that we really need and it should help us reach the vaccination coverage we say much need and to find our way out of the covid—19 crisis. find our way out of the covid-19 crisis. . ~ find our way out of the covid-19 crisis. ., ~' , ., find our way out of the covid-19 crisis. ., ~ , ., ., , ~ crisis. thank you. the headlines. at least five people _ crisis. thank you. the headlines. at least five people are _ crisis. thank you. the headlines. at least five people are killed - crisis. thank you. the headlines. at least five people are killed and i crisis. thank you. the headlines. at least five people are killed and 40 l least five people are killed and 40 injured after a high end car drives
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at high speed into a christmas parade in wisconsin. today our community faced horror and tragedy in what should have been a community celebration. i am deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went to a parade, but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. there's further unrest over covid restrictions in europe. police have clashed with protestors in brussels — while austria has returned to full lockdown. some conservative mps urge the government to rethink changes to funding social care in england — saying poorer people will be disproportionately affected. new homes and buildings in england are to be required — by law — to install electric vehicle charging points from next year. the prime minister says plans are part of the uk's green industrial revolution. the british government is being urged by senior conservatives to rethink the latest changes to its social care
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overhaul in england over concerns poorer people will be disproportionately affected. ministers insist the plans — which will be voted on in parliament later — will protect everyone from what they describe as the "catastrophic costs" of care. our chief political correspondent adam fleming gave us this update. this change to the social care cap is being delivered through an amendment to a piece of legislation going through parliament at the moment which will itself amend the original legislation that put the social care cap in place a few years ago but was never activated. this legislation still has a few more parliamentary stages to go through not least the house of lords as well so i think tonight's vote rather than some kind of make or break decisive moment is going to be more of an opportunity to take the temperature in the comments, particularly on the tory backbenches, around this issue, and an opportunity to see the temperature is rising on this, which
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could presage some more difficulties for the government further on in the legislative process. i would not describe it as a showdown yet but definitely a little bit of a tremor on the tory backbenches. it definitely a little bit of a tremor on the tory backbenches.- on the tory backbenches. if the temperature — on the tory backbenches. if the temperature shows _ on the tory backbenches. if the temperature shows it _ on the tory backbenches. if the temperature shows it is - on the tory backbenches. if the temperature shows it is fairly i on the tory backbenches. if the temperature shows it is fairly high, might the government change its strategy? might the government change its strate: ? ~ ., , ., , strategy? apologies for mixing my metaphors _ strategy? apologies for mixing my metaphors. never _ strategy? apologies for mixing my metaphors. never mind! - strategy? apologies for mixing my metaphors. never mind! through l strategy? apologies for mixing my i metaphors. never mind! through the kitchen sink at it especially when it is a difficult issue to explain. the government have been explaining to the other parties and its own backbenchers some of the numbers behind us. there was an analysis published by the department of health on friday which showed the amount saved by not going for the full ideal version of the cap and going for this tweaked version means the government would be spending £900 million a year less by the end of this decade. in other words suggesting a u—turn or going back to kind of the ideal version of these
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plans would cost quite a lot of money. appealing to tory backbenchers' sense of fiscal need. and saying that changes to the means test, changing the levels you get state support so that more people overall will be helped, the government reinforcing this idea or trying very hard to say that this tweaked version of the camp is still significantly better for everyone and the existing system for social care. they are just trying to fight against this idealised version of the system that could be in place. another interesting bit of politics about what yardstick you used to measure whether something is a good reform. it was the prime minister who said our social care plans will mean no one has to sell their homes. what percentage of people's assets are left when they reach the end of
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their lives and their care gusts are taken into account? that is what opponents arejudging taken into account? that is what opponents are judging these opponents are judging these opponents on some of the government shouldn't be too surprised that they could people are using. a memorial service for the uk conservative mp sir david amess, who was killed last month, will take place this afternoon in his southend constituency. members of the public are expected to line the streets to pay their respects as simon dedman reports. sir david amess had been an mp for nearly 40 years, first famously in basildon, winning the seat for the conservatives in the close �*92 election before going on to represent southend. last month, he was stabbed to death whilst holding a constituency surgery — where mps meet people they represent. today, localfriends, family and colleagues will come together to remember him. we've had some great times together and, literally, working with him on the streets, knocking on doors, going to see people. and he ran them.
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you had to be fit to keep up with him because he ran the streets. a memorial service will be held this afternoon at st mary's parish church in southend. neighbouring mp mark francois will deliver the eulogy and ann widdecombe will read a statement on behalf of the amess family. afterwards, a horse—drawn procession will take sir david's casket through southend, where members of the public are likely to line the streets to pay their respects. tomorrow, a funeral service takes place at westminster cathedral presided over by the leader of the catholic church in england and wales, cardinal vincent nichols. mps and members of the house of lords will attend, where a message from the pope will be read. simon dedman, bbc news. less than 1% of the population in england account for more than 16% of all visits to accident & emergency departments. a study by the british red cross shows some of the people in this group — known as high—intensity users — visit emergency departments more than 300 times a year.
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dominic hughes has this report. accident & emergency departments across the uk are busier than ever, with some patients facing long waits for treatment. now, a study of six years of nhs data reveals how a small number of people, known as high—intensity users, are returning to a&es time and time again. high—intensity use of an a&e department is defined as more than five visits in a year. while less than 0.7% of england's population fall into this category, nhs data from 2015 showed they accounted for a significant proportion — 16% of all a&e visits, and well over a quarter of all ambulance journeys, as well as 26% of all emergency hospital admissions in england. but specialist teams based in a&es across england can help to reduce frequent visits by offering individual support to people who feel hospital is their only option. the reasons for people attending a&e are quite complex, but it's often
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because they don't feel they've got anywhere else to go and they have fallen through the gaps between other services and teams previously. and we found that really interesting. there's a couple of cohorts, which are particular frequent attenders at a&e. there's younger people from the age of 22 to 29, who might have particular mental health problems as well as other issues. and those over 70, who have other complex issues, including chronic loneliness. so it's really important to work with people, to understand them as individuals, so we can get them the support that they need, hopefully before they even get to a&e. specialist help can cut repeat visits by more than 80%, potentially saving the nhs millions of pounds, and reducing the pressure on an already—stretched service. dominic hughes, bbc news. the number of children in care in england could climb from 80,000 to reach almost 100,000 by 2025, according to new analysis commissioned by county councils and shared with the bbc. of those in care, around 12,000 are in children's homes, and that number is rising.
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local authorities say this is due to a shortage of foster carers and cuts to family support. the government says it's providing new grant funding to help maintain children's social care. our political correspondent chris mason has this report. i realised when i left my mum how little support i have compared to other kids. i was just a bit scared. oliwia is 24 and lives in oxford. she was 16 when her life changed in a way she'll never forget. this emergency happened and i had to go into emergency foster care. it was so terrifying for me, i remember at that time. i didn't know where i'll end up. and it was terrifying. and there's a shortage of foster carers. it means the demand for and cost of places in children's homes is rocketing.
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from oxfordshire to cheshire, local authorities across england are confronted by this. here in warrington, a new children's home opened in april. this home is part of a trial scheme. the aim is simple. minimise how long children are in the home and put money and effort into stopping them ending up here in the first place. this is a lighthouse. the reason why it's called the lighthouse is that it's a beacon of light for the young people going through theirjourney. right. let's have a look. what we have here? so this is our chillout area. it's yes to beanbags and no to mobile phones in here. there are six bedrooms, two reserved for emergency last—minute admissions. this is an insight for most of us into something that is out of sight, unseen, unheard of, perhaps little thought about. and yet it is about some of society's most vulnerable. yes, how to help them, but also to minimise the problems that will follow —
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a failure to get it right now. the blunt truth is a quarter of the adult prison population in england used to be in care. so meet the policeman based here, who doesn't look like one. imagine if i was coming into work in a full uniform. the young people, firstly, it just wouldn't sit right. you know, me not wearing a uniform, it breaks down those barriers away. policing cannot fix everything on their own. so we do a lot ofjoined—up work with obviously with social care, with parents, with carers, with education, with health. and we're realising one of those other terminologies, you can't arrest your way out of this. there's got to be another approach. and that's where i absolutely 100% believe in the system. the children living here are at school right now. at the end of the corridor, the office, the front line in helping children at a desperate time. a place in a children's home is the last resort and hugely expensive. on average in england, more than £4,000 a week.
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and sometimes with private providers a lot more. we were recently quoted, you know, £22,000 a week for a child to be placed in a children's home. £22,000 a week! yeah. and when, you know, you're faced with the prospect at five o'clock in the evening, where you can't find a home for a child who needs to come into our care, unfortunately, you are between a rock and a hard place. joe and joanne in eastbourne have been foster carers for nine years. when the children come to us and they look so down, they look like they're carrying so much baggage. and then after a few weeks, sometimes you just see their face start to light up. i mean, the fact of the matter is there's more children who need our help than there is carers who can help. yeah, but i also think people have got a misconception about fostering. ithink, you know, it's... am i qualified enough to be a foster carer? and it's, at the end of the day, it's about your personality,
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it's about your character, it's about your heart. foster carers, children's homes, local authorities, the police. society wrestling with helping the next generation's most in need take their first steps. chris mason, bbc news. the bbc has learned that the un has repeatedly ignored requests for information to help the investigation into the beirut port explosion. lawyers representing hundreds of bereaved families sent letters over a period of five months to the un secretary general antonio guterres. none has had a response, even though the un itself called for a "prompt and independent investigation" in the days after the blast. our middle east correspondent anna foster reports. a city torn apart. but the people of beirut still don't know why. the investigation into last august's explosion has stalled, leaving a desperate search for answers.
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delia was killed instantly in the blast. her daughter, who was with her in herfinal moments, wasjust 16. i feel like my mother doesn't have a value to them. my mother's life doesn't have a value and my own health doesn't have a value to them. like, we are not humans. this is what i feel when i see this lack of responsibility. one week after the explosion the united nations called for a full investigation, but the bbc has learned that it consistently ignored a request to help that inquiry. the beirut bar association, which represents nearly 2000 families, sent three separate letters asking for satellite photos of the blast. they also wanted to know if the un should have stopped the explosive material entering lebanon in the first place. material entering lebanon in the first lace. ., material entering lebanon in the first place-— first place. their final request in march noted _ first place. their final request in march noted unfortunately i first place. their final request in march noted unfortunately our l march noted unfortunately our letters remain unanswered and unacknowledged. lebanon is a founder
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member of the un and is asking for help. we member of the un and is asking for hel _ . ., member of the un and is asking for hel. ~ ., , member of the un and is asking for hel. ~ . , �* help. we are fighters. and we will continue fighting _ help. we are fighters. and we will continue fighting because - help. we are fighters. and we will continue fighting because we i help. we are fighters. and we will continue fighting because we are. continue fighting because we are responsible for 1800 people who have asked us to represent them and we will do everything by law to obtain justice and justice and justice. the justice and 'ustice and 'ustice. the un told justice and justice and 'ustice. the un told me — justice and justice and 'ustice. the un told me it h justice and justice and justice. the un told me it is committed to supporting the lebanese people and is mobilised to help the victims, but it did not explain why it had not acknowledged any of those three vital letters asking for evidence. international community has let down the survivors of the explosion. there are many tools at the disposal of the un and the international community they could have used but they have not done. the community they could have used but they have not done.— they have not done. the survivors and bereaved _ they have not done. the survivors and bereaved families _ they have not done. the survivors and bereaved families say - they have not done. the survivors and bereaved families say they i and bereaved families say they deserve better than this, but while
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the lebanese authorities procrastinate and other countries do not help where they can the answer is a nation needs will remain elusive. workshops to help men in england understand sexual harassment and abuse against women have started in nottingham. they're thought to be the first courses of their kind in the country to help men challenge or intervene when they see women being targeted. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports. a training session but unlike one you have experienced before. we need guys like you who are wanting to make a difference. these men have come to learn about how to be a good ally for women. if people get away with stuff at a lower level... the stand by her programme is a men's only workshop about sexual harassment and abuse faced by women, created by a community group and the charity women's aid. this programme is for men that
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want to be allies in making a difference in relation to women's safety. it is not a programme for perpetrators, so this programme will help to give them the skills, knowledge and confidence to be more effective in intervening when they see women getting unwanted attention but also raise their confidence in talking to other men in their networks and also other young boys in their networks as well. i feel threatened, laughed at. seven out of ten women have experienced some form of sexual harassment in public according to a recent poll. i love a good laugh with my colleagues and things. sometimes the line is crossed and it is the word banter that almost makes it acceptable. compliment. i am not sure when to compliment. these sessions are designed for men to reflect on their own personal experiences with advice on how to intervene effectively when help is needed.
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somebody was punching this woman on the floor under a street light and he said, "she's my girlfriend," and she said, "it's all right." it stopped the violence, but it's hard to intervene sometimes because you do not know the dynamics. what we wanted to do is be dynamic and look at masculinity notjust as toxic masculinity which we see the response of and the effects of, we wanted to see and support men to use healthy masculinity to support us. we are not asking to be rescued by men, we are asking to be supported by men. more workshops are running in greater manchester and london in the next few weeks. it is hoped through doing these courses men will put into practice what they have learned and go on to educate other men and boys in their communities. adina campbell, bbc news.
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let's go back to events in wisconsin where five people have been killed — and dozens injured — after a car drove at high speed into a christmas parade. reverend david simmons from st. matthias episcopal church in waukesha was part of the parade and witnessed the incident. my my church at the beginning of the parade route. at that point a red card came in from the right, we find out later it had gone through police barriers further down the street, it came in on main street. as it was passing the church at high speed the driver was honking the horn, making a whole bunch of noise and swerving to avoid people, so i think many people assumed that he was somebody who was a local resident who was really upset that there was a parade going on and was trying to get
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around it or something like that or somebody who had blundered into the parade route, but as he passed as he started to accelerate timeless further down the main street into the main part of where all the casualties actually occurred. at that point i never heard gunshots but at one point one of our policeman took three shots to try to stop the vehicle and then police on our end of the street basically told us that we needed to vacate the street, so we always have our church open during these periods for rest rooms, warmth and stuff like that, so we started telling people into the church, including a dance team, and what ended up as we had a dance team and a church full of young girls and women and most of their parents were down at the other team of the parade route waiting for them to finish and ended up taking
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shelter and other buildings. luckily with cell phones most kids were able to get hold of their parents and let them know that they were safe at the other end, but it took about two and a half hours to resolve that part of the story. let's speak to wisconsin local reporter chuck ouirmbach, from wuwm—news in waukesha. such a clear sense from what we were hearing there of her terrifying this must have been for those caught up in it. . , . in it. that is right, and it certainly _ in it. that is right, and it certainly was _ in it. that is right, and it certainly was expressed | in it. that is right, and it l certainly was expressed by in it. that is right, and it i certainly was expressed by the in it. that is right, and it _ certainly was expressed by the mayor who was in the parade and later news conference last night from the police chase in the fire chief as well, all expressing concerns in shock and surprise that this happened. shock and surprise that this happened-— shock and surprise that this ha ened. ~ ., , ., , shock and surprise that this hauened. . ., , ., , ., , happened. what is the latest on why it happened? _ happened. what is the latest on why it happened? we — happened. what is the latest on why it happened? we really _ happened. what is the latest on why it happened? we really do _ happened. what is the latest on why it happened? we really do not i happened. what is the latest on why| it happened? we really do not know. there is going _ it happened? we really do not know. there is going to _ it happened? we really do not know. there is going to be _ it happened? we really do not know. there is going to be another- it happened? we really do not know.
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there is going to be another news i there is going to be another news conference at one o'clock central time today. nothing was said about motive last night. this vehicle all of a sudden sped up and got into the parade and quite a high speed and started hitting people. we do not know why this individual that there is. the person is in custody. nothing is being officially ruled out although there is speculation it may have been somebody fleeing the scene of a crime. that may have been somebody fleeing the scene of a crime.— scene of a crime. that would be another reason _ scene of a crime. that would be another reason i _ scene of a crime. that would be another reason i suppose i scene of a crime. that would be another reason i suppose by i scene of a crime. that would be j another reason i suppose by the police did not see much last night because there is video of police vehicles following this red suv, so that he or she decided to drive through the parade to escape the police behind the driver? that through the parade to escape the police behind the driver?- through the parade to escape the police behind the driver? that is a possibility- _ police behind the driver? that is a possibility- it _ police behind the driver? that is a possibility. it is _ police behind the driver? that is a possibility. it is clear— police behind the driver? that is a possibility. it is clear from - police behind the driver? that is a possibility. it is clear from the i possibility. it is clear from the pictures we are looking at how fast
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that vehicle was nothing. the pictures we are just seeing have people on either side of the road looking but as it went further down the road it is clear obviously that there were people in the path of that vehicle who simply could not get out of the way quickly enough because it came there so fast. thihk because it came there so fast. think about it. because it came there so fast. think about it- if — because it came there so fast. think about it- if you _ because it came there so fast. think about it. if you have _ because it came there so fast. think about it. if you have been _ because it came there so fast. think about it. if you have been in - because it came there so fast. think about it. if you have been in a i about it. if you have been in a parade or had occurred in a parade or a relative or loved ones orjust want to watch the parade, think how vulnerable people are in the street, especially of the vehicle is coming up especially of the vehicle is coming up behind them. a tremendous sense of vulnerability and all of a sudden this vehicle is upon you. that must be re this vehicle is upon you. that must be pretty traumatising _ this vehicle is upon you. that must be pretty traumatising for - this vehicle is upon you. that must be pretty traumatising for the i this vehicle is upon you. that mustj be pretty traumatising for the local community. be pretty traumatising for the local communi . be pretty traumatising for the local community-— be pretty traumatising for the local communi . ., . ., , ., ., community. there are certainly a lot of sadness and _ community. there are certainly a lot of sadness and grief _ community. there are certainly a lot of sadness and grief and _ community. there are certainly a lot| of sadness and grief and expressions of sadness and grief and expressions of disbelief that this might have happened. a relatively quiet community. things like this are not common here or anywhere around here but it happened in this otherwise
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quiet downtown. hate but it happened in this otherwise quiet downtown.— but it happened in this otherwise quiet downtown. we are waiting for an u date quiet downtown. we are waiting for an update from _ quiet downtown. we are waiting for an update from the _ quiet downtown. we are waiting for an update from the police. - quiet downtown. we are waiting for an update from the police. how i quiet downtown. we are waiting for. an update from the police. how soon is not going to be happening? thea;r is not going to be happening? they are sa in: is not going to be happening? they are saying about — is not going to be happening? tue: are saying about one is not going to be happening? tta: are saying about one o'clock is not going to be happening? tt21 are saying about one o'clock central time. the state of wisconsin is also pledging its resources and milwaukee office and the fbi says it is assisting in the investigations in case there is an interstate issue or other reasons the fbi would be involved. . ~ other reasons the fbi would be involved. ., ~ , ., other reasons the fbi would be involved. . ~' , ., ., other reasons the fbi would be involved. ., ~ , ., ., ., , involved. thank you for 'oining us. he the international olympic committee has said its president, thomas bach, has held a video call with the chinese tennis star pung schai who disappeared earlier this month. it says in the 30—minute video call she confirmed that she was safe and well. this still image of the conversation
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was released by the ioc. it comes after videos released by chinese state media did little to dampen concern about her wellbeing — following her accusations of sexual assault against a senior chinese politician. tennis journalist ben rothenberg has more. i think with the ifc it is fair to say their main goal is keeping things on track understandably for the 2020 olympics being held in beijing. the 2020 olympics being held in bei'inu. , ., ., , the 2020 olympics being held in bei'in.. , ., ., , ., beijing. only a few months away, settle to a _ beijing. only a few months away, settle to a february _ beijing. only a few months away, settle to a february start - beijing. only a few months away, settle to a february start date. i beijing. only a few months away, l settle to a february start date. the priority is to make sure the smoke clears in time for the torch lighting there and i think that is a different goal to the wta which has been preaching ideals about transparency and lack of censorship and women need to be heard and accusations like they should be taken seriously. these groups have very different goals and the ioc plus $9 for things to calm down. the bbc has received a statement from the international olympic committee about
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sunday's phone call. the presidential election in chile is heading for a run—off between candidates at the extremes of the political spectrum. with 80% of ballots counted, the far—right former congressmanjose antonio kast is in the lead with 28% of the vote. in second place with twenty—five percent is the left—wing former student leader gabriel boric. a week after the queen had to pull out of the remembrance day service at the cenotaph because of a back strain, she's attended a christening for two of her great grandchildren at windsor. mike and zara tindall�*s son lucas was baptised alongside august, the son of princess eugenie and jack brooksbank. her majesty was pictured in the back of a black range rover at the royal lodge in windsor on sunday as she joined
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other family members. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. it has been a cold and frosty start to the day for many of us, but we are looking at some sunshine. high pressure is firmly in charge. we do have a weak weather front moving down the east coast producing some showers. we also have another one across the english channel producing some showers and another one across the far north of scotland. we have thicker cloud and patchy rain and quite gusty winds as well. but for many it is going to be a dry day with some sunshine. any wintry showers in the moors in yorkshire this morning tending to fade. still a few getting into norfolk and we still have some for the channel islands in the direction of kent. these black circles represent the gust strength of wind. the gustiest will be across the far north—west today and temperatures
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more or less average for the time of year, looking at seven to 11 degrees, but compared to last week when we had 16 and 17 degrees in some places it will feel a lot colder. through this evening and overnight all those cloud spills a bit further south getting into southern scotland, north—west england, north west wales and also northern ireland, and this will be thick enough for some drizzle here and there but ahead of it some clear skies so once again there will be frost around especially in sheltered areas and across parts of the midlands and wales you can expect to see some patchy fog. tomorrow high pressure still firmly in charge. still fairly quiet weather—wise. across the far north of scotland you can see we have more cloud than today. the mist and fog that has formed overnight will slowly lift and across southern areas there will be some sunshine but still those showers across parts of east anglia and the channel islands and the cloud thick enough for some drizzle and some patchy light rain across parts of the west. temperatures if anything down a degree or so today.
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we are looking at eight to about ten degrees. then as we head into the middle of the week we have this weather front coming our way. it is a cold front and it is going to bring some rain with it as it pushes southwards. behind that there will be some showers, some of which may be wintry, and the wind changes direction so more of a northerly component to it, so you can see the blues move across the charts. it is going to feel colder. as we head towards the end of the weekend into the weekend it looks like it is going to be that bit more unsettled. there will be areas of cloud at times, some rain as well. it looks like it is going to be windier and for some an increased chance of a wintry shower.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: at least five people are killed and 40 injured after a car drives at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin. today our community faced horror and tragedy in what should have been a community celebration. i am deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went to a parade, but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. deserted streets in austria — as the country enters a full national lockdown. the government says it's the only way to cut surging covid infections. some conservative mps urge the government to rethink changes to funding social care in england — saying poorer people will be disproportionately affected. a memorial service and procession are to be held later in southend to remember the murdered mp
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sir david amess. good morning and welcome to bbc news. there have been distressing scenes as five people have been killed — and dozens injured after a car drove at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin. more than 20 people — half of them children — were taken to hospital following the incident. footage shows a red suv driving through the parade at around 16.40 local time. people described hearing a loud bang, and then deafening cries and screams from people who were struck by the vehicle. it's understood police are not treating the incident as terrorism and believe the suspect may have been fleeing another crime scene.
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a "person of interest" is in police custody. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. this was the scene seconds before the holiday parade descended into chaos and mayhem. all of a sudden, a red sports utility vehicle ploughed at high speed into a school marching band that was entertaining the crowd. the sequence of event was captured on video by the city's live stream of the parade and on the mobile phones of people there in person. much of it quickly shared in social media. oh, my god, no! horrified and screaming, the onlookers, families with children, fled for their lives as the suv sped off. the vehicle struck more than 20 individuals, some of the individuals were children and there was some fatalities as a result of this incident. we will not be releasing information on fatalities at this time, while we are working on notifying
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the family members of the deceased. police say an officer fired his gun at the vehicle to try to stop it. officials say no bystanders were injured as a result. the car has since been recovered and one person is in custody. today our community faced horror and tragedy in which should have been a community celebration. i'm deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went to a parade, but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. the white house said it is monitoring the situation and the fbi is helping the local authorities with their investigation. reports suggest the suspect was fleeing another scene, possibly a knife fight, when he ran into people at the parade. this was the town's first holiday parade after months of restrictions because of covid, but it ended in tragedy. cbs news reporter adam rife says there is concern that death and injury totals could rise.
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five people dead, more than 40 people injured but so many people were taken to hospital by their own cars, by their family and friends and so those totals may be adjusted and we are waiting on the severity of many of those injuries as well. the police department, fire chief and mayor couldn't update us on all of those injuries. a very disturbing scene in the community of waukesha. 70,000 people live there. it's 20 minutes to the west of milwaukee. an suv at 4:39pm local time ploughed through the back end of this parade, walking forward, and this suv came barrelling through the back end of the parade. it did not stop, it ran over so many people and then took off. they found the suv abandoned a short distance away and a short time later that person of interest was taken into custody, but most unsatisfying of all is we may not know the motive of that person.
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even if we did, it doesn'tjustify this action of course. we are waiting for an update from police and the city in seven hours from now. it is a little after 4am local time, so we'll wake up to many different pieces of information as we try to get that from at least six different hospitals. has terrorism been completely ruled out? we asked those questions and they weren't addressed directly. we had three different news briefings and those questions were asked to make sure that we could cross them off the list. they didn't address it particularly and i know a lot of reporters in the room were upset that we didn't hear a yes and no. there have been rumours on social media that many are working to confirm not only the identity of the person of interest but also some of the domestic past, the criminal history that might be part of this gentleman. once we can confirm that i think will be able to piece it together but we aren't able to speculate, it is just supposition.
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we want to try and make sure we can tell the community this isn't part of a larger issue. police have said there is no threat right now. what's absolutely clear is the speed at which that vehicle drove through this very busy area. it's shocking to see how quickly it was moving when we look at the pictures. this was the 58th annual holiday christmas parade in waukesha. last year it was cancelled because of coronavirus. you can imagine how excited people were to come back out and kick off the holiday season here. there were elderly people, there is a dance troupe called the dancing grannies, a high school marching band, so many youth groups, children dressed in costumes ready to celebrate. when you see these terrifying images, one is sticking with me. you see the car whizzing by at a speed that is difficult to judge because we are watching
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some of those videos slowed down to get a better look at the driver. the speed at which it went through and then just to know that person didn't slow down and just kept going. the government's being urged by senior conservatives to rethink the latest changes to its social care overhaul in england over concerns poorer people will be disproportionately affected. ministers insist the plans, which will be voted on in parliament this evening, will protect everyone from what they describe as the "catastrophic costs" of care. i'm joined now by retired nurse, julia knight, whose mother is in a care home in lincolnshire. welcome, thank you forjoining us. just tell us if you don't mind what the situation is for you with your mother in care and the costs of it and how it's been paid for. tqm. mother in care and the costs of it and how it's been paid for. ok, so my journey _ and how it's been paid for. ok, so my journey with — and how it's been paid for. ok, so my journey with care _ and how it's been paid for. ok, so my journey with care homes i and how it's been paid for. ok, so i my journey with care homes started myjourney with care homes started in just before the pandemic, myjourney with care homes started injust before the pandemic, when both of my parents went into care home together. and my dad had very
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high needs, needed 24 hour care, mum not so much at the time and i really struggled to get funding for him, even though he had dementia, had hardly any mobility, could do nothing for himself hardly, i but he was refused funding. after a big fight i managed to get funding for him, but sadly he died not long after. mum opted to say in the care home, because she had made friends. although she is 92 now, she is very frail, she is a little tiny lady, she weighs about six stone and doesn't qualify for funding at all and she's, so we have already had to sell her property. the cost is just about £4,500 per month. their
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property was in lincolnshire, where house prices are way below the national average. house prices are way below the nationalaverage. so house prices are way below the national average. so their little bungalow was worth £150,000. y take away the cost of selling a house, and the money we had already paid out before we managed to get some funding for dad, and now faced with paying that sort of costs. as i say, she has already paid out from her little bungalow over £80,000. obviously, the system needs changing. but maybejust obviously, the system needs changing. but maybe just not in the way the government are looking at at the moment. t’m way the government are looking at at the moment-— the moment. i'm so sorry about you losin: the moment. i'm so sorry about you losing your — the moment. i'm so sorry about you losing your dad. _ the moment. i'm so sorry about you losing your dad, you've _ the moment. i'm so sorry about you losing your dad, you've obviously i losing your dad, you've obviously had a very difficult time with all of these things that have been happening and you have been dealing with. in terms of system changing, and the government saying going forward under the changes no one
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should have to sell their homes, obviously you have already said that your parents' home had to be sold, and it sounds like you don't think it would be any difficult for you under the new system? tia. it would be any difficult for you under the new system? no, because --eole in under the new system? no, because people in the — under the new system? no, because people in the areas _ under the new system? no, because people in the areas of— under the new system? no, because people in the areas of the _ under the new system? no, because people in the areas of the country i people in the areas of the country where property is not worth like it is in other parts of the country, they will quickly use up any capital they will quickly use up any capital they have got and we have £150,000 was the total value of their property, didn't have, mum doesn't have much in savings, because they got into their 90s and have been living on just their state got into their 90s and have been living onjust their state pension. i can't see, all i can see is if she had a couple of million pounds in the bank, and the new system comes in, she wouldn't have to pay a massive proportion of what she owns, but for people who you know whose property is only worth that sort of
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amount of money, that is a massive proportion of what they own. and also the new proposals, if you look into the small print, the proposal for the cap of £86,000, only covers what they are terming personal care. so that is washing, dressing, feeding. so, it is not an £86,000 cap, because somebody is still going to have to pay for the rest of the fees that the care home charges. 50 fees that the care home charges. so how does this make you feel? i feel| how does this make you feel? i feel really sad. — how does this make you feel? i feel really sad, because _ how does this make you feel? i feel really sad, because i _ how does this make you feel? i feel really sad, because i know - how does this make you feel? 115-1 really sad, because i know what a difficult, what a really difficult time i have had trying to do my best by my parents. i think one thing that... people who are trying to implement this system, one thing they don't take into account, is if
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you get a parent in their late 805, 90, their children are often in their late 605, 705, often have long—term conditions themselves and find it impossible to find 24 needs care. so you go through a whole lot of guilt about not being able to care for your parents, they cared for you, and then you get into a system where you have to fight for funding, 5o system where you have to fight for funding, so the whole system of funding, so the whole system of funding per 5e needs looking at, because when i think about my dad, who had such limited abilities was turned down for funding without even a second, there is no right of appeal. and lucky enough, because i am a retired nurse, i did have the background to challenge the system and in the end i won, but it was at great cost to myself, because when
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we were going through all this, he, we were going through all this, he, we finally did get the funding, but he died shortly after wards and within a couple of weeks, my mum had covid as well, so you can imagine what a year we had. and it's continuously for me, it's fighting the system. now i have got to fight it for my mum as well, because she is notjudged to need any funding. i just see that the complexities of the social care are so great, we are just, i think we are just tinkering with the edges. has just, i think we are 'ust tinkering with the edges.— just, i think we are 'ust tinkering with the edges. just, i think we are 'ust tinkering with the edaes. .,, ., ., .,, with the edges. has someone who has had to navigate _ with the edges. has someone who has had to navigate it, _ with the edges. has someone who has had to navigate it, are _ with the edges. has someone who has had to navigate it, are there _ had to navigate it, are there changes that would make a difference to somebody like you? t changes that would make a difference to somebody like you?— to somebody like you? i think obviously. — to somebody like you? i think obviously, the _ to somebody like you? i think obviously, the financial- to somebody like you? i think obviously, the financial cost l to somebody like you? i think| obviously, the financial cost is huge and you know i mean i have every sympathy for local councils who are in this position. but the people who are going to start making
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changes are trying to make changes, because i remember the prime minister standing on the steps of downing street saying that nobody would ever have to sell their house again. well, that's, you know, that's... that is going to happen, that's... that is going to happen, thatis that's... that is going to happen, that is plainly going to happen. but i think the people who are in the system already need to be listened to. listened to the distress it causes. you know, people rarely talk to the people who it's happening to. and until they do, i don't think we will have a fair system.— will have a fair system. thank you very much — will have a fair system. thank you very much for— will have a fair system. thank you very much forjoining _ will have a fair system. thank you very much forjoining us. - a full national coronavirus lockdown has come into force in austria. it's the first country in europe to announce such a step, as covid cases surge. the austrian government says it will also make covid vaccinations mandatory from february as bethany bell reports. the lockdown will last
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forjust under three weeks. it comes after record numbers of new covid infections in recent days. last week austria introduced a lockdown for the unvaccinated, but cases continue to soar and the government decided to impose even tougher measures. the chancellor alexander schallenberg said covid vaccinations will become mandatory as of february. the move is controversial. thousands of people took to the street this weekend in protest at the plans for compulsoryjabs. around two—thirds of austrians are fully vaccinated, one of the lowest rates in western europe. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna. well, lockdowns spell difficulties for many industries, tourism in particular and christmas time is a key period in vienna for the tourism industry. joining me now is angelika kronberger, a vienna—based
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tour and museum guide. welcome, thank you forjoining us. first of all; perhaps give us the over view of what it feels to be there with the restrictions and how people are responding? hello there with the restrictions and how people are responding?— people are responding? hello and aood people are responding? hello and good morning _ people are responding? hello and good morning to _ people are responding? hello and good morning to the _ people are responding? hello and good morning to the uk, - people are responding? hello and good morning to the uk, thanks l people are responding? hello and i good morning to the uk, thanks for inviting me. of course, the news of a new lockdown is very bad news for us. it is very frustrating. especially in my branch, when the tourism has started to revive again in summer and early autumn and now we are having once again a lockdown. it is the fourth lockdown in austria. a worst case scenario, we wouldn't have expected that in summer at least. so it is obviously necessary, it is obviously a necessary, it is obviously a necessary step to reduce the infection numbers, but i don't want to question that, but maybe more effective, more consequence and
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milder steps should started in the late summer season in all regions and all states of austria. in order to prevent this really harsh step. we have seen how people are reacting to it, violence on the streets, how divided does the country feel to you right now? or united, what is the sense you have?— right now? or united, what is the sense you have? well it is of course there is a wide _ sense you have? well it is of course there is a wide range _ sense you have? well it is of course there is a wide range of _ sense you have? well it is of course there is a wide range of emotions i there is a wide range of emotions here. emotions ranging from frustration, indignation, dissatisfaction with the way the health crisis has been handled in the last couple of months on various political levels. of course there is also a loud group which is against the vaccination, the mandatory vaccinations, but all in all, i think this is rather a minority. i don't think this is, it is not the
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largest part of the population. it is... a loud minority, but it is a minority. tt is... a loud minority, but it is a minority-— minority. it is a relatively short lockdown. _ minority. it is a relatively short lockdown, but _ minority. it is a relatively short lockdown, but what _ minority. it is a relatively short lockdown, but what impact i minority. it is a relatively short lockdown, but what impact willj minority. it is a relatively short l lockdown, but what impact will it have on your personally? abs, big have on your personally? a big im act, have on your personally? a big impact, because _ have on your personally? a big impact, because december- have on your personally? a big impact, because december is i have on your personally? a; impact, because december is the best winter month in vienna. so city tourism is very important in vienna as well. so our best months are usually spring and autumn months. during the winter season december is the best month. we have the christmas markets that attract many people from all over the worlds. the museums, concerts and so on. so it affects us a lot. 0k, museums, concerts and so on. so it affects us a lot. ok, the lockdown was was to last until 13th december, but we can't really know. people have already started to cancel their
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tourists to cancel their bookings already for christmas time. although the government has declared the lockdown until 13th december, bookings are gone, many bookings are gone for the second half of december already, because people simply feel insecure and don't want to risk anything. so probably decide to go somewhere else, or to come at a later point to vienna. tt somewhere else, or to come at a later point to vienna.— later point to vienna. it has been very stop/start — later point to vienna. it has been very stop/start for _ later point to vienna. it has been very stop/start for your _ later point to vienna. it has been very stop/start for your industry i later point to vienna. it has been | very stop/start for your industry in particular and that must have been tough to navigate, looking forward, what are your thoughts on the mandatory vaccination and whether that will give you reassurance and whether you think it is the right idea or not?— whether you think it is the right idea or not? oh, i sincerely hope that this will — idea or not? oh, i sincerely hope that this will help. _ idea or not? oh, i sincerely hope that this will help. a _ idea or not? oh, i sincerely hope that this will help. a couple i idea or not? oh, i sincerely hope that this will help. a couple of i that this will help. a couple of months ago i was against compulsory vaccination, because i thought this
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is really a personal decision. i'm of course fully vaccinated, that is clear, but in the meantime i have changed my opinion, because i think if this is the only way out of this pandemic, if this prevents us from further harm, harm of... the general health system, harm of for the economy, then so be it. then we have to introduce it.— to introduce it. what sort of conversations _ to introduce it. what sort of conversations do _ to introduce it. what sort of conversations do you i to introduce it. what sort of conversations do you have l to introduce it. what sort of i conversations do you have with others, i'm assuming it is probably one of the biggest topics of conversation currently and maybe a lot of disagreement between people? it is generally, the mood is gloomy, the mood is gloomy and some people, some many citizens, many good citizens, have a feeling of powerlessness as well, because
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people are getting vaccinated, getting their third shot maybe, being cautious, wearings masks, at some point reducing your personal contacts again and again we are landing ina contacts again and again we are landing in a lockdown. that leaves you... deeply frustrated i have to say. deeply frustrated. of course, there are discussions, could this harsh step, could this step have been prevented. there is largely an agreement that it could, the performance could have been been better on various political levels and milder steps should have been taken, starting from early autumn on and in addition also our vaccination campaign was not very effective, so everything put together led us to this situation now which is regrettable.— this situation now which is regrettable. this situation now which is retrettable. ., ~ , . regrettable. thank you very much. thanks to you- _
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and coming up this afternoon we'll be speaking to two experts on what the big spike in covid infections in europe could mean for the uk. get in touch with the hashtag #bbcyourouestions, or you can email yourquestions@bbc. co. uk. a memorial service for conservative mp sir david amess, who was killed last month, will take place this lunchtime in his southend constituency. members of the public are expected to line the streets to pay their respects. our correspondent danjohnson is in southend and joins me now. yes, this is is the church where that memorial service will start at 1pm. this is a private service for sir david amess's family, friend a colleagues. after that, his coffin will be taken through the streets of southend on a horse—drawn carriage and that is a chance for his constituents, for the people in the community that he worked for to pay
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their respects, ahead of a bigger more public funeral service that will take place tomorrow in westminster. so a very sad day for people here in this city, in this constituency, but an important day, with lots of people wanting to mark the service that their mp gave over so many years and i want to introduce to a couple of those constituents. kelly and to natasha. you both went to sir david amess for help, as constituent and got that help? help, as constituent and got that hel ? , ii' help, as constituent and got that hel ? , ::' ., ., help? yes, in 2017, i wrote to him, i had lots help? yes, in 2017, i wrote to him, i had lots of— help? yes, in 2017, i wrote to him, i had lots of different _ i had lots of different complications with mesh in my bowel, and i was in a wheelchair, unable to work and in pain and he led me, through two years in being with him to get to the right consultants to haveit to get to the right consultants to have it removed. i have so much love and gratitude for him to be here now. if it wasn't for him, i wouldn't have been kind of been able to be here and pay my respects to
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him. thejourney to be here and pay my respects to him. the journey was to much longer for us as a pair?— for us as a pair? yeah, after the help that _ for us as a pair? yeah, after the help that he _ for us as a pair? yeah, after the help that he gave _ for us as a pair? yeah, after the help that he gave us _ for us as a pair? yeah, after the help that he gave us and i for us as a pair? yeah, after the help that he gave us and he i for us as a pair? yeah, after the l help that he gave us and he would for us as a pair? yeah, after the i help that he gave us and he would be there and _ help that he gave us and he would be there and do things, like he wrote in correspondence to all the hospital— in correspondence to all the hospital appointments and took away that worry— hospital appointments and took away that worry and stress and he introduced us to parliament and the nhs put _ introduced us to parliament and the nhs put together with his own passion — nhs put together with his own passion and understanding, the help that we _ passion and understanding, the help that we provide now for mental health. — that we provide now for mental health, for children and young families _ health, for children and young families. ~ , ., health, for children and young families. , ., , ., ., ., families. we built a programme to help people _ families. we built a programme to help people recover _ families. we built a programme to help people recover from - families. we built a programme to help people recover from certain l help people recoverfrom certain depression and mental health and trauma. he backed us and was a great ambassador to spread that within our community and the nhs. tbs, ambassador to spread that within our community and the nhs. b. tat ambassador to spread that within our community and the nhs.— community and the nhs. a lot of --eole community and the nhs. a lot of people would _ community and the nhs. a lot of people would say _ community and the nhs. a lot of people would say that _ community and the nhs. a lot of people would say that is - community and the nhs. a lot of people would say that is the i community and the nhs. a lot of people would say that is the sort | community and the nhs. a lot of i people would say that is the sort of work you would expect an mp to do, but by no means do they all live up to that. he but by no means do they all live up to that. . , but by no means do they all live up to that. ., , ., but by no means do they all live up to that. ., ., ,
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to that. he was above and beyond, it was conversations, _ to that. he was above and beyond, it was conversations, introductions, i was conversations, introductions, conversations to see how we were. we would _ conversations to see how we were. we would see _ conversations to see how we were. we would see him every couple of months at one _ would see him every couple of months at one point— would see him every couple of months at one point in his office. he would see him every couple of months at one point in his office.— at one point in his office. he had become our _ at one point in his office. he had become our mp _ at one point in his office. he had become our mp to _ at one point in his office. he had become our mp to start - at one point in his office. he had become our mp to start with, i at one point in his office. he had| become our mp to start with, but after that he became our greatest friend and support for everything that we have gone through and believed in everything that we have done to support children, adults and families across essex. he done to support children, adults and families across essex.— families across essex. he stuck with ou, he families across essex. he stuck with you. he didn't _ families across essex. he stuck with you, he didn't help _ families across essex. he stuck with you, he didn't help you _ families across essex. he stuck with you, he didn't help you through i families across essex. he stuck with you, he didn't help you through one | you, he didn't help you through one issue. he you, he didn't help you through one issue. . , , you, he didn't help you through one issue. ., , , ., issue. he was the truest gentleman and he had — issue. he was the truest gentleman and he had so _ issue. he was the truest gentleman and he had so much _ issue. he was the truest gentleman and he had so much compassion i issue. he was the truest gentleman | and he had so much compassion and issue. he was the truest gentleman i and he had so much compassion and he made _ and he had so much compassion and he made things— and he had so much compassion and he made things happen, whatever he could _ made things happen, whatever he could do— made things happen, whatever he could do in— made things happen, whatever he could do in his power, he did it with— could do in his power, he did it with love — could do in his power, he did it with love and compassion and he will be incredibly missed. you with love and compassion and he will be incredibly missed.— be incredibly missed. you will be art of be incredibly missed. you will be part of service — be incredibly missed. you will be part of service today. _ be incredibly missed. you will be part of service today. how i be incredibly missed. you will be part of service today. how do i be incredibly missed. you will be| part of service today. how do you think people are coping with the fact that he is not here any more? he has left a great hole in many people's hearts and not only that,
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it becomes a bit silent. he did make a big noise around, because he was the most amazing guy. he really was. one part of his legacy is already this is new a city, do you think there are other things that should donein there are other things that should done in time to remember the service he gave? done in time to remember the service he ave? ~ done in time to remember the service heave? ,, u,’ done in time to remember the service heave? ,, .. , ., he gave? well specially with what we are doint he gave? well specially with what we are doing with _ he gave? well specially with what we are doing with mental— he gave? well specially with what we are doing with mental health - he gave? well specially with what we are doing with mental health and i are doing with mental health and post—traumatic stress, many people go through those experiences and he helped us with the early intervention that we are able to provide children with tools and techniques, and if anything happens, they have the toolbox and we provide that and he was behind news getting into schools and we have been funding by the clinical commissioner. that is part of his legacy. commissioner. that is part of his lea . , ., ., ., legacy. yes and that will live on in our work- — legacy. yes and that will live on in our work- so _ legacy. yes and that will live on in our work. so everything _ legacy. yes and that will live on in our work. so everything that i legacy. yes and that will live on in our work. so everything that we . legacy. yes and that will live on in | our work. so everything that we do will be _ our work. so everything that we do will be in _ our work. so everything that we do will be in his— our work. so everything that we do will be in his honour.— will be in his honour. thank you, i appreciate — will be in his honour. thank you, i appreciate you — will be in his honour. thank you, i appreciate you taking _ will be in his honour. thank you, i appreciate you taking the - will be in his honour. thank you, i appreciate you taking the time i will be in his honour. thank you, i appreciate you taking the time to | appreciate you taking the time to talk us to. it is a difficult time
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for many people here in this city, but it is a chance for them to pay their rmts respects to their mp. you get an impress in this constituency that he was somebody who was prom innocents prominent and well loved by his constituents. but they will be making every effort to mark his service. with every interview we learn more about the impact he had. it is very powerful. thank youment plans for electric vehicles charging points to be installed at new buildings have been outlined by the prime minister today. the legislation will mean new homes, offices and supermarkets built from next year will be required to feature ev charging facilities. the prime minister told business leaders that another 145—thousand charging points will be installed annually but labour says the announcement doesn't address what it called the "appalling" geographical divide in available ev points.
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earlier, the prime minister illustrated the rise in popularity of electric vehicles and spoke of how industries are responding. in that time, that great era, i only tried two evs, electric vehicles, an extraordinary wheeled rabbit hutch that was so tiny you could park it side ways and the first, i tried the first tesla for sale in this country. it expired in the fast lane of m40 i'm sad to say. they have got a lot better. a few years later i tried to get london motorists to go electric and we put charging points around the city. they were not then around the city. they were not then a success and they store forelorne like a bit of unused gym equipment. now the tipping point has come. sales are increasing at 70% a year
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and in 2030 we end the market for internal combustion engines, and our companies are responding. nissan has decided to make an enormous bet on new electric vehicles and there is now a massive new factory for batteries. around the world, these cars are getting ever more affordable. at glasgow, two weeks ago, the tipping point came, as motor manufacturers representing a third of the world market, including the eu and america, announced that they would go electric by 2035. the prime minister was speaking as part of the confederation of business industry's annual conference, which began this morning. the industry body is arguing that parts of the uk have been living with the consequences of 'benign neglect�* and unless there is economic growth in every area of the uk, the government will not succeed in its levelling up agenda. that was the theme of the cbi
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director—general speech this morning. joining me now is rain newton—smith, chief economist at the confederation of british industry. welcome. thank you forjoining us. so there seems to be a disconnect in what tony duncan, your director—general, was saying and what the government are saying in terms of levelling up. how would you rate what the government is doing on levelling up? itaste rate what the government is doing on levelling up?— levelling up? we were delighted to host the prime _ levelling up? we were delighted to host the prime minister _ levelling up? we were delighted to host the prime minister at - levelling up? we were delighted to host the prime minister at our- host the prime minister at our annual conference today up in newcastle and i think for us it's a new era of partnership and i think we both share the same level of ambition particularly on levelling up. we know that in the uk we have one of the highest regional inequalities across europe and it's great for the government is focused on it. it's something we are very passionate about and we are planning to set up the centre for the regions to set up the centre for the regions to set up a playbook on how we can help every region in the uk to meet
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its full potential, so i think we absolutely agree. we do need to see the commitment from government particularly on infrastructure and skills, and also on business investment, and that was one of the things we discussed with the prime minister at our conference today. t5 minister at our conference today. is there are divergences in your view between the rhetoric and the action from the government? t between the rhetoric and the action from the government?— between the rhetoric and the action from the government? i think we have to wait and see _ from the government? i think we have to wait and see what _ from the government? i think we have to wait and see what happens - from the government? i think we have to wait and see what happens in i from the government? i think we have to wait and see what happens in the i to wait and see what happens in the coming months and weeks. i think what we do see is a clear commitment from both sides that we need to work together to deliver this. we cannot see levelling up, if that simply driven by government or business alone can't deliver it. we know we need to see the large scale infrastructure, the connectivity between regions, to really deliver this and also on skills. we know so much of this is about how many graduates you have in your region and how many skilled workers you have available to really innovate. we also need to see business investment and our director—general was talking to the prime minister
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about the role of the super deduction, which the chancellor set out to really encourage business investment, and it is paid a huge row that comes to an end in 2023, so if we really are going to level up in fuel growth across different regions in the uk, we need to see business investment and we need to see something follow—on from the super deduction so we can really get the investment we need happening across regions in the uk. itetheh the investment we need happening across regions in the uk. when you sa that across regions in the uk. when you say that there _ across regions in the uk. when you say that there is _ across regions in the uk. when you say that there is the _ across regions in the uk. when you say that there is the highest i say that there is the highest regional inequalities in this country in europe, obviously levelling up northern powerhouse, hsz, obviously we had news on that last week, these are things which have been talked about by mps last week, these are things which have been talked about by mp5 for a long time. is it narrowing their geographical differences? l long time. is it narrowing their geographical differences? i think what we have — geographical differences? i think what we have seen, _ geographical differences? i think what we have seen, we - geographical differences? i think what we have seen, we have - geographical differences? i think. what we have seen, we have seen geographical differences? i think- what we have seen, we have seen some improvement, and i do think that the green industrial revolution that the prime minister likes to talk about
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is a real opportunity for the uk, and that's one of the reasons why we hosted the conference from newcastle where we've seen the partnership between the region and nissan who are working together to export electric vehicles around the world, and we know there are so many other examples around the uk, where we are adopting some of the green technologies we need to make our economy net to zero and that's something to hold world needs to get behind. i think we are seeing some areas where that's really helping to create green jobs and opportunities in local areas, but we know we still have a lot further to go and that's why we are committed to working with government. we've got 800 businesses on our regional councils are completely committed to setting out what we need to see in each region of the uk to develop the skills, investment and infrastructure we need so we don't see this high level of disparity and opportunity that we see at the moment in the uk. thank
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ou. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's katherine downes. good morning. after ole gunnar solskjaer�*s tearful exit, manchester united have put michael carrick in temporary charge, while they look for a new manager. he's the fourth boss to be sacked in the seven—and—a—half years since sir alex ferguson stood down. saturday's 4—1 defeat to watford proving to be the final straw after a run of poor results. former united midfielder bryan robson says united need a new approach. the club has looked at going down the right lines with big—name managers. didn't quite work out. you know, then they brought within, he knew what man united was all about, he'd experienced the success and everything, the squad of players he had when he was a group of that, and so, for me now, they have given
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michael carrick the role. let's see how michael does. i think it needs an experienced manager who can organise, but is not afraid to leave some of the big players out who may be just don't fit into the pack of players you want as a coach. you know, that's a big thing. you've got to have everybody playing together because if you want to be a successful team, all the individuals have got to fit into that team. united were planning to appoint an interim manager until the end of the season but that could change if they bring in mauricio pochettino. it's not thought they've made an approach but he says he's open to taking the job as he's not completely happy with the setup at paris saint germain, where he's essentially first—team coach, under sporting director leonardo. pochettino enjoyed the control he had in his five years at tottenham and he's been open about his desire to manager in the premier league again. he's been at ps6 for 10 months
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and they're 11 points clear at the top of the league. united did approach the former real madrid boss zinedine zidane about the job but sources say he's not interested at this stage. he ended his second spell as real manager in may this year and he's apparently keen on exploring other options, including the french national side and ps6 so that could have an impact on united's decision. mark cavendish suffered two broken ribs and a partially collapsed lung in a crash at the ghent six day race yesterday. he spent the night in hospital after hitting the bike of lasse norman hansen, after the dane lost control in front of him during the madison. after initial treatment, cavendish was able to walk but he was then taken to hospital on a stretcher. according to his team, deceuninck — quick—step, he should be discharged today or tomorrow morning, before undergoing a period of recuperation. now, look who's back. tiger woods has shared this clip on social media with the caption "making progress". it's the first time we've seen him
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hitting balls since his car crash back in february. and that is only going to heighten talk the 45 year old could be preparing to make a comeback. we have missed him, haven't we? that's all from me for now but there's more on the bbc sport website, where you can keep up to date with manchester united's search for a new manager, and all today's stories. i will be back later on. joanna, back to you. thank you. see you later. less than one percent of the population in england, account for more than 16% of all visits to accident and emergency departments. a study by the british red cross shows some of the people in this group, known as high intensity users, visit emergency departments more than 300 times a year. dominic hughes has this report. accident and emergency departments across the uk are busier than ever, with some patients facing long waits for treatment. now, a study of six years of nhs data reveals how a small number of people, known as high—intensity users,
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are returning to a&es time and time again. high—intensity use of an a&e department is defined as more than five visits in a year. while less than 0.7% of england's population fall into this category, nhs data from 2015 showed they accounted for a significant proportion — 16% of all a&e visits, and well over a quarter of all ambulance journeys, as well as 26% of all emergency hospital admissions in england. but specialist teams based in a&es across england can help to reduce frequent visits by offering individual support to people who feel hospital is their only option. the reasons for people attending a&e are quite complex, but it's often because they don't feel they've got anywhere else to go and they have fallen through the gaps between other services and teams previously. and we found that really interesting. there's a couple of cohorts, which are particular frequent attenders at a&e. there's younger people from the age of 22 to 29, who might have particular mental health problems as well as other issues.
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and those over 70, who have other complex issues, including chronic loneliness. so it's really important to work with people, to understand them as individuals, so we can get them the support that they need, hopefully before they even get to a&e. specialist help can cut repeat visits by more than 80%, potentially saving the nhs millions of pounds, and reducing the pressure on an already—stretched service. dominic hughes, bbc news. the number of children in care in england could climb from 80 thousand to reach almost 100,000 by 2025, according to new analysis commissioned by county councils and shared with the bbc. of those in care, around 12,000 are in children's homes and that number is rising. local authorities say this is due to a shortage of foster carers and cuts to family support. the government says it's providing new grant funding to help maintain children's social care. our political correspondent chris mason has this report.
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i realised when i left my mum how little support i have compared to other kids. i was just a bit scared. olivia is 2a and lives in oxford. she was 16 when her life changed in a way she'll never forget. this emergency happened and i had to go into emergency foster care. it was so terrifying for me, i remember at that time. i didn't know where i'll end up. and it was terrifying. and there's a shortage of foster carers. it means the demand for and cost of places in children's homes is rocketing. from oxfordshire to cheshire, local authorities across england are confronted by this. here in warrington, a new children's home opened in april. this home is part of a trial scheme. the aim is simple. minimize how long children are in the home and put money and effort into stopping them ending
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up here in the first place. this is a lighthouse. the reason why it's called the lighthouse is that it's a beacon of light for the young people going through theirjourney. right. let's have a look. what we have here? so this is our chillout area. it's yes to beanbags and no to mobile phones in here. there are six bedrooms, two reserved for emergency last—minute admissions. this is an insight for most of us into something that is out of sight, unseen, unheard of, perhaps little thought about. and yet it is about some of society's most vulnerable. yes, how to help them, but also to minimize the problems that will follow — a failure to get it right now. the blunt truth is a quarter of the adult prison population in england used to be in care. so meet the policeman based here, who doesn't look like one. imagine if i was coming
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into work in a full uniform. the young people, firstly, it just wouldn't sit right. you know, me not wearing a uniform, it breaks down those barriers away. policing cannot fix everything on their own. so we do a lot ofjoined—up work with obviously with social care, with parents, with carers, with education, with health. and we're realising one of those other terminologies, you can't arrest your way out of this. there's got to be another approach. and that's where i absolutely 100% believe in the system. the children living here are at school right now. at the end of the corridor, the office, the front line in helping children at a desperate time. a place in a children's home is the last resort and hugely expensive. on average in england, more than £4,000 a week. and sometimes with private providers a lot more. we were recently quoted, you know, £22,000 a week for a child to be placed in a children's home. £22,000 a week! yeah. and when, you know, you're faced with the prospect at five
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o'clock in the evening, where you can't find a home for a child who needs to come into our car, unfortunately, you are between a rock and a hard place. joe and joanne in eastbourne have been foster carers for nine years. when the children come to us and they look so down, they look like they're carrying so much baggage. and then after a few weeks, sometimes you just see their face start to light up. i mean, the fact of the matter is there's more children who need our help than there is carers who can help. yeah, but i also think people have i got a misconception about fostering. ithink, you know, it's... am i qualified enough to be a foster carer? i and it's, at the end of the day, it's about your personality, - it's about your character, it's about your heart. - foster carers, children's homes, local authorities, the police. society wrestling with helping the next generation's most in need take their first steps. chris mason, bbc news.
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chinese tennis star peng shuai, who disappeared from the public eye almost three weeks ago, has said she is safe and well in a video call with the international olympic committee. the ioc said its president thomas bach had spoken to peng for 30 minutes and she was "doing fine". other footage of peng at a restaurant and tennis match have also emerged over the weekend, but the women's tennis association says it's still concerned about her wellbeing. the headlines on bbc news. at least five people are killed, and a0 injured after a car drives at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin. deserted streets in austria — as the country enters a full national lockdown. the government says it's the only way to cut surging covid infections. a memorial service and procession are to be held later in southend to remember the murdered mp sir david amess.
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welsh labour and plaid cymru's co—operation agreement in the senedd is set to last for "the coming three years". it includes plans to create a national care service, as well as looking at ways to bring the net zero carbon emissions target date forward and increase the size of the senedd. hywel griffiths is in cardiff. a lot of things that had to be agreed — a lot of things that had to be agreed upon _ a lot of things that had to be agreed upon there? - a lot of things that had to be agreed upon there?- a lot of things that had to be agreed upon there? yes, and it's taken a very. _ agreed upon there? yes, and it's taken a very. very _ agreed upon there? yes, and it's taken a very, very long _ agreed upon there? yes, and it's taken a very, very long time - agreed upon there? yes, and it's taken a very, very long time to i agreed upon there? yes, and it's i taken a very, very long time to get here. the welsh election was back in may but over the last five and a half months, labour have been talking to plaid cymru not about a coalition, but a deal. labour won 30 of the '605 seats and it was enough to form a government could not guarantee an overall majority to get their policies through, so they talked through a huge raft of policies. you mentioned a few there. notably increasing the size of the
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senate from 60 up to 80, may be 100 seats. something which politicians have spoken about for several years lois failed to get much public support. in other areas, lois failed to get much public support. in otherareas, energy policies setting up a publicly owned energy company in wales and also the issue of second homes. whether there should be a cap on the number of second homes in some communities and education can potentially free school meals for all primary children up to the age of ii. we will get far more details this lunchtime when we expect to hear from the first minister mark drakeford and plaid cymru leader adam price on the steps of the senate, however, it won't be signed and sealed until next weekend. that's when plaid cymru held their virtual conference, their members will need to have a say on this as well. they will probably want to know what is it for them because it won't be a coalition and we don't expect them to have ministers in the cabinet, therefore why should plaid cymru prop up labour will be the
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question for some people thank you. let's get more now on the memorial service that is going to be held for the conservative mp sir david amess, who was killed last month. our correspondent danjohnson is in southend joins me once more. yes, people are already gathering here for the memorial service that starts at 1pm. it's a chance for sir david amess and his family and friends and his closest colleagues to join together and remember his life and his work, his love for this constituency, this city, and this part of the country. and his fellow mp mark francois is here and will give a eulogy here at the service. an honour for give a eulogy here at the service. an honourfor you give a eulogy here at the service. an honour for you to give a eulogy here at the service. an honourfor you to do give a eulogy here at the service. an honour for you to do that i imagine. how difficult has it been to find the right words? it is imagine. how difficult has it been to find the right words?— to find the right words? it is a privilege. _ to find the right words? it is a privilege. i— to find the right words? it is a privilege, i was _ to find the right words? it is a privilege, i was honoured - to find the right words? it is a privilege, i was honoured to l to find the right words? it is a l privilege, i was honoured to be asked — privilege, i was honoured to be asked to — privilege, i was honoured to be asked to deliver the eulogy. not
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easy partly because you've always -ot easy partly because you've always got a _ easy partly because you've always got a finite amount of time and the guide _ got a finite amount of time and the guide of— got a finite amount of time and the guide of so— got a finite amount of time and the guide of so many incredible things, how do— guide of so many incredible things, how do cram a quart into a pint pot. theres— how do cram a quart into a pint pot. there's a _ how do cram a quart into a pint pot. there's a lot — how do cram a quart into a pint pot. there's a lot i — how do cram a quart into a pint pot. there's a lot i want to say but i'm going _ there's a lot i want to say but i'm going to — there's a lot i want to say but i'm going to try— there's a lot i want to say but i'm going to try to be upbeat about his life. going to try to be upbeat about his life he _ going to try to be upbeat about his life. he accomplished so much and always— life. he accomplished so much and always with david there was always some _ always with david there was always some humour, so hopefully i can do thatiustice, — some humour, so hopefully i can do thatjustice, but may also say some humour, so hopefully i can do that justice, but may also say a couple — that justice, but may also say a couple of — that justice, but may also say a couple of serious things as well. this is_ couple of serious things as well. this is somebody you have known for over 30 years. he helped to get into politics. over 30 years. he helped to get into olitics. , , over 30 years. he helped to get into -olitics. , , politics. yes, i first met david in the 1987 general _ politics. yes, i first met david in the 1987 general election - politics. yes, i first met david in the 1987 general election when i j the 1987 general election when i came _ the 1987 general election when i came back from university and without — came back from university and without his support and mentoring i would _ without his support and mentoring i would never have become an mp, so some _ would never have become an mp, so some people would say he's got much to answer— some people would say he's got much to answer for. but, you know, it was an incredible — to answer for. but, you know, it was an incredible constituency mp. he was genuinely loved by the people of southend. _ was genuinely loved by the people of southend, and one of the reasons ladyjulia — southend, and one of the reasons ladyjulia decided she wants to have two services, one of the cathedral
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requiem _ two services, one of the cathedral requiem mass tomorrow because it was a staunch _ requiem mass tomorrow because it was a staunch catholic, but also one in southend — a staunch catholic, but also one in southend to help the community of southend _ southend to help the community of southend come together and to grieve and to— southend come together and to grieve and to pay— southend come together and to grieve and to pay their respects. i think that was— and to pay their respects. i think that was a — and to pay their respects. i think that was a very good decision on ladyjulia's — that was a very good decision on ladyjulia's behalf. that was a very good decision on lady julia's behalf.— lady julia's behalf. you're expecting _ lady julia's behalf. you're expecting hundreds - lady julia's behalf. you're expecting hundreds of. lady julia's behalf. you're - expecting hundreds of people lady julia's behalf. you're _ expecting hundreds of people today? i think there will be quite a big turnout~ — i think there will be quite a big turnout. st mary's, known as southend — turnout. st mary's, known as southend cathedral unofficially, maybe — southend cathedral unofficially, maybe it — southend cathedral unofficially, maybe it will become officially now who knows? it soon will be. that's down _ who knows? it soon will be. that's down to _ who knows? it soon will be. that's down to david. he was asked by the local paper, — down to david. he was asked by the local paper, the echo, a year ago, how are _ local paper, the echo, a year ago, how are you — local paper, the echo, a year ago, how are you going to get them to make _ how are you going to get them to make southend a city and he said i'm going _ make southend a city and he said i'm going to _ make southend a city and he said i'm going to wear them down, i'm just going _ going to wear them down, i'm just going to _ going to wear them down, i'm just going to keep hammering at them until they— going to keep hammering at them until they give in. well, going to keep hammering at them untilthey give in. well, he going to keep hammering at them until they give in. well, he won in the end — until they give in. well, he won in the end he — until they give in. well, he won in the end. he was a great husband and father _ the end. he was a great husband and father he _ the end. he was a great husband and father. he was a staunch catholic. a fine parliamentarian. he was a brilliant — fine parliamentarian. he was a brilliant constituency mp, i suppose he was _ brilliant constituency mp, i suppose he was a _ brilliant constituency mp, i suppose he was a bit of a legendarily, wasn't — he was a bit of a legendarily, wasn't he?— he was a bit of a legendarily, wasn't he? , ., wasn't he? somebody who en'oyed fun, as well? absolutely, he _ wasn't he? somebody who en'oyed fun, as well? absolutely, he was _ wasn't he? somebody who enjoyed fun,
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as well? absolutely, he was fun - wasn't he? somebody who enjoyed fun, as well? absolutely, he was fun to - as well? absolutely, he was fun to be around and _ as well? absolutely, he was fun to be around and you _ as well? absolutely, he was fun to be around and you never— as well? absolutely, he was fun to be around and you never quite - as well? absolutely, he was fun to l be around and you never quite knew what was _ be around and you never quite knew what was going to do next. this was a member— what was going to do next. this was a member of parliament who got blessed — a member of parliament who got blessed by that hopeful them how many— blessed by that hopeful them how many other mps managed to do that? in the _ many other mps managed to do that? in the eulogy i'm going to try to have _ in the eulogy i'm going to try to have a — in the eulogy i'm going to try to have a few— in the eulogy i'm going to try to have a few light—hearted examples of the unbelievable way in which he achieved — the unbelievable way in which he achieved hisjob, but whilst the unbelievable way in which he achieved his job, but whilst always having _ achieved his job, but whilst always having empathy and sympathy for the people _ having empathy and sympathy for the people of— having empathy and sympathy for the people of southend. he was genuinely loved in _ people of southend. he was genuinely loved in this town, soon to be city, and i_ loved in this town, soon to be city, and i think— loved in this town, soon to be city, and i think you'll see a lot of art on display— and i think you'll see a lot of art on display today. and i think you'll see a lot of art on displav today-— and i think you'll see a lot of art on display today. thank you, we appreciate _ on display today. thank you, we appreciate your _ on display today. thank you, we appreciate your time _ on display today. thank you, we appreciate your time and - on display today. thank you, we appreciate your time and we - on display today. thank you, we appreciate your time and we did| on display today. thank you, we - appreciate your time and we did our best wishes for delivering the eulogy this lunchtime and that is something which really comes across. the huge presence sir david amess was in this constituency, the recognition he had, the loyalty he had from the people here who respected the work he had given to this community for so many years, so there will be this memorial service at lunchtime and then his coffin will be drawn by horses through the streets of southend and then tomorrow, there is that big a funeral service at westminster
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cathedral. this is a private memorial service but it will be broadcast on bbc essex from 1pm, through bbc science.— broadcast on bbc essex from 1pm, through bbc science. thanks, dan. workshos through bbc science. thanks, dan. workshops to _ through bbc science. thanks, dan. workshops to help _ through bbc science. thanks, dan. workshops to help them _ through bbc science. thanks, dan. | workshops to help them understand sexual harassment and abuse against women have started in nottingham. they are thought to be the first courses of their kind in the country to help men challenge or intervene when they see women being targeted. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports. atraining a training session but unlike when they've experienced before. we need quys they've experienced before. we need guys like you are wanting to make a difference. these men have come to learn how to be a good ally for women. the stand by her programme is a men's only workshop about sexual harassment and abuse faced by women, created by a community group and the charity women's aid. this programme is for men that want to be allies in making
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a difference in relation to women's safety. it is not a programme for perpetrators, so this programme will help to give them the skills, knowledge and confidence to be more effective in intervening when they see women getting unwanted attention but also raise their confidence in talking to other men in their networks and also other young boys in their network as well. i feel threatened, laughed at. seven out of ten women have experienced some form of sexual harassment in public according to a recent poll. i love a good laugh with my colleagues and things. - sometimes the line is crossed and it is the word banter thatl almost makes it acceptable. compliment. i am not sure when to compliment. these sessions are designed for men to reflect on their own personal experiences with advice on how to intervene effectively when help is needed. somebody was punching this women on the floor under
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a street light and he said, "she's my girlfriend," and she said, "it's all right." it stopped the violence, but it's hard to intervene sometimes because you do not know the dynamics. what we wanted to do is be dynamic and look at masculinity notjust as toxic masculinity which we see the response of and the effects of, we wanted to see and support men to use healthy masculinity to support us. we are not asking to be rescued by men, we are asking to be supported by men. more workshops are running in greater manchester and london in the next few weeks. it is hoped through doing these courses men will put into practice what they have learned and go on to educate other men and boys in their communities. kevin sinfield is a man who likes a challenge.
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last year it was seven marathons in seven days, and now he's started something bigger. he's running 101 miles injust21i hours — without any sleep — raising money for motor neurone disease research, and his friend and former leeds rhinos team mate rob burrow who has the disease. kevin set off this morning from the leicester tigers stadium where he currently works as a coach. he'll run all through the day and all through the night until he finally arrives at headingley stadium, the home of the leeds rhinos, tomorrow morning. graham satchell reports. kevin sinfield sets off this morning on an epic challenge. he's running 2a hours straight from leicester to leeds — it's101 miles with no sleep. i want it to be horrible. raining and sleeting and windy and... i want everything to get thrown at us that can be. there's people out there doing it really tough with mnd, and people connected with mnd
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who are fighting a really tough fight at the minute, and i'm just showing them that we care. this is a sensational try. there aren't many in - super league who can do that. kev is running for his former team—mate and friend, rugby league legend rob burrow. rob was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 2019. his family can't quite believe what kev is about to do. 100 miles in one day without no sleep? you are crazy! you know we think you are amazing. thank you for doing everything you have done for my dad - and people with mnd. good luck on your next challenge. today's run will be a physical and mental test like no other. running through the night, sleep deprived, glycogen depleted, fatigued. he motivates us to do things that we don't think we can do and he does that by leading by example and doing things that nobody should be able to do.
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kev will be raising money for people with motor neurone disease like ian, was diagnosed in 2019. mnd is a cruel disease, a degenerative brain disorder. there is no effective treatment, no cure. but in the mnd community kev has become a hero — you could say a heart—throb. he's a bit of all right! elsie! don't! ithink he's... ..he's amazing. the money raised today will help build new much—needed treatment centres. a place that has some dignity, has some joy and has some hope, will provide so much hope for people when they enter it, that they know the research is going on, that they know the technology is there. and just an environment with some green space, some light. it makes such a difference to so many families.
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i suppose you have your good days, your bad days, but, erm, yeah,... right from the very beginning, when rob burrow first announced his diagnosis, kevin sinfield was there. today he will once again go the extra mile for his best friend. we are with him all the way. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. it has been a cold and frosty start to the day for many of us, but we are looking at some sunshine. high pressure is firmly in charge. we do have a weak weather front moving down the east coast producing some showers. we also have another one across the english channel producing some showers and another one across the far north of scotland. we have thicker cloud and patchy rain and quite gusty winds as well. but for many it is going to be a dry day with some sunshine. any wintry showers in
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the moors in yorkshire this morning tending to fade. still a few getting into norfolk and we still have some for the channel islands in the direction of kent. these black circles represent the gust strength of wind. the gustiest will be across the far north—west today and temperatures more or less average for the time of year, looking at seven to 11 degrees, but compared to last week when we had 16 and 17 degrees in some places it will feel a lot colder. through this evening and overnight all those cloud spills a bit further south getting into southern scotland, north—west england, north west wales and also northern ireland, and this will be thick enough for some drizzle here and there but ahead of it some clear skies so once again there will be frost around especially in sheltered areas and across parts of the midlands and wales you can expect to see some patchy fog. tomorrow high pressure still firmly in charge. still fairly quiet weather—wise. across the far north of scotland you can see we have more cloud than today. the mist and fog that has formed
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overnight will slowly lift and across southern areas there will be some sunshine but still those showers across parts of east anglia and the channel islands and the cloud thick enough for some drizzle and some patchy light rain across parts of the west. temperatures if anything down a degree or so today. we are looking at eight to about ten degrees. then as we head into the middle of the week we have this weather front coming our way. it is a cold front and it is going to bring some rain with it as it pushes southwards. behind that there will be some showers, some of which may be wintry, and the wind changes direction so more of a northerly component to it, so you can see the blues move across the charts. it is going to feel colder. as we head towards the end of the weekend into the weekend it looks like it is going to be that bit more unsettled. there will be areas of cloud at times, some rain as well. it looks like it is going to be windier and for some an increased chance of a wintry shower.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: at least five people are killed and a0 injured after a car drives at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin. it was so sudden and so quick, the truck came out of nowhere and all of a sudden you hear this sound of people getting hit... the sound was crazy. the sound of the car and the image of it and seeing that happening and innocent people and seeing the aftermath. some conservative mps urge the government to rethink changes to funding social care in england — saying poorer people will be disproprtionately affected. you go through a whole ton of guilt about not being able to care - for your parents, they cared for - you, and then you get into a system where you literally have to fight for funding. -
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there's further unrest over covid restrictions in europe. police have clashed with protestors in brussels while austria has returned to full lockdown. and less than 1% of the population in england account for more than 16% of visits to accident and emergency departments according to a new study. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. there have been distressing scenes as five people have been killed and dozens injured after a car drove at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin. more than 20 people — half of them children — were taken to hospital following the incident. footage shows a red suv driving through the parade at around 16.40 local time.
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people described hearing a loud bang, and then deafening cries and screams from people who were struck by the vehicle. it's understood police are not treating the incident as terrorism and believe the suspect may have been fleeing another crime scene. a "person of interest" is in police custody. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. this was the scene seconds before the holiday parade descended into chaos and mayhem. all of a sudden, a red sports utility vehicle ploughed at high speed into a school marching band that was entertaining the crowd. the sequence of events was captured on video by the city's live stream of the parade and on the mobile phones of people there in person. much of it quickly shared in social media. oh, my god, no! horrified and screaming, the onlookers, families with children, fled for their lives as the suv sped off.
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the vehicle struck more than 20 individuals, some of the individuals were children and there was some fatalities as a result of this incident. we will not be releasing information on fatalities at this time, while we are working on notifying the family members of the deceased. police say an officer fired his gun at the vehicle to try to stop it. officials say no bystanders were injured as a result. the car has since been recovered and one person is in custody. today our community faced horror and tragedy in which should have been a community celebration. i'm deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went to a parade, but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. the white house said it is monitoring the situation and the fbi is helping the local authorities with their investigation. reports suggest the suspect was fleeing another scene, possibly a knife fight, when he ran into people at the parade. this was the town's first
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holiday parade after months of restrictions because of covid, but it ended in tragedy. reverend david simmons from st matthias episcopal church in waukesha was part of the parade and witnessed the incident. my church is right at the beginning of the parade route. there are stages and it starts off. at that point, a red car came in from the right. we found out later it had basically gone through police barriers further down main street, came into main street. as it passed the church at high speed, the driver was honking the horn, making a bunch of noise and swerving to the right to actually try to avoid people. many of us assumed he was somebody like a local resident who was really upset that a parade was going on and was trying to get round it. somebody who had blundered into the parade route. when he passed us, he started
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to accelerate and moved into the main part of where all the casualties actually occurred. at that point, i never heard gunshots, but at one point one of our policemen took three shots to try to stop the vehicle. and then police on our end of the street basically told us we needed to vacate the street. we always have our church open during this parade for rest rooms, for warmth, stuff like that. we started to pull people into the church, including a dance team. what ended up is we had a dance team, basically a church full of young girls and women and most of their parents were down at the other end of the parade route, waiting for them finish. it ended up they were told to shelter in other buildings.
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luckily with cell phones most kids could get hold of their parents and let them know they were safe at the other end of the zone. it took about two and a half hours to resolve that part of the story. cbs news reporter adam rife said the community was shocked by the tragedy and gave us this update on the latest. five people dead, more than a0 people injured but so many people were taken to hospital by their own cars, by their family and friends, and so those totals may be adjusted and we are waiting on the severity of many of those injuries as well. the police department, fire chief and mayor couldn't update us on all of those injuries. a very disturbing scene in the community of waukesha. 70,000 people live there. it's 20 minutes to the west of milwaukee. an suv at a:39pm local time ploughed through the back end of this parade, walking forward, and this suv came barrelling through the back end of the parade.
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it did not stop, it ran over so many people and then took off. they found the suv abandoned a short distance away and a short time later that person of interest was taken into custody, but most unsatisfying of all is we may not know the motive of that person. even if we did, it doesn'tjustify this action of course. we are waiting for an update from police and the city in seven hours from now. it is a little after aam local time, so we'll wake up to many different pieces of information as we try to get that from at least six different hospitals. has terrorism been completely ruled out? we asked those questions and they weren't addressed directly. we had three different news briefings and those questions were asked to make sure that we could cross them off the list. they didn't address it particularly and i know a lot of reporters in the room were upset that we didn't hear a yes and no. there have been rumours on social
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media that many are working to confirm not only the identity of the person of interest but also some of the domestic past, the criminal history that might be part of this gentleman. once we can confirm that i think will be able to piece it together but we aren't able to speculate, it is just supposition. we want to try and make sure we can tell the community this isn't part of a larger issue. police have said there is no threat right now. what's absolutely clear is the speed at which that vehicle drove through this very busy area. it's shocking to see how quickly it was moving when we look at the pictures. this was the 58th annual holiday christmas parade in waukesha. last year it was cancelled because of coronavirus. you can imagine how excited people were to come back out and kick off the holiday season here. there were elderly people, there is a dance troupe called the dancing grannies, a high school marching band, so many youth groups, children dressed in costumes ready to celebrate.
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when you see these terrifying images, one is sticking with me. so many youth groups. you see the car whizzing by at a speed that is difficult to judge because we are watching some of those videos slowed down to get a better look at the driver. the speed at which it went through and then just to know that person didn't slow down and just kept going. the government's being urged by senior conservatives to rethink the latest changes to its social care overhaul in england over concerns poorer people will be disproportionately affected. ministers insist the plans — which will be voted on in parliament this evening — will protect everyone from what they describe as the "catastrophic costs" of care. sally warren is the director of policy at the king's fund, a charitable organisation that works to improve health and care in england. welcome, thank you forjoining us. let'sjust work through
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welcome, thank you forjoining us. let's just work through then what these proposals are, because they have changed from what was initially understood in that the £86,000 ceiling for assets is going to take longer to basically run through for people who end up getting help. explain how things stand and how fair that is. ., explain how things stand and how fair that is. . , , explain how things stand and how fair that is— fair that is. yeah, so this is a technical. — fair that is. yeah, so this is a technical, but _ fair that is. yeah, so this is a technical, but very _ fair that is. yeah, so this is a technical, but very important change, back in september the prime minister announced a new cap for social care costs that was intended to mean none of us would face catastrophic costs for care if we were unlucky enough to have a long care journey. were unlucky enough to have a long carejourney. they were unlucky enough to have a long care journey. they said they based this on the care act, that act said what counted towards the cap was both what you personally paid and if you got support from your local authority through the means test system, that would count as well. in september, we thought this was a proposal that meant the max mum
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people would say was £86,000. what last week they announced was they intended to amend the care act to make it not the contributions of the local authority and it is just what you pay. so everybody will pay £86,000 to reach the capf you pay. so everybody will pay £86,000 to reach the cap f they have a long care journey. £86,000 to reach the cap f they have a long carejourney. the government says that is fair, a lot of people says that is fair, a lot of people say that is unfear, because £—— unfair, because if your house is worth £100,000 is a lot of, if you have a house of £500,000 it is a smaller proportion. it is is households that are at a lower level that are not protected. what households that are at a lower level that are not protected.— that are not protected. what is your view on the — that are not protected. what is your view on the fairness _ that are not protected. what is your view on the fairness of _ that are not protected. what is your view on the fairness of it? -
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that are not protected. what is your view on the fairness of it? i - that are not protected. what is your view on the fairness of it? i think i view on the fairness of it? i think that a cap _ view on the fairness of it? i think that a cap cost — view on the fairness of it? i think that a cap cost model— view on the fairness of it? i think that a cap cost model is - view on the fairness of it? i think that a cap cost model is the - view on the fairness of it? i think that a cap cost model is the best| that a cap cost model is the best way to share the cost between the government and the individual, but this change, although it is technical, does change how fair the scheme is. i would like mps to be thinking long and hard about whether they can vote to change legislation that means poorer households don't receive the same support from those costs. but the overall principle behind let's have a model that means none of us should face high costs, the change means that doesn't affect lower and moderate levels of wealth households. the lower and moderate levels of wealth households— lower and moderate levels of wealth households. ,., _ , ., households. the government says that nobody should — households. the government says that nobody should have _ households. the government says that nobody should have to _ households. the government says that nobody should have to sell— households. the government says that nobody should have to sell their - nobody should have to sell their home to pay the costs of care, is that true now with this change? l that true now with this change? i think it is very hard to imagine that can be true, so if you are for example living in hartlepool with an average house price of £128,000, how will you be able to pay that £86,000
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without needing to sell your house and use the assets to pay for that? i think a lot of people will be looking at these proposals and thinking, does that meet the manifesto commitment and the promise that the prime minister made us to not only fix social care, but mean i don't have to sell my house to pay for care. ., ~ don't have to sell my house to pay for care. ., ,, i. gareth southgate has been given a two—year contract extension after leading england to the euro final. the fa said they are delighted to confirm he has signed a new contract through to december 202a. i think that will mean if he sees that contract out, he becomes the third longest serving england manager of all time. i think it means he will be in place for eight years, so
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potentially on a par with bobby robson. you're watching bbc news. less than 1% of the population in england, account for more than 16% of all visits to accident and emergency departments. a study by the british red cross shows some of the people in this group — known as high intensity users — visit emergency departments more than 300 times a year. dominic hughes has this report. accident and emergency departments across the uk are busier than ever, with some patients facing long waits for treatment. now, a study of six years of nhs data reveals how a small number of people, known as high—intensity users, are returning to a&es time and time again. high—intensity use of an a&e department is defined as more than five visits in a year. while less than 0.7% of england's population fall into this category,
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nhs data from 2015 showed they accounted for a significant proportion — 16% of all a&e visits — and well over a quarter of all ambulance journeys, as well as 26% of all emergency hospital admissions in england. but specialist teams based in a&es across england can help to reduce frequent visits by offering individual support to people who feel hospital is their only option. the reasons for people attending a&e are quite complex, but it's often because they don't feel they've got anywhere else to go and they have fallen through the gaps between other services and teams previously. and we found that really interesting. there's a couple of cohorts, which are particular frequent attenders at a&e. there's younger people from the age of 22 to 29, who might have particular mental health problems as well as other issues. and those over 70, who have other complex issues, including chronic loneliness. so it's really important to work with people, to understand them as individuals, so we can get them the support that they need, hopefully before they even get to a&e.
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specialist help can cut repeat visits by more than 80%, potentially saving the nhs millions of pounds, and reducing the pressure on an already—stretched service. dominic hughes, bbc news. let's head to southend—on—sea now for the memorial service that is being held for the conservative mp sir david amess, who was killed last month. he was stabbed to death on 15th october. today in st mary's church is there a private service for those closest to him. we were hearing earlier from closest to him. we were hearing earlierfrom sir closest to him. we were hearing earlier from sir david friend and colleague, mark francois, who will deliver a eulogy. we have been hearing from his constituents about
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what a dedicated local mp he was and we herd from heard from the prime minister speaking about the feelings of affection, love and admiration he inspired as a result of the causes he espoused. there is now this private service. we can hear the church belling tolling and we will be back in southend for some of that a little bit later. the headlines on bbc news... at least five people are killed, and forty injured after a car drives at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin. into a christmas parade some conservative mps urge the government to rethink changes to funding social care in england — saying poorer people will be disproprtionately affected.
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there's further unrest over covid restrictions in europe. police have clashed with protestors in brussels — while austria has returned to full lockdown. now back to southend. our correspondent danjohnson is there. dan, just tell us what is happening. yes, people are gathering already for this memorial event, it doesn't start until1 o'clock, but the bells have started paling. this is —— started peeling. this is a huge day for this part of essex and everybody who knew sir david amess. this is the part of his funeral event that really is for the friends and family, close colleagues and his constituents to pay their respects. there is a full funeral service tomorrow at westminster cathedral, but this is a private memorial service for the closest friends and
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colleagues and then his coffin will be drawn through the streets of southend from 2pm. that is a real chance for everybody in this community to pay their respects, to thank their long—serving mp for the service he has given to this town, now to become a city, and to this constituency. somebody who knew him very well is david stanley, who was part of music man project. tell us what that project is. it is part of music man pro'ect. tell us what that project is._ what that pro'ect is. it is a full-time — what that project is. it is a full-time muse _ what that project is. it is a full-time muse -time - what that project is. it is a i full-time muse -time music what that project is. it is a _ full-time muse -time music education full—time muse —time music education for people _ full—time muse —time music education for people with learning difficulties.— for people with learning difficulties. ~ ., ., ,, difficulties. we saw footage of sir david introducing _ difficulties. we saw footage of sir david introducing the _ difficulties. we saw footage of sir david introducing the choir- difficulties. we saw footage of sir david introducing the choir at - difficulties. we saw footage of sir david introducing the choir at the | david introducing the choir at the albert hall. david introducing the choir at the albert hall-— david introducing the choir at the albert hall. . ., ,, albert hall. thanks to sir david, we erformed albert hall. thanks to sir david, we performed at _ albert hall. thanks to sir david, we performed at the _ albert hall. thanks to sir david, we performed at the albert _ albert hall. thanks to sir david, we performed at the albert hall, - albert hall. thanks to sir david, we | performed at the albert hall, where sir david _ performed at the albert hall, where sir david stood up in front of thousands of people to congratulate our musicians and to tell them that whatever— our musicians and to tell them that whatever they wanted to do, they
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could _ whatever they wanted to do, they could achieve.— whatever they wanted to do, they could achieve. this was one of the causes, could achieve. this was one of the causes. the _ could achieve. this was one of the causes, the charities, _ could achieve. this was one of the causes, the charities, the - causes, the charities, the organisations that he was deeply involved in, deeply committed to for a long time?— a long time? yes, i have known sir david for over _ a long time? yes, i have known sir david for over 25 _ a long time? yes, i have known sir david for over 25 years. _ a long time? yes, i have known sir david for over 25 years. he - a long time? yes, i have known sir| david for over 25 years. he became the president of the music man project— the president of the music man project and helped break through that glass ceiling to extend the project — that glass ceiling to extend the project around the country, indeed we have _ project around the country, indeed we have managed to reach communities around _ we have managed to reach communities around the _ we have managed to reach communities around the world, and perform at places— around the world, and perform at places like — around the world, and perform at places like the royal albert hall. that is _ places like the royal albert hall. that is largely thanks to the drive of sir— that is largely thanks to the drive of sir david helping me. a that is largely thanks to the drive of sir david helping me.— of sir david helping me. a real motivating _ of sir david helping me. a real motivating force, _ of sir david helping me. a real motivating force, a _ of sir david helping me. a real i motivating force, a cheerleader? yes, champion is the best way to describe — yes, champion is the best way to describe it — yes, champion is the best way to describe it. he championed those less easy— describe it. he championed those less easy to reach communities, perhaps— less easy to reach communities, perhaps those with learning disabilities and that is howl perhaps those with learning disabilities and that is how i would like to— disabilities and that is how i would like to remember sir david, as well as a friend. — like to remember sir david, as well as a friend, but somebody who championed those who might be
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forgotten by others. not championed those who might be forgotten by others.— championed those who might be forgotten by others. not 'ust work that is in the h forgotten by others. not 'ust work that is in the spot h forgotten by others. not 'ust work that is in the spot lite, _ forgotten by others. notjust work that is in the spot lite, but - forgotten by others. notjust work that is in the spot lite, but a - that is in the spot lite, but a commitment, work that he put in time and time again? yes commitment, work that he put in time and time again?— and time again? yes for 20 years, alwa s and time again? yes for 20 years, always turning _ and time again? yes for 20 years, always turning up _ and time again? yes for 20 years, always turning up to _ and time again? yes for 20 years, always turning up to events, - and time again? yes for 20 years, | always turning up to events, always talking _ always turning up to events, always talking and — always turning up to events, always talking and opening doors. and giving — talking and opening doors. and giving us — talking and opening doors. and giving us self belief, he he said it, i believed it and i know the students — it, i believed it and i know the students did as well. he it, i believed it and i know the students did as well.— it, i believed it and i know the students did as well. he had an ambition for _ students did as well. he had an ambition for you _ students did as well. he had an ambition for you to _ students did as well. he had an ambition for you to play - students did as well. he had an ambition for you to play on - students did as well. he had an i ambition for you to play on broad way. ambition for you to play on broad wa . , ambition for you to play on broad wa , , ambition for you to play on broad wa . , , , ambition for you to play on broad wa. , , way. yes he said next step broad way so, wh way. yes he said next step broad way so. why can't — way. yes he said next step broad way so. why can't we _ way. yes he said next step broad way so, why can't we take _ way. yes he said next step broad way so, why can't we take them _ way. yes he said next step broad way so, why can't we take them to - way. yes he said next step broad way so, why can't we take them to broad | so, why can't we take them to broad way for— so, why can't we take them to broad way for that— so, why can't we take them to broad way for that amazing night? its way for that amazing night? important way for that amazing night? it; important for you to be here? way for that amazing night? its i important for you to be here? yes way for that amazing night? its - important for you to be here? yes it is a real moment _ important for you to be here? yes it is a real moment for _ important for you to be here? yes it is a real moment for us _ important for you to be here? yes it is a real moment for us all - important for you to be here? yes it is a real moment for us all in - is a real moment for us all in southend. _ is a real moment for us all in southend, his friends that he did so much _ southend, his friends that he did so much for. _ southend, his friends that he did so much for, for us to say thank you and to— much for, for us to say thank you and to honour him. it much for, for us to say thank you and to honour him.— much for, for us to say thank you and to honour him. it was a shocking event, his death, _ and to honour him. it was a shocking event, his death, how— and to honour him. it was a shocking event, his death, how do _ and to honour him. it was a shocking event, his death, how do you - and to honour him. it was a shocking event, his death, how do you feel. event, his death, how do you feel people are dealing with the
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aftermath of that? i people are dealing with the aftermath of that?- people are dealing with the aftermath of that? i think people are still coming _ aftermath of that? i think people are still coming to _ aftermath of that? i think people are still coming to terms - aftermath of that? i think people are still coming to terms with - aftermath of that? i think people | are still coming to terms with the shock _ are still coming to terms with the shock we — are still coming to terms with the shock. we think obviously most of all of— shock. we think obviously most of all of his— shock. we think obviously most of all of his family. but the legacy, you know— all of his family. but the legacy, you know i — all of his family. but the legacy, you know i talked about this a lot, the legacy— you know i talked about this a lot, the legacy of sir david in the city of southend and we must continue to celebrate _ of southend and we must continue to celebrate everything that he has achieved — celebrate everything that he has achieved throughout his time as our mp. ., ., ., ., mp. you will do that through the choir? iwill— mp. you will do that through the choir? i will do _ mp. you will do that through the choir? i will do through - mp. you will do that through the choir? i will do through my - choir? i will do through my musicians _ choir? i will do through my musicians with _ choir? i will do through my musicians with learning - choir? i will do through my - musicians with learning disabilities and we _ musicians with learning disabilities and we will do what we can to make it as big _ and we will do what we can to make it as big and — and we will do what we can to make it as big and as best as we can make it as big and as best as we can make it in his _ it as big and as best as we can make it in his name — it as big and as best as we can make it in his name-— it in his name. thank you for speaking _ it in his name. thank you for speaking us _ it in his name. thank you for speaking us to _ it in his name. thank you for speaking us to ahead - it in his name. thank you for speaking us to ahead of - it in his name. thank you for - speaking us to ahead of memorial service. we are grateful to everyone who has shared their memories of sir david amess. there is a huge column of navy cadets heading into the church. sir david's coffin will be carried by members of essex fire and rescue and then that court edge
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going through the streets will be escorted by members of essex police force. this gives you a sense of sir david amess as the constituent mp, as an essex man, a guy who championed his part of the country, instead of searching for the national spotlight as possibly some politicians may focus on, somebody who put in the ground work and stood up who put in the ground work and stood up for his constituent and is recognised, respected and thanked by loads of people here and they will be taking the chance today to do that. it is a private memorial service for people who knew sir david personally. but it will be carried on bbc essex, or they can see their coffin being drawn through the streets from 2 am and then that funeral service at westminster tomorrow. thank you.
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austria has returned to a full national lockdown to try and stem the rise of covid infections in the country. non—essential shops have closed and workers are being encouraged to work from home. new restrictions have sparked protests throughout europe, including in belgium where demonstrators clashed with police. translation: by the end of this winter, as is sometimes cynically said, everyone will be vaccinated, recovered or dead. that said, everyone will be vaccinated, recovered or dead.— recovered or dead. that was the german health _ recovered or dead. that was the german health minister. - our correspondentjessica parker is in brussels and can tell us about the situation across europe. germany following austria in making vaccinations come pulse prince. it o' —— vaccinations come pulse prince. it o' -- compulsory- _ vaccinations come pulse prince. it o' -- compulsory. it— vaccinations come pulse prince. it o' -- compulsory. it is— vaccinations come pulse prince. it o' -- compulsory. it is worth - o' -- compulsory. it is worth ttickin o' -- compulsory. it is worth picking up — o' -- compulsory. it is worth picking up on _ o' -- compulsory. it is worth picking up on that _ o' -- compulsory. it is worth picking up on that clip - o' -- compulsory. it is worth picking up on that clip saying o' -- compulsory. it is worth i picking up on that clip saying by the end of winter everyone in germany will be vaccinated,
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recovered or dead. i mean, it is incredibly stark message from a politician. and i think it is off the back of a few weeks of build up where we have seen politicians speaking out, including the outgoing german chancellor, angela merkel. we have seen it how suddenly everything can change, it almost feels overnight. the warning signs have been there, there has been a push for more people to get vaccinated, but suddenly it feels like a crunch moment. overthe but suddenly it feels like a crunch moment. over the weekend, a protest here in brussels yesterday, in the city here, the capital of belgium, saw violent protests, things being set on fire, police using water cannon, as some people and the government are saying it is a minority of people, make their feelings clear about the restrictions that have been brought in in belgium. here it is mandatory
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to work from home four days a work, unless you can't work from home, because of the nature of yourjob, they're extending the use of face mask, children from ten years and above have to wear face masks and extending the use of covid safe pass. when i go into a cafe, i have to get my phone out and show i have been doubled vaccinated. they are strict on it. and show i have been doubled vaccinated. they are strict on it. yesterday, somebody�*s phone wasn't working and we couldn't go into the cafe. they're trying to crackdown on that there. as we are seeing here and other parts, there are people who are angry about the kinds of decisions that governments are making. we have seen that kind of debate in the uk as well, but not the type of clashes that we saw in brussels yesterday. it is the type of clashes that we saw in brussels yesterday.— brussels yesterday. it is a mixed ticture in brussels yesterday. it is a mixed picture in terms _ brussels yesterday. it is a mixed picture in terms of _ brussels yesterday. it is a mixed picture in terms of the _ brussels yesterday. it is a mixed picture in terms of the numbers| brussels yesterday. it is a mixed i picture in terms of the numbers and the decisions being taken. what is the decisions being taken. what is the sense of how much unity there might be between eu countries in
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terms of the thresholds for certain measures? ., terms of the thresholds for certain measures? . ., terms of the thresholds for certain measures?— terms of the thresholds for certain measures? . ., ., ., ~ ., , measures? yeah, i mean, look, as the call measures? yeah, i mean, look, as they call it. — measures? yeah, i mean, look, as they call it. is _ measures? yeah, i mean, look, as they call it. is a — measures? yeah, i mean, look, as they call it, is a national _ they call it, is a national competence, it is up to national governments as to what they want to do. in some cases regional governments. in germany different regional governments have taken different decisions. the more urgent people feel the situation is getting, the more you will see national measures taken. clearly, this fourth wave of covid is causing concern and what is behind? listening to somebody from the world health organization over the weekend, they put it down to the delta variant so, minister transmissible and the fact that we are entering the winter, and that allows coronavirus spread more and you see a greater strain on health services, because of other illnesses and some people are saying it is a
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sort of pandemic of unvaccinated. those who haven't been vaccinated, you see lower rates in austria, where they are bringing in this lockdown and concerns about waning immunity and you're getting this emphasis on booster shots. thank ou. and coming up at a.30 this afternoon we'll be speaking to two experts on what the big spike in covid infections in europe could mean for the uk. get in touch with the hashtag #bbcyourquestions — or you email yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good afternoon. after the mild weather we have had this autumn, there is no doubt things have changed. it is chilly out there now. for most of us we have sunshine, but you can see on the radar this stream of showers across the south—east of england into the channel islands. we will keep those showers through the
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afternoon. more cloud in north—west scotland and northern ireland with some drizzle and temperatures topping at ten degrees. tonight some showers in the south—east. more cloud in the north. that will hold the temperatures up where the skies remain clear in the midlands and wales and southern england, a frosty night. some fog patches too. generally ly, the best of sunshine tomorrow to the south, more cloud to the temperature. —— north. a milder day on tuesday won't last for the rest of week. it is turning colder. by rest of week. it is turning colder. by friday unsettled with showers that could turn wintry in places.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. at least five people are killed and a0 injured after a car drives at high speed into a christmas
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parade in the us state of wisconsin. it was so sudden and so quick. the truck came out of nowhere and all of a sudden you just hear this sound of people getting hit. the sound was crazy. the sound was scarring and so was the image of it, seeing that happen to innocent people and seeing that aftermath. some conservative mps urge the government to rethink changes to funding social care in england saying poorer people will be disproprtionately affected. you go through a whole tonne of guilt about not being able to care for your parents. they cared for you and then you get into a system where you literally have to fight for funding. there's further unrest over covid restrictions in europe. police have clashed with protestors in brussels while austria has returned to full lockdown. and less than 1% of the population in england account for more than 16% of visits to accident and emergency departments according to a new study.
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let's go back to those tragic events in wisconsin where five people have been killed and dozens injured after a car drove at high speed into a christmas parade. one waukesha family at the parade describe what they saw. just a warning that some of the details you are about to hear are distressing, and you may wish to turn the sound down for a few minutes. my my husband said... so, ijust remember him saying, is that guy trying to go around the parade? and i looked over and as i looked over, i started to hear a lot of screaming and just saw a red suv coming towards us. so all i could think of was to get my family back. and as we were getting back, i heard. iheard... and saw. ..people being hit, but what you could do more than seeing is hearing and just that sound was insane.
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so we got back towards the building we were standing in front of, and as he went by, it was like everybody keeps saying it was just kind of slow motion. it was just a lot of silence. you saw the people on the ground. it happened so suddenly and so quick. and the truck came out of nowhere. and all of a sudden you just hear the sound of people getting hit. the sound was crazy. the sound was scarred and so wasjust seeing seeing that happen to some people and seeing the aftermath just because your mind isjust really pure confusion and anger. and it'sjust it's frustrating because it's so stressful of a situation. i'm a i'm a nurse and my mother—in—law was saying going to help people. i went out there. the first gentleman resort on the ground, he had people by him, he was alert and awake. we moved on from him across the road and that's when we came across the
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little boy that was in the road. turning purple. i didn't really have to do cpr on him, but i felt his knack for a pulse and he had one, but his eyes were barely open and his face, all i can remember as his sweet little innocent face was purple. he wasn't really with us. he went through all six blocks of the parade _ went through all six blocks of the parade and i think his motive was pure _ parade and i think his motive was pure evik — parade and i think his motive was ture evil. . ., parade and i think his motive was ture evil. . . , ., , , , pure evil. what blows my mind is that it is all _ pure evil. what blows my mind is that it is all kids _ pure evil. what blows my mind is that it is all kids in _ pure evil. what blows my mind is that it is all kids in the _ pure evil. what blows my mind is that it is all kids in the parade. i that it is all kids in the parade. it's just that it is all kids in the parade. it'sjust a parade that it is all kids in the parade. it's just a parade of kids. we that it is all kids in the parade. it'sjust a parade of kids. we had a group up hug. you are together. you know something crazyjust happened and you _ know something crazyjust happened and you can't comprehend it yet. you come _ and you can't comprehend it yet. you come together as a family with a group _ come together as a family with a group hug. we are safe. all night
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we've _ group hug. we are safe. all night we've just — group hug. we are safe. all night we've just been together as a family to talk— we've just been together as a family to talk through it. tell each other how we _ to talk through it. tell each other how we are — to talk through it. tell each other how we are all feeling and i think it helps — how we are all feeling and i think it helps it — how we are all feeling and i think it helps. it helps you deliver that in own _ it helps. it helps you deliver that in own way. with the way our family works. _ in own way. with the way our family works. if_ in own way. with the way our family works. if one — in own way. with the way our family works, if one of us need something, we know— works, if one of us need something, we know to — works, if one of us need something, we know to reach out to each other. we are _ we know to reach out to each other. we are a _ we know to reach out to each other. we are a small community. this kind of stuff does not happen here. we hear about it, but now that we are hearing the injuries and stuff coming through, we all know somebody or knows somebody who knows somebody. we will definitely all be here for each other. i hope that i can see this little boy make it through and see him and his family. i would love to give him a hug if he's ok. wisconsin's state representative — sara rodriguez — was also at the parade and told us what she saw. i was in the parade, i was a little bit earlier in the parade, and we had just finished i was walking with the waukesha
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county democrats when there were people running and yelling and telling everybody to get off the street because a car had come through that main area of the parade and hit multiple people. and so what we are hearing today officially is that they have around 23 people who have been injured and taken to the hospital, and that includes multiple children. and so they do have somebody of interest today. they have lifted the lockdown for downtown waukesha, although they are still investigating. there's just a lot that we need to be able to learn from this and we don't have all the answers right now. i'm in a state of shock and these are the kids that my kids go to school with. these are the parents that i know when we go to the schools. and, you know, i have been on the phone all evening with different parents that i know, checking in on people to see if they're ok, getting updates from kids
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and other people's parents who may have been affected. and this was just a tragedy. and we're going to learn more about why it happened. let's get more now on the vote in parliament this evening, on the latest changes to the social care overhaul in england. julia knight's mother is currently in a care home in lincolnshire. she tells us about her experience with the social care system and how the proposed reforms will affect her family. the proposalfor the cap of £86,000, only covers what they are terming personal care. so that is washing, dressing, feeding. so, it is not an £86,000 cap, because somebody is still going to have to pay for the rest of the fees that the care home charges. so how does this make you feel? ifeel really sad, because i know what a difficult, what a really
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difficult time i have had trying to do my best by my parents. i think one thing that... people who are trying to implement this system, one thing they don't take into account, is if you get a parent in their late 805, 90, their children are often in their late 60s, 705, often have long—term conditions themselves and find it impossible to find 2a needs care. so you go through a whole lot of guilt about not being able to care for your parents, they cared for you, and then you get into a system where you have to fight for funding, so the whole system of funding per se needs looking at, because when i think about my dad, who had such limited abilities was turned down for funding
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without even a second, there is no right of appeal. and lucky enough, because i am a retired nurse, i did have the background to challenge the system and in the end i won, but it was at great cost to myself, because when we were going through all this, he, we finally did get the funding, but he died shortly afterwards and within a couple of weeks, my mum had covid as well, so you can imagine what a year we had. and it's continuously for me, it's fighting the system. now i have got to fight it for my mum as well, because she is notjudged to need any funding. i just see that the complexities of the social care are so great, we are just, i think we are just tinkering with the edges. as someone who has had to navigate
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it, are there changes that would make a difference to somebody like you? i think obviously, the financial cost is huge and you know i mean i have every sympathy for local councils who are in this position. but the people who are going to start making changes are trying to make changes, because i remember the prime minister standing on the steps of downing street saying that nobody would ever have to sell their house again. well, that's, you know, that's... that is going to happen, that is plainly going to happen. but i think the people who are in the system already need to be listened to. listened to the distress it causes. you know, people rarely talk to the people who it's happening to. and until they do, i don't think
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we will have a fair system. workshops to help men understand sexual harassment and abuse against women have started in nottingham. they re thought to be the first courses of their kind in the country to help men challenge or intervene when they see women being targeted. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports. a training session but unlike one you have experienced before. we need guys like you who are wanting to make a difference. these men have come to learn about how to be a good ally for women. if people get away with stuff at a lower level... the stand by her programme is a men's only workshop about sexual harassment and abuse faced by women, created by a community group and the charity women's aid. this programme is for men that want to be allies in making a difference in relation to women's safety. it is not a programme for perpetrators, so this programme
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will help to give them the skills, knowledge and confidence to be more effective in intervening when they see women getting unwanted attention but also raise their confidence in talking to other men in their networks and also other young boys in their network as well. i feel threatened, laughed at. seven out of ten women have experienced some form of sexual harassment in public according to a recent poll. i love a good laugh with my colleagues and things. sometimes the line is crossed and it is the word banter that almost makes it acceptable. compliment. i am not sure when to compliment. these sessions are designed for men to reflect on their own personal experiences with advice on how to intervene effectively when help is needed. somebody was punching this women on the floor under a street light and he said, "she's my girlfriend,"
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and she said, "it's all right." it stopped the violence, but it's hard to intervene sometimes because you do not know the dynamics. what we wanted to do is be dynamic and look at masculinity notjust as toxic masculinity which we see the response of and the effects of, we wanted to see and support men to use healthy masculinity to support us. we are not asking to be rescued by men, we are asking to be supported by men. more workshops are running in greater manchester and london in the next few weeks. it is hoped through doing these courses men will put into practice what they have learned and go on to educate other men and boys in their communities.
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the energy company bulb is entering special administration, the biggest of the energy firms so far to go into administration as a result of the increasing pressures through the extra gusts of gas in particular. ? gusts. they have 1.7 million customers, 1.6% of the energy markets a lot of customers affected by this news. let me read from a statement they put out saying we've made the difficult decision to support boulder being placed into special administration. it's designed to protect members and ensure there is no change to your supply and your credit balance is protected. so they say that your tariffs are not changing and the price cap applies to all consumer energy tariffs. if you pay by top up coming will continue to work as normal. they are trying to reassure with the statement saying they are
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expecting a high volume of calls today so please only call if it's an emergency, in a vulnerable situation or struggling to pay your bills. obviously, as we have heard, when other energy companies have gone under, there is now this process where ofgem basically takes over switching the customers from that firm to another, so it should be seamless if you are a customer, but that one of the biggest casualties of what's been happening in the energy market. bulbs gone into special administration, which affects 1.7 million customers so we will bring you more on that as we get it. as we've been hearing, a memorial service for conservative mp sir david amess, who was killed last month, will get underway soon in his southend constituency. he'll not only be remembered for his work as a politician, having served as an mp for nearly a0 years, but also for his friendship and compassion as zoe conway explains. let's go live to southend where people are gathering for that
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service. the locals wait for it to begin at one o'clock. there are two services, the local one and then there is a full requiem mass at westminster cathedral tomorrow, but his widow said she wanted there to be two services, the first here in southend so the town can grieve and pay its respects, and then, because he was a strong catholic and his face was very important to him, there is also going to be a full requiem mass at westminster cathedral tomorrow, so we will go back there but let's just get this report from zoe connolly. # i walked across an empty land # i knew the pathway like the back of my hand # i felt the earth beneath my feet # sat by the river and it
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made me complete...# the southend vox choir are singing somewhere only we know, the song sir david amess always asked for when he came to see them. # oh, simple thing # where have you gone # i'm getting tired and i need someone to rely on.# he wasn'tjust the choir�*s mp, he was their patron, their friend. he knew most of our members by name. he would recall previous performances. he wasn'tjust there as the mp sir david amess, he was there as david — as a person with a family and with friends. and he definitely felt like he was one of us. yeah. he understood that music could be good. he understood. he enjoyed music himself.
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and he knew that music could, you know, bring a community together. and that was what he enjoyed. he enjoyed, again, seeing all of those people. # is this the place?# sir david was known as mr southend. he loved the place. he loved the people. lakh sandhu and his father, sandy, turned to sir david for help two years ago. lakh had been imprisoned for months without charge in prague in the czech republic. straight away, he met my family. he even came over and visited me to make sure that my conditions were good. how i was. that was quite heartwarming. i didn't really expect that from an mp, but he just was worried about myself and especially my family, to make sure that this horrific ordeal was going to come to an end. sir david raised lakh's case in parliament, wrote to the foreign secretary. a year later, a judge ordered
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that lakh be released and he was later acquitted. it was a personal issue of my son, problem. and i like to recall him as a public servant. i saw him helping so many people. he was... we all will miss him. he came to my allotment and it was summertime and i had beans ready to take. he said, "can i take some beans, please?" i was too happy to give it to him. this year's winner of westminster dog of the year is vivien. - and in memory of sir david amess. sir david's dog vivien was crowned westminster dog of the year after his death, but he didn'tjust care about his bulldog. he was passionate about the welfare of all dogs. he was a frequent visitor here at the dogs home in basildon. he was a really enthusiastic
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and empathetic person and had a really lovely energy about him. you know, he was a great supporter of some of the campaigns that we're involved in as an organisation, including our puppy pilot taskforce, to end the cruel puppy smuggling trade. so, you know, he was a real, real champion for the underdog, if you pardon the pun. southend is notjust saying goodbye to its mp. the city is saying goodbye to its most passionate champion. # this could be the end of everything. # so why don't we go. # somewhere only we know.# our correspondent danjohnson is in southend and joins me now. we are minutes away from that service beginning.—
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we are minutes away from that service beginning. yeah, the service officially commences _ service beginning. yeah, the service officially commences at _ service beginning. yeah, the service officially commences at 1pm. i service beginning. yeah, the service officially commences at 1pm. this i service beginning. yeah, the service officially commences at 1pm. this is| officially commences at 1pm. this is a memorial service primarily for sir david amess's family, friends and some of his closest colleagues here in southend, in this corner of essex. the constituency that he represented for so many years and had done so much work for and, as you head on that report, he really is a towering figure in this part of the country. he's done so much work for so many communities, organisations and charities here, i've just got the list of charities people are being asked to donate to at the end of the service today. it gives you a real clear sense of the variety of interests sir david put his energy into evils of the collection today is for the endometriosis uk charity, the music man project, we were hearing about that area, the music project for
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people with learning difficulties sir david had supported for many, many years. for the prostate charity, supporting prostate cancer. for the dogs trust, we know he was a keen dog lover and a big supporter on animal welfare issues and for the dame vera lynn memorial statue fund, so a really varied range of interests, and that characterises the sort of mp he was. notjust that he had a range of interests, but that he was also very deeply committed to those various charities and organisations and groups, and he had given his time and energy, anybody here will tell you, so much over so many years and that was something he did very honestly, very generously and very determinedly, not just something generously and very determinedly, notjust something he did to be in the spotlight or to get attention, but something he actually practically put effort, hours and work into to make them a success. so people here in this city could be
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proud, and that's why there are so many people here today as sir david amess's coffin arrived here at st mary's church for the first part of this memorial service. this is the part of his funeral that is for his constituents and for people here in the community that he represented for so many years. there will be a memorial service here with hymns and prayers, with readings that will be given by his fellow mps, byjames sutton bridge and mark francois, and there will be a statement read here on behalf of his family, and, although we are celebrating, marking, reflecting the positives of his life today, and focusing on the way he lived and worked rather than the way he died, it is perhaps worth reflecting for a moment today on the situation that his family are left in. they have had a really tough time since he was killed so brutally just over a month ago. if ijust read you a few words from a
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statement. this will be read to the congregation here in the church in the next hour. they say strong and courageous is an appropriate way to describe david. they say he was a patriot, and a man of peace, so they asked people to set aside their differences to show kindness and love to all, they say that is the only way forward, to set aside hatred and to work towards togetherness. they say, as a family, we are trying to understand why this awful thing has occurred, and nobody should die in that way, nobody, they say. please, let some good come from this tragedy. his family say we are absolutely broken. but we will survive and carry on for the sake of a wonderful and inspiring man and it is that positive sentiment that comes through from everybody who seems to have had dealings with sir david amess, as their mp, as a friend, as a colleague, as a
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cheerleader and supporter for so many good causes and organisations here in southend and across this part of essex. he represented basildon, as well in parliament, and he really had been somebody who had stood up for his constituents at every possible opportunity. his coffin will be carried today by members of essex fire and rescue service and later, after this memorial service, service and later, after this memorialservice, his service and later, after this memorial service, his coffin will be drawn through the streets of southend, and that is a point for people here in this community to really line the streets and pay their respects. and his coffin will be escorted by officers of essex police, so you really get a sense today this county and this to be city, is putting on its best and showing its respect to a figure who really towered above all aspects of
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life here. his big campaign, has one overarching mission had been for so many years to get southend status as a city and that will now happen and that will be part of his legacy to southend. but there's so much here people want to reflect on today, from his life, his work, to causes his champions and the figure that he was for everybody here.— was for everybody here. thank you. so much we — was for everybody here. thank you. so much we didn't _ was for everybody here. thank you. so much we didn't know _ was for everybody here. thank you. so much we didn't know and i was for everybody here. thank you. so much we didn't know and we i was for everybody here. thank you. so much we didn't know and we arej so much we didn't know and we are learning from all of those interviews you have been doing and even his family, those closest to them of course, are said they're so grateful for everyone who is getting in touch with a family because there's so much she was doing even they didn't know about. the latest news coming up with ben brown right now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. after the mild weather we've had this autumn it is now cold out
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there. bright for most of us, of sunshine around and a satellite picture reveals more cloud in the north of the uk and some speckled shower clouds plaguing eastern and southern parts, east anglia, perhaps kent and the channel islands will see some showers through the afternoon. more cloud across north—west scotland, northern ireland, the odd spot of this autumn sunshine in between and temperatures between 9—11. through this evening and tonight, we keep the showers in the far south—east, clear skies for southern parts and we will see mist and fog developing through parts of east wales, and into the midlands, but under those clear skies in the south, there will be another cold and frosty night. further north, not as cold because we will have more cloud, selling gray's start for much of scotland, northern ireland, northern england and indeed parts of north wales to tomorrow morning. the cloud producing the odd spot of rain and drizzle at times and some fog patches could linger for east wales into the midlands and we will keep some showers going across the far south—east but generally speaking,
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the best of the sunshine tomorrow will be found across southern parts and, for some, maybe not quite as cold with highs of 9—10. that's only a temporary feature because as we get into wednesday, this band of rain sinks its way south eastwards and ahead of it, a lot of cloud and mist and murk but behind the rain, the air is set to turn colder and brighter skies for scotland and northern ireland, some showers and a decidedly chilly feel. as we move into thursday, we push this frontal system south—east eastwards and it's a cold front as the name suggests behind the front, the air will be turning colder bring you down from the north at this time of year and it always means there will be something of a chill. but another very bright day on thursday and quite a lot of sunshine. some showers especially for coastal areas and some of these will be minted over the high ground and to lower levels for a time in the far north of scotland, those of the afternoon highs on thursday. single digits for just about all of us and them, as we get into friday, this low pressure
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dives its way down from the north and this will turn things more unsettled with some brisk winds, some showers at times, and depending onjust how cold some showers at times, and depending on just how cold the air gaps, some of those showers will turn wintry so it stays cold through the week.
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a car is driven at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin, killing five people and injuring more than a0. police are holding the driver in custody but they don't believe there was a terrorist motive. today, our community faced horror and tragedy in what should have been and tragedy in what should have been a community celebration. i am deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went to a parade but ended up community went to a parade but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. children are thought to be among the victims. we'll be live with our correspondent in the united states also this lunchtime... mps vote today on the government's controversial plans to overhaul social care in england with a cap of £86,000.

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