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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 22, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. lam iamjames i am james reynolds. the headlines: a car is driven at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin, killing five people and injuring more than a0. police are holding the driver in custody. the incident doesn't appear to be an act of terrorism. today are community faced horror and tragedy in what should have been a community celebration. i am deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went to a parade, but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. mps vote today on the government's controversial plans to overhaul social care in england with a cap of £86,000. bulb energy is set to appoint administrators. the energy firm, which has 1.7 million customers, is the latest uk energy company to face difficulties, after a sharp rise in wholesale gas prices.
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empty streets as austria becomes the first country in europe to reimpose a lockdown amid a surge in covid cases. a memorial service and procession is held in southend — to remember the mp sir david amess — who was stabbed to death last month. a bbc investigation has found that two mothers who died of herpes after giving birth could have been infected by a single surgeon. and going the extra mile — rugby league star kevin sinfield attempts to run 101 miles in a day for motor neurone disease research. good afternoon and welcome to bbc
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news. five people have been killed and more than a0 injured after a car was driven at high speed into a christmas parade in the american state of wisconsin. children are among the victims. police in the town of waukesha have arrested the driver of the vehicle. they say it does not appear to be an act of terrorism, and that the suspect may have been fleeing a crime scene. peter bowes sent this report. this was the scene seconds before the holiday parade in waukesha descended into chaos and mayhem. all of a sudden, a red sports utility vehicle ploughed at high speed into a school marching band that was entertaining the crowd. the sequence of events was captured on video by the city's live stream of the parade, and on the mobile phones of the people there in person. much of it was quickly shared in social media. oh, my god! horrified and screaming, the onlookers, families with children, fled for their lives as the suv sped off. the vehicle struck more than 20 individuals. some of the individuals
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were children, and there are some fatalities as a result of this incident. we will not be releasing information on fatalities at this time, while we are working on notifying the family members of the deceased. police say an officer fired his gun at the vehicle to try to stop it. officials say no bystanders were injured as a result. the car has since been recovered and one person is in custody. today, our community faced horror and tragedy in what should have been a community celebration. i'm deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went to a parade but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. the white house says it's monitoring the situation and the fbi is helping the local authorities with their investigation. reports suggest the suspect was fleeing another scene, possibly a knife fight, when he ran into people at the parade. this was the town's first holiday parade after months of restrictions because of covid, but it ended in tragedy. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles.
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let's talk to our washington correspondent, gary 0'donoghue. given recent years, the default assumption when we see news like this is terrorism. but what are the police saying in this case?- police saying in this case? well, the are police saying in this case? well, they are not _ police saying in this case? well, they are not saying _ police saying in this case? well, they are not saying that - police saying in this case? well, they are not saying that at - police saying in this case? well, they are not saying that at this | they are not saying that at this point in time and i think it is worth noting that the local police are still in charge of this investigation and if there is any indication that there is terrorism involved they will hand over typically to the fbi pretty quickly because it becomes a federal crime and a federal investigation. that has not happened at this stage, so as things look at the moment it does not seem like they are treating it in that way. however, they are not really saying much, to be honest, they have not said much since some news came out in the early hours. we are waiting for another update from them, particularly whether or not they have any indication of what the
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motive might be, whether or not this person or persons in the car had given any sign of what they were up to, whether they are talking even to the police because of course they don't have to answer any questions whatsoever if they don't want to and meanwhile the police are going about the business of securing the crime scene, gathering the evidence, all that video evidence that is out there on social media and also the terrible job of informing the families of those who have been injured and those who have been killed. fin injured and those who have been killed. ., ,., injured and those who have been killed. ., , ., ., killed. on that point, gary, what do we know about _ killed. on that point, gary, what do we know about those _ killed. on that point, gary, what do we know about those who _ killed. on that point, gary, what do we know about those who have - killed. on that point, gary, what do| we know about those who have been injured and killed?— injured and killed? well, we know there are five _ injured and killed? well, we know there are five people _ injured and killed? well, we know there are five people who - injured and killed? well, we know there are five people who died. i there are five people who died. there are around a0 who are injured. we know we think that some of those who died may have been part of one of the marching and dancing groups that was in that parade. again, it is pretty sketchy at the moment. if you look at the terrible video, you see the redcar going along the
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right—hand side of the road and then it veers left and ploughs into the back of a marching band from a local high school. the black shirt marching band. you can see it effectively goes through the left hand side of that band as it continues down the road. we understand that after that it also started to hit people in a sort of dance group, young girls with pom—poms on their hands in a dance group and also a dance group of older women, group and also a dance group of olderwomen, grannies dancing, as they were described and as they have described themselves, so it could be injuries and deaths among all these groups. but no name is being released at this stage, but the police do have this one individual in custody and they do seem to have his red suv, which seems to have been the vehicle that caused all the damage after having crashed through these police barriers at the beginning of the parade. gar? beginning of the parade. gary o'donoghue _ beginning of the parade. gary o'donoghue in _ beginning of the parade. gary o'donoghue in washington, thank you.
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mps are expected to vote today on the government's plans to overhaul social care in england. the changes will see a cap of £86,000 on the amount people have to pay towards their own care. but labour says homeowners in poorer parts of the country will end up losing a larger proportion of their assets than those in more affluent areas. 0ur political correspondent, ben wright, is in westminster. then, not only labour, but some conservatives are unhappy with this, i understand?— i understand? yes, they are. it is uuite i understand? yes, they are. it is quite difficult _ i understand? yes, they are. it is quite difficult to _ i understand? yes, they are. it is quite difficult to gauge _ i understand? yes, they are. it is quite difficult to gauge at - i understand? yes, they are. it is quite difficult to gauge at the - quite difficult to gauge at the moment how many and how sharp their anger is. there is a vote in the house of commons this evening on this, which will give us a good indication of how the conservative backbenchers are feeling, but i think they have got a number of concerns. first, the way that this change of policy or adjustment to the care cap policy was announced last week, sort of rushed out on a busy news day, not giving people much of a chance to digest it. the government has not so far produced
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an impact assessment of how it will affect people, particularly with low or medium level assets, less valuable houses, we believe will now have far less generous arrangements when it comes to their care costs and how this will affect them then it would have done, had this change not been made. so there is tory concern and number ten is well aware of that and when he spoke this morning, borisjohnson tried to reassure his own site. this morning, boris johnson tried to reassure his own site.— reassure his own site. this is massively — reassure his own site. this is massively more _ reassure his own site. this is massively more generous - reassure his own site. this is i massively more generous than reassure his own site. this is - massively more generous than any other_ massively more generous than any other scheme, so previously you had to pay— other scheme, so previously you had to pay for— other scheme, so previously you had to pay for the cost of your care until_ to pay for the cost of your care until you — to pay for the cost of your care until you are down to 23,000 bats. now we _ until you are down to 23,000 bats. now we are — until you are down to 23,000 bats. now we are saying if you have £100,000 we will help you, or less, we will_ £100,000 we will help you, or less, we will help— £100,000 we will help you, or less, we will help you. and that does not include _ we will help you. and that does not include your housing assets, your home _ isa is a result of the government's
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proposals, there is now a cap for the first time and the government says this is to prevent anybody facing catastrophic care costs as they get older and if they need serious care. but the change being made removes means tested support for the way that cap is calculated and for some conservatives and for labour, that means it is a less generous settlement, really, for people who don't have enormous assets or big expensive houses and that they will be left with a smaller proportion of their wealth, potentially, at the end of their care. for labour, that is the big concern and this is what labour's jonathan ashworth was saying this morning. it's actually a care con, because if you need social care and you're fortunate enough to own a £1 million house, for example in the home counties, then 90% of your assets will be protected. but if you're unfortunate enough to need social care and you live in an £80,000 terrace house in barrow, hartlepool or mansfield, you'll lose nearly everything. that is manifestly unfair.
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it's not levelling up, it's frankly daylight robbery. asi as i said,james, as i said, james, the government put this to mps this evening. there is no sign, to be honest, that there is anything like a big enough tory rebellion on this to cause any problems for ministers tonight. then this piece of legislation will go to the house of lords, where it will be chewed over further, the house of lords, where it will be chewed overfurther, but i do think this is something that will remain a live issue for some time and i think tory mps in particular are wanting further assurances from the government about the impact this policy is going to happen. —— labour mps in particular. energy supplier bulb has been put into special administration, but will continue to supply its 1.7 million customers as normal. the company's exit from the market comes following the collapse of more than 20 suppliers since the start of the year amid the soaring price of gas. ben king is our business correspondent and joins me now.
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what has happened to bulb energy? hunter was one of the most successful challenges to the big six energy suppliers that have dominated the market in recent years ? back bulb energy was successful. it marketed itself as a green supplier with renewable electricity and carbon neutral gas and with over 1.7 million customers, it was too big to go through the process that of a failed energy companies have gone through, the so—called supplier of last resort process, where they get transferred to another supplier. it is going on to something called the special administration scheme, which means it will keep trading with some government support, if necessary, until it can either be restructured, so put back on its feet financially, or sold, or indeed eventually shut down and customers transferred onto other suppliers in due course. what other suppliers in due course. what should customers _ other suppliers in due course. what should customers then _ other suppliers in due course. what should customers then do? the - other suppliers in due course. what i should customers then do? the advice is to sit tight — should customers then do? the advice is to sit tight and _ should customers then do? the advice is to sit tight and just _ should customers then do? the advice is to sit tight and just wait _ should customers then do? the advice is to sit tight and just wait for - is to sit tight and just wait for the process to resolve itself. your
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energy will carry on being supplied as normal and any credit balance that you may have built up will be protected. and there are not any better deals out there any way with energy prices going up, so the advice isjust to energy prices going up, so the advice is just to sit tight, wait for the process to resolve itself, but some websites also recommend that you keep any copies of statements carefully, just in case there is a dispute later on down the line that you need to resolve. i know it is incredibly difficult to predict what might happen, but are there many other suppliers who might fall into difficulties at the moment?— fall into difficulties at the moment? ~ , , ., moment? well, it is definitely a difficult market. _ moment? well, it is definitely a difficult market. the _ moment? well, it is definitely a difficult market. the thing - moment? well, it is definitely a difficult market. the thing that. moment? well, it is definitely a i difficult market. the thing that did for bulb energy eventually was the high energy prices. wholesale gas prices have more than doubled in recent months and electricity prices have risen very fast as well. 0fgem has described the situation is unprecedented. the other thing that bulb energy blames for its demise is the price cap, which means it was not able to pass those extra costs
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on to its customers. those are problems that every supplier has had to deal with and those that don't have the financial resources to weather that storm has been going out of business. ben weather that storm has been going out of business.— weather that storm has been going out of business. ben king, thank you so much. austria is going back into lockdown today amid sharply rising rates of coronavirus. across europe, new restrictions in the run up to christmas have brought protests in countries such as switzerland, italy, belgium and the netherlands, with rioting in some places. from vienna, bethany bell sent this report. the lockdown will last forjust under three weeks. it comes after record numbers of new covid infections in recent days. last night, this market was full of people out enjoying themselves, eating gingerbread and drinking mulled wine, but now everything's closed. the government says the lockdown will go on for almost three weeks, but it all depends on the infection rates. the number of infections have been rising exponentially. at the moment we have 1%
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of the population being infected every week, with some regions being infected even more severely. yes, i think one major factor is the low vaccine coverage we have in austria, but this is also coupled with the delta wave. last week, austria introduced a lockdown for the unvaccinated. but cases continued to soar and the government decided to impose even tougher measures. the chancellor said covid vaccinations will become mandatory as of february. the move is controversial. several european countries saw angry protests against tougher restrictions this weekend. some of them turned violent. in brussels, police used water cannon against demonstrators. across the border in the netherlands, rioting took place for the third night in a row. in austria, thousands of people took
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to the streets in protest at the plans for compulsory jabs. around two thirds of austrians are fully vaccinated — one of the lowest rates in western europe. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna. people in england aged over a0 can now book their coronavirus booster vaccine. that is me! almost 500,000 people in their a0s are currently eligible for the booster, having received their second jab at least six months ago, according to nhs england. 16 and 17—year—olds are now also able to book their second dose, after scientists concluded it was safe and effective for this age group. a memorial service for conservative mp sir david amess, who was killed last month, is taking place in his southend constituency. members of the public are lining up in the streets to pay their respects. let's cross to southend—on—sea and our correspondent, dan johnson.
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take us through what is happening. yes, the memorial service isjust wrapping up here and sir david amess's coffin is being led away in a horse—drawn hearse. it is being taken in procession through the streets of southend. this has been a private memorial service for his family, his closest friends and colleagues, but now there's a chance for the people of this soon—to—be city to line the streets here to pay their respects for the mp has given service to this town and this constituency for many decades. he is a long—standing mp, a very loyal and well loved figure here in the community. well, we can talk to reverend steve, who hasjust left the service here. you were here as a guest, not leading the service, but give us an idea of what that service was like. it give us an idea of what that service was like. ., , give us an idea of what that service was like. . , . , , give us an idea of what that service was like. ., . , , ,., was like. it was incredibly powerful and poignant _ was like. it was incredibly powerful and poignant. you _ was like. it was incredibly powerful and poignant. you know, _ was like. it was incredibly powerful and poignant. you know, being - was like. it was incredibly powerful and poignant. you know, being a i and poignant. you know, being a minister— and poignant. you know, being a minister of— and poignant. you know, being a minister of a church, i have been to my fair— minister of a church, i have been to my fair share — minister of a church, i have been to my fair share of funerals. i don't
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think_ my fair share of funerals. i don't think anything could quite prepare me for— think anything could quite prepare me for how moving and... and how touching _ me for how moving and... and how touching it— me for how moving and... and how touching it was, a real testament to a wonderfui— touching it was, a real testament to a wonderful man.— touching it was, a real testament to a wonderful man. your own church is in sir david's — a wonderful man. your own church is in sir david's constituency, _ a wonderful man. your own church is in sir david's constituency, so - a wonderful man. your own church is in sir david's constituency, so you i in sir david's constituency, so you have known him a long time? yes. have known him a long time? yes, until recently _ have known him a long time? yes, until recently i _ have known him a long time? yes, until recently i was _ have known him a long time? yes, until recently i was minister i have known him a long time? yes, until recently i was minister of the baptist _ until recently i was minister of the baptist church that is indeed in david's — baptist church that is indeed in david's constituency. i had my last service _ david's constituency. i had my last service there are a couple of weeks a-o service there are a couple of weeks ago and _ service there are a couple of weeks ago and david was scheduled to be present— ago and david was scheduled to be present at— ago and david was scheduled to be present at it because he wanted to come _ present at it because he wanted to come and — present at it because he wanted to come and share some stories of how we had _ come and share some stories of how we had worked together, so it is a complete — we had worked together, so it is a complete privilege to be invited to one of— complete privilege to be invited to one of david's last.— one of david's last. what is it about his _ one of david's last. what is it about his character, - one of david's last. what is it about his character, his i one of david's last. what is it - about his character, his commitment, his service, his work in that really stands out for you? just his service, his work in that really stands out for you?— his service, his work in that really stands out for you? just his loyalty to the town _ stands out for you? just his loyalty to the town and _ stands out for you? just his loyalty to the town and his _ stands out for you? just his loyalty to the town and his unwavering i to the town and his unwavering devotion— to the town and his unwavering devotion to the town. we just finished — devotion to the town. we just finished the service with make me a channel— finished the service with make me a channel of— finished the service with make me a channel of your piece and it has these _ channel of your piece and it has these words of, that i may never seek— these words of, that i may never seek to — these words of, that i may never seek to much to be understood as to understand, — seek to much to be understood as to understand, and that epitomised
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david's _ understand, and that epitomised david's character, it wasn't somebody that desperately wanted everybody's love or desperately wanted — everybody's love or desperately wanted everybody to understand him, but he _ wanted everybody to understand him, but he went out of his way to make sure he _ but he went out of his way to make sure he understood the town and he demonstrated his love to the town, so the _ demonstrated his love to the town, so the embodiment of a call to us all to— so the embodiment of a call to us all to he _ so the embodiment of a call to us all to be people that don't seek to -et all to be people that don't seek to get the _ all to be people that don't seek to get the attention and the craving of the understanding and love of others, — the understanding and love of others, but to show understanding and to— others, but to show understanding and to show love. it is a real testament _ and to show love. it is a real testament and again a wonderful way to conclude the service. it testament and again a wonderful way to conclude the service.— to conclude the service. it does say a lot, the number _ to conclude the service. it does say a lot, the number of _ to conclude the service. it does say a lot, the number of people - to conclude the service. it does say a lot, the number of people here i to conclude the service. it does say i a lot, the number of people here who have respect for him, have personal experience of him helping them, supporting them and yet he wasn't someone who was necessarily known on the national stage. he obviously worked to make himself known here in southend? , , ., southend? yes, 'ust the definition of a aood southend? yes, just the definition of a good constituency _ southend? yes, just the definition of a good constituency mp. - southend? yes, just the definition of a good constituency mp. i i southend? yes, just the definition of a good constituency mp. i am i southend? yes, just the definition i of a good constituency mp. i am yet to meet— of a good constituency mp. i am yet to meet anybody who has been in southend — to meet anybody who has been in southend for inlay length of time who has— southend for inlay length of time who has not met sir david at some point _ who has not met sir david at some point and — who has not met sir david at some point and that is how well known and approachable he was. it did not matter— approachable he was. it did not matter what your face, what your political — matter what your face, what your political standing, if you had
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something on your mind, if you needed — something on your mind, if you needed his— something on your mind, if you needed his help as a constituency mp, needed his help as a constituency mp. he _ needed his help as a constituency mp, he would open his door and make himself— mp, he would open his door and make himself available to you and do his utmost— himself available to you and do his utmost to — himself available to you and do his utmost to assist you in whatever it was that _ utmost to assist you in whatever it was that you need it. this utmost to assist you in whatever it was that you need it.— was that you need it. this was a celebration _ was that you need it. this was a celebration of _ was that you need it. this was a celebration of his _ was that you need it. this was a celebration of his life _ was that you need it. this was a celebration of his life and i was that you need it. this was a celebration of his life and his i celebration of his life and his character, but it is a sad day, isn't it? especially for his family and the statement that was read on their behalf by ann widdecombe, they say they are still trying to understand why this awful things happened, they say they are absolutely broken, but they will survive and carry on for the sake of a wonderful and inspiring man. you must see the support they have had? yes, there have been flowers, letters, — yes, there have been flowers, letters, books of condolences, services — letters, books of condolences, services and gatherings... you know, since _ services and gatherings... you know, since his— services and gatherings... you know, since his tragic and untimely death. and it _ since his tragic and untimely death. and it is _ since his tragic and untimely death. and it is in — since his tragic and untimely death. and it is in those moments that you stop to _ and it is in those moments that you stop to consider the manner of his death— stop to consider the manner of his death that — stop to consider the manner of his death that it really brings a lump to your— death that it really brings a lump to your throat and helps you understand why this is so painful for anybody, understand why this is so painful foranybody, but understand why this is so painful for anybody, but particularly for his family, and now we want to move on and _ his family, and now we want to move on and on _ his family, and now we want to move on and on the —
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his family, and now we want to move on and on the words of his family for us _ on and on the words of his family for us to— on and on the words of his family for us to understand one another, to bring _ for us to understand one another, to bring a _ for us to understand one another, to bring a sense — for us to understand one another, to bring a sense of understanding and compassion in a town that is as divided — compassion in a town that is as divided as _ compassion in a town that is as divided as the rest of the country. and, _ divided as the rest of the country. and. you — divided as the rest of the country. and, you know, we have this city status— and, you know, we have this city status looming and so, the conversation now moves to, what kind of city _ conversation now moves to, what kind of city are _ conversation now moves to, what kind of city are we — conversation now moves to, what kind of city are we going to be? and i hope _ of city are we going to be? and i hope and — of city are we going to be? and i hope and i— of city are we going to be? and i hope and i pray and i planned that it will— hope and i pray and i planned that it will be _ hope and i pray and i planned that it will be one that emulates the best of— it will be one that emulates the best of what sir david brought to the town — best of what sir david brought to the town. ., ~ best of what sir david brought to the town. ., ,, , ., , best of what sir david brought to the town. ., ,, i. , . the town. thank you very much, i appreciate _ the town. thank you very much, i appreciate your — the town. thank you very much, i appreciate your time _ the town. thank you very much, i appreciate your time this - the town. thank you very much, i i appreciate your time this lunchtime. that quotation is still processing through the street here in southend, a chance for constituents and anybody who wants to pay their respects to sir david to do that on the streets of southend this afternoon and then tomorrow there's afternoon and then tomorrow there's a funeral service in london at westminster cathedral. david amess was a committed catholic and is expected there will be a message read there from pope. so many reflections on the life that he lived at the service that he gave, particularly to the people here in this town, soon city, the thing that
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he campaigned for so much for so long. he campaigned for so much for so lonu. he campaigned for so much for so lon.. i, long. dan johnson, in southend-on-sea, i long. dan johnson, in i southend-on-sea, thank long. dan johnson, in - southend-on-sea, thank you. two mothers who died of herpes after giving birth could have been infected by the surgeon who carried out caesareans on the women. the families were told there was no connection between the deaths, which were six weeks apart. they're calling for inquests into the deaths to be opened. the east kent hospitals trust says it could not identify the source of the infection, and the surgeon had no history of the virus. 0ur social affairs correspondent, michael buchanan, gave us the latest on the investigation into what happened. this relates to the death of two women — kim sampson and samantha mulcahy — in the summer of 2018. both had emergency caesarean sections at two different hospitals run by the same nhs trust. however, both developed complications that doctors could not diagnose and unfortunately both died a few days after giving birth. tests later revealed both had died of herpes, which is an extremely rare way
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to die indeed, but despite the rarity of the death, the two families were told there was no link between the cases. working with the families, we were able to reveal a previously undisclosed investigation that revealed the same surgeon had operated on the two women and a lab had written to the trust shortly after the second death to say explicitly it does look like surgical contamination. we passed all the documentation to an expert on herpes and he said the most biologically plausible explanation is the surgeon had unwittingly infected the women. there is no suggestion whatsoever that the surgeon had any idea that he may have been infectious. in a statement, the east kent hospitals trust, which run the two hospitals, told us they passed their sympathies onto the two families, but that the investigation led by the trust and the health care safety investigation branch took advice from a number of experts and concluded it was not possible to identify the source of either infection. both families, as you said, are now hoping there will be
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an inquest into the deaths. michael buchanan there. in response to the deaths, dr rebecca martin, chief medical officer for east kent hospitals, said, "our deepest sympathies are with the families and friends of kimberley and samantha. the investigations led by the trust and the healthcare safety investigation branch took advice from a number of experts and concluded that it was not possible to identify the source of either infection. the surgeon who performed both caesarean sections did not have any "hand lesions that could have caused infection, or any "history of the virus. "kimberley and samantha's treatment was based on the different symptoms "showed during their illness." drug—related deaths in scotland last year reached a record high for the seventh year in a row. latest figures show there were more than 1,300 deaths in 2020. it's prompted the first minister to visit a centre which helps addicts and works to divert young people away from drugs. scotland has by far the highest drug death rate recorded
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by any country in europe. and its rate is more than three—and—a—half times that of england and wales. borisjohnson has said his levelling up agenda is a moral mission and that the older he gets, the more idealistic he becomes. he was speaking at the annual conference of the employers' organisation, the cbi. our business correspondent, theo leggett, is here. theo, what was big business's message to the prime minister? for many things, but i think you can sum up what they've said today is words needing to be backed up with action. the cbi conference is a major set piece event that allows business to talk directly and publicly to the prime minister and this year the director—general of the organisation, tony danko, set out how the investment in growing sectors, like biotechnology, cybersecurity, climate friendly technologies, could create a new industrial revolution and bring new wealth to poorer parts of the country, in line with the government's levelling up agenda,
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but he said business could not do this kind of thing on its own. this might be a new line from the head of the cbi, but simply saying the market will fix these things is not good enough. there are free marketeers in the debate who say that government should never play an active role like this, but i don't know a country in the world, including and especially the united states, where governments aren't active in economic geography. the prime minister came up on stage next and his speech was frankly a little bit unusual and at one point he actually seemed to lose his thread, to be lost for words, after apparently losing his place in his notes. he later launched into a quite lengthy anecdote about peppa pig world, which he said he visited yesterday, but i don't think many of his audience had visited it at all! he also defended his levelling up agenda, which is of course his plan to address regional inequalities. questions have been raised about his commitment of that plan because of things that happened last week, for example, when major rail schemes
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like the northern powerhouse rail project were rained in as was part of hs too. but he insisted he remains committed to his agenda. it is a moral mission and as you get oldei’, _ is a moral mission and as you get older. i_ is a moral mission and as you get older. i find — is a moral mission and as you get older, i find the funny thing is you -et older, i find the funny thing is you get more — older, i find the funny thing is you get more idealistic and less cynical~ _ get more idealistic and less cynical. it is a moral thing, but it is also _ cynical. it is a moral thing, but it is also an— cynical. it is a moral thing, but it is also an economic imperative because — is also an economic imperative because if— is also an economic imperative because if this country could achieve _ because if this country could achieve the same kind of geographical balance and dispersion of growth _ geographical balance and dispersion of growth and wealth, that you find in most _ of growth and wealth, that you find in most of— of growth and wealth, that you find in most of our most successful economic— in most of our most successful economic comparators, and if all our businesses _ economic comparators, and if all our businesses could reach more balance in their— businesses could reach more balance in their levels of productivity, then— in their levels of productivity, then there would be absolutely no stopping _ then there would be absolutely no stopping us and we would achieve what _ stopping us and we would achieve what i _ stopping us and we would achieve what i believe we can and become the biggest _ what i believe we can and become the biggest and most successful economy in europe _ biggest and most successful economy in euro e. ., biggest and most successful economy in euroe. . .,, in europe. that was the prime minister speaking _ in europe. that was the prime minister speaking this - in europe. that was the prime i minister speaking this morning, early afternoon we had the leader of the opposition, sir keir starmer, and his message was a kind of reassurance very much that his party
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was business friendly. he talked of a contract with business, but he also took the opportunity to accuse the prime minister of what he called betrayal over northern powerhouse rail. we need increased business investment and better capital stock on improved infrastructure. we need to embrace new technology. we need to lift our export performance. we need cities outside of the south—east to become economic powerhouses. which is why it was so devastating to see the government wrap to see the government rip up its promises in relation to h52 and the northern powerhouse rail. so there you have it, all three main speakers all talking about basically the same thing, how to address regional inequalities, but talking about it in different ways, i think. theo leggett, thank you so much. the breaking news now, two men have been arrested on suspicion of murder after a man and woman were killed in a village in somerset. the man and a woman, both
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in their 30s, were found with serious injuries at an address in northern fit warren, avon and somerset police area. despite the efforts of emergency services, they were both pronounced dead at the scene. two children were in the injuries, according to the force. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben. hello. the week has begun with some bright, but cold weather. many of us will hold onto sunshine this afternoon, but with a few showers plaguing some eastern and some southern parts, more cloud rolling into north—west scotland and parts of northern ireland, with the odd spot of drizzle, temperatures between 7 and 11 degrees. through this evening and tonight, where the skies remain clear across southern parts, well, it would turn cold again, with a touch of frost. some fog is likely through parts of east wales and into the midlands, but further north, scotland, northern ireland, northern england, not as cold, because here we will have more cloud, there will be the odd spots of light rain or drizzle, and we will generally have more cloud in the mix for tomorrow. again, giving the odd spot of drizzle here and there. the best of the sunshine likely to be found down towards the south,
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although parts of east anglia and the south—east could remain quite cloudy, still with the odd shower. temperatures of 9 or 10 degrees. but it does look like it's turning a little bit colder again as we head towards the end of the week, and by friday, more unsettled too, with showers or longer spells of rain, and the potential for something wintry. area are a you hello. this is bbc news. the headlines... a car is driven at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin, killing five people, and injuring more than a0. are police are holding the driver in custody. you the incident doesn't appear to be an act of terrorism. today, our community faced horror and tragedy in what should have been and tragedy in what should have been a community celebration. i am deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went to a parade but ended up community went to a parade but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. mps vote today on the government's
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controversial plans to overhaul social care in england with a cap of £86,000. bulb energy is set to appoint administrators. the energy firm, which has 1.7 million customers, is the latest uk energy company to face difficulties, after a sharp rise in wholesale gas prices. empty streets, as austria becomes the first country in europe to reimpose a lockdown, amid a surge in covid cases. a memorial service and procession is held in southend to remember the mp sir david amess, who was stabbed to death last month. a bbc investigation has found that two mothers who died of herpes after giving birth could have been infected by a single surgeon. and going the extra mile — rugby league star kevin sinfield attempts to run 101 miles in a day for motor neurone disease research. sport now, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre.
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good afternoon. manchester united captain harry maguire says he and the team take full responsibility for the poor results, which led to the sacking of manager 0le gunnar solsjkaer yesterday. he was speaking alongside temporary united head coach michael carrick who's been put in charge of the team for now. after a very poor run, saturday's a—1 defeat to watford proved to be the final straw. united are now eighth in the premier league, 12 points behind leaders chelsea. the club announced that they had parted company with solskjaer yesterday, but maguire says it was the fault of the players. ultimately, the manager's paid the price, and we're all so disappointed for that. price, and we're all so disappointed forthat. but price, and we're all so disappointed for that. but yes, price, and we're all so disappointed forthat. but yes, of price, and we're all so disappointed for that. but yes, of course, we take huge responsibility. we haven't been good enough. we know that individually, collectively, as a team, as players. we know that, we spoke about that, now we have to look forward to make sure we get this club back to where it was in the last two years, and of a slew
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the last two years, and of a slew the last two years, and of a slew the last few months have been nowhere near good enough. the former tottenham manager mauricio pochettino has emerged as a contender to take over permanantly at manchester united, after the departure of solskjaer. it's not thought they've made an approach, but pochettino says he'd be open to taking the job as he's not completely happy with the setup at paris saint—germain. he's essentially first—team coach there, undersporting director leonardo. pochettino has been at psg for ten months and they're 11 points clear at the top of the league. united did approach the former real madrid boss zinedine zidane about the job, but sources say he's not interested at this stage. he ended his second spell as real manager in may this year and he's apparently keen on exploring other options, including the french national side. and, interestingly, psg, which could have an impact on united's decision. england manager gareth southgate has been speaking to the media, after signing a two—year extension to his contract, keeping him in charge until december 202a. southgate took england to the final of the euros this summer and they've
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qualified for next year's world cup in qatar. his deal was due to end after that, but the fa said southgate had secured the best men's performance in 55 years. his assistant steve holland has agreed a similar extension. southgate took over in 2016 and the new deal means he'll oversee qualification for euro 202a. he says he has big plans for the long—term development of the squad. the last five years have been an incredible — the last five years have been an incredible experience, and we are really— incredible experience, and we are really pleased with the progress of the team — really pleased with the progress of the team. we feel that there's still room _ the team. we feel that there's still room for— the team. we feel that there's still room for that team to to improve. i think— room for that team to to improve. i think everybody has seen what's possible — think everybody has seen what's possible with the existing squad, and some — possible with the existing squad, and some of the younger players that are coming _ and some of the younger players that are coming through our age—group teams _ are coming through our age—group teams as— are coming through our age—group teams as well. yorkshire cricket club have announced 36 people have contacted a whistleblowing hotline in its first week. the hotline opened last monday, following the claims of racism levelled at the club by former yorkshire cricketer azeem rafiq.
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he gave an emotional testimony to a dcms select committee, where he told mps he had been called racist names and that he felt cricket was institutionally racist. an independent panel has also been set up by the county to review the complaints. cycling, and british racer mark cavendish suffered two broken ribs and a partially collapsed lung, in a crash at the ghent six day race yesterday. he spent the night in hospital, after hitting the bike of lasse norman hansen, after the dane lost control in front of him during the madison. after initial treatment, cavendish was able to walk, but he was then taken to hospital on a stretcher. according to his team, deceuninck quick—step, he should be discharged today or tomorrow morning, before undergoing a period of recuperation. that's all the sport for now. more details on all of those stories on the bbc sport website. the number of children in care
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in england could reach almost 100,000 by 2025, up by more than a third in a decade. the figures come from new research commissioned by county councils. local authorities say the increase it's creating "unprecedented pressure" on their budgets. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. this is eastbourne in east sussex. joe and joanne have been foster carers for nine years. when the children come to us and they look so down, they look like they're carrying so much baggage and then after a few weeks sometimes, you start to see their face light up. i mean the fact of the matter is there's more children who need our help than there is carers who can help. yeah, but i also think people have a misconception about fostering. i think it is, "am i qualified enough to be a foster carer?" and it is at the end of the day, it is about your personality, about your character, about your heart. england's county council leaders are getting together today for their conference in marlow in buckinghamshire. they are worried the overall number
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of children in care is going up and the number in children's homes is going up too, partly because there are aren't enough foster carers. addressing them today, this man, who is chairing an independent review of children's social care in england. there is no future for children's social care that is not _ going to cost the country, england, more money. i we just need to accept that. the choice is, do we put more money into a flawed system that doesn't i work well enough for children i and their families, or do we put it into a programme of reform that's actually going to address - the fundamental issues that have been highlighted - through this report today? this is the lighthouse. the idea is it is a beacon for light for the young people going through theirjourney. in warrington in cheshire, a trial scheme, and a chance to see what a new children's home looks like inside. there is an emphasis here on what the independent reviewer and councils want to see
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more of — doing everything possible to nip issues in the bud straight away. they're addressing the brutal truth that a quarter of the adult prison population in england used to be in care, and so have a police officer on site. imagine if i was coming into work in a full uniform. the young people, firstly, it just wouldn't sit right. me not wearing uniform, it breaks down those barriers straight away. policing cannot fix everything on their own, so we do a lot ofjoined up work with, obviously, with social care, with parents, with carers, with education, with health and we are realising one of the other terminologies, you can't arrest your way out of this. there's got to be another approach and that's where i am 100% believing in this system. plenty argue how society helps the next generations most in need has to change. the government says it is providing new funding to help maintain children's social care. chris mason, bbc news.
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as we've been hearing, mps are expected to vote today on the government's plans to overhaul social care in england. the changes will see a cap of £86,000 on the amount people have to pay towards their own care. but labour says homeowners in poorer parts of the country will end up losing a larger proportion of their assets than those in more affluent areas. i'm joined by kari gerstheimer, the ceo of access social care — a charity that provides free legal information and advice for people who aren t getting the social care they need. what you think the containers? if you are a homeowner in the south of england and your home is worth upwards of £1 million, proportionally you will pay may be
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10% of your home, whereas if your home is in the north, and it might only be worth 100,000, 200,000, then there is catastrophic care costs could mean that you lose your home, or you lose a really significant part of it. or you lose a really significant part of it— or you lose a really significant artofit. , ,, ., part of it. when people speak to our part of it. when people speak to your organisation _ part of it. when people speak to your organisation and _ part of it. when people speak to your organisation and ring i part of it. when people speak to your organisation and ring you i part of it. when people speak to | your organisation and ring you up for legal information, what kind of things are they saying, they mention what is happening now? the things are they saying, they mention what is happening now?— things are they saying, they mention what is happening now? the cases we are seeinu what is happening now? the cases we are seeing are — what is happening now? the cases we are seeing are devastating, _ what is happening now? the cases we are seeing are devastating, they i what is happening now? the cases we are seeing are devastating, they are i are seeing are devastating, they are so distressing that we pay for our legal advisors, whether a 9a—year—old with dementia, who is being denied support, prompting support to remember to wash and clean themselves, or whether it is a young person with a learning disability who hasn't had the right support of the community and has ended up being sectioned hundreds of miles from home in a really inappropriate setting which is distressing for them and for their family, i think the cases that we
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see are evidence of a system that is under extreme strain, and whether it is the mandatory vaccinations or whether it's the reliance on council tax income to pay for social care, what we are seeing is the government social care policies are deepening inequalities between richer and poorer regions and that is really the polar opposite of levelling up. so how is managing vaccinations changing anything? we so how is managing vaccinations changing anything?— so how is managing vaccinations changing anything? we know that vaccine hesitancy _ changing anything? we know that vaccine hesitancy is _ changing anything? we know that vaccine hesitancy is greater- changing anything? we know that vaccine hesitancy is greater in i changing anything? we know that i vaccine hesitancy is greater in more economically deprived areas. those are the areas where people are being required to have come across the country, people are being required to have mandatory vaccination out in order to work in a social care setting, unlike in nhs settings. so we are seeing those areas losing the greater proportion of staff. thank ou.
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the number of migrants reaching the uk by small boats this year is now three times the level recorded for the whole of last year. the home office has confirmed that 886 people arrived on saturday, taking the total number of people who've reached the uk by boat this year to more than 25,700. welsh labour and plaid cymru reached a co—operation agreement this weekend, their deal in the senedd has been finalised, and is set to last for "the coming three years". it includes plans to create a national care service, as well as looking at ways to bring the net zero carbon emissions target date forward and increase the size of the senedd. first minister of wales, mark drakeford said that the deal allows the parties to continue working together over shared interests. the chance to work with other parties wherever we have shared and common interests is something that has been here in the senedd since
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the start of devolution, and this agreement ensures that we can continue to do that in the best interests of people in wales. now, of course, today's cooperation agreement is a bespoke deal. that form of agreement has never been carried out in the way that we are now committed to doing. the agreement is limited to a6 policy areas set out in the document we have published today. those policy areas range from extending free school meals to all primary school pupils to finding long—term solutions to the problems caused by for example, to many second homes in some communities, and ensuring that we all have good social care when we need it. my focus and the focus of the government is on those bread—and—butter issues, which improve people's everyday lives, and
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which help wales to recover from this long pandemic. the cooperation agreement is ambitious in just that way, and will help us to do just that. it will give us the stability we need in the senedd to go on delivering for wales. that we need in the senedd to go on delivering for wales.— we need in the senedd to go on delivering for wales. that was the wales first _ delivering for wales. that was the wales first minister. _ and the leader of plaid cymru, adam price, illustrated what he hopes the deal will achieve. wales that will exist by the next election. — wales that will exist by the next election, a radical wales, wales that will exist by the next election, a radicalwales, a wales that will exist by the next election, a radical wales, a wales of well— election, a radical wales, a wales of well being, built, in the words of well being, built, in the words of robert — of well being, built, in the words of robert 0wen, through the cooperation of all to the benefit of each, _ cooperation of all to the benefit of each, will— cooperation of all to the benefit of each, will look very different to the wales of today. in these islands, _ the wales of today. in these islands, and as a radical counterpoint to westminster's politics — counterpoint to westminster's politics of selfishness, of divisiveness and greed, we will be a
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beacon _ divisiveness and greed, we will be a beacon of— divisiveness and greed, we will be a beacon of hope, of progress and civility — beacon of hope, of progress and civility we — beacon of hope, of progress and civility. we stand here as two leaders — civility. we stand here as two leaders of two parties, government and opposition, who continue to disagree — and opposition, who continue to disagree on many things, but our ability— disagree on many things, but our ability to— disagree on many things, but our ability to come together on some things— ability to come together on some things will mean everything to the hungry— things will mean everything to the hungry child, the homeless adult, and those — hungry child, the homeless adult, and those at the dawn of their lives, — and those at the dawn of their lives, and _ and those at the dawn of their lives, and at the twilight of their lives, _ lives, and at the twilight of their lives, who— lives, and at the twilight of their lives, who need our care the most. 0ur wales correspondent hywel griffith is with me. is this a natural and logical political partnership? it is this a natural and logical political partnership?- is this a natural and logical political partnership? it is. when ou look political partnership? it is. when you look at _ political partnership? it is. when you look at the _ political partnership? it is. when you look at the arithmetic - political partnership? it is. when you look at the arithmetic of i political partnership? it is. when you look at the arithmetic of this j you look at the arithmetic of this place _ you look at the arithmetic of this place behind _ you look at the arithmetic of this place behind me, _ you look at the arithmetic of this place behind me, the _ you look at the arithmetic of this place behind me, the senedd, i you look at the arithmetic of this | place behind me, the senedd, six months _ place behind me, the senedd, six months ago — place behind me, the senedd, six months ago the _ place behind me, the senedd, six months ago the welsh _ place behind me, the senedd, six. months ago the welsh parliamentary elections _ months ago the welsh parliamentary elections delivered _ months ago the welsh parliamentary elections delivered 30 _ months ago the welsh parliamentary elections delivered 30 of— months ago the welsh parliamentary elections delivered 30 of the - months ago the welsh parliamentary elections delivered 30 of the seats i elections delivered 30 of the seats for labour, — elections delivered 30 of the seats for labour, that's _ elections delivered 30 of the seats for labour, that's exactly- elections delivered 30 of the seats for labour, that's exactly half, i elections delivered 30 of the seats for labour, that's exactly half, so. for labour, that's exactly half, so they've _ for labour, that's exactly half, so they've known _ for labour, that's exactly half, so they've known since _ for labour, that's exactly half, so they've known since then - for labour, that's exactly half, so they've known since then that i for labour, that's exactly half, so. they've known since then that they needed _ they've known since then that they needed some _ they've known since then that they needed some kind _ they've known since then that they needed some kind of— they've known since then that they needed some kind of deal. - they've known since then that they needed some kind of deal. now, i they've known since then that they. needed some kind of deal. now, this is cooperation — needed some kind of deal. now, this is cooperation not _ needed some kind of deal. now, this is cooperation not a _ needed some kind of deal. now, this is cooperation not a coalition. - needed some kind of deal. now, this is cooperation not a coalition. it- is cooperation not a coalition. it doesn't — is cooperation not a coalition. it doesn't deliver— is cooperation not a coalition. it doesn't deliver any— is cooperation not a coalition. it doesn't deliver any ministers, i is cooperation not a coalition. it. doesn't deliver any ministers, not even _ doesn't deliver any ministers, not even deputy— doesn't deliver any ministers, not even deputy ministers _ doesn't deliver any ministers, not even deputy ministers for- doesn't deliver any ministers, not even deputy ministers for plaid i even deputy ministers for plaid cymru. — even deputy ministers for plaid cymru. but _ even deputy ministers for plaid cymru. but it— even deputy ministers for plaid cymru, but it does— even deputy ministers for plaid cymru, but it does give - even deputy ministers for plaid
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cymru, but it does give a - even deputy ministers for plaid cymru, but it does give a plan. even deputy ministers for plaid i cymru, but it does give a plan for the next — cymru, but it does give a plan for the next three _ cymru, but it does give a plan for the next three years _ cymru, but it does give a plan for the next three years ahead - cymru, but it does give a plan for the next three years ahead and i cymru, but it does give a plan for. the next three years ahead and will end the next three years ahead and will and six— the next three years ahead and will end six months— the next three years ahead and will end six months potentially- the next three years ahead and will end six months potentially or- the next three years ahead and will end six months potentially or a i the next three years ahead and willi end six months potentially or a year and six _ end six months potentially or a year and six months _ end six months potentially or a year and six months ahead _ end six months potentially or a year and six months ahead of— end six months potentially or a year and six months ahead of the - end six months potentially or a year and six months ahead of the next. and six months ahead of the next eiection— and six months ahead of the next election depending _ and six months ahead of the next election depending on _ and six months ahead of the next election depending on what - and six months ahead of the next election depending on what is i election depending on what is decided, _ election depending on what is decided, in _ election depending on what is decided, in terms _ election depending on what is decided, in terms of - election depending on what is decided, in terms of the i election depending on what is decided, in terms of the termj election depending on what is i decided, in terms of the term of parliament _ decided, in terms of the term of parliament. what _ decided, in terms of the term of parliament. what will— decided, in terms of the term of parliament. what will it - decided, in terms of the term of parliament. what will it deliverl decided, in terms of the term of. parliament. what will it deliver for the people — parliament. what will it deliver for the people of— parliament. what will it deliver for the people of wales, _ parliament. what will it deliver for the people of wales, vitally- parliament. what will it deliver for the people of wales, vitally how i the people of wales, vitally how much _ the people of wales, vitally how much defence _ the people of wales, vitally how much defence with _ the people of wales, vitally how much defence with a _ the people of wales, vitally how much defence with a sea? - the people of wales, vitally howj much defence with a sea? some the people of wales, vitally how i much defence with a sea? some of the people of wales, vitally how - much defence with a sea? some of the headlines_ much defence with a sea? some of the headlines you — much defence with a sea? some of the headlines you heard _ much defence with a sea? some of the headlines you heard earlier— much defence with a sea? some of the headlines you heard earlier on, - much defence with a sea? some of the headlines you heard earlier on, some i headlines you heard earlier on, some free school— headlines you heard earlier on, some free school meals— headlines you heard earlier on, some free school meals for— headlines you heard earlier on, some free school meals for all, _ headlines you heard earlier on, some free school meals for all, primary i free school meals for all, primary a-e free school meals for all, primary age children. _ free school meals for all, primary age children, also— free school meals for all, primary age children, also the _ free school meals for all, primary age children, also the setting i free school meals for all, primary age children, also the setting upl free school meals for all, primary i age children, also the setting up of age children, also the setting up of a national— age children, also the setting up of a national care _ age children, also the setting up of a national care service, _ age children, also the setting up of a national care service, somethingl a national care service, something that has— a national care service, something that has also — a national care service, something that has also been _ a national care service, something that has also been worked - a national care service, something that has also been worked on i a national care service, something that has also been worked on in. that has also been worked on in scotland — that has also been worked on in scotland but _ that has also been worked on in scotland but also _ that has also been worked on in scotland but also as _ that has also been worked on in scotland but also as you - that has also been worked on in scotland but also as you heard i that has also been worked on in- scotland but also as you heard from adam _ scotland but also as you heard from adam price — scotland but also as you heard from adam price at — scotland but also as you heard from adam price at played _ scotland but also as you heard from adam price at played camera, - scotland but also as you heard fromj adam price at played camera, there are key— adam price at played camera, there are key things — adam price at played camera, there are key things they— adam price at played camera, there are key things they don't _ adam price at played camera, there are key things they don't agree i adam price at played camera, there are key things they don't agree on, i are key things they don't agree on, and certainly— are key things they don't agree on, and certainly what _ are key things they don't agree on, and certainly what they— are key things they don't agree on, and certainly what they don't - are key things they don't agree on, and certainly what they don't agree on is _ and certainly what they don't agree on is what — and certainly what they don't agree on is what this— and certainly what they don't agree on is what this should _ and certainly what they don't agree on is what this should mean - and certainly what they don't agree on is what this should mean next. i and certainly what they don't agree i on is what this should mean next. is it a stepping — on is what this should mean next. is it a stepping stone _ on is what this should mean next. is it a stepping stone towards - on is what this should mean next. is it a stepping stone towards an - it a stepping stone towards an independent _ it a stepping stone towards an independent wales? - it a stepping stone towards an independent wales? well, i it a stepping stone towards an independent wales? well, no| it a stepping stone towards an i independent wales? well, no is it a stepping stone towards an - independent wales? well, no is the answer— independent wales? well, no is the answer from — independent wales? well, no is the answer from the _ independent wales? well, no is the answer from the first _ independent wales? well, no is the answer from the first minister- independent wales? well, no is the answer from the first minister mark drakeford — answer from the first minister mark drakeford. ., , ., ~' answer from the first minister mark drakeford. ., , ., ,, ., drakeford. how will they work at those disagreements? _ drakeford. how will they work at those disagreements? the i drakeford. how will they work at those disagreements? the last i drakeford. how will they work at i those disagreements? the last one they talked about, independence, thatis they talked about, independence, that is a profound disagreement between the two parties. absolutely, and i asked both _ between the two parties. absolutely, and i asked both really _ between the two parties. absolutely, and i asked both really what - between the two parties. absolutely, and i asked both really what they i and i asked both really what they thought— and i asked both really what they thought this _ and i asked both really what they thought this changed _ and i asked both really what they thought this changed with - and i asked both really what they thought this changed with the i thought this changed with the increase — thought this changed with the increase potentially— thought this changed with the increase potentially of- thought this changed with the | increase potentially of senedd
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thought this changed with the - increase potentially of senedd seats from 60 _ increase potentially of senedd seats from 60 to — increase potentially of senedd seats from 60 to maybe _ increase potentially of senedd seats from 60 to maybe 80 _ increase potentially of senedd seats from 60 to maybe 80 or— increase potentially of senedd seats from 60 to maybe 80 or 100, - increase potentially of senedd seats from 60 to maybe 80 or 100, they. from 60 to maybe 80 or 100, they talk about, — from 60 to maybe 80 or 100, they talk about, could _ from 60 to maybe 80 or 100, they talk about, could mean. _ from 60 to maybe 80 or 100, they talk about, could mean. is - from 60 to maybe 80 or 100, they talk about, could mean. is it- from 60 to maybe 80 or 100, they talk about, could mean. is it a i talk about, could mean. is it a stepping — talk about, could mean. is it a stepping stone _ talk about, could mean. is it a stepping stone or— talk about, could mean. is it a stepping stone or is _ talk about, could mean. is it a stepping stone or is it- talk about, could mean. is it a stepping stone or is it a - talk about, could mean. is it a stepping stone or is it a way. talk about, could mean. is it a| stepping stone or is it a way of cementing _ stepping stone or is it a way of cementing wales— stepping stone or is it a way of cementing wales and - stepping stone or is it a way of cementing wales and the i stepping stone or is it a way of. cementing wales and the union? stepping stone or is it a way of- cementing wales and the union? the answer— cementing wales and the union? the answer differed _ cementing wales and the union? the answer differed from _ cementing wales and the union? the answer differed from both, _ cementing wales and the union? the answer differed from both, they- cementing wales and the union? the answer differed from both, they say. answer differed from both, they say they don't— answer differed from both, they say they don't have _ answer differed from both, they say they don't have to _ answer differed from both, they say they don't have to agree _ answer differed from both, they say they don't have to agree on - they don't have to agree on everything. _ they don't have to agree on everything, they— they don't have to agree on everything, they got - they don't have to agree on everything, they got their i they don't have to agree on. everything, they got their a6 they don't have to agree on - everything, they got their a6 points from their— everything, they got their a6 points from their priorities, _ everything, they got their a6 points from their priorities, particularly i from their priorities, particularly as wales — from their priorities, particularly as wales tries _ from their priorities, particularly as wales tries to _ from their priorities, particularly as wales tries to come - from their priorities, particularly as wales tries to come out - from their priorities, particularly as wales tries to come out of i from their priorities, particularlyl as wales tries to come out of the pandemic, — as wales tries to come out of the pandemic, that _ as wales tries to come out of the pandemic, that they— as wales tries to come out of the pandemic, that they want - as wales tries to come out of the pandemic, that they want to i as wales tries to come out of the | pandemic, that they want to work as wales tries to come out of the i pandemic, that they want to work on, so they— pandemic, that they want to work on, so they will— pandemic, that they want to work on, so they will put — pandemic, that they want to work on, so they will put their _ pandemic, that they want to work on, so they will put their differences i so they will put their differences aside _ so they will put their differences aside to— so they will put their differences aside to work— so they will put their differences aside to work on _ so they will put their differences aside to work on those, - so they will put their differences aside to work on those, but i so they will put their differencesj aside to work on those, but they will have — aside to work on those, but they will have the _ aside to work on those, but they will have the freedom _ aside to work on those, but they will have the freedom to - aside to work on those, but theyl will have the freedom to disagree essentially— will have the freedom to disagree essentially on _ will have the freedom to disagree essentially on other— will have the freedom to disagree essentially on other matters. i will have the freedom to disagree i essentially on other matters. again, what it _ essentially on other matters. again, what it means — essentially on other matters. again, what it means for— essentially on other matters. again, what it means for people _ essentially on other matters. again, what it means for people in- essentially on other matters. again, what it means for people in wales . essentially on other matters. again, i what it means for people in wales we will wait _ what it means for people in wales we will wait to— what it means for people in wales we will wait to see — what it means for people in wales we will wait to see. the _ what it means for people in wales we will wait to see. the two _ what it means for people in wales we will wait to see. the two parties - will wait to see. the two parties have _ will wait to see. the two parties have worked _ will wait to see. the two parties have worked together— will wait to see. the two parties have worked together before. . will wait to see. the two parties i have worked together before. they had been _ have worked together before. they had been informal— have worked together before. they had been informal coalition- have worked together before. they had been informal coalition but- have worked together before. theyi had been informal coalition but they have the _ had been informal coalition but they have the freedom _ had been informal coalition but they have the freedom to _ had been informal coalition but they have the freedom to criticise - had been informal coalition but they have the freedom to criticise each . have the freedom to criticise each other— have the freedom to criticise each other now— have the freedom to criticise each other how hot _ have the freedom to criticise each other now not being _ have the freedom to criticise each other now not being tied - have the freedom to criticise each other now not being tied in - have the freedom to criticise each other now not being tied in as- have the freedom to criticise each other now not being tied in as a l other now not being tied in as a government— other now not being tied in as a government together. - other now not being tied in as a government together. ililt�*hait- other now not being tied in as a government together.— government together. what do opposition _ government together. what do opposition politicians - government together. what do opposition politicians make - government together. what do opposition politicians make ofl government together. what do i opposition politicians make of it? well, from the conservatives cosmic point _ well, from the conservatives cosmic point of— well, from the conservatives cosmic point of view, — well, from the conservatives cosmic point of view. they— well, from the conservatives cosmic point of view, they question - well, from the conservatives cosmic point of view, they question why- point of view, they question why something — point of view, they question why something like _ point of view, they question why something like increasing - point of view, they question why something like increasing the i point of view, they question why- something like increasing the number senedd _ something like increasing the number senedd members _ something like increasing the number senedd members would _ something like increasing the number senedd members would be _ something like increasing the number senedd members would be a - something like increasing the number senedd members would be a priority, i senedd members would be a priority, while the _ senedd members would be a priority, while the welsh _ senedd members would be a priority, while the welsh nhs _ senedd members would be a priority, while the welsh nhs at _ senedd members would be a priority, while the welsh nhs at the _ senedd members would be a priority, while the welsh nhs at the moment. senedd members would be a priority, l while the welsh nhs at the moment is seeing _ while the welsh nhs at the moment is seeing some _ while the welsh nhs at the moment is seeing some of— while the welsh nhs at the moment is seeing some of its— while the welsh nhs at the moment is seeing some of its worst _ while the welsh nhs at the moment is seeing some of its worst ever- seeing some of its worst ever results — seeing some of its worst ever results when _ seeing some of its worst ever results when it _ seeing some of its worst ever results when it comes - seeing some of its worst ever results when it comes to - seeing some of its worst ever- results when it comes to ambulance waiting _ results when it comes to ambulance waiting times — results when it comes to ambulance waiting times of _ results when it comes to ambulance waiting times of the _ results when it comes to ambulance waiting times of the weights - results when it comes to ambulance waiting times of the weights in - results when it comes to ambulance| waiting times of the weights in a&e.
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so they— waiting times of the weights in a&e. so they question _ waiting times of the weights in a&e. so they question the _ waiting times of the weights in a&e. so they question the priorities - waiting times of the weights in a&e. so they question the priorities of- so they question the priorities of these _ so they question the priorities of these two — so they question the priorities of these two parties. _ so they question the priorities of these two parties. also - so they question the priorities of these two parties. also the - these two parties. also the opposition— these two parties. also the opposition parties- these two parties. also the opposition parties will- these two parties. also the - opposition parties will suggest, well, _ opposition parties will suggest, well, if— opposition parties will suggest, well, if you _ opposition parties will suggest, well, if you vote _ opposition parties will suggest, well, if you vote for _ opposition parties will suggest, well, if you vote for labour- opposition parties will suggest, well, if you vote for labour you | well, if you vote for labour you will get — well, if you vote for labour you will get played _ well, if you vote for labour you will get played kamrul- well, if you vote for labour you will get played kamrul and - well, if you vote for labour you | will get played kamrul and vice versa. — will get played kamrul and vice versa. so— will get played kamrul and vice versa. so they— will get played kamrul and vice versa, so they are _ will get played kamrul and vice versa, so they are not - will get played kamrul and vice versa, so they are not really. versa, so they are not really offering _ versa, so they are not really offering much _ versa, so they are not really offering much of— versa, so they are not really offering much of an - versa, so they are not really- offering much of an alternative. wheh _ offering much of an alternative. when they— offering much of an alternative. when they remember— offering much of an alternative. when they remember that - offering much of an alternative. l when they remember that labour offering much of an alternative. - when they remember that labour has been in _ when they remember that labour has been in government, _ when they remember that labour has been in government, whether- when they remember that labour has been in government, whether alone l when they remember that labour hasi been in government, whether alone or in coalition, _ been in government, whether alone or in coalition, for— been in government, whether alone or in coalition, for over— been in government, whether alone or in coalition, for over two _ been in government, whether alone or in coalition, for over two decades - in coalition, for over two decades now in coalition, for over two decades how irr— in coalition, for over two decades how in wales, _ in coalition, for over two decades how in wales, so _ in coalition, for over two decades now in wales, so they— in coalition, for over two decades now in wales, so they will- in coalition, for over two decades now in wales, so they will say. now in wales, so they will say really — now in wales, so they will say really it — now in wales, so they will say really it is— now in wales, so they will say really it is more _ now in wales, so they will say really it is more of— now in wales, so they will say really it is more of a - now in wales, so they will say really it is more of a status i now in wales, so they will say. really it is more of a status quo. the headlines on bbc news... a car is driven at high speed in to a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin, killing five people and injuring more than forty. police are holding the driver in custody. the incident doesn't appear to be an act of terrorism. mps vote today on the government's controversial plans to overhaul social care in england with a cap of 86—thousand pounds. bulb energy is set to appoint administrators. the energy firm which has 1.7 million customers is the latest uk energy company to face difficulties, after a sharp rise in wholesale gas prices.
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adults should stop mocking young people, by calling them "woke", for standing up for things they believe in, a leading head teacher has said. samantha price, president of the girls' schools association, said that pupils are genuinely worried about racism, sexism and climate change, and urged parents and teachers to keep up with the younger generation and support them. i'm joined now by samantha price. thanks so much forjoining us. we thanks so much for “oining us. we shouldn't thanks so much forjoining us. shouldn't speak of the younger generation as woke, which one word should be used to describe them? good afternoon, james, very good to talk to you. i think we need to talk about this younger generation is being committed and passionate. i think that work actually is a good word, the problem is it is misunderstood, and therefore it is being misused, and that is why it is used in a derogatory sense. the original interpretation of woke
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actually is to reawaken. it was originally used within the context of reawakening people's of reawa kening people's understanding of reawakening people's understanding with regards to racism, but also socialjustice, and of course that's how it started to be used but what has happened over particularly the last 18 months is that anyone with a more sort of liberal view with regards to how society operates tends to be branded in a derogatory sense as being woke, and very sadly the real meaning of the word has been eroded. i’m and very sadly the real meaning of the word has been eroded. i'm not entirely sure _ the word has been eroded. i'm not entirely sure many _ the word has been eroded. i'm not entirely sure many people - the word has been eroded. i'm not entirely sure many people would i entirely sure many people would dispute the fact that young people want to complain against many of the things you describe, racism and in favour of the environment, but what also comes with that sometimes is a perception from older generations that young people do not want to listen to any opposing voices, do not want to be challenged in those ways. how do you deal with that particular part of the argument? i particular part of the argument? i think that is a very good point.
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that is where us as educators come in, and i think it is the most important role actually that we have. so certainly we never want as school leaders to undermine any passion and conviction young people in our schools have but we do have a responsibility to educate them and to teach them to recognise that actually if you want to be at the forefront of implementing change, to do that, you've got to bring people along side with you, and the way you bring people along side with you of course is to be able to actively listen to other people's views, to respect other people's views and then of course be able to dialogue and debate, and that way to get your own point across. it is an awful lot to ask of teenagers. understandably, teenagers are passionate and you want them to be passionate. you also want them to be passionate. you also want them to be passionate. you also want them to be consistent in what they believe in and to practice out what they believe in day 2 day as well. but i do think from a young age to really put a focus on
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listening skills and recognition that people do have different views is absolutely essential and that's why i wanted to bring this out today in our conference, and the focus of our conference is to think about how we compare young people to be that voice of change. but that isn'tjust shouting out, it is about strategising and to be able to in an informed way start to implement what they are wanting to see, going forwards. i they are wanting to see, going forwards. ., ,., ., forwards. i wonder if some of the sto is forwards. i wonder if some of the story is as _ forwards. i wonder if some of the story is as old — forwards. i wonder if some of the story is as old as _ forwards. i wonder if some of the story is as old as time. _ forwards. i wonder if some of the story is as old as time. aren't - forwards. i wonder if some of the i story is as old as time. aren't the different generations meant to drive each other crazy? i different generations meant to drive each other crazy?— each other crazy? i think so. they are. it is extraordinary _ each other crazy? i think so. they are. it is extraordinary when - each other crazy? i think so. they are. it is extraordinary when we l are. it is extraordinary when we think about our own teenage days and what we felt passionately about and then how we tend to moderate as we get older with more life experience. i think the one thing i would say is i think the one thing i would say is i have been in education for 25 years and i have never experienced
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with teenagers such a ground swell of conviction in order to be able to drive a more equal world, that is with younger teenagers as well as older teenagers, they do feel that there is a different pace and the different momentum with this generation, and ifeel different momentum with this generation, and i feel that different momentum with this generation, and ifeel that if we can give this generation the effective platform to be able to go into adulthood, i really do feel that they could sustain the change that they could sustain the change that they could sustain the change that they are actually asking for. thank you so much.— a new analysis has found that only a small number of people — less than one percent — are behind more than 16 per cent of all visits to accident and emergency departments in england. a study by the british red cross shows that some of the people in this group — so called high intensity users — go to emergency departments more than 300 times a year. with more, here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes.
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returning to a&es time and time again. high—intensity use of an a&e department is defined as more than five visits in the year, while less than 0.67% of england's population fall into this category, nhs data showed they accounted for a significant proportion, 16% of all a&e visits, and well over a quarter of all ambulance journeys, as well as 26% of all emergency hospital admissions in england. but specialist teams based in a&es across england can help to reduce frequent visits by offering individual support to people who feel hospital is their only option. the reasons for people attending a&e are quite complex but it is often because they don't feel they have anywhere else to go and they have fallen through the gaps between other services and teams previously. we found it is really interesting, there are a couple of cohorts that
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are particularfrequent there are a couple of cohorts that are particular frequent attendance to a&e, the younger people from the age of 20 to 29, who might have mental health bonds as well as other issues, and those over 70 who have other complex issues, including chronic loneliness. so it's really important to work with people to understand them as individual so we can get them the support that they need, hopefully before they even get to a&e. ,,, u, , need, hopefully before they even get toa&e. u, , , need, hopefully before they even get toa&e. , ,., to me. specialist help can repeat -- cut repeat _ to me. specialist help can repeat -- cut repeat visits _ to me. specialist help can repeat -- cut repeat visits by _ to me. specialist help can repeat -- cut repeat visits by more - to me. specialist help can repeat -- cut repeat visits by more thanl —— cut repeat visits by more than 80% potentially saving the nhs millions of pounds and reducing the pressure on an already stretched service. dominic hughes, bbc news. rugby league legend kevin sinfield has set off this morning to run 101 miles in 2a hours. he's trying to raise money for the motor neurone disease assocation — and for his friend and former teammate, rob burrow, who has the illness. graham satchell has been watching. three, two, one, go. cheering. kevin sinfield, setting off on an epic challenge. he's running 2a hours straight, from leicester to leeds. it is 101 miles with no sleep.
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i want it to be horrible, raining and sleeting and windy. i want everything to get thrown at us that can be. there's people out there doing it really tough with mnd and people connected with mnd who are fighting a really tough fight at the minute, and we're just showing them that we care. commentator: this is a sensational try. there aren't many in super league that could do that. _ kev is running for his former team—mate and friend rugby league legend rob burrow. rob was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 2019. his family can't quite believe what kev is about to do. 100 miles in one day without no sleep? you are crazy! you know we think you are amazing. thank you for doing everything you have done for my dad and people with mnd. good luck on your next challenge. today's run will be a physical
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and mental test like no other. running through the night, - sleep deprived, glycogen depleted, fatigued, he motivates us to do - things that we don't think we can do and he does that by leading - by example and doing things that nobody should be able to do. kev will be raising money for people with motor neurone disease, like ian, who was diagnosed in 2019. mnd is a cruel disease, a degenerative brain disorder. there is no effective treatment, no cure. but in the mnd community, kev has become a hero. the money raised today will help build new, much—needed treatment centres. a place that has some dignity, i has some joy and has some hope would provide so much hope i for people when they enter it, that they know the research is going on, they know- the technology is there. i suppose you have your good days, your bad days, but, yeah...
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right from the very beginning, when rob burrow first announced his diagnosis, kevin sinfield was there. today, he will once again go the extra mile for his best friend. graham satchell, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. after all the mild weather we've had this autumn, it is now cold out there. bright for most of us, quite a lot of sunshine around and a satellite picture reveals more cloud in the north of the uk and some speckled shower clouds plaguing eastern and southern parts, east anglia, perhaps kent and the channel islands will see some showers through the afternoon. more cloud across north—west scotland, northern ireland, the odd spot of this autumn sunshine in between and temperatures between 9—11. through this evening and tonight, we keep the showers in the far
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south—east, clear skies for southern parts and we will see mist and fog developing through parts of east wales, and into the midlands, but under those clear skies in the south, there will be another cold and frosty night. further north, not as cold, because we will have more cloud, so a grey start for much of scotland, northern ireland, northern england and indeed parts of north wales to tomorrow morning. that cloud producing the odd spot of rain and drizzle at times and some fog patches could linger for east wales into the midlands and we will keep some showers going across the far south—east but generally speaking, the best of the sunshine tomorrow will be found across southern parts and, for some, maybe not quite as cold with highs of 9—10. that's only a temporary feature, because as we get into wednesday, this band of rain sinks its way south eastwards, and ahead of it, a lot of cloud and mist and murk, but behind the rain, the air is set to turn colder. brighter skies for scotland and northern ireland,
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some showers and a decidedly chilly feel. as we move into thursday, we push this frontal system south—east eastwards and it's a cold front as the name suggests behind the front, the air will be turning colder bring you down from the north at this time of year and it always means there will be something of a chill. but another very bright day on thursday and quite a lot of sunshine. some showers especially for coastal areas and some of these will be wintry over the high ground and to lower levels for a time in the far north of scotland. those are the afternoon highs on thursday. single digits forjust about all of us and them, as we get into friday, this low pressure dives its way down from the north and this will turn things more unsettled with some brisk winds, some showers at times, and depending onjust how cold the air gaps, some of those showers will turn wintry so it stays cold through the week.
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this is bbc news. i'm james reynolds. the headlines: mps vote today on the government's controversial plans to overhaul social care in england with a cap of £86,000. there has never been any protection like this across the whole country and what we're doing is we are saying to everybody, we are going to make sure that we look after you in your old age better than has ever happened before. but some working in the care system say the plans could hit some areas of the uk harder than others. if your home is in the north, then it might only be worth 100,000, 200,000, then you may... those catastrophic care costs could mean that you lose your home or that you lose a really significant part of it. a car is driven at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin,
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killing five people and injuring more than a0. police are holding the driver in custody. it doesn't appear to be an act of terrorism. it happened so sudden and so quick and... the truck came out of nowhere and all of a sudden you just hear the sound of people getting hit by... the sound was crazy. the sound was scarring, and so were the images of it, just seeing what happened to innocent people and seeing the aftermath. britain's seventh biggest energy firm, bulb energy, is set to go into administration. the firm — which has 1.7 million customers — is the latest to get into financial difficulty. empty streets in austria, as it becomes the first country in europe to reimpose a full national lockdown amid a surge in covid cases. a memorial service and procession is held in southend, to remember the mp, sir david amess, who was stabbed to death last month.
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hello and welcome. mps are expected to vote today on the government's plans to overhaul social care in england. the changes will see a cap of £86,000 on the amount people have to pay towards their own care. but labour says homeowners in poorer parts of the country will end up losing a larger proportion of their assets than those in more affluent areas. 0ur political correspondent, lone wells, is in westminster. not only labour, but some conservatives unhappy with these proposals? that is right. there is certainly some growing discontent among the conservative backbenchers as well about these plans, particularly this concern that any state contributions to people's social care costs won't count towards that £86,000 cap on
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overall care costs, which some mps worry will disproportionately hit those whose homes are less valuable, compared to those who have more valuable homes in more affluent areas. in terms of the backbench unease that is growing among conservative mps, there are a number of things that some of them are unhappy about. one former cabinet minister told me one thing that is causing unrest in some of the conservative whatsapp groups, particularly among some of those newer mps in the so—called red wall areas, is they feel like they have not been provided with enough of a reason from the government about why those means tested contributions from the state won't count towards people's care cap costs. some people feel, particularly after what has been described as a bit of a rocky few weeks for the relationship between backbench mps and government ministers and whips, but they don't really want to be marched up a hill to vote with and back the government, if there is a chance their constituents may be unhappy
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with this or they may turn out to be on what one mp described as the wrong side of the argument, and they certainly don't want any more situations where the government to make some support something, but later u—turns on it. so there is some unease thatjust hasn't really been properly explained to mp5. something tying into that argument as well is this issue that these plans were sort of slipped out last week on quite a busy news day. mps don't really feel like they have had enough chance to consider what the impact of this might be on their constituents, particularly because number ten today admitted that the government's own impact of the changes to these plans won't be unfermented before the boat on it this evening, so mps don't feel like they know what the impact will be, particularly on some of their less well off as it once, but today the prime minster did try to alleviate some of these concerns and reassure mps that without voting for these plans i won't be a cap on care costs at all. —— there won't be a cap.
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this is massively more generous than any previous regime, so previously you had to pay for the cost of your care until you were down to £23,000. now we are saying if you have £100,000 — or less — we will help you. and that does not include your housing assets, your home. so the prime minister there kind of defending the government's plans, saying if mps don't vote for this then there won't be that cap on care costs, which successive governments have not so far managed to introduce and that is certainly a reason why some of the mps tonight who are a bit nervous about not really knowing what the impact of these changes might be are still quite likely to vote with the government their argument is if we don't vote for this these changes won't be brought in at all, so that is one argument which may be alleviating some concern from mps, but i think there is still a growing unrest about this cap and particularly the fact that this cap won't include those contributions from the council, which labour's jonathan
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contributions from the council, which labour'sjonathan ashworth says means this will be much less generous than was previously advertised. it's actually a care con, because if you need social care and you're fortunate enough to own a £1 million house, for example in the home counties, then 90% of your assets will be protected. but if you're unfortunate enough to need social care and you live in an £80,000 terrace house in barrow, hartlepool or mansfield, you'll lose nearly everything. that is manifestly unfair. it's not levelling up, it's frankly daylight robbery. so labour is very critical there, saying this is much less generous than what the panellist and health secretary, sajid javid, had previously announced when they outlined their new social care reforms. today downing street's response to labour's criticism at the criticism of some of their own mps says this is all about balancing cost. they want to introduce a maximum care cost to deal with what they describe as the catastrophic
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cost some people have to pay, while also balancing and managing the cost to the taxpayer. we know this is all going to be funded by a rise to national insurance contributions coming in next year. they say this is all about balancing both those care costs and what all of us as taxpayers would have to pay. it doesn't currently look like the rebellion this evening is going to be big enough to defeat the government, not necessarily enough tory mps who are planning to abstain or vote against their own government, but i think the vote will certainly be an indication of just how much unease that is within the conservative party itself. lane the conservative party itself. lone wells, the conservative party itself. lone wells. you _ the conservative party itself. lone wells. you said — the conservative party itself. lone wells, you said it _ the conservative party itself. lone wells, you said it all, _ the conservative party itself. ione wells, you said it all, thank you in the last hour i spoke to the ceo of so so much. access social care, kari gerstheimer — a charity that provides free legal information and advice for people who aren t getting the social care they need. she said the government's policy will hit poorer people in care disproportionately. i think the concern is that people with smaller assets will lose a much greater proportion of their money and their assets than the wealthy.
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so if you are a homeowner in the south of england and your home is may be worth upwards of £1 million, proportionately, you will pay may be 10% of the value of your home, whereas if your home is in the north, then it might only be worth 100,000 or £200,000, then those catastrophic care costs could mean that you lose your home or that you lose a really significant part of it. five people have been killed and more than a0 injured after a car was driven at high speed into a christmas parade in the american state of wisconsin. children are among the victims. police in the town of waukesha have arrested the driver of the vehicle. they say it does not appear to be an act of terrorism, and that the suspect may have been fleeing a crime scene. peter bowes sent this report. this was the scene seconds before the holiday parade in waukesha descended into chaos and mayhem. all of a sudden, a red sports utility vehicle ploughed at high speed into a school marching band
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that was entertaining the crowd. the sequence of events was captured on video by the city's live stream of the parade, and on the mobile phones of the people there in person. much of it was quickly shared in social media. oh, my god! horrified and screaming, the onlookers, families with children, fled for their lives as the suv sped off. the vehicle struck more than 20 individuals. some of the individuals were children, and there are some fatalities as a result of this incident. we will not be releasing information on fatalities at this time, while we are working on notifying the family members of the deceased. police say an officer fired his gun at the vehicle to try to stop it. officials say no bystanders were injured as a result. the car has since been recovered and one person is in custody. today, our community faced horror and tragedy in what should have been a community celebration.
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i'm deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went to a parade, but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. the white house says it's monitoring the situation and the fbi is helping the local authorities with their investigation. reports suggest the suspect was fleeing another scene, possibly a knife fight, when he ran into people at the parade. this was the town's first holiday parade after months of restrictions because of covid, but it ended in tragedy. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. our washington correspondent, gary o'donoghue, says police will hold a briefing update in the next few hours, but at this stage they don't appear to be linking their investigation to terrorism. i think it is worth noting that the local police are still in charge of this investigation and if there is any indication that there is terrorism involved they will hand over, typically to the fbi, pretty quickly because it becomes a federal crime and a federal investigation. that has not happened
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at this stage, so as things look at the moment, it does not seem like they are treating it in that way. however, they are not really saying much, to be honest. they haven't said much since some news came out in the early hours. so we are waiting for another update from them, particularly whether or not they have any indication of what the motive might be, whether or not this person or persons in the car have given any sign of what they were up to, whether they are talking, even, tothe police because of course to the police because of course they don't have to answer any questions whatsoever if they don't want to. and meanwhile the police are going about the business of securing the crime scene, gathering the evidence — all that video evidence that is out there on social media — and also the terrible job of informing the families of those who have been injured and those who have been killed. on that point, gary, what do we know about those who have been injured and killed? well, we know there are five people who died.
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there are around a0 who are injured. we know... we think that some of those who died may have been part of one of the marching and dancing groups that was in that parade. again, it is pretty sketchy at the moment. if you look at the terrible video, you see the red car going along the right—hand side of the road and then it veers left and ploughs into the back of a marching band from a south waukesha high school — the blackshirt marching band. you can see it effectively goes through the left—hand side of that band as it continues down the road. we understand that after that it also started to hit people in a sort of dance group — young girls with pom—poms on their hands in a dance group — and also a group of older women — grannies dancing, as they were described and as they have described themselves. so it could be injuries and deaths among all these groups. but no names being released at this stage, but the
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police do have this one individual in custody and they do seem to have this red suv, which seems to have been the vehicle that caused all the damage after having crashed through these police barriers at the beginning of the parade. gary o'donoghue in washington. energy supplier bulb has been put into special administration, but will continue to supply its 1.7 million customers as normal. the company's exit from the market comes following the collapse of more than 20 suppliers since the start of the year amid the soaring price of gas. i asked our business correspondent, ben king, to explain what's happened to bulb. bulb was one of the most successful challengers to the big six energy suppliers that have dominated the market in recent years. it marketed itself as a green supplier with renewable electricity and carbon neutral gas and with over
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1.7 million customers, it was too big to go through the process that other failed energy companies have gone through, the so—called supplier of last resort process, where they get transferred to another supplier. it is going on to something called the special administration regime, which means it will keep trading — with some government support, if necessary — until it can either be restructured, so put back on its feet financially, or sold, or indeed eventually shut down and customers transferred onto other suppliers in due course. what should customers then do? the advice is to sit tight and just wait for the process to resolve itself. your energy will carry on being supplied as normal and any credit balance that you may have built up will be protected. and there aren't any better deals out there anyway, with energy prices going up, so the advice is just to sit tight, wait for the process to resolve itself, but some websites also recommend
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that you keep any copies of statements carefully, just in case there is a dispute later on down the line that you need to resolve. i know it is incredibly difficult to predict what might happen, but are there many other suppliers who might fall into difficulties at the moment? well, it is definitely a difficult market. the thing that did for bulb eventually was the high energy prices. wholesale gas prices have more than doubled in recent months and electricity prices have risen very fast as well. the boss of 0fgem has described this situation as "unprecedented." the other thing that bulb blames for its demise is the price cap, which means it was not able to pass those extra costs onto its customers. those are problems that every supplier has had to deal with and those that don't have the financial resources to weather that storm have been going out of business. the headlines on bbc news...
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mps vote today on the government's controversial plans to overhaul social care in england. costs are capped at £86,000, but some worry poorer people could be hit disproprtionately. a car is driven at high speed in to a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin, killing five people and injuring more than forty. police are holding the driver in custody. it doesn't appear to be an act of terrorism. britain's seventh biggest energy firm — bulb energy — is set to go into administration. the firm — which has 1.7m customers — is the latest to get into financial difficulty. austria is going back into lockdown today amid sharply rising rates of coronavirus. across europe, new restrictions in the run—up to christmas have brought protests in countries such as switzerland, italy, belgium and the netherlands, with rioting in some places. from vienna, bethany bell sent this report. the lockdown will last forjust under three weeks. it comes after record numbers of new covid infections in recent days.
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last night, this market was full of people out enjoying themselves, eating gingerbread and drinking mulled wine, but now everything's closed. the government says the lockdown will go on for almost three weeks, but it all depends on the infection rates. the number of infections have been rising exponentially. at the moment we have 1% of the population being infected every week with some regions being infected even more severely. yes, i think one major factor is the low vaccine coverage we have in austria, but this is also coupled with the delta wave. last week, austria introduced a lockdown for the unvaccinated. but cases continued to soar and the government decided to impose even tougher measures. the chancellor, alexander schallenberg, said covid vaccinations will become mandatory as of february.
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the move is controversial. several european countries saw angry protests against tougher restrictions this weekend. some of them turned violent. in brussels, police used water cannon against demonstrators. across the border in the netherlands, rioting took place for the third night in a row. in austria, thousands of people took to the streets in protest at the plans for compulsory jabs. around two thirds of austrians are fully vaccinated — one of lowest rates in western europe. one of the lowest rates in western europe. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna. let's talk to our europe correspondent, jessica parker. iimagine i imagine this is not quite what governments wanted? they have managed to vaccinate a large number of their citizens, yet they are seeing these demonstrations. what our government telling their
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citizens? . .. our government telling their citizens? , ,, , ., . citizens? yes, i think you are riaht, citizens? yes, i think you are right, governments - citizens? yes, i think you are right, governments didn't - citizens? yes, i think you are i right, governments didn't really want to be here and as we have seen there are certainly members of the public who don't want to be here either. here in response to the protests we saw in brussels yesterday, which we were just hearing in bethany�*s report, in some instances turned violent, and what the government has been saying here is this is a minority of people and as we are more broadly hearing from the authorities that any protest should be peaceful. that is certainly something that has been emphasised by the european commission, the eu's executive arm, today. but in terms of how we got here, because i think there is a sense that yes, the warning lights have been flashing for a few weeks, but as ever with covid suddenly things seem to turn quite quickly and there is a slight sense of shock that all of a sudden we are looking at a full lockdown in austria, new restrictions here in belgium, these protests that have been going on in brussels, and in the netherlands and
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elsewhere. but listening to what the world health organization has been saying about why this has come about, three principal reasons have been named. we are heading into winter, when respiratory viruses tend to spread more easily, including covid, but you also see more pressure on health services generally increase in winter as well, and is well those people do remain unvaccinated, and it varies from country to country. austria has a relatively low vaccination rate compared to other parts of western europe, and as well in some cases there is evidence that the vaccine wanes and efficacy, particularly with older people, hence this emphasis on booster shots, and as well be delta variant, this more highly infectious variant now here in europe, sol highly infectious variant now here in europe, so i think some surprise and shock here that suddenly we seem to be back here again, although the warning lights have been flashing for a few weeks, although the language has been getting very stark. germany's health minister
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today against by the end of this winter, pretty much everyone in germany will either be vaccinated, recovered or dead, so incredibly strong words from a senior politician this morning. those are uuite politician this morning. those are quite some _ politician this morning. those are quite some words! _ politician this morning. those are quite some words! austria, - politician this morning. those are quite some words! austria, the l quite some words! austria, the neighbouring country to germany, of course is imposing a mandatory vaccination policy from the 1st of february. are any other eu nations going to suit?— going to suit? well, that is the question- _ going to suit? well, that is the question. they _ going to suit? well, that is the question. they are _ going to suit? well, that is the question. they are the - going to suit? well, that is the question. they are the first - going to suit? well, that is the question. they are the first to | going to suit? well, that is the l question. they are the first to go down that road and as we have seen, pretty controversial amongst some people. but i think it is important to say we have seen protests, of course, as we have seen in those pictures from bethany�*s report, but other people i have spoken to here in belgium are supportive of further restrictions coming in, of quite a strong push on vaccinations and listening to the briefing by the european commission today their message is still vaccinate, vaccinate. that is the message they keep on saying and emphasising, they see that as a key way of getting out
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of the situation or trying to combat it, although i am increasingly as well hearing more emphasis on those other measures people can take, mask wearing, social distancing, hygiene, etc, but i think those protests we saw in brussels yesterday, they are notjust saw in brussels yesterday, they are not just about those further restrictions that have been brought in here, such as a four—day mandatory working week from home, unless you can't work from home, extending the use of a covid pass, which is something you have to show to get into cafe is other venues, but some people feel the state is overstepping its mandate here, that you could see further mandatory vaccinations. that has not happened here yet, but clearly austria have taken that step and it is seen is seen is a pretty significant one. jessica parker in brussels, thank you so much. and coming up at 4:30 this afternoon we'll be speaking to two experts on what the big spike in covid infections in europe could mean for the uk. get in touch with the hashtag
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#bbcyourquestions — or email yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. a memorial service for conservative mp sir david amess, who was killed last month, is taking place in his southend constituency. members of the public are lining up in the streets to pay their respects. let's cross to southend—on—sea and our correspondent, danjohnson. inaudible several hundred of sir david a mas's family, his friends and closest colleagues join family, his friends and closest colleaguesjoin here family, his friends and closest colleagues join here to family, his friends and closest colleagues join here— family, his friends and closest colleagues join her colleagues 'oin here to share hymns and colleagues join here to share hymns and prayers — colleagues join here to share hymns and prayers and _ colleagues join here to share hymns and prayers and there _ colleagues join here to share hymns and prayers and there were - colleagues join here to share hymns and prayers and there were some i and prayers and there were some readings, remembering his life and his contribution to this to be city of southend. a sad day here, but a significant day for so many people who want to pay their respects and want to show their gratitude for the service you gave as an mp for his constituency for so many years, for decades, and now his coffin is being drawn through the streets of southend, a horse—drawn hearse is
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taking the coffin around the streets for his constituents to show their respects. and this is all i of his bigger official funeral service, which will take place at westminster cathedral in london tomorrow. sir david was a committed roman catholic and it is expected that service tomorrow will be attended by hundreds of people, but will also include a message that will be read by the pope. but what you really get a sense of, speaking to people here today, it's how important sir david was in this constituency and how important his constituency was to him. perhaps a politician who was not necessarily a household name, had not made his name on the national stage, had not made his name on the nationalstage, but had not made his name on the national stage, but had focused on working hard for people here, and representing people, on supporting local charities, organisations, local charities, organisations, local people, really doing the work of a constituency mp, to help people with their problems and their issues and that is why so many people have
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been thankful for her service and have turned out to remember him today. have turned out to remember him toda . have turned out to remember him toda. p, today. dan johnson in southend-on-sea, i today. dan johnson in i southend-on-sea, thank today. dan johnson in - southend-on-sea, thank you today. dan johnson in _ southend-on-sea, thank you so much. two mothers who died of herpes after giving birth could have been infected by the surgeon who carried out caesareans on the women. the families were told there was no connection between the deaths, which were six weeks apart. they're calling for inquests into the deaths to be opened. the east kent hospitals trust says it could not identify the source of the infection, and the surgeon had no history of the virus. our social affairs correspondent, michael buchanan, gave us the latest on the investigation into what happened. this relates to the death of two women — kim sampson and samantha mulcahy — in the summer of 2018. both had emergency caesarean sections at two different hospitals run by the same nhs trust. however, both developed complications that doctors could not diagnose and unfortunately both died a few days after giving birth. tests later revealed both had died of herpes, which is an extremely rare way
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to die indeed, but despite the rarity of the death, the two families were told there was no link between the cases. working with the families, we were able to reveal a previously undisclosed investigation that revealed the same surgeon had operated on the two women and a lab had written to the trust shortly after the second death to say explicitly it does look like surgical contamination. we passed all the documentation to an expert on herpes and he said the most biologically plausible explanation is the surgeon had unwittingly infected the women. there is no suggestion whatsoever that the surgeon had any idea that he may have been infectious. in a statement, the east kent hospitals trust, which run the two hospitals, told us they passed their sympathies onto the two families, but that the investigation led by the trust and the health care safety investigation branch took advice from a number of experts and concluded it was not possible to identify the source
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of either infection. both families, as you said, are now hoping there will be an inquest into the deaths. that was michael buchanan. in response to the deaths, dr rebecca martin, chief medical officer for east kent hospitals, said, "our deepest sympathies are with the families and friends "of kimberley and samantha. "the investigations led by the trust and the healthcare safety "investigation branch took advice from a number of experts "and concluded that it was not possible to identify the source "of either infection. "the surgeon who performed both caesarean sections did not have any "hand lesions that could have caused infection, or any "history of the virus. "kimberley and samantha's treatment was based on the different symptoms "showed during their illness." drug—related deaths in scotland last year reached a record high for the seventh year in a row. latest figures show there were more than 1,300 deaths in 2020. it's prompted the first minister to visit a centre which helps addicts and works to divert young people away from drugs. scotland has by far the highest drug death rate recorded by any country in europe.
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and its rate is more than 3.5 times that of england and wales. just got some news to break to you given by callum may, who is one of our ukjournalists, it given by callum may, who is one of our uk journalists, it is about a review into the home secretary priti patel, who has announced that a former lord advocate, will lead the home office's review into the death of sarah everard. the dame... is investigating complaints made earlier this year, which the chief constable raised said raised a consistent significant concern. the enquiry into the death of sarah everard was going to be into a non—statutory quarry at first, but she might turn it into a statutory enquiry. we will have more on that as it develops. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. hello. the week has begun with some
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bright, but cold weather. many of us will hold onto sunshine this afternoon, but with a few showers plaguing some eastern and some southern parts, more cloud rolling into north—west scotland and parts of northern ireland, with the odd spot of drizzle, temperatures between 7 and 11 degrees. through this evening and tonight, where the skies remain clear across southern parts, well, it would turn cold again, with a touch of frost. some fog is likely through parts of east wales and into the midlands, but further north, scotland, northern ireland, northern england, not as cold, because here we will have more cloud, there will be the odd spots of light rain or drizzle, and we will generally have more cloud in the mix for tomorrow. again, giving the odd spot of drizzle here and there. the best of the sunshine likely to be found down towards the south, although parts of east anglia and the south—east could remain quite cloudy, still with the odd shower. temperatures of 9 or 10 degrees. but it does look like it's turning a little bit colder again as we head towards the end of the week, and by friday, more unsettled too, with showers or longer spells of rain, and the potential for something wintry.
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hello. this is bbc news with james reynolds. the headlines... mps vote today on the government's controversial plans to overhaul social care in england with a cap of £86,000. we will look after you and your old age better than has ever happened before. but some working in the care system — say the plans could hit some areas of the uk harder than others. if your home is in the north and it might— if your home is in the north and it might only— if your home is in the north and it might only be worth 100,000, 200,000, then you make of those catastrophic care costs, could mean that you _ catastrophic care costs, could mean that you lose your home, or that you lose a _ that you lose your home, or that you lose a really— that you lose your home, or that you lose a really significant part of it. a car is driven at high speed in to a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin, killing five people and injuring more than a0. police are holding the driver in custody. it doesn't appear to be an act of terrorism. britain's seventh biggest energy firm — bulb energy — is set to go into administration.
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the firm — which has 1.7m customers — is the latest to get into financial difficulty. empty streets in austria — as it becomes the first country in europe to reimpose a full national lockdown amid a surge in covid cases. a memorial service and procession is held in southend — to remember the mp sir david amess — who was stabbed to death last month. sport centre... sport, and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre... manchester united captain harry maguire says he and the team take full responsibility for the poor results which led to the sacking of manager ole gunnar solsjkaer yesterday. he was speaking alongside temporary united head coach michael carrick who's been put in charge of the team for now. after a very poor run, saturday's 4—1 defeat to watford proved to be the final straw. united are now eighth in the premier league, 12 points behind leaders chelsea. the club announced that they had parted company with solskjaer yesterday, but maguire says
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it was the fault of the players. ultimately, the manager's paid the price, and we're all so disappointed for that. but yes, of course, we take huge responsibility. we haven't been good enough. we know that individually, collectively, as a team, as players. we know that, we spoke about that, now we have to look forward to make sure we get this club back to where it was in the last two years, and of a slew the last few months have been nowhere near good enough. the former tottenham manager mauricio pochettino has emerged as a contender to take over permanantly at manchester united, after the departure of solskjaer. it's not thought they've made an approach, but pochettino says he'd be open to taking the job as he's not completely happy with the setup at paris saint—germain. he's essentially first—team coach there, undersporting director leonardo. pochettino has been at psg for ten months and they're 11 points clear
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at the top of the league. united did approach the former real madrid boss zinedine zidane about the job, but sources say he's not interested at this stage. he ended his second spell as real manager in may this year and he's apparently keen on exploring other options, including the french national side. and interestingly — psg — which could have an impact on united's decision. england manager gareth southgate has been speaking to the media after signing a two—year extension to his contract, keeping him in charge until december 202a. southgate took england to the final of the euros this summer and they've qualified for next year's world cup in qatar. his deal was due to end after that, but the fa said southgate had secured the best men's performance in 55 years. his assistant steve holland has agreed a similar extension. southgate took over in 2016 and the new deal means he'll oversee qualification for euro 2024, he says he has big plans for the long—term development of the squad.
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the last five years have been an incredible experience, and we're really pleased with the progress of the team. we still feel there is room for that team to develop, to improve. i think everybody has seen what is possible with the existing squad and some of the younger players that are coming through our age—group teams as well. yorkshire cricket club have announced 36 people have contacted a whistle—blowing hotline in its first week the hotline opened last monday, following the claims of racism levelled at the club by former yorkshire cricketer azeem rafiq. he gave an emotional testimoney to a dcms select committee where he told mps he had been called racist names and that he felt cricket was institutionally racist. an independent panel has also been set up by the county to review the complaints.
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the five time grand slam singles champion alfie hewett says he's thrilled after being told he will be able to continue his wheelchair tennis career, after previously being told new classification rules would make him ineligible. hewett, who has a hip disorder, was reassessed and — eventually — told he did meet the criteria to play on. just clarity, i think that's the big word _ just clarity, i think that's the big word to — just clarity, i think that's the big word to sum _ just clarity, i think that's the big word to sum up— just clarity, i think that's the big word to sum up the _ just clarity, i think that's the big word to sum up the last- just clarity, i think that's the big word to sum up the last two - just clarity, i think that's the big word to sum up the last two and just clarity, i think that's the big i word to sum up the last two and a half years. — word to sum up the last two and a half years. not _ word to sum up the last two and a half years, not knowing _ word to sum up the last two and a half years, not knowing what's - half years, not knowing what's around — half years, not knowing what's around the _ half years, not knowing what's around the corner, _ half years, not knowing what's around the corner, and - half years, not knowing what's around the corner, and that i half years, not knowing what'si around the corner, and that has honestly— around the corner, and that has honestly been _ around the corner, and that has honestly been around _ around the corner, and that has honestly been around —— - around the corner, and that has honestly been around —— out i around the corner, and that has honestly been around —— out of| around the corner, and that has i honestly been around —— out of my hands _ honestly been around —— out of my hands to — honestly been around —— out of my hands to be — honestly been around —— out of my hands. to be told _ honestly been around —— out of my hands. to be told the _ honestly been around —— out of my hands. to be told the news, - honestly been around —— out of my hands. to be told the news, it- honestly been around —— out of my hands. to be told the news, it is. hands. to be told the news, it is excitement _ hands. to be told the news, it is excitement and _ hands. to be told the news, it is excitement and relief— hands. to be told the news, it is excitement and relief and - hands. to be told the news, it is excitement and relief and really| hands. to be told the news, it is. excitement and relief and really i'm more _ excitement and relief and really i'm more motivated _ excitement and relief and really i'm more motivated than _ excitement and relief and really i'm more motivated than i— excitement and relief and really i'm more motivated than i probably- excitement and relief and really i'm i more motivated than i probably have been in _ more motivated than i probably have been in a _ more motivated than i probably have been in a long — more motivated than i probably have been in a long while _ more motivated than i probably have been in a long while to _ more motivated than i probably have been in a long while to go _ more motivated than i probably have been in a long while to go and - more motivated than i probably have been in a long while to go and push. been in a long while to go and push on and _ been in a long while to go and push on and do _ been in a long while to go and push on and do well— been in a long while to go and push on and do well in _ been in a long while to go and push on and do well in australia, - been in a long while to go and push on and do well in australia, and i been in a long while to go and push on and do well in australia, and do| on and do well in australia, and do well for— on and do well in australia, and do well for the — on and do well in australia, and do well for the three _ on and do well in australia, and do well for the three years _ on and do well in australia, and do well for the three years coming i on and do well in australia, and do| well for the three years coming up. good _ well for the three years coming up. good to— well for the three years coming up. good to hear — that's all the sport for now. welsh labour and plaid cymru reached a co—operation agreement this weekend,
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their deal in the senedd has been finalised — and is set to last for "the coming three years". it includes plans to create a national care service, as well as looking at ways to bring the net zero carbon emissions target date forward and increase the size of the senedd. i spoke to our wales correspondent, hywel griffith, a little earlier — and i started by asking him if this is a natural, and logical, political partnership. it is. when you look at the arithmetic of this i place behind me, the senedd, six. months ago the welsh parliamentary elections delivered 30. of the seats for labour, that's exactly half, - so they've known since then that they needed some kind of deal. now, this is cooperation not a coalition. - it doesn't deliver. any ministers, not even deputy ministers - for plaid cymru, but it does give a plan for the next three years ahead and will i end six months potentially or a year and six months ahead of the next. election depending| on what is decided, in terms of the term of parliament. what will it deliver for the people of wales, vitally how _
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much defence with a sea? some of the headlines i you heard earlier on, some free school meals for all, primary age children, i also the setting up of a national care service, something - that has also been i worked on in scotland but also as you heard from _ adam price at played camera, there are key things _ they don't agree on, _ and certainly what they don't agree on is what this should mean next. is it a stepping stone _ towards an independent wales? well, no is the answer- from the first minister mark drakeford. how will they work at those disagreements? the last one they talked about, independence, that is a profound disagreement between the two parties. absolutely, and i asked both really what they i thought this changed with the - increase potentially of senedd seats from 60 to maybe 80 or 100, they talk about, could mean. | is it a stepping stone or is it a way of- cementing wales and the union? the answer differedj from both, they say they don't have to agree - on everything, they got their 46
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points from their- priorities, particularly as wales tries to come out of the pandemic, l that they want to work on, i so they will put their differences | aside to work on those, but they| will have the freedom to disagree essentially on other matters. again, what it means. for people in wales we will wait to see. the two parties have i worked together before. they had been in formal coalition but they - have the freedom to criticise each other now not being tied in as a l government together. what do opposition politicians make of it? well, from the conservatives cosmic point of view, they question why- something like increasing the number |senedd members would be a priority, while the welsh nhs at the moment i is seeing some of its worst everi results when it comes to ambulance lwaiting times or the waits in a&e. i also they question the priorities of these two parties. _ also the opposition i parties will suggest, well, if you vote for labour- you will get played kamrul and vice versa, so they are not really-
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offering much of an alternative. when they remember that labour hasi been in government, whether alone or in coalition, for over two decades now in wales, so they will say. really it is more of a status quo. the final phase of trial runs has started on the much—delayed crossrail project linking east and west london. it was due to open in 2018 and is several billion pounds over—budget. hundreds of different scenarios — such as signalfailures and passenger illness — will be tested over the coming months to check if the line can cope. it's now expected to welcome passengers before next summer. workshops to help men understand sexual harassment and abuse against women have started in nottingham. they're thought to be the first courses of their kind in the country to help men challenge or intervene when they see women being targeted. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell reports. atraining a training session. but unlike one you have experienced before. we need guys like you who are wanting to make a difference.
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these men have come to learn about how to be a good ally for women. if people get away with stuff at a lower level... the stand by her programme is a men's only workshop about sexual harassment and abuse faced by women, created by a community group and the charity women's aid. this programme is for men that want to be allies in making a difference in relation to women's safety. it is not a programme for perpetrators, so this programme will help to give them the skills, knowledge and confidence to be more effective in intervening when they see women getting unwanted attention but also raise their confidence in talking to other men in their networks and also other young boys in their network as well. i feel threatened, laughed at. seven out of ten women have experienced some form of sexual harassment in public according to a recent poll. i love a good laugh with my colleagues and things. sometimes the line is crossed and it is the word banter that
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almost makes it acceptable. compliment. i am not sure when to compliment. whether it is going to be misconstrued? - whether it is going to be misconstrued? i- whether it is going to be misconstrued? i get i whether it is going to be l misconstrued? i get that. whether it is going to be - misconstrued? i get that. asking whether it is going to be _ misconstrued? i get that. asking for a drink, _ misconstrued? i get that. asking for a drink, i_ misconstrued? i get that. asking for a drink, i mean _ these sessions are designed for men to reflect on their own personal experiences with advice on how to intervene effectively when help is needed. somebody was punching this women on the floor under a street light and he said, "she's my girlfriend," and she said, "it's all right." so we just left it. it stopped the violence, but it's hard to intervene sometimes because you do not know the dynamics. what we wanted to do is be dynamic and look at masculinity notjust as toxic masculinity which we see the response of and the effects of, we wanted to see and support men to use healthy masculinity to support us. we are not asking to be rescued
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by men, we are asking to be supported by men. more workshops are running in greater manchester and london in the next few weeks. it is hoped through doing these courses, men will put into practice what they have learned and go on to educate other men and boys in their communities. two men have been arrested on suspicion of murder, after two bodies were found at an address in somerset. the man and women, both in their 30s were found with serious injuries by police at an address in the village of norton fitzwarren, around three miles from taunton. avon and somerset police said they were both pronounced dead at the scene. it's believed two children were in the property at the time of the killings. a new analysis has found that only a small number of people — less than 1% — are behind more than 16% of all visits to accident and emergency departments in england. a study by the british red cross shows that some of the people in this group — so called high intensity users —
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go to emergency departments more than 300 times a year. with more, here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes. a&e departments across the uk are busier than ever, with some patients waiting long waits for treatments. now a study of six years of nhs data reveals how a small number of people, known as high—intensity users, are returning to a&es time and time again. high—intensity use of an a&e department is defined as more than five visits in the year, while less than 0.7% of england's population fall into this category, nhs data showed they accounted for a significant proportion, 16% of all a&e visits, and well over a quarter of all ambulance journeys, as well as 26% of all emergency hospital admissions in england. but specialist teams based in a&es across england can help to reduce frequent visits by offering individual support to people who feel hospital is their only option. the reasons for people attending a&e
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are quite complex but it is often because they don't feel they have anywhere else to go, and they have fallen through the gaps between other services and teams previously. we found it is really interesting, there are a couple of cohorts that are particular frequent attenders to a&e, the younger people from the age of 20 to 29, who might have mental health problems, as well as other issues, and those over 70 who have other complex issues, including chronic loneliness. so it's really important to work with people to understand them as individuals so we can get them the support that they need, hopefully before they even get to a&e. specialist help can cut repeat visits by more than 80%, potentially saving the nhs millions of pounds and reducing the pressure on an already stretched service. dominic hughes, bbc news. i want to bring you some years which isjust coming into i want to bring you some years which is just coming into us about bulb, the energy company that says it is going into administration. there is
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a statement from 0fgem, the energy regulator. the statement says, customers of bulb do not need to worry, it will continue to operate as normal. 0fgem is working closely with the government. this includes plans for 0fgem to apply to court to appoint an administrator who will run the company. customers will see no disruption to their supply, and their account and tariff will continue as normal. the statement concludes while staff will still be available to answer calls and queries. bulb has 1.7 million customers. the headlines on bbc news... mps vote today on the government's controversial plans to overhaul social care in england. costs are capped at 86—thousand pounds — but some worry poorer people could be hit disproprtionately. a car is driven at high speed in to a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin, killing five people and injuring more than forty. police are holding the driver in custody. it doesn't appear to be an act of terrorism. empty streets in austria — as it becomes the first country in europe to reimpose a full national lockdown amid a surge in covid cases.
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the number of children in care in england could reach almost 100,000 by 2025, up by more than a third in a decade. the number of children in care in england could reach almost 100,000 by 2025, up by more than a third in a decade. the figures come from new research commissioned by county councils. local authorities say the increase its creating "unprecedented pressure" on their budgets. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. this is eastbourne in east sussex. joe and joanne have been foster carers for nine years. when the children come to us and they look so down, they look like they're carrying so much baggage and then after a few weeks sometimes, you start to see their face light up. i mean, the fact of the matter is there's more children who need our help than there is carers who can help. yeah, but i also think people have a misconception about fostering. i think it is, "am i qualified enough to be a foster carer?" and it is at the end of the day, it is about your personality,
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about your character, about your heart. england's county council leaders are getting together today for their conference in marlow in buckinghamshire. they are worried the overall number of children in care is going up and the number in children's homes is going up too, partly because there are aren't enough foster carers. addressing them today, this man, who is chairing an independent review of children's social care in england. there is no future for children's social care that is not _ going to cost the country, england, more money. i we just need to accept that. the choice is, do we put more money into a flawed system that doesn't i work well enough for children i and their families, or do we put it into a programme of reform that's actually going to address - the fundamental issues that have been highlighted - through this report today? this is the lighthouse. the idea is it is a beacon for light for the young people going through theirjourney. in warrington in cheshire,
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a trial scheme, and a chance to see what a new children's home looks like inside. there is an emphasis here on what the independent reviewer and councils want to see more of — doing everything possible to nip issues in the bud straightaway. they're addressing the brutal truth that a quarter of the adult prison population in england used to be in care, and so have a police officer on site. imagine if i was coming into work in a full uniform. the young people, firstly, it just wouldn't sit right. me not wearing uniform, it breaks down those barriers straightaway. policing cannot fix everything on their own, so we do a lot ofjoined up work with, obviously, with social care, with parents, with carers, with education, with health and we are realising one of the other terminologies, you can't arrest your way out of this. there's got to be another approach and that's where i am 100% believing in this system. plenty argue how society helps the next generations most in need has to change.
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the government says it is providing new funding to help maintain children's social care. chris mason, bbc news. plans for electric vehicles charging points to be installed at new buildings have been outlined by the prime minister today. the legislation will mean new homes, offices and supermarkets built from next year will be required to feature ev charging facilities. the prime minister told business leaders that another 145,000 charging points will be installed annually but labour says the announcement doesn't address what it called the "appalling" geographical divide in available ev points. joel teague is the chief executive of the electric vehicle charger sharing app, co charger. thank you forjoining us. what about existing buildings? what happens there? ~ . , existing buildings? what happens there? ~ . ., , there? well, it has already perfectly — there? well, it has already perfectly possible - there? well, it has already perfectly possible to i there? well, it has already| perfectly possible to install
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charging points in any building that has somewhere to put a car. but yes, i believe they have included in the scope of this announcement major refurbishments, so that is a good step, and applies notjust a private but to business properties as well. how much does it cost to install a single ev charger?— single ev charger? domestic is around £800. _ single ev charger? domestic is around £800. a _ single ev charger? domestic is around £800. a lot _ single ev charger? domestic is around £800. a lot of- single ev charger? domestic is around £800. a lot of people i single ev charger? domestic is i around £800. a lot of people qualify for a £350 grant towards that. what for a £350 grant towards that. what about people _ for a £350 grant towards that. what about people who _ for a £350 grant towards that. what about people who park on the street who don't have access to off—site parking, where will they charge? that is where the code charger thing comes in. there are lots of different solutions. you can use public charges, —— the co charger comes in. there are mobile charging facilities. but like most charges, bearin facilities. but like most charges, bear in mind we have around half a million home and workplace charges now and most of them are used for about five hours a week. so with our app about five hours a week. so with our app certainly and there are other options as well, enabling the owner
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of that charge points to make it available to their neighbourhood, who is a community charger, is a major part of this will stop the announcement today is good but to get the full benefit of it and actually solve the problem for everybody, those new charge points need to be shared as well. hagar everybody, those new charge points need to be shared as well.— need to be shared as well. how are --eole need to be shared as well. how are people going _ need to be shared as well. how are people going to _ need to be shared as well. how are people going to learn _ need to be shared as well. how are people going to learn how - need to be shared as well. how are people going to learn how to i need to be shared as well. how are | people going to learn how to share? 0h, people going to learn how to share? oh, it is very easy to do it, it is a matter of you download the app, set up a host account to say where you are and how much you want paying for using your charger, and they can find new and booked a regular slot every week to charge their car. 50 it is very simple thing to do, it is religious to cultural matter a bit like recycling, we all do it now and i think the government are on board with encouraging people to do that as well. because we want to clean up transport. we have to. fine as well. because we want to clean up transport. we have to.— transport. we have to. one thing --eole transport. we have to. one thing peeple say _ transport. we have to. one thing peeple say about _ transport. we have to. one thing people say about electric- transport. we have to. one thing people say about electric cars, i l people say about electric cars, i should say, is that when they are driving, they don't know how long the charge will last. if you have a long journey say from cardiff to london, what do you do midway through? to london, what do you do midway throu~h? ., , ., , , ., through? to be honest it is no different from _ through? to be honest it is no different from a _ through? to be honest it is no different from a petrol - through? to be honest it is no different from a petrol car, . through? to be honest it is no - different from a petrol car, except you are likely to leave home with a
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full charge. 90% or more charging happens what we call bass charging, either at home or in a workplace. it is more like a mobile phone. it is unhelpful to compare charging a car to fuelling a fossil fuel car, you don't generally stop on the way somewhere because 97% of the time you don't need to. so it changes the way you think about running an electric vehicle. very much a mobile phone with wheels. you charge it where there is electricity while you are doing something else, so it is important the government keeps going on the work to improve the public charging network. that improving really fast, quite impressive plans there, for availability, numbers, everything is in place, but people need to bear in mind that is not generally how you run an electric car, that's the exception. you need both, but what's good about today's announcement is it focuses on based charging which really gets people into electric cars.— back to foot power, running now.
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rugby league legend kevin sinfield has set off this morning to run 101 miles in 2a hours. he's trying to raise money for the motor neurone disease assocation — and for his friend and former team—mate, rob burrow, who has the illness. graham satchell has been watching. three, two, one — go! cheering. kevin sinfield, setting off on an epic challenge. he's running 2a hours straight, from leicester to leeds. it is 101 miles with no sleep. i want it to be horrible, raining and sleeting and windy. i want everything to get thrown at us that can be. there's people out there doing it really tough with the mnd and people connected with mnd who are fighting a really tough fight at the minute, and we're just showing them that we care. commentator: this is a sensational try! l there aren't many in super league that could do that. _ kev is running for his former team—mate and friend rugby league legend rob burrow.
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rob was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 2019. his family can't quite believe what kev is about to do. 100 miles in one day without no sleep?! you are crazy! you know we think you are amazing. thank you for doing everything you have done for my dad and people with mnd. good luck on your next challenge. today's run will be a physical and mental test like no other. running through the night, sleep—deprived, glycogen—depleted, fatigued, he motivates us to do things that we don't think we can do and he does that by leading by example and doing things that nobody should be able to do. kev will be raising money for people with motor neurone disease, like ian, who was diagnosed in 2019. mnd is a cruel disease, a degenerative brain disorder. there is no effective treatment, no cure. but in the mnd community, kev has become a hero. the money raised today will help build new, much—needed treatment centres.
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a place that has some dignity, has some joy and has some hope would provide so much hope for people when they enter it, that they know the research is going on, they know the technology is there. i suppose you have your good days, your bad days, but, yeah... - right from the very beginning, when rob burrow first announced his diagnosis, kevin sinfield was there. today, he will once again go the extra mile for his best friend. graham satchell, bbc news. and according to the schedule, kevin should be making his way through hucknall in nottinghamshire about now. my colleague ben brown will be on the big seat at the top of the albert before then, a look at the weather with the other ben rich. hello.
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after all the mild weather we've had so far this autumn, it is now cold out there. bright for most of us, quite a lot of sunshine around, the satellite picture reveals more cloud in the north of the uk and some speckled shower clouds plaguing eastern and southern parts, east anglia, perhaps kent and the channel islands will see some showers through the afternoon. more cloud across north—west scotland, northern ireland, the odd spot of this autumn sunshine in between and temperatures between 9—11. through this evening and tonight, we keep the showers in the far south—east, clear skies for southern parts and we will see mist and fog developing through parts of east wales, and into the midlands, but under those clear skies in the south, there will be another cold and frosty night. further north, not as cold, because we will have more cloud, so a grey start for much of scotland, northern ireland, northern england and indeed parts of north wales to tomorrow morning. that cloud producing the odd spot of rain and drizzle at times and some fog patches could linger for east wales into the midlands and we will keep some showers going across the far south—east but generally speaking, the best of the sunshine tomorrow will be found across southern parts
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and, for some, maybe not quite as cold with highs of 9—10. that's only a temporary feature, because as we get into wednesday, this band of rain sinks its way south eastwards, and ahead of it, a lot of cloud and mist and murk, but behind the rain, the air is set to turn colder. brighter skies for scotland and northern ireland, some showers and a decidedly chilly feel. as we move into thursday, we push this frontal system south—east eastwards and it's a cold front as the name suggests behind the front, the air will be turning colder bring the air down from the north at this time of year and it always means there will be something of a chill. but another fairly bright day on thursday and quite a lot of sunshine. some showers especially for coastal areas and some of these will be wintry over the high ground and to lower levels for a time in the far north of scotland. those are the afternoon highs on thursday. single digits forjust about all of us, and then,
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as we get into friday, this low pressure dives its way down from the north and this will turn things more unsettled with some brisk winds, some showers at times, and depending onjust how cold the air gaps, some of those showers will turn wintry so it stays cold through the week.
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this is bbc news. iam ben i am ben brown. our headlines at the 4pm... mps vote today on the government's controversial plans to overhaul social care in england with a cap of £86,000. there has never been any protection like this across the whole country and what we're doing is we are saying to everybody, we are going to make sure that we look after you in your old age better than has ever happened before. but labour say the plans mean people living in areas with lower house prices will be hit disproportionately. the prime minister promised people would _ the prime minister promised people would not _ the prime minister promised people would not have to sell their homes in order_ would not have to sell their homes in order to — would not have to sell their homes in order to afford social care. he has broken — in order to afford social care. he has broken that promise today. worse than that, _ has broken that promise today. worse than that, he has broken it for those — than that, he has broken it for those that_ than that, he has broken it for those that can least afford it. a car is driven at high speed
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into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin, killing five people and injuring more than a0. police are holding the driver in custody. it doesn't appear to be an act of terrorism. britain's seventh biggest energy firm, bulb energy, is set to appoint administrators — the latest uk energy firm to hit financial problems. empty streets in austria, as it becomes the first country in europe to reimpose a national lockdown amid a surge in covid cases. a memorial service and procession is held in southend, to remember the mp, sir david amess, who was stabbed to death last month. good afternoon. borisjohnson has insisted that his plans to overhaul social care in england will overturn a decades—long injustice for people with dementia.
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mps are expected to vote this evening on whether benefits received from local authorities should count towards an £86,000 cap on how much people should pay for their care. labour argue that not including benefits would amount to daylight robbery. our political correspondent, lone wells, said there is growing cross—party opposition to the government's plans — including from some of its own mps. there is certainly some growing discontent among the conservative backbenchers as well about these plans, particularly this concern that any state contributions to people's social care costs won't count towards that £86,000 cap on overall care costs, which some mps worry will disproportionately hit those whose homes are less valuable, compared to those who have more valuable homes in more affluent areas. in terms of the backbench unease that is growing among conservative mps, there are a number of things that some of them are
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unhappy about. one former cabinet minister told me one thing that is causing unrest in some of the conservative whatsapp groups, particularly among some of those newer mps in the so—called red wall areas, is they feel like they have not been provided with enough of a reason from the government about why those means tested contributions from the state won't count towards people's care cap costs. some people feel, particularly after what has been described as a bit of a rocky few weeks for the relationship between backbench mps and government ministers and whips, that they don't really want to be marched up a hill to vote with and back the government, if there is a chance their constituents may be unhappy with this or they may turn out to be on what one mp described as the wrong side of the argument, and they certainly don't want any more situations where the government makes them government makes them support something, but later u—turns on it.
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so there is some unease that this hasn't really been properly explained to mps. something tying into that argument as well is this issue that these plans were sort of slipped out last week on quite a busy news day. mps don't really feel like they have had enough chance to consider what the impact of this might be on their constituents, particularly because number ten today admitted that the government's own impact assessment of the changes won't be implemented before the vote on it this evening, so mps don't feel like they know what the impact will be, particularly on some of their less well off constituents, but today the prime minster did try to alleviate some of these concerns and reassure mps that without voting for these plans there won't be a cap on care costs at all.
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this is massively more generous than any previous regime, so previously you had to pay for the cost of your care until you were down to £23,000. now we are saying if you have £100,000 — or less — we will help you. and that does not include your housing assets, your home. so the prime minister there kind of defending the government's plans, saying if mps don't vote for this then there won't be that cap on care costs, which successive governments have not so far managed to introduce and that is certainly a reason why some of the mps tonight who are a bit nervous about not really knowing what the impact of these changes might be are still quite likely to vote with the government their argument is if we don't vote for this these changes won't be brought in at all. in the last few minutes labour leader sir keir starmer has been talking about this issue. lets take a listen. what the government has done on soddl— what the government has done on social care — what the government has done on social care is to break yet another uromiso — social care is to break yet another promise. the government has unveiled what they— promise. the government has unveiled what they said was a social care plan _ what they said was a social care plan which _ what they said was a social care plan which wouldn't make people sell their homes. we have now learned that people will have to sell their homes, — that people will have to sell their homes, so — that people will have to sell their homes, so it is another broken
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uromiso — homes, so it is another broken promise. worse than that is that it is the _ promise. worse than that is that it is the people who are not so well off who _ is the people who are not so well off who have to sell their homes because — off who have to sell their homes because of course many families will not have _ because of course many families will not have £86,000 to hand and they will have _ not have £86,000 to hand and they will have to — not have £86,000 to hand and they will have to sell their homes to do it, will have to sell their homes to do it. so— will have to sell their homes to do it, so another day, another broken promise _ it, so another day, another broken promise from his prime minister. it also said _ promise from his prime minister. it also said that no one would have to sell the _ also said that no one would have to sell the house and now we know that those _ sell the house and now we know that those who _ sell the house and now we know that those who will have to sell their house _ those who will have to sell their house are — those who will have to sell their house are those who are not so well off and _ house are those who are not so well off and i_ house are those who are not so well off and i don't know many families who have — off and i don't know many families who have got £86,000 to hand, that won't _ who have got £86,000 to hand, that won't mean — who have got £86,000 to hand, that won't mean them selling their houses, — won't mean them selling their houses, so it is a broken promise, but it— houses, so it is a broken promise, but it is— houses, so it is a broken promise, but it is absolutely hitting those without — but it is absolutely hitting those without as much money, those without the resources and if you have got a house _ the resources and if you have got a house that — the resources and if you have got a house that is worth 120 or £150,000, you're _ house that is worth 120 or £150,000, you're basically going to have to sell your— you're basically going to have to sell your whole house to fund social care, _ sell your whole house to fund social care, the _ sell your whole house to fund social care, the one thing the prime mirrister— care, the one thing the prime minister promised he would not have to do _ minister promised he would not have to do. . , minister promised he would not have to do. ., , ,, ,, ., to do. that is sir keir starmer talkin: a to do. that is sir keir starmer talking a short _ to do. that is sir keir starmer talking a short time _ to do. that is sir keir starmer talking a short time ago. - in the last hour i spoke to the ceo of access social care, kari gerstheimer —
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a charity that provides free legal information and advice for people who aren t getting the social care they need. she said the government's policy will hit poorer people in care disproportionately. i think the concern is that people with smaller assets will lose a much greater proportion of their money and their assets than the wealthy. so if you are a homeowner in the south of england and your home is maybe worth upwards of £1 million, proportionately, you will pay may be proportionately, you will pay maybe 10% of the value of your home, whereas if your home is in the north, then it might only be worth 100,000 or £200,000, then those catastrophic care costs could mean that you lose your home or that you lose a really significant part of it. now, let's bring you an update on the deaths in wisconsin, in which five people died when a car was
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driven at high speed into a christmas parade and some a0 people were injured, children amongst the victims. this was in the town of waukesha and now police have arrested the driver of that vehicle that was driven at high speed through this people and that driver has just been named, through this people and that driver hasjust been named, in fact, by the authorities in wisconsin, as darryl brooks. no more information about who he is, he is in custody. police have been saying that he did not appear to be an act of terrorism, that the suspect may indeed have been fleeing from a crime scene. peter sent us this report. this was the scene seconds before the holiday parade in waukesha descended into chaos and mayhem. all of a sudden, a red sports utility vehicle ploughed at high speed into a school marching band that was entertaining the crowd. the sequence of events was captured on video by the city's live stream of the parade, and on the mobile phones of the people there in person. much of it was quickly shared in social media. oh, my god!
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horrified and screaming, the onlookers, families with children, fled for their lives as the suv sped off. the vehicle struck more than 20 individuals. some of the individuals were children, and there are some fatalities as a result of this incident. we will not be releasing information on fatalities at this time, while we are working on notifying the family members of the deceased. police say an officer fired his gun at the vehicle to try to stop it. officials say no bystanders were injured as a result. the car has since been recovered and one person is in custody. today, our community faced horror and tragedy in what should have been a community celebration. i'm deeply saddened to know that so many in our community went to a parade, but ended up dealing with injury and heartache. the white house says it's monitoring the situation and the fbi is helping the local authorities with their investigation.
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reports suggest the suspect was fleeing another scene, possibly a knife fight, when he ran into people at the parade. this was the town's first holiday parade after months of restrictions because of covid, but it ended in tragedy. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. we have just had we havejust had in we have just had in the latest covid—19 figures for the united kingdom. they show a5 people have died in the last 2a—hour period. there are the government figures for you there now. the death figure often lower after a weekend because often lower after a weekend because of the way the figures are recorded. in terms of the number of cases, aa,000 917, so in terms of the number of cases, aa,ooo 917, so nearly 50,000 cases new cases, and the lack compares to aa,000 new cases, and the lack compares to aa,ooo yesterday, so those of the
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figures there for you. meanwhile across europe there are a surging case rates. austria is going back into lockdown today amid sharply rising rates of coronavirus. across europe, new restrictions in the run up to christmas have brought protests in countries such as switzerland, italy, belgium and the netherlands, with rioting in some places. from vienna, bethany bell sent this report. the lockdown will last forjust under three weeks. it comes after record numbers of new covid infections in recent days. last night, this market was full of people out enjoying themselves, eating gingerbread and drinking mulled wine, but now everything's closed. the government says the lockdown will go on for almost three weeks, but it all depends on the infection rates. the number of infections have been rising exponentially. at the moment we have 1% of the population being infected every week with some regions being infected even more severely. yes, i think one major factor is the low vaccine
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coverage we have in austria, but this is also coupled with the delta wave. last week, austria introduced a lockdown for the unvaccinated. but cases continued to soar and the government decided to impose even tougher measures. the chancellor, alexander schallenberg, said covid vaccinations will become mandatory as of february. the move is controversial. several european countries saw angry protests against tougher restrictions this weekend. some of them turned violent. in brussels, police used water cannon against demonstrators. across the border in the netherlands, rioting took place for the third night in a row. in austria, thousands of people took to the streets in protest at the plans for compulsory jabs. around two thirds of austrians are fully vaccinated — one of the lowest rates in western europe. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna.
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so bethany bell now with the latest on the situation in austria. our correspondent in brussels, jessica parker, explained what european governments are doing to try and put an end to the protests. governments didn't really want to be here and as we have seen there are certainly members of the public who did not want to be here either. here in response to the protests we saw in brussels yesterday, which we were just hearing in bethany�*s report, in some instances turned violent, and what the government has been saying here is this is a minority of people and as we are more broadly hearing from the authorities that any protest should be peaceful. that is certainly something that has been emphasised
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by the european commission, the eu's executive arm, today. but in terms of how we got here, because i think there is a sense that yes, the warning lights have been flashing for a few weeks, but as ever with covid suddenly things seem to turn quite quickly and there is a slight sense of shock that all of a sudden we are looking at a full lockdown in austria, new restrictions here in belgium, these protests that have been going on in brussels, and in the netherlands and elsewhere. but listening to what the world health organization has been saying about why this has come about, three principal reasons have been named. we are heading into winter, when respiratory viruses tend to spread more easily, including covid, but you also see more pressure on health services generally increase in winter as well, and as well those people who do remain remain unvaccinated — and it varies from country to country. austria has a relatively low vaccination rate compared to other parts of western europe, and as well in some cases there is evidence that the vaccine wanes in efficacy, particularly with older people, hence this
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emphasis on booster shots, and as well the delta variant, this more highly infectious variant now here in europe, so i think some surprise and shock here that suddenly we seem to be back here again, although the warning lights have been flashing for a few weeks, and the language has been getting very stark. germany's health ministerjens today saying by the end of this winter, "everyone in germany will either be vaccinated, "recovered or dead." so incredibly strong words from a senior politician this morning. the headlines on bbc news... mps vote today on the government's controversial plans to overhaul social care in england. costs are capped at £86,000 — but some worry poorer people could be hit disproprtionately. five people have been killed and more than ao injured, after a car was driven at high speed into a christmas parade in the us state of wisconsin.
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a man taken into custody has been named by two law enforcement officials as darryl brooks. empty streets in austria — as it becomes the first country in europe to reimpose a full national lockdown amid the home secretary has blamed a "global migration crisis" for the record number of migrants travelling across the english channel. earlier in the commons, priti patel promised to crack down on the unacceptable levels of people making the journey. that is what she called it. of course, we would be in a much worse position if it was not for the work already undertaken by the government. we have ensured that the national crime agency has the resulting it needs to tackle and go after the people smuggling gangs, resulting in 9a ongoing investigations, a6 arrests and eight convictions this year. we have reached two new deals with france, putting more police officers and
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french beaches, introducing new ground—breaking technology to better detect migrants, set up a joint intelligence with france to target migrant interceptions on french beaches, introduced new and tougher criminal offences for those attempting to enter the uk illegally, late statutory instruments to stop asylum claims being made at agreed agreements with deer and albania and there were discussions just last week with pakistan to take back more failed asylum seekers with more returns deal is imminent. all of these measures, apart from the new plan for immigration, which i launched in this house in february of last year. there are many components of that plan that are currently making their way through parliament in the national borders bill and i look forward to getting all colleagues' sent on this as soon as possible. the bill will introduce a number of measures, including but not limited to a one—stop appeals process, the ability for asylum claims to be heard offshore in a third country,
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the ability to declare those having arrived in the uk having passed through safe countries where they could have claimed asylum inadmissible to our asylum system, meaning no recourse to public funds and limited family reunion rights. these are penalties for countries refusing to take back their nationals. quicker returns of foreign... and a new verification to prevent adult asylum seekers posing as children. . , prevent adult asylum seekers posing as children. ., , ., as children. that is the home secretary- — the shadow home secretary nick thomas symonds gave this response. 5700 people have risked their lives in these _ 5700 people have risked their lives in these most dangerous shipping lanes— in these most dangerous shipping lanes this — in these most dangerous shipping lanes this year alone and is the home — lanes this year alone and is the home secretary knows the government has already— home secretary knows the government has already spent over £200 million of taxpayers money on deals with the french— of taxpayers money on deals with the french authorities that are not working — french authorities that are not working. the situation is getting worse _ working. the situation is getting worse so— working. the situation is getting worse. so will be government committed to transparency as to how the money— committed to transparency as to how the money is spent? on the 9th of august— the money is spent? on the 9th of august i_ the money is spent? on the 9th of august i asked a home office to facilitate — august i asked a home office to facilitate a visit for me to calais, so i facilitate a visit for me to calais, so i could — facilitate a visit for me to calais, so i could look at what the money was being —
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so i could look at what the money was being spent on and i eventually had a _ was being spent on and i eventually had a response last month from the honourable — had a response last month from the honourable gentleman for corby, referring — honourable gentleman for corby, referring me to the foreign office. i referring me to the foreign office. i still— referring me to the foreign office. i still have — referring me to the foreign office. i still have no substantive response. what do ministers have to hide? _ response. what do ministers have to hide? and _ response. what do ministers have to hide? and i— response. what do ministers have to hide? and i am conscious i am being challenged _ hide? and i am conscious i am being challenged about the position on the national— challenged about the position on the national borders. make it absolutely clear. _ national borders. make it absolutely clear. a _ national borders. make it absolutely clear. a bill— national borders. make it absolutely clear, a bill that breaches the refugee — clear, a bill that breaches the refugee convention, reduces protections for victims of modern slavery— protections for victims of modern slavery and will not help the situation _ slavery and will not help the situation in the channel is not worthy— situation in the channel is not worthy of— situation in the channel is not worthy of the support of the opposition! mr speaker, the home secretary— opposition! mr speaker, the home secretary has repeatedly made pledges that the route across the channel— pledges that the route across the channel will be made unviable, but as usual— channel will be made unviable, but as usual with this government, it is all empty— as usual with this government, it is all empty rhetoric and broken promises!— all empty rhetoric and broken promises!- the - all empty rhetoric and broken | promises!- the home promises! jeering. the home secretary has _ promises! jeering. the home secretary has blamed - promises! jeering. the home| secretary has blamed everyone promises! jeering. the home - secretary has blamed everyone but herself— secretary has blamed everyone but herself and now we know the cabinet officer _ herself and now we know the cabinet officer has _ herself and now we know the cabinet officer has been brought in to look at this, _ officer has been brought in to look at this, so— officer has been brought in to look at this, so can we have some clarity from _ at this, so can we have some clarity from the _ at this, so can we have some clarity from the government, who actually is
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in charge _ from the government, who actually is in charge of— from the government, who actually is in charge of immigration policy? is it the _ in charge of immigration policy? is it the home secretary or is it the cabinet — it the home secretary or is it the cabinet office?— it the home secretary or is it the cabinet office? a ., ., , ,, ., , cabinet office? nick thomas simmons there. the home secretary has also announced that a former lord advocate will leave the home office's review into the death of sarah everard. dame elish angiolini criticised police scotland in a separate report about complaints against the force earlier this year, which the chief constable said raised a legitimate concern. ms patel told mps the inquiry would be on a non—statutory footing at first, but that might convert into a statutory one as the review progresses. as we're reporting... law enforcement officials in the us have identified darryl brooks as the name of the suspect who drove through the christmas parade parade in wisconsin,
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killing five people and injuring more than ao others. our correspondent gary o'donoghue is in there. what more the police saying? not much at the _ what more the police saying? fiat much at the moment. we understand that darryl brooks is a self—styled rapper referring to himself as a boy fly. there's not much available, but there is stuff lying around on social media about his identity, which we won't go into, but we know that they are holding him in custody. we don't know whether he is answering a question, he does have a right by the fifth amendment that he does not have to answer questions if he does not want to. they are currently describing him as a person of interest. so we're hoping to hear more from the police, more detail in the next hours, but of course the work goes on meanwhile to console the families of those who lost loved
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ones, five people dead and more than a0 ones, five people dead and more than ao injured in the hospitals in the region. 40 injured in the hospitals in the reuion. , , 40 injured in the hospitals in the reuion. my , 40 injured in the hospitals in the reuion. , . ., region. gary, this was such a terrible tragedy, _ region. gary, this was such a terrible tragedy, this - region. gary, this was such a terrible tragedy, this was - region. gary, this was such a terrible tragedy, this was a l terrible tragedy, this was a christmas parade that i think had been cancelled last year because of covid. it was back on this year, everybody was enjoying it, there were children there, grandparents are on the street and then this car just ploughed through people. yes. are on the street and then this car just ploughed through people. yes, i mean, it is shocking, _ just ploughed through people. yes, i mean, it is shocking, really. - just ploughed through people. yes, i mean, it is shocking, really. the - mean, it is shocking, really. the 21st—century, so we see this stuff unfold, don't we, on multiple video feeds and when you see the car crashed through the police barriers, seemingly driving quite a way before then veering left into the back of a high school band, effectively. a high school band, effectively. a high school band, a self waukesha band, high school band, a self waukesha hand, he ploughed through many of them, the the blackshirt marching
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band, and he also hit a group of girls, a dance group with pom—poms on their hands, and also another group also self—styled grannies in that parade who were dancers there as well before the car speeded off, so the devastation and the horror and terror was absolutely palpable and terror was absolutely palpable and you could see it through every inch of every moment from those videos. having said that, the police still seem to be treating this as non—terrorist. that is the indication that the local police are indication that the local police are in charge rather than the fbi taking over, who would do that, if it was a terrorist incident, but still not really no indication about the motive. there are a lot of rumours that he may have been involved in some kind of violent incident preceding what happened here with the parade itself, something involving a knife, we don't know. it is speculation at the moment. we are just waiting for more information from the police.— just waiting for more information
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from the police. wright, gary, thank ou for from the police. wright, gary, thank you for that — from the police. wright, gary, thank you for that update. _ from the police. wright, gary, thank you for that update. that _ from the police. wright, gary, thank you for that update. that is - from the police. wright, gary, thank you for that update. that is gary - you for that update. that is gary o'donoghue with the very latest from washington. energy supplier bulb has been put into special administration, but will continue to supply its 1.7 million customers as normal. the company's exit from the market comes following the collapse of more than 20 suppliers since the start of the year amid the soaring price of gas. i asked our business correspondent, ben king, to explain what's happened to bulb. bulb was one of the most successful challengers to the big six energy suppliers that have dominated the market in recent years. it marketed itself as a green supplier with renewable electricity and carbon neutral gas and with over 1.7 million customers, it was too big to go through the process that other failed energy companies have gone through, the so—called supplier of last resort process, where they get transferred to another supplier. it is going on to something called the special administration regime,
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which means it will keep trading — with some government support, if necessary — until it can either be restructured, so put back on its feet financially, or sold, or indeed eventually shut down and customers transferred onto other suppliers in due course. what should customers then do? the advice is to sit tight and just wait for the process to resolve itself. your energy will carry on being supplied as normal and any credit balance that you may have built up will be protected. and there aren't any better deals out there anyway, with energy prices going up, so the advice is just to sit tight, wait for the process to resolve itself, but some websites also recommend that you keep any copies of statements carefully, just in case there is a dispute later on down the line that you need to resolve. i know it is incredibly difficult to predict what might happen, but are there many other suppliers who might fall into difficulties at the moment? well, it is definitely a difficult market. the thing that did for
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bulb eventually was the high energy prices. wholesale gas prices have more than doubled in recent months and electricity prices have risen very fast as well. the boss of ofgem has described this situation as "unprecedented." the other thing that bulb blames for its demise is the price cap, which means it was not able to pass those extra costs onto its customers. those are problems that every supplier has had to deal with and those that don't have the financial resources to weather that storm have been going out of business. ben king there. a memorial service for conservative mp sir david amess, who was killed last month, is taking place in his southend constituency. members of the public are lining up in the streets to pay their respects. our correspondent danjohnson is outside the church where the service took place. it was a private memorial service at
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lunchtime here in st mary's church, eight few hundred of the family, closest friends and colleagues of sir david amess, who are gathered here for a service that included prayers, hymns, readings by some of his fellow mps, reflecting on his life, his character, his work and his contribution, particularly in this constituency, this soon to be city of southend, something he campaigned vigorously for. you get a sense of how loyal he was two people here, how committed he was in his service. how much his constituency meant to him and how much he meant to people here. he was a politician, not necessarily known nationwide, not necessarily known nationwide, not particularly a household name across the country, but someone who built a very strong reputation here from the ground up in southend, the constituency that he had represented for many years, for decades, as the mp here. someone who had taken a huge interest in a number of local
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charities, groups, organisations, really tackling the everyday issues that are brought to a constituency mp with great energy and determination to actually help people and to make a difference and it is that sort of thing that people here have been reflecting on today. well, after the service, his coffin was taken behind a horse—drawn hearse through the streets of southend for his constituency, for this community, the people he represented, to pay their respects. and this is ahead of a wider funeral service that will be held tomorrow in london at westminster cathedral. sir david was a committed roman catholic and there will be hundreds more people there at that service tomorrow and it is expected that a message will be read there from the pope. well, so david was a public figure and these are major events, but we perhaps should not forget in
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this his family and although today has been a chance to reflect on the way sir david lived his life, there was of course a huge shock about the way his life was taken in a statement was read at the service this lunchtime on behalf of his family. in that, they reflect on his character, saying that a strong and courageous is an appropriate way to describe david. they say he was a patriot and a man of peace, and they ask people to set aside their differences and to show kindness and love to all. they say that is the only way forward. they say, we as a family are trying to understand why this awful thing occurred. they say, nobody should die that way. nobody. they underline, we are absolutely broken, but we will survive and carry on for the sake of a wonderful and inspiring man. danjohnson dan johnson reporting there danjohnson reporting there from southend. we are going to get a look at the latest forecast for you now. ben richjoins us. it has turned chilly, hasn't it?
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it really has, yes, after what has been a really mild autumn so far. the last couple of days have been a bit of a shock to the system and it is set to stay chilly willy throughout the rest of this week. but we have today in many places is sunshine, but you can see in our satellite picture a lot of cloud rolling and across parts of northern scotland and ireland, and some showers through kent and the channel islands and those showers will continue through the night and more that ploughed filtering southwards across scotland, northern ireland, northern england and spots of drizzle, but under the bank of cloud not as cold at night, whereas the south of england and wales dropping through to be likely to be some fog patches that could be dense and slow to slow to clear tomorrow. some sunshine down to the south tomorrow, but still be odd sunshine in the south—east, the odd spot of light rain and drizzle in that area, but if anything temperatures nudging a bit higher than they have been today. but that would will not last because as we head through the middle of the week it will turn colder again and then for friday not
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only cold, but very unsettled with some heavy showers of rain, the potential for sleet and snow mixing in via ground and some very strong as well. —— very strong winds as well. hello. this is bbc news, with ben brown. the headlines... mps vote today on the government's controversial plans to overhaul social care in england with a cap of £86,000.
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there has never been any protection like this across the whole country and what we're doing is we are saying to everybody, we are going to make sure that we look after you in your old age better than has ever happened before. but labour say the plans mean people living in areas with lower house prices will be hit disproportionately. the prime minister promised people wouldn't _ the prime minister promised people wouldn't have to sell their homes in order— wouldn't have to sell their homes in order to _ wouldn't have to sell their homes in order to afford social care. he's broken — order to afford social care. he's broken that promise today. worse than that, — broken that promise today. worse than that, he's broken it for those that can _ than that, he's broken it for those that can least afford it. in than that, he's broken it for those that can least afford it.— that can least afford it. in the united states, _ that can least afford it. in the united states, five _ that can least afford it. in the united states, five people . that can least afford it. in the l united states, five people have that can least afford it. in the - united states, five people have been killed and more than ao injured after a car was driven at high speed into a christmas parade in the state of wisconsin. a man taken into custody has been named by two law enforcement officials as darrell brooks. britain's seventh biggest energy firm — bulb energy — is set to appoint administrators — the latest uk energy firm
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to hit financial problems. a memorial service and procession is held in southend — to remember the mp sir david amess — who was stabbed to death last month. people have lined the streets of southend to pay tribute to the former member of parliament. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougall. good afternoon. "we haven't been good enough and the manager has paid the price." the words of manchester united captain harry maguire following the sacking of ole gunnar solskjaer yesterday. maguire was speaking alongside temporary united head coach michael carrick who's been put in charge of the team for now. after a very poor run, saturday's a—i defeat to watford proved to be the final straw, leaving united eighth in the premier league. the club announced that they had parted company with solskjaer yesterday, but maguire says it was the fault of the players.
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ultimately, the manager's paid the price, and we're all so disappointed for that. but yes, of course, we take huge responsibility. we haven't been good enough. we know that individually, collectively, as a team, as players. we know that, we spoke about that, now we have to look forward to make sure we get this club back to where it was in the last two years, and of a slew the last few months have been nowhere near good enough. the former tottenham manager mauricio pochettino has emerged as a contender to take over permanantly at manchester united, after the departure of solskjaer. it's not thought they've made an approach, but pochettino says he'd be open to taking the job as he's not completely happy with the setup at his current club, paris saint germain. he's essentially first—team coach there, undersporting director leonardo. pochettino has been at psg for 10 months and they're 11 points clear at the top of the league. united did approach the former real madrid boss zinedine zidane about the job, but sources say he's not interested at this stage. he ended his second spell as real manager in may this year and he's
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apparently keen on exploring other options, including the french national side and interestingly — psg — which could have an impact on united's decision. england manager gareth southgate says he has big plans for the longterm development of the squad after signing a two—year extension to his contract, keeping him in charge until december 202a. southgate took england to the final of the euros this summer and they've qualified for next year's world cup in qatar. his deal was due to end after that, but the fa said southgate had secured the best men's performance in 55 years. his assistant steve holland has agreed a similar extension. southgate took over in 2016 and the new deal means he'll oversee qualification for euro 202a. the last five years have been an incredible experience, and we're really pleased with the progress of the team. we still feel there is room for that team to develop, to improve. i think everybody has seen what is possible with the existing squad and some of the younger
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players that are coming through our age group teams as well. yorkshire county cricket club have announced 36 people have contacted a whistleblowing hotline in its first week. the hotline opened last monday, following the claims of racism levelled at the club by former yorkshire cricketer azeem rafiq. he gave an emotional testimony to a dcms select committee, where he told mps he had been called racist names and that he felt cricket was institutionally racist. an independent panel has also been set up by the county to review the complaints. the five—time grand slam singles champion alfie hewett says he's thrilled after being told he will be able to continue his wheelchair tennis career, after previously being told new classification rules would make him ineligible. hewett, who has a hip disorder, was reassessed and — eventually — told he did meet the criteria to play on.
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just clarity, i think that's the big word to sum up the last- two and a half years, - not knowing what's around the corner, and that has honestly been out of my hands. _ to be told the news, - it is excitement and relief, and really i'm more motivated - than i probably have been in along while, to go and push- on and do well in australia, and do well for the three years coming up. - that is all the support for now. thank you very much indeed —— all of the sport. welcome to your questions answered. you've been sending in your questions about the covid surge in europe. with me is dr margaret harris, spokesperson for the world health organization —
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who joins us from kabul. also i'm joined by professorjonathan ball, professor of molecular virology at the university of nottingham. doctor harris, let me just ask you while you're in kabul, nothing to do with the covert situation, but how is the situation in afghanistan where you find yourself now? itrefoil. where you find yourself now? well, certainly l'm _ where you find yourself now? well, certainly i'm here _ where you find yourself now? well, certainly i'm here with _ where you find yourself now? well, certainly i'm here with who - where you find yourself now? well, certainly i'm here with who to - where you find yourself now? it certainly i'm here with who to look at the health system which has really been teetering on the brink of collapse, but we've been able to get emergency funding is from the un to prop up, to start finding some of the primary health care facilities, and get some of the health workers paid. so we are seeing better things, and in terms of how it is here, it's reasonably quiet. well, ve aood here, it's reasonably quiet. well, very good luck — here, it's reasonably quiet. well, very good luck to _ here, it's reasonably quiet. well, very good luck to you _ here, it's reasonably quiet. well, very good luck to you with - here, it's reasonably quiet. well, very good luck to you with all- here, it's reasonably quiet. well, very good luck to you with all your work there, because i know it's a very difficult situation in afghanistan at the moment. let's focus on covid now though with
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professor ball, starting off with you. a question from dave edwards, who says with covert cases rising across europe, why are we not implementing travel restrictions to europe? implementing travel restrictions to euroe? , ., , ., implementing travel restrictions to euroke? ., , ., ., , europe? great question, and it is one of the _ europe? great question, and it is one of the things _ europe? great question, and it is one of the things that _ europe? great question, and it is one of the things that has - europe? great question, and it is i one of the things that has concerned quite a _ one of the things that has concerned quite a number of people. i have heard _ quite a number of people. i have heard that — quite a number of people. i have heard that question recently a few tinres _ heard that question recently a few times. what we need to realise is within— times. what we need to realise is within the — times. what we need to realise is within the united kingdom we have had high _ within the united kingdom we have had high levels of cases for many months _ had high levels of cases for many months now, since we started coming out of— months now, since we started coming out of lockdown, just before the sunrnrer. — out of lockdown, just before the summer, our cases increased markedly and they— summer, our cases increased markedly and they have stayed at a pretty steady _ and they have stayed at a pretty steady level since. whereas in europe. — steady level since. whereas in europe, particularly western europe, they have _ europe, particularly western europe, they have had more active measures to try— they have had more active measures to try and _ they have had more active measures to try and inhibit the amount of virus _ to try and inhibit the amount of virus circulating, so please know that have — virus circulating, so please know that have been much lower. they have now started _ that have been much lower. they have now started to increase, so germany for example — now started to increase, so germany for example as comparison —— is
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comparable _ for example as comparison —— is comparable to our country at the moment— comparable to our country at the moment so the risk of getting covid here and _ moment so the risk of getting covid here and europe is about the same. a here and europe is about the same. question from denise right, who says is the three—week gap between covert jabs on the continent a possible reason for their covid surge, saying that compared to the uk where people have to wait longer between their vaccinations, is it the case that perhaps our immunity in the uk is not waning yet? it is perhaps our immunity in the uk is rrot waning yet?— perhaps our immunity in the uk is not waning yet? it is an interesting ruestion, not waning yet? it is an interesting question. but _ not waning yet? it is an interesting question, but you _ not waning yet? it is an interesting question, but you should _ not waning yet? it is an interesting | question, but you should remember that there are actually 17 different vaccine products being used around the world. some have longer periods between the first and second jabs, some are only one chap. the third most commonly used vaccine around the world is the jansen product and thatis the world is the jansen product and that is one single jab. so it would be pretty difficult but also to look at that period, look at the immune levels and compare it with whether or not they were being infected. we
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are really looking mostly at transmission and we do know that all of the vaccines are great at keeping you out of hospital, great at stopping you from dying but not so good at stopping you from getting a mild infection or passing it on to somebody else, so as professor paul said, what really matters here are behaviours forced— behaviours forced speaking of behaviour. — behaviours forced speaking of behaviour, that _ behaviours forced speaking of behaviour, that takes - behaviours forced speaking of behaviour, that takes us - behaviours forced speaking of| behaviour, that takes us nicely behaviours forced speaking of - behaviour, that takes us nicely onto a question from nicky holloway, essentially about face coverings. i have just come back from spain, essentially about face coverings. i havejust come back from spain, and in all the shops we had to wear a mask and in some outdoor places, where social distancing couldn't be guaranteed, we had to wear a mask. wouldn't it be a good idea if it was compulsory in those settings here in the uk, theatres, cinemas, museums, nightclubs, football stadiums and so on? , �* nightclubs, football stadiums and so on? . .,, nightclubs, football stadiums and so on? . ., , ., on? yes, so i'm certainly not auainst on? yes, so i'm certainly not against that. _ on? yes, so i'm certainly not against that, and _ on? yes, so i'm certainly not against that, and i _ on? yes, so i'm certainly not against that, and i think - on? yes, so i'm certainly not against that, and i think the | against that, and i think the majority— against that, and i think the majority of my colleagues would be supportive of that idea of wearing a face covering in a crowded place. i think— face covering in a crowded place. i think it _ face covering in a crowded place. i think it is — face covering in a crowded place. i think it is important to note that
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over— think it is important to note that over the — think it is important to note that over the past few weeks the case numbers— over the past few weeks the case numbers in— over the past few weeks the case numbers in spain for example have also doubled. so we can't think of face coverings or facemasks as a panacea — face coverings or facemasks as a panacea that is going to prevent the virus from _ panacea that is going to prevent the virus from spreading. it is a collection— virus from spreading. it is a collection of interventions which will have — collection of interventions which will have the biggest impact, and i think— will have the biggest impact, and i think one — will have the biggest impact, and i think one of the reasons in the uk that we _ think one of the reasons in the uk that we are — think one of the reasons in the uk that we are seeing fewer hospitalisations and cases of severe disease _ hospitalisations and cases of severe disease is _ hospitalisations and cases of severe disease is not only because we have a vast _ disease is not only because we have a vast majority of our vulnerable population is vaccinated, but also the fact— population is vaccinated, but also the fact that we have started to introduce — the fact that we have started to introduce boosters, so we have introduced _ introduce boosters, so we have introduced boosters before germany for example and also places like austria. — for example and also places like austria, and of course what the booster— austria, and of course what the booster is — austria, and of course what the booster is doing is increasing the levels _ booster is doing is increasing the levels of— booster is doing is increasing the levels of immunity even further. yes, _ levels of immunity even further. yes. they— levels of immunity even further. yes, they are working great but we still need _ yes, they are working great but we still need that boost the level of immunity, so that is preventing serious — immunity, so that is preventing serious disease but it also reduces the number of cases. so i think it is a whole —
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the number of cases. so i think it is a whole collection of interventions that is important and we shouldn'tjust focus interventions that is important and we shouldn't just focus on one interventions that is important and we shouldn'tjust focus on one of those _ we shouldn't 'ust focus on one of those. a . we shouldn't 'ust focus on one of those. ~. . . , we shouldn't 'ust focus on one of those. a, ., ., , ., we shouldn't 'ust focus on one of those. ., ., , ., . ., those. margaret harris for the world health organization, _ those. margaret harris for the world health organization, this _ those. margaret harris for the world health organization, this is - those. margaret harris for the world health organization, this is one - health organization, this is one from carol miles. why are we not getting any information about the positive cases? i'm not sure if carol myles means positive cases in the uk or across europe, but she is saying, have they been vaccinated, have they been double vaccinated, what ages are they? i feel sure this information would be helpful in the push for people to be vaccinated. in other words, should we know more about those people who are testing positive and then register on the daily case numbers? 50. positive and then register on the daily case numbers? so, certainly what we really — daily case numbers? so, certainly what we really look _ daily case numbers? so, certainly what we really look at _ daily case numbers? so, certainly what we really look at mostly - daily case numbers? so, certainly. what we really look at mostly other people who are ending up in hospital, ratherthan people who are ending up in hospital, rather than the overall cases, although we do certainly try, what she is asking, too stratified by age group, so that we understand who is most getting infected, and in most countries, you will see these differences. i think actually the uk
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is very good with their information and their data. but indeed what is very clear is when you look at who is in hospital and who is getting very sick, the vast majority of those people have not been vaccinated. there are some people who have weaker immune systems and they may need a third dose, but generally when you look at the numbers worldwide, and talking about whatever hospital system you are looking at, the people who are ending up in hospital, the people who are ending up very sick are those who have not been vaccinated, and you are right, carol, that message doesn't seem to be getting through and it needs to be getting through. these vaccines will really help you to stay out of hospital, and what i would really like to see, stop you from dying.— stop you from dying. following on from that. — stop you from dying. following on from that, professor, _ stop you from dying. following on from that, professor, this - stop you from dying. following on from that, professor, this is - stop you from dying. following on from that, professor, this is a - from that, professor, this is a question from peter clarke, which is simply why our infections higher,
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given the high number of people who are vaccinated?— are vaccinated? yes, unfortunately immuni , are vaccinated? yes, unfortunately immunity, either— are vaccinated? yes, unfortunately immunity, either from _ are vaccinated? yes, unfortunately immunity, either from natural- immunity, either from natural infection— immunity, either from natural infection or from vaccination, isn't permanent — infection or from vaccination, isn't permanent. i would liken it very much _ permanent. i would liken it very much to— permanent. i would liken it very much to fuel in a fuel tank in your car. much to fuel in a fuel tank in your car it— much to fuel in a fuel tank in your car. it doesn't last forever, and over— car. it doesn't last forever, and over time — car. it doesn't last forever, and over time that fuel level reduces and you — over time that fuel level reduces and you have to go to the garage and -et and you have to go to the garage and get it— and you have to go to the garage and get it topped up, so that's true for your immunity. the immunity, when we brought— your immunity. the immunity, when we brought out— your immunity. the immunity, when we brought out vaccines, we were very keen— brought out vaccines, we were very keen for— brought out vaccines, we were very keen for the — brought out vaccines, we were very keen for the vaccines and immunity to prevent — keen for the vaccines and immunity to prevent serious disease, and i think— to prevent serious disease, and i think it _ to prevent serious disease, and i think it is — to prevent serious disease, and i think it is safe to say that the vaccines— think it is safe to say that the vaccines have performed incredibly well _ vaccines have performed incredibly well one — vaccines have performed incredibly well. one of the second thing is that we — well. one of the second thing is that we hope might have an impact on is the _ that we hope might have an impact on is the ability _ that we hope might have an impact on is the ability of the virus to spread _ is the ability of the virus to spread from person to person. but it is more _ spread from person to person. but it is more difficult to do that, and it is more difficult to do that, and it is more _ is more difficult to do that, and it is more difficult to do that, and it is more difficult for vaccines for example. — is more difficult for vaccines for example, because you get injected in the arm. _ example, because you get injected in the arm. in _ example, because you get injected in the arm, in muscles in your arm can you produce — the arm, in muscles in your arm can you produce a — the arm, in muscles in your arm can you produce a type of antibody that circulates _ you produce a type of antibody that circulates in your blood and prevents _ circulates in your blood and prevents serious disease, but what it's less _ prevents serious disease, but what it's less good at doing is
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preventing an infection in your nose — preventing an infection in your nose you _ preventing an infection in your nose. you need antibodies that get secreted _ nose. you need antibodies that get secreted into the mucus in your nose to have _ secreted into the mucus in your nose to have the _ secreted into the mucus in your nose to have the best protection from that _ to have the best protection from that so — to have the best protection from that. so we've never thought that vaccines — that. so we've never thought that vaccines would give total protection against _ vaccines would give total protection against infection, but we do know that they— against infection, but we do know that they certainly reduce rates of infection. — that they certainly reduce rates of infection, and the sooner you are after— infection, and the sooner you are after having received your vaccine, or indeed — after having received your vaccine, or indeed after you have been naturally— or indeed after you have been naturally infected, then you have reasonably high levels of protective immunity. — reasonably high levels of protective immunity, but those levels fall over time and _ immunity, but those levels fall over time and that is why we will always see the _ time and that is why we will always see the virus circulating. and time and that is why we will always see the virus circulating.— see the virus circulating. and that be . s the see the virus circulating. and that begs the question, _ see the virus circulating. and that begs the question, doctor - see the virus circulating. and that begs the question, doctor harris, j begs the question, doctor harris, and it is a good one from judith mcnicol, how many boosterjabs are we going to need in the future, and are they going to be every six months or so for life, or is it going to be every year, you know, what did you think the future holds for us, in terms of how often we are all going to need this vaccine? that's an excellent question and thatis that's an excellent question and
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that is one of the questions we are bringing the best minds in backs analogy together actually next week at our geneva headquarters to look at our geneva headquarters to look at notjust at our geneva headquarters to look at not just that, at our geneva headquarters to look at notjust that, look at our geneva headquarters to look at not just that, look at the whole range of evidence we have on boosters, and whether you need to increase the numbers in the primary dose, at what point would you need a booster, who needs it, and how often, and what would be potentially or not the side effects. what do we know so far and what can we tell you in the future. unfortunately i'm going to have to say watch this space. going to have to say watch this sace. , ., , , going to have to say watch this sace. , , ., ., space. hedging your bets. jonathan ball, this space. hedging your bets. jonathan ball. this is — space. hedging your bets. jonathan ball, this is from _ space. hedging your bets. jonathan ball, this is from paul— space. hedging your bets. jonathan ball, this is from paul dando, - space. hedging your bets. jonathan ball, this is from paul dando, in - ball, this is from paul dando, in the light of the number of cases for double vaccinated people, we know lots of people obviously who have been double vaccinated and have still got covid, how are we going to manage to live with the virus if it keeps on spreading?— keeps on spreading? yeah, and i think this relates, _ keeps on spreading? yeah, and i think this relates, to _ keeps on spreading? yeah, and i think this relates, to some - keeps on spreading? yeah, and i. think this relates, to some degree, to the _ think this relates, to some degree, to the previous question, and that is what _ to the previous question, and that is what can— to the previous question, and that is what can we expect our immunity
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to do— is what can we expect our immunity to do in— is what can we expect our immunity to do in the — is what can we expect our immunity to do in the future, how can the immunity— to do in the future, how can the immunity protect us from infection, but also _ immunity protect us from infection, but also more importantly from serious — but also more importantly from serious disease hospitalisations and deaths? _ serious disease hospitalisations and deaths? and the reality is that we've — deaths? and the reality is that we've known for seasonal coronavirus, so these are coronaviruses that cause common cold like symptoms and have been with us for many, _ like symptoms and have been with us for many, many years, we know that we get _ for many, many years, we know that we get reinfected by them lots of times— we get reinfected by them lots of times throughout our lifetime because — times throughout our lifetime because our immunity wanes, and sol think it's _ because our immunity wanes, and sol think it's true — because our immunity wanes, and sol think it's true to say that the sars coronavirus, the novel coronavirus, will do _ coronavirus, the novel coronavirus, will do the — coronavirus, the novel coronavirus, will do the same. what's unclear at the moment is what those natural levels _ the moment is what those natural levels of— the moment is what those natural levels of infection will be and that very much— levels of infection will be and that very much depends on the levels of immunity— very much depends on the levels of immunity in— very much depends on the levels of immunity in the population, because if you _ immunity in the population, because if you have _ immunity in the population, because if you have very high levels of immunity. _ if you have very high levels of immunity, then that will reduce the number— immunity, then that will reduce the number of— immunity, then that will reduce the number of cases, it will reduce the spread _ number of cases, it will reduce the spread of— number of cases, it will reduce the spread of the virus, and if you have low levels — spread of the virus, and if you have low levels of — spread of the virus, and if you have low levels of immunity or people in the population who have no immunity, then that _ the population who have no immunity, then that is _ the population who have no immunity, then that is where the virus will be spreading — then that is where the virus will be spreading. so it very much depends
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on the _ spreading. so it very much depends on the future and our levels of immunity _ on the future and our levels of immunity-— on the future and our levels of immuni . ., ,, i. , . , immunity. thank you very much. this is a question — immunity. thank you very much. this is a question from _ immunity. thank you very much. this is a question from peter— immunity. thank you very much. this is a question from peter forward. - is a question from peter forward. hope it's not a forward question but anyway i'm going to ask it to your (l) i had anyway i'm going to ask it to your (l) i had two covert vaccinations, then had chemotherapy. i had a third dose of vaccine, how much immunity dose of vaccine, how much immunity do i have and how long before i get another booster? i'm not sure you're going to be able to answer that but what is the rough answer to that, how much immunity you get from a third dose of the vaccine and how long before you then have to have another booster?— long before you then have to have another booster? peter, it is again another booster? peter, it is again a very good _ another booster? peter, it is again a very good question, _ another booster? peter, it is again a very good question, and - another booster? peter, it is again a very good question, and i'm - another booster? peter, it is again a very good question, and i'm not| a very good question, and i'm not your doctor so i won't give you a very specific information about your situation, but you fit the category that we would call somebody who is expected to be immunocompromised because if you have had chemotherapy, the way chemotherapy works is that it attacks your immune system while it is attacking the cancer cells. so it reduces your
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ability to fight, and it reduces your immune system's ability to be primed by yourfirst your immune system's ability to be primed by your first vaccination. so certainly giving the next vaccination was to give you another booster but i would say discuss it with your medical advisors, you know, look at where your immune system is, where you are, where your health is, for any more information about whether you would need any further vaccination.— further vaccination. jonathan, let me ask you _ further vaccination. jonathan, let me ask you a _ further vaccination. jonathan, let me ask you a question, - further vaccination. jonathan, let me ask you a question, a - further vaccination. jonathan, let me ask you a question, a wider l me ask you a question, a wider question really, which is where are we, the uk, ata question really, which is where are we, the uk, at a time when we are seeing other european countries reimposing restrictions, a lockdown in the case of austria today, making vaccination is compulsory in austria as well? are we, do you think, in a better position because we have a booster programme and because we unlocked in the summer and obsolete quite a lot of people have had covid, there is a kind of level of immunity from that? l
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covid, there is a kind of level of immunity from that?— covid, there is a kind of level of immunity from that? i think that's the key here- _ immunity from that? i think that's the key here. we _ immunity from that? i think that's the key here. we have _ immunity from that? i think that's the key here. we have taken - immunity from that? i think that's the key here. we have taken a - the key here. we have taken a different — the key here. we have taken a different approach in the united kingdom. i know it has not particularly been popular in many guarters — particularly been popular in many quarters but essentially what we have _ quarters but essentially what we have allowed the virus to do over the summer, and coming into the autumn— the summer, and coming into the autumn months, in the summer we had lots of— autumn months, in the summer we had lots of infections in young adults who hadn't had lots of vaccination, and so _ who hadn't had lots of vaccination, and so many of those young adults gained _ and so many of those young adults gained their immunity from natural infection _ gained their immunity from natural infection. when the school is returned. _ infection. when the school is returned, we saw the same thing happen— returned, we saw the same thing happen in— returned, we saw the same thing happen in schools, so we had lots of virus _ happen in schools, so we had lots of virus circulation in schools, and again— virus circulation in schools, and again that — virus circulation in schools, and again that would bring levels of immunity up in our school children. and of— immunity up in our school children. and of course the vulnerable people in our— and of course the vulnerable people in our population and older people had very— in our population and older people had very good vaccination rates, so if you _ had very good vaccination rates, so if you are _ had very good vaccination rates, so if you are looking at the united kingdom, _ if you are looking at the united kingdom, more than 90% of people have noticeable, measurable immunity to the _ have noticeable, measurable immunity to the virus. _ have noticeable, measurable immunity to the virus, or at least antibodies to the virus, or at least antibodies to the _ to the virus, or at least antibodies to the virus. — to the virus, or at least antibodies to the virus, and so the challenge is to— to the virus, and so the challenge is to keep — to the virus, and so the challenge is to keep that immunity as high as possible _ is to keep that immunity as high as possible so— is to keep that immunity as high as
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possible so that we continue to minimise — possible so that we continue to minimise the cases of a serious disease — minimise the cases of a serious disease. of course one of the challenges is to get into pockets within _ challenges is to get into pockets within our— challenges is to get into pockets within our community when may vaccine — within our community when may vaccine uptake isn't as high as we want, _ vaccine uptake isn't as high as we want. and — vaccine uptake isn't as high as we want, and try and get the message across— want, and try and get the message across about how effective and beneficial vaccination will be. last . uestion beneficial vaccination will be. last question to _ beneficial vaccination will be. last question to you. _ beneficial vaccination will be. last question to you, doctor harris, from a world health organization point of view, how worried are you about the continuing situation with covid really around the world? certainly aaain we really around the world? certainly again we are _ really around the world? certainly again we are seeing _ really around the world? certainly again we are seeing so _ really around the world? certainly again we are seeing so many - really around the world? certainly i again we are seeing so many spikes, rises, and you are quite right, this is happening around the world. we are seeing worrying trends in the americas, we are also seeing big rises in the west pacific, in vietnam, the philippines has been struggling with a large outbreak. so, yes indeed, we are concerned, and our guest concern is to get the very first dose into so many people. we are still struggling with getting the number of doses needed into the
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various populations, to give them the level of protection that the uk is enjoying. the level of protection that the uk is en'o int. . ~ the level of protection that the uk is en'o int. ., ,, the level of protection that the uk is enjoying-— the brit awards will scrap male and female categories at the awards ceremony next year, introducing gender—neutral gongs in their place. our music correspondent, mark savage, is with me. what is the rationale behind this?
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they have had male and female award since they were first given out in 1997 so this is more than ao yea rs of history years of history they are changing and the reason for this is quite a few artists have criticised pitting male and female artist together and actually saying they are excluding non—binary artists, so someone like sam smith felt that they were unable to put their album forward for this year's brit awards because they didn't fit into the male or so the brits are saying this is something they are doing to reconfigure the awards to reflect the way society and music is going. find awards to reflect the way society and music is going.— awards to reflect the way society and music is going. and what you think the impact _ and music is going. and what you think the impact of _ and music is going. and what you think the impact of that - and music is going. and what you think the impact of that will - and music is going. and what you think the impact of that will be? l and music is going. and what you j think the impact of that will be? i suppose if awards are essentially and increased competition, in some ways? and increased competition, in some wa s? ~ , ., , ways? absolutely, have definitely been fears it _ ways? absolutely, have definitely been fears it will _ ways? absolutely, have definitely been fears it will be _ ways? absolutely, have definitely been fears it will be to _ ways? absolutely, have definitely been fears it will be to the - been fears it will be to the detriment of some female artist. the brits are not the first to do this, the mtv awards did it five years ago and since then and their best artist prize, it has been three female winners and two male ones. the grammys, similarly, made a similar
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call and it is about 50—50 male—female winning. so it doesn't seem at this point it will upset the balance in any way in particular. the other effect is they've got more space in the ceremony now, so they are bringing back some of the awards that they cancelled 15 years ago. we will have a best pop act, a best dance act, a best rap and crime act and for the first time in more than and for the first time in more than a decade. l and for the first time in more than a decade. ., , a decade. i wonder if this might sread a decade. i wonder if this might s - read to a decade. i wonder if this might spread to other _ a decade. i wonder if this might spread to other rewards, - a decade. i wonder if this might spread to other rewards, i - a decade. i wonder if this might i spread to other rewards, i mean, a decade. i wonder if this might - spread to other rewards, i mean, the oscars and acting awards and so on? absolutely, i think when an organisation the size of the brits decides to do this, it does turn the spotlight on the acting awards, the baftas, spotlight on the acting awards, the baftas, also the oscars. it does happen already at the national tv awards so there is a kind of growing momentum for award ceremonies to stop pitting men and women against each other, and to open the categories for people who feel they don't fit into those categorisations. don't fit into those catetorisations. ., ,, , ., , don't fit into those catetorisations. ., ,, , . categorisations. thank you very much for talkin: categorisations. thank you very much for talking to — categorisations. thank you very much for talking to us. _ how is the weather looking? we know
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it is chile, chile, chile. ben rich has the latest forecast. indeed. temperatures have taken quite a tumble over the last few days, and that chilly air are set to stay with us, as we head through the rest of this week. but this is the satellite picture from today and it shows that while many of us have been enjoying sunny skies, we've had more cloud filtering and across parts of scotland and northern ireland, also some speckled shower clouds continuing to bring the odd shower across east anglia, the south—east and the channel islands as we head through tonight. we will see more of that cloud filtering down across scotland, northern ireland, with the odd spots of england —— drizzle, and of those cloudy skies in the north not such a chilly night but where skies are clear down to the south, lows of —2. we could see fog patches forming in east wales, the west midlands, some of it quite slow to clear tomorrow morning. generally speaking tomorrow, the best of the sunshine will be found across southern areas, certainly southern england, south wales, parts of the midlands, once any of that early fog clears. still
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the odd shower in the far south—east. but further north expect more in the way of cloud, the odd spot of drizzle, but with a slightly cloudy conditions, some slightly less cold conditions, highs of nine or10 less cold conditions, highs of nine or 10 degrees. however, as we head into wednesday, we will see this band of rain sinking its way southwards and eastwards, and this is associated with a cold front, so the air is going to start to turn colder again from the north, brighter but colder conditions returning from the north during wednesday afternoon, with a scattering of showers, and then as we move into thursday, that cold front continues to make progress southwards and eastwards, and then behind it, follow the white lines, the isobars of the way up to the north. that is where the air will be coming from by this stage on thursday, we will be tapping into some really rather chilly air indeed, quite a cold and frosty start to thursday for many. a bright day with some sunshine but scattered showers around coastal fringes, day with some sunshine but scattered showers around coastalfringes, some of which will be wintry over high ground, showers perhaps turning wintry to low levels, and the
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afternoon highs are stuck in single digits for all of us. then by the end of the week, not only looking cold but also looking unsettled as this area of low pressure dives in from the north, quite a deep low, lots of white lines, lots of isobars on the chart, some quite strong winds in prospect. we will see showers or longer spells of rain. i say rain, with colder air tucking in it is very likely that some of the showers will start to turn wintry, especially higher ground in the west. those winds are strengthening, temperatures five, six or 7 degrees, it is going to feel very cold indeed. so yes, the chilly weather continues through this week and if anything by the end of the wicked are going to start to even colder. _by —— by the end of the week it is going to start to feel even colder.
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this is bbc news. the headlines mps vote today on the government's controversial plans to overhaul social care in england with a cap of 86—thousand pounds. there has never been any protection like this across the whole country and what we are doing is missing to everybody that we are going to make sure that we look after you enter your old age, better than has ever happened before. but labour say the plans mean people living in areas with lower house prices will be hit disproportionately. the prime minister promised people wouldn't _ the prime minister promised people wouldn't have to sell their homes in order— wouldn't have to sell their homes in order to _ wouldn't have to sell their homes in order to afford social care. he has broken _ order to afford social care. he has broken their— order to afford social care. he has broken their promise today. worse than that, — broken their promise today. worse than that, he has broken it for those — than that, he has broken it for those who— than that, he has broken it for those who can least afford it. police have identified
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the suspect in wisconson attack as darrell brooks. five people have been killed and more than ao injured,

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