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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  November 22, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. countries in europe are clamping down to stop the spread of coronavirus. nationwide lockdown is the first on the continent to do that. in the netherlands, the more protests against tougher restrictions, much of europe is doing with raising his numbers. the health this morning.— doing with raising his numbers. the health this morning. probably by the end of this winter, _ health this morning. probably by the end of this winter, pretty _ health this morning. probably by the end of this winter, pretty much - end of this winter, pretty much everyone in germany will be vaccinated and recovered, or dead. still questioning a man who drove a car into a christmas parade and two in five people and we will bring you that life. the uk prime minister speech to a major is not
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getting we went, to pepper pig world. describing the performance is shambolic. describing the performance as shambolic. austria is back in lockdown today. its trying to control a rising covid infection rate. and with new restrictions coming in across europe, we've seen protests in belgium, austria, italy, the netherlands, switzerland and croatia. once again we're seeing the tension between public health measures and personal freedoms. let's start in austria. tens of thousands of people protested in the capital, vienna, in response to the new national lockdown — and to plans that make vaccination a legal requirement. here's the president of the austrian medical association on the decision to do this.
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here is from february the 1st, vaccination will be mandatory in our country because it is necessary to stop the spread. a police press conferences just started. a police press conferences 'ust started. , ., ., ., , started. firing his weapon and was takin: a started. firing his weapon and was taking a short _ started. firing his weapon and was taking a short distance _ started. firing his weapon and was taking a short distance from - started. firing his weapon and was taking a short distance from the i taking a short distance from the scene and we are confident that he acted alone. there is no evidence that this is the terrorist incident. due to the wind yesterday, there was a power outage that further complicated our emergency response. i want to identify the victims that
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we know of at this time. and i say this with great sorrow. virginia sorensen. 79—year—old female. leanna, 71—year—old female. durand, 52—year—old female. jane coolidge, 52—year—old female. jane coolidge, 52—year—old female. jane coolidge, 52—year—old female. willem, 81—year—old male. the suspect involved in this tragic incident is identified as darrell brooks. 39 years of age, resident of milwaukee. at this time, the police department is referring five counts of homicide with additional charges based on the investigation. but those will come investigation. but those will come in time. there are many roads in the
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downtown area that were closed as of this investigation is the work of the crime scene. other roads has since been opened. minutes after the incident occurred, i responded to the scene and when i saw the chaos and tragedy i saw heroes. first responders coming together and working together and triaging victims the fire department working and and transporting multiple victims and officers picking up victims and officers picking up victims and officers picking up victims and putting them in squad and brushing them to the hospital and brushing them to the hospital and citizens also picking up victims and citizens also picking up victims and rushing them to the hospital. there were also off—duty law enforcement, fire and ems that were
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attending this event who immediately got involved and took part in saving lives. i want to thank our community partners. i wanted to dispel some rumours. there was no pursue the lead—up to this incident. this is not a terrorist event. i want to thank of first responder partners. it is a long list and i apologise and we apologise if i forget anyone. the fire department. no words can express the partnership that we have and how we work together as one in this incident mutual aid, they talked about that. the suburban mutual aid response team which we
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call smart and respondents which includes dozens of law enforcement agencies. fbi, atf, the state of criminal investigations. school district in the milwaukee police department centre. wisconsin state crime lab. we will provide a link on our website for any questions regarding witness information. if there's any additional video that they have, they can look at this link and family members who need to recover property. the police department website is the only source for information. do not release information from any other source as it has not been vetted and could lead to false information. thank you.
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could lead to false information. thank vom— could lead to false information. thank yon-— could lead to false information. thank ou. ., �* ., thank you. thank you, dan. before i aet thank you. thank you, dan. before i get started — thank you. thank you, dan. before i get started on _ thank you. thank you, dan. before i get started on behalf— thank you. thank you, dan. before i get started on behalf of— thank you. thank you, dan. before i get started on behalf of the - thank you. thank you, dan. before i get started on behalf of the men - thank you. thank you, dan. before i | get started on behalf of the men and women _ get started on behalf of the men and women of— get started on behalf of the men and women of the waukesha fire department. i would like to say prayers — department. i would like to say prayers go to the families and the whole _ prayers go to the families and the whole community that was affected by yesterday's tragedy. on the fire department responded to a mass casualty— department responded to a mass casualty incident yesterday afternoon. all 26 on—duty personnel responded _ afternoon. all 26 on—duty personnel responded to the incident from five stations— responded to the incident from five stations and downtown station within the site _ stations and downtown station within the site of— stations and downtown station within the site of the parade route. our unit started a spontaneous response based _ unit started a spontaneous response based on _ unit started a spontaneous response based on radio trafficking, dispatch information and reactivated a mass casualty— information and reactivated a mass casualty protocol and utilised our mutual _ casualty protocol and utilised our mutual aid system and box alarm system _ mutual aid system and box alarm system to — mutual aid system and box alarm system to the second level to provide — system to the second level to provide us with additional resources
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to treat _ provide us with additional resources to treat the — provide us with additional resources to treat the victims. we received resources — to treat the victims. we received resources from 12 area fire departments and we were also aided greatly— departments and we were also aided greatly hy— departments and we were also aided greatly by off—duty firefighters and personnel and bystanders that greatly — personnel and bystanders that greatly assisted us with treatment and triage patients. patients were transported to six area hospitals with fire — transported to six area hospitals with fire department transporting 22 patients _ with fire department transporting 22 patients. law enforcement personnel, by standards, they also transported additional— by standards, they also transported additional personnel or additional victims _ additional personnel or additional victims to— additional personnel or additional victims to the hospital and at this time, _ victims to the hospital and at this time, we — victims to the hospital and at this time, we believe the 40 people were treated _ time, we believe the 40 people were treated at— time, we believe the 40 people were treated at local hospitals although this number might increase based on information— this number might increase based on information being gathered. like chief— information being gathered. like chief thompson, have an opportunity to respond _ chief thompson, have an opportunity to respond to the incident and i
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'ust to respond to the incident and i just got— to respond to the incident and i just got there after the chief did and based on my observations, very, very overwhelmed by the response of the community to this tragedy and peopie _ the community to this tragedy and people banded together to do the best they could to deal with this incident — best they could to deal with this incident and last night, going out and visiting the fire stations and the people that responded overwhelmingly, our personnel expressed their sincere thanks for everyone — expressed their sincere thanks for everyone who stepped up and assisted with the _ everyone who stepped up and assisted with the treatment of the citizens that were — with the treatment of the citizens that were injured. again, our hearts io that were injured. again, our hearts go out _ that were injured. again, our hearts go out to— that were injured. again, our hearts go out to the — that were injured. again, our hearts go out to the families and the victims — go out to the families and the victims of— go out to the families and the victims of this senseless tragedy and we _ victims of this senseless tragedy and we appreciate all the assistance and we appreciate all the assistance and support that is been offered to the fire _ and support that is been offered to the fire department. last and support that is been offered to the fire department.— and support that is been offered to the fire department. last night we experienced _ the fire department. last night we experienced a _ the fire department. last night we experienced a senseless _ the fire department. last night we experienced a senseless tragedy. l experienced a senseless tragedy. many— experienced a senseless tragedy. many of— experienced a senseless tragedy. many of us— experienced a senseless tragedy. many of us are _ experienced a senseless tragedy. many of us are participants - experienced a senseless tragedy. many of us are participants in - experienced a senseless tragedy.
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many of us are participants in the parade _ many of us are participants in the parade and — many of us are participants in the parade and witnessed _ many of us are participants in the parade and witnessed each - many of us are participants in the i parade and witnessed each horrific action~ _ parade and witnessed each horrific action we — parade and witnessed each horrific action we are _ parade and witnessed each horrific action. we are all— parade and witnessed each horrific action. we are all trying _ parade and witnessed each horrific action. we are all trying to - parade and witnessed each horrific| action. we are all trying to process will he _ action. we are all trying to process will be experienced. _ action. we are all trying to process will be experienced. our— action. we are all trying to process will be experienced. our police, i will be experienced. our police, firefighters, _ will be experienced. our police, firefighters, partners— will be experienced. our police, firefighters, partners and - will be experienced. our police, firefighters, partners and so - will be experienced. our police, . firefighters, partners and so many others _ firefighters, partners and so many others sprang _ firefighters, partners and so many others sprang into _ firefighters, partners and so many others sprang into action - others sprang into action immediately— others sprang into action immediately last- others sprang into action immediately last night. others sprang into actionj immediately last night at others sprang into action - immediately last night at the others sprang into action _ immediately last night at the people that were _ immediately last night at the people that were injured. _ immediately last night at the people that were injured. for— immediately last night at the people that were injured. for those - immediately last night at the people that were injured. for those of- immediately last night at the people that were injured. for those of you l that were injured. for those of you who do— that were injured. for those of you who do not— that were injured. for those of you who do not live _ that were injured. for those of you who do not live in waukesha, - that were injured. for those of you who do not live in waukesha, you i who do not live in waukesha, you need _ who do not live in waukesha, you need to— who do not live in waukesha, you need to know— who do not live in waukesha, you need to know that _ who do not live in waukesha, you need to know that waukesha - who do not live in waukesha, you need to know that waukesha is l who do not live in waukesha, you need to know that waukesha is a | need to know that waukesha is a community— need to know that waukesha is a community that _ need to know that waukesha is a community that helps _ need to know that waukesha is a community that helps the - need to know that waukesha is a - community that helps the neighbours. waukesha _ community that helps the neighbours. waukesha is— community that helps the neighbours. waukesha is a — community that helps the neighbours. waukesha is a community _ community that helps the neighbours. waukesha is a community that - community that helps the neighbours. waukesha is a community that takes l waukesha is a community that takes pride in _ waukesha is a community that takes pride in its _ waukesha is a community that takes pride in its identity— waukesha is a community that takes pride in its identity and _ waukesha is a community that takes pride in its identity and has - pride in its identity and has wonderful— pride in its identity and has wonderful spirit. _ pride in its identity and has wonderful spirit. waukesha pride in its identity and has - wonderful spirit. waukesha looks after— wonderful spirit. waukesha looks after each — wonderful spirit. waukesha looks after each other. _ wonderful spirit. waukesha looks after each other. waukesha - wonderful spirit. waukesha looks. after each other. waukesha enjoys its celebrations— after each other. waukesha enjoys its celebrations and _ after each other. waukesha enjoys its celebrations and the _ after each other. waukesha enjoys its celebrations and the entire - its celebrations and the entire community— its celebrations and the entire communityjoins _ its celebrations and the entire communityjoins in _ its celebrations and the entire communityjoins in the - its celebrations and the entire - communityjoins in the celebrations. we are _ communityjoins in the celebrations. we are very— communityjoins in the celebrations. we are very close _ communityjoins in the celebrations. we are very close community. - we are very close community. waukesha _ we are very close community. waukesha is— we are very close community. waukesha is a _ we are very close community. waukesha is a community - we are very close community. . waukesha is a community where we are very close community. - waukesha is a community where many of its residents — waukesha is a community where many of its residents have _ waukesha is a community where many of its residents have lived _ waukesha is a community where many of its residents have lived for- of its residents have lived for generations _ of its residents have lived for generations. waukesha - of its residents have lived for generations. waukesha is - of its residents have lived for. generations. waukesha is also of its residents have lived for- generations. waukesha is also the type of— generations. waukesha is also the type of community— generations. waukesha is also the type of community where - generations. waukesha is also the type of community where new- type of community where new residents— type of community where new residents tell— type of community where new residents tell their— type of community where new residents tell their friends - type of community where new residents tell their friends to i type of community where new- residents tell their friends to move here because — residents tell their friends to move here because it— residents tell their friends to move here because it is— residents tell their friends to move here because it is special. - residents tell their friends to move i here because it is special. waukesha has held _ here because it is special. waukesha has held what— here because it is special. waukesha has held what can _ here because it is special. waukesha has held what can be _ here because it is special. waukesha has held what can be described - here because it is special. waukesha has held what can be described as a i has held what can be described as a
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norman— has held what can be described as a norman rockwell— has held what can be described as a norman rockwell type _ has held what can be described as a norman rockwell type of _ has held what can be described as a norman rockwell type of christmasj norman rockwell type of christmas parade _ norman rockwell type of christmas parade for— norman rockwell type of christmas parade for six — norman rockwell type of christmas parade for six decades. _ norman rockwell type of christmas parade for six decades. last - norman rockwell type of christmas parade for six decades. last night, i parade for six decades. last night, our wonderful— parade for six decades. last night, our wonderful waukesha _ parade for six decades. last night, our wonderful waukesha parade i parade for six decades. last night, - our wonderful waukesha parade became the scene _ our wonderful waukesha parade became the scene of— our wonderful waukesha parade became the scene of a _ our wonderful waukesha parade became the scene of a horrific— our wonderful waukesha parade became the scene of a horrific tragedy. - the scene of a horrific tragedy. last _ the scene of a horrific tragedy. last night, _ the scene of a horrific tragedy. last night, that— the scene of a horrific tragedy. last night, that parade - the scene of a horrific tragedy. | last night, that parade became the scene of a horrific tragedy. i last night, that parade became a nightmare — last night, that parade became a nightmare. last _ last night, that parade became a nightmare. last night, _ last night, that parade became a nightmare. last night, many- last night, that parade became al nightmare. last night, many were severely— nightmare. last night, many were severely injured. _ nightmare. last night, many were severely injured. last _ nightmare. last night, many were severely injured. last night, - nightmare. last night, many were severely injured. last night, livesl severely injured. last night, lives were _ severely injured. last night, lives were lost— severely injured. last night, lives were lost during _ severely injured. last night, lives were lost during the _ severely injured. last night, lives were lost during the middle - severely injured. last night, lives were lost during the middle of. severely injured. last night, lives. were lost during the middle of what shouid've _ were lost during the middle of what shouid've been _ were lost during the middle of what should've been a _ were lost during the middle of what should've been a celebration. - were lost during the middle of what should've been a celebration. last. should've been a celebration. last night, _ should've been a celebration. last night, many— should've been a celebration. last night, manvwere_ should've been a celebration. last night, many were severely- should've been a celebration. lasti night, many were severely injured, lost night, many were severely injured, iost their— night, many were severely injured, lost their lives— night, many were severely injured, lost their lives and _ night, many were severely injured, lost their lives and all— night, many were severely injured, lost their lives and all who - night, many were severely injured, lost their lives and all who were i lost their lives and all who were there _ lost their lives and all who were there were _ lost their lives and all who were there were traumatised. - lost their lives and all who were there were traumatised. we i there were traumatised. we experienced _ there were traumatised. we experienced a _ there were traumatised. we experienced a horrific- there were traumatised. we i experienced a horrific tragedy, there were traumatised. we - experienced a horrific tragedy, we have so— experienced a horrific tragedy, we have so much— experienced a horrific tragedy, we have so much healing _ experienced a horrific tragedy, we have so much healing that- experienced a horrific tragedy, we have so much healing that needsl experienced a horrific tragedy, we. have so much healing that needs to occur _ have so much healing that needs to occur. waukesha _ have so much healing that needs to occur. waukesha will— have so much healing that needs to occur. waukesha will not _ have so much healing that needs to occur. waukesha will not be - have so much healing that needs to| occur. waukesha will not be defined by the _ occur. waukesha will not be defined by the horrific— occur. waukesha will not be defined by the horrific events _ occur. waukesha will not be defined by the horrific events of _ occur. waukesha will not be defined by the horrific events of last - by the horrific events of last night — by the horrific events of last night we _ by the horrific events of last night we are _ by the horrific events of last night. we are a _ by the horrific events of last night. we are a communityl by the horrific events of last i night. we are a community that by the horrific events of last - night. we are a community that will come _ night. we are a community that will come together, _ night. we are a community that will come together, we _ night. we are a community that will come together, we will— night. we are a community that will come together, we will help - night. we are a community that will come together, we will help those i come together, we will help those who experienced _ come together, we will help those who experienced the _ come together, we will help those who experienced the loss - come together, we will help those who experienced the loss of - come together, we will help those who experienced the loss of a i come together, we will help those i who experienced the loss of a loved one or— who experienced the loss of a loved one or were — who experienced the loss of a loved one or were injured. _ who experienced the loss of a loved one or were injured. we _ who experienced the loss of a loved one or were injured. we will- who experienced the loss of a loved one or were injured. we will work. one or were injured. we will work together— one or were injured. we will work together to — one or were injured. we will work together to bring _ one or were injured. we will work together to bring healing. - one or were injured. we will work together to bring healing. the i together to bring healing. the heaiing — together to bring healing. the healing needs _ together to bring healing. the healing needs to _ together to bring healing. the
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healing needs to begin - together to bring healing. the healing needs to begin now. l together to bring healing. the i healing needs to begin now. with that in— healing needs to begin now. with that in mind, _ healing needs to begin now. with that in mind, i_ healing needs to begin now. with that in mind, i share _ healing needs to begin now. with that in mind, i share the - healing needs to begin now. with. that in mind, i share the following. our that in mind, i share the following. 0ur prayer— that in mind, i share the following. 0ur prayer vigil— that in mind, i share the following. our prayer vigil will— that in mind, i share the following. our prayer vigil will be _ that in mind, i share the following. our prayer vigil will be held - our prayer vigil will be held tonight— our prayer vigil will be held tonight at— our prayer vigil will be held tonight at 5pm _ our prayer vigil will be held tonight at 5pm at _ our prayer vigil will be held tonight at 5pm at cutler- our prayer vigil will be held i tonight at 5pm at cutler park. our prayer vigil will be held - tonight at 5pm at cutler park. the waukesha — tonight at 5pm at cutler park. the waukesha public— tonight at 5pm at cutler park. the waukesha public library— tonight at 5pm at cutler park. the waukesha public library which i tonight at 5pm at cutler park. the waukesha public library which is l waukesha public library which is adjacent — waukesha public library which is adjacent to— waukesha public library which is adjacent to it _ waukesha public library which is adjacent to it will _ waukesha public library which is adjacent to it will be _ waukesha public library which is adjacent to it will be closing i waukesha public library which is adjacent to it will be closing at i adjacent to it will be closing at four pm~ — adjacent to it will be closing at four pm so. _ adjacent to it will be closing at four pm. so, the _ adjacent to it will be closing at four pm. so, the public- adjacent to it will be closing at four pm. so, the public and i adjacent to it will be closing at i four pm. so, the public and utilise the parking — four pm. so, the public and utilise the parking lot _ four pm. so, the public and utilise the parking lot. the _ four pm. so, the public and utilise the parking lot. the downtown- four pm. so, the public and utilise the parking lot. the downtown sol the parking lot. the downtown so street _ the parking lot. the downtown so street parking _ the parking lot. the downtown so street parking ramp _ the parking lot. the downtown so street parking ramp which - the parking lot. the downtown so street parking ramp which is i street parking ramp which is immediately— street parking ramp which is immediately near— street parking ramp which is immediately near there i street parking ramp which is immediately near there willl street parking ramp which is i immediately near there will be available — immediately near there will be available for— immediately near there will be available for free _ immediately near there will be available for free parking. i immediately near there will be i available for free parking. members of the _ available for free parking. members of the community— available for free parking. members of the community want _ available for free parking. members of the community want to _ available for free parking. members of the community want to help i available for free parking. members of the community want to help out. of the community want to help out and heip— of the community want to help out and heip the — of the community want to help out and help the victims. _ of the community want to help out and help the victims. the - of the community want to help out. and help the victims. the waukesha community— and help the victims. the waukesha community foundation— and help the victims. the waukesha community foundation and - and help the victims. the waukesha community foundation and united i and help the victims. the waukesha i community foundation and united way of greater— community foundation and united way of greater milwaukee _ community foundation and united way of greater milwaukee in _ community foundation and united way of greater milwaukee in waukesha i of greater milwaukee in waukesha county— of greater milwaukee in waukesha county have — of greater milwaukee in waukesha county have joined _ of greater milwaukee in waukesha county have joined together - of greater milwaukee in waukesha county have joined together to i county have joined together to create — county have joined together to create the _ county have joined together to create the united _ county have joined together to create the united for - county have joined together to| create the united for waukesha community— create the united for waukesha community fund. _ create the united for waukesha community fund. this - create the united for waukesha community fund. this fund i create the united for waukesha community fund. this fund will| community fund. this fund will create — community fund. this fund will create the _ community fund. this fund will create the needs _ community fund. this fund will create the needs of— community fund. this fund will create the needs of the - community fund. this fund willl create the needs of the family's impact — create the needs of the family's impact and _ create the needs of the family's impact and there _ create the needs of the family's impact and there will— create the needs of the family's impact and there will be - create the needs of the family's impact and there will be there i create the needs of the family's i impact and there will be there via website _ impact and there will be there via website on — impact and there will be there via website on our— impact and there will be there via website on our web— impact and there will be there via website on our web page - impact and there will be there via website on our web page to- impact and there will be there via website on our web page to see l impact and there will be there via i website on our web page to see how you can _ website on our web page to see how you can access— website on our web page to see how you can access that _ website on our web page to see how you can access that fun. _ website on our web page to see how you can access that fun. we - you can access that fun. we witnessed _ you can access that fun. we witnessed dramatic- you can access that fun. we witnessed dramatic events. you can access that fun. we i witnessed dramatic events last evening — witnessed dramatic events last evening and _ witnessed dramatic events last evening and if— witnessed dramatic events last evening and if you _ witnessed dramatic events last evening and if you need - witnessed dramatic events last evening and if you need to- witnessed dramatic events last evening and if you need to talkj witnessed dramatic events last i evening and if you need to talk to someone — evening and if you need to talk to someone you _ evening and if you need to talk to someone, you can _ evening and if you need to talk to someone, you can call— evening and if you need to talk to someone, you can call or-
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evening and if you need to talk to someone, you can call or text i someone, you can call or text 8009859590 _ someone, you can call or text 8009859590 to _ someone, you can call or text 8009859590 to be _ someone, you can call or text 8009859590 to be connectedj someone, you can call or text i 8009859590 to be connected to a train carrying _ 8009859590 to be connected to a train carrying counsellor _ 8009859590 to be connected to a train carrying counsellor and - 8009859590 to be connected to a train carrying counsellor and theyl train carrying counsellor and they are available _ train carrying counsellor and they are available 20 _ train carrying counsellor and they are available 20 47. _ train carrying counsellor and they are available 20 47. that - train carrying counsellor and they are available 20 47. that number will also — are available 20 47. that number will also be — are available 20 47. that number will also be on _ are available 20 47. that number will also be on a _ are available 20 47. that number| will also be on a website. please, only call— will also be on a website. please, only call 911— will also be on a website. please, only call 911 for— will also be on a website. please, only call 911 for true _ will also be on a website. please, | only call 911 for true emergencies. we are _ only call 911 for true emergencies. we are listening _ only call 911 for true emergencies. we are listening to— only call 911 for true emergencies. we are listening to a _ only call 911 for true emergencies. we are listening to a press- we are listening to a press conference after a car drove into work christmas market. we are listening to gary o'donoghue in washington, dc. for people who did not see the press conference in the beginning, won't you pick out his being the most significant parts of it was yellow we now have the details of the five people who lost their lives. they have been named, their lives. they have been named, the eldest was an 80—year—old man, the eldest was an 80—year—old man, the youngest was a 52—year—old woman. bill the youngest was a 52-year-old woman. �* , , ., , the youngest was a 52-year-old woman. �* , , . ., woman. all elderly people. we now have the police _ woman. all elderly people. we now have the police and _ woman. all elderly people. we now have the police and their _ woman. all elderly people. we now have the police and their own i woman. all elderly people. we nowj have the police and their own words saying that this is not a terrorist incident and that the man they have incident and that the man they have in custody who they believe is responsible for these homicides was
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fleeing from a domestic incident and they say they did not pursue him from that some stories and suggested and he is going to be charged with five counts of intentional homicide and earlier on, there's a whole number of children still in hospital. something like 18 of them still in hospital and six in critical condition, three in serious condition and has a few hours ago, a few of them were undergoing surgery. there's a lot of anxious people in waukesha this afternoon with children in the hospital and tragic tragic 36 hours that the small town is experienced in wisconsin. thinking very much indeed for that update. rising covid—19 cases in europe. austria is back in lockdown today. its trying to control a rising
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covid infection rate. and with new restrictions coming in across europe, we've seen protests in belgium, austria, italy, the netherlands, switzerland and croatia. once again we're seeing the tension between public health measures and what some people are constraints on their personal freedoms. let's start in austria. tens of thousands of people protested in the capital, vienna, in response to the new national lockdown — and to plans that make vaccination a legal requirement. here's the president of the austrian medical association on the decision to do this. from february the 1st, vaccination will be mandatory in our country because it is necessary to increase the vaccination rate or there is no
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chance stop the spread of this pandemic in our country. yes, it is legal. we have vaccinations in the past _ it is legal. we have vaccinations in the past and so, this is not a new instrument — the past and so, this is not a new instrument we are installing and i'm sorry— instrument we are installing and i'm sorry to _ instrument we are installing and i'm sorry to say— instrument we are installing and i'm sorry to say that we have to go this way, _ sorry to say that we have to go this way, i'd _ sorry to say that we have to go this way, i'd rather have it the other way, i'd rather have it the other way and — way, i'd rather have it the other way and we _ way, i'd rather have it the other way and we have done ten months of campaigning, of trying to persuade people _ campaigning, of trying to persuade people. but still, we have a certain share _ people. but still, we have a certain share, merely one third of the population whichjust as share, merely one third of the population which just as hesitant. this policy will make austria the first country in europe to impose mandatory vaccinations. next to belgium. it has one of the highest vaccination rates in europe — almost 75% are double jabbed. but cases are still rising. and restrictions are being reimposed. this was brussels on sunday as the lastest raft of covid measures came into effect over the weekend. they include compulsory mask—wearing for anyone aged 10 and over for indoor and some outdoor activities — as well
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as making home—working mandatory four days a week. it's estimated that 35,000 people took part in what was initially a peaceful demonstration. here are some of them. translation: we know that the virus is there. i but we leave it to people to decide whether or not to be vaccinated. translation: i came togive my i opinion about freedom of expression and freedom of choice, and really to respect everyone's choices. later that day, the demonstration turned violent. police resorted to dispersing the crowds with water cannons and tear gas. and this is the aftermath on monday. burnt debris and damaged pavements. here's belgium's prime minister. where a free country where people have the right to demonstrate. but of a demonstration ends in a wave of violence, it is an acceptable and it is certainly unacceptable for this wave of violence to be directed against the police.
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the netherlands saw the worst violence over the weekend. this is rotterdam where police shot live rounds towards the crowds on sunday. elsewhere vandals torched bicycles in the hague. some suspect that organised criminals are behind the violence. here's the dutchjustice minister. these are not demonstrations. these are attacks on police and firefighters. a number of factors are behind the unrest there. the bbc�*s anna holligan is at the hague. a lot of this was in response to a new years fireworks band that was announced on friday and that is in combination with a partial lockdown introduced last week that bars restaurants by eight and plus a fear that the covid—19 can be about to get tighter and the freedom of the unvaccinated is about 16% of dutch adults could about to be limited even further.
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and there were more protests on the continent. on sunday, thousands of people marched in the capital of croatia, opposing mandatory vaccinations for public sector workers. and this was italy on saturday. thousands gathered in rome to oppose the "green pass" certificates. that's a certificate showing that the holder has been vaccinated, tested negative or recovered from covid—19. without it people won't be able to access workplaces, leisure venues and public transport. the factors behind the protests are specific to each country. but a common thread of disagreement is about the role of governments. mandates, like the vaccine mandate planned in austria are particularly contentious. and there's even disagreement among scientists. here's one scientific advisor to the british government. i'm personally against the mandate of mandatory vaccination. i think the answer is education and making sure that the correct messages get out.
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the professor mentioned �*correct information' there. something the pandemic has shown is just how easily incorrect information can spread. here's the professor again. confidence, complacency and convenience. so the mandatory vaccination has to be really a last resort. that all the access barriers are removed but i do think it is time we do have the legal and societal debate about mandatory vaccination. the arguments for and against vaccine mandates look set to continue. dr kluge covers europe, for the world health organisation. normally this would be packed with people especially in the run—up to christmas but as you can see there are a few people going out for a walk or returning home from work, there really is the sense that people are locking down. the sense of frustration for some people, since of anger with others or resignation, even some relief, some people have said that it was high time that the government took this
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step because the coronavirus cases have just soared in step because the coronavirus cases havejust soared in recent step because the coronavirus cases have just soared in recent days. step because the coronavirus cases havejust soared in recent days. [10 have 'ust soared in recent days. do we have just soared in recent days. do we know how long the lockdown will go on for? late we know how long the lockdown will no on for? ~ ~' ., we know how long the lockdown will no on for? ~ ~ ., ., ., go on for? we know that it will go on for 20 days _ go on for? we know that it will go on for 20 days and _ go on for? we know that it will go on for 20 days and it _ go on for? we know that it will go on for 20 days and it will - go on for? we know that it will go on for 20 days and it will be i on for 20 days and it will be reassessed after ten days but of course, everything depends on whether or not the infections to start to come down and people are hoping that the chancellor who i interviewed today will say that after the 20 days is up, they are hoping to lift the lockdown for the vaccinated and that they would then be able to go to shops and restaurants as usual. but the big question is the divisive element in all of these debates of the moment is precisely what we have been hearing, whether or not this proposal for mandatoryjabs by proposal for mandatory jabs by february, proposal for mandatoryjabs by february, opinions here are very split on that and he spoke to one woman today who said it is her right to choose what she puts into her own
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body. here in the uk, prime minister, borisjohnson is facing a growing row over his social care reform. the costs of caring for the elderly including those with dementia aren't covered by the nhs, and many people are forced to sell their homes to pay for it. in september the government unveiled proposals including an 86 thousand pound cap on costs to stop this from happening. but an amendment to the plan now says support payments from councils will not count towards the cap. critics say this will unfairly hit the poorest, and there's predicted to be a rebellion within his own party when the amendment is voted on shortly. here's our political editor, laura kuenssberg. a mother's care for her daughter. decades on, romo's daughter helps care for her. the 83—year—old, who has dementia, had to sell the family home to pay for the full—time care she now needs. she worked night and day to have her own home.
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i mean, my mum would have been the tory poster girl. she never took a penny in benefits, she worked, she must have paid income tax for 50 years and everything she worked for has gone, because she has been ill. and that is just wrong. the prime minister claims the new system will protect families just like lorraine's from enormous bills those who need intensive care can face if they need to contribute, but there is a fear the wealthiest will benefit the most. if somebody has a house worth £120,000, they will still have to pay £86,000 himself, even though they qualify that some council help and they will be left with just over a quarter of the value of their home. but look at this, if an individual has a house worth £500,000, they will have to pay the £86,000 but will keep over 80% of the value of their house to pass on. some of borisjohnson's own mps fear his big platform plan
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for social care is unfair. and... at a time when some wonder if downing street is really concentrating. yesterday, i went, as we all must, to peppa pig world _ an appearance today won't have calmed those nerves, or fears about the proposals that mps will vote on tonight. they are much better— than the existing system because, under the existing system, - nobody gets any support if they have assets of £23,000 or more. no you get support if you have £100,000 or less. i but after losing his place, he was later asked? frankly, is everything ok? i think that people got the vast | majority of the points i wantedj to make and i thought it went over well. - the social care plan follows years of governments to make changes and overall it should mean billions of extra care in england,
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with people receiving help towards the cost. the former health secretary will back the reform, even with a heavy heart. it is disappointing that the way the cap is going to be calculated is going to be changed, which means that it is going to be a less progressive measure than was hoped for. the opposition is trying to persuade more tories to join with them to reject the plan in the commons later. we now learn that people will have to sell their homes so it is another broken promise. worse than that, it is the people who aren't so well off who will have to sell their homes because, of course, many families won't have £86,000 to hand. the plan seemed likely to pass the first hurdle in parliament tonight, but borisjohnson's claimed that his plan will fix social care could well cause some political damage that needs fixing itself. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. these are important and pressing times for british business.
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will look in detail during the back half of outside source. good evening. monday turned into a cold but bright day for many of us. i can promise plenty more cold weather this week but tuesday may not be quite such a bright affair because on the earlier satellite picture you can see this big bank of cloud working down from the north. that cloud will become more extensive as we head through tonight. where cloud does become widespread across scotland, northern ireland and parts of northern england it will hold the temperatures up so not as cold as it was last night for many spots here. the lowest temperatures to be found further south through the midlands and parts of wales in southern england where the skies remain clear and we will see values to around minus two celsius. but some fog patches are likely through parts of wales and into the midlands, some of that fog quite slow to clear during tomorrow. generally speaking, it southern areas, parts of the midlands, wales, southern england and will see the best of the sunshine
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through the day. although some showers will still graze into parts of essex, kent and the channel islands. further north more in the way of cloud with the odd spot of light rain or drizzle here and there. temperatures, will if anything, just a notch up from where they have been today, up to nine or ten degrees. into wednesday we see a band of rain starting to push its way southwards and eastward. this band of rain is associated with a cold front. so behind it the air will be turning colder. brightening up to the afternoon for scotland and northern ireland but with a strengthening wind, some showers and in increasingly cold feel. as we move out of wednesday and into thursday the cold front continues to journey southeastward. behind it, follow the white lines, the isobars all the way up to the north, all the way up to the arctic. that is where the air will be coming from during thursday. so a very chilly feeling day, a frosty start is likely. but we should see brighter skies returning with lots of sunshine. scattered showers around coastal fringes which could be
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wintry over high ground. showers could well turn wintry to low levels for a time in northern scotland. afternoon highs just five to eight, maybe nine degrees at best. and then for friday it stays cold but it also turns much more unsettled as this deep area of low pressure dives down from the north. that will bring increasingly strong winds, particularly up towards the north and west of the uk. we will see showers or longer spells say rain, there is the potentialfor some sleet and snow to mix in with the showers. particularly over high ground in the west and it is going to feel very cold indeed.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. police in wisconsin have been giving more details by the five people killed when a car drove into a christmas parade. and they've been telling us about its driver.— telling us about its driver. someone was taken into _ telling us about its driver. someone was taken into custody _ telling us about its driver. someone was taken into custody a _ telling us about its driver. someone was taken into custody a short i was taken into custody a short distance from the scene and we are confident he acted alone. there is no evidence that this is a terrorist incident. ., ., ., incident. charged with intentional homicide police _ incident. charged with intentional homicide police that _ incident. charged with intentional homicide police that he _ incident. charged with intentional homicide police that he was i incident. charged with intentional. homicide police that he was fleeing what they described as in the domestic incident. across europe a number of countries are clamping down, bringing new restrictions to try and contain covid—19. austria has gone into a nationwide lockdown.
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sourcing can the government is getting tough on people who are not vaccinated. this could affect millions of people potentially if they don't need the vaccination deadline of late december. that's because at the moment less than 10% of the kenyan population is currently double vaccinated. they'll be banned from bars, restaurants public transport and government buildings. and it will affect millions of people potentially, if they don't make the vaccination deadline in late december. that's because less than 10% of the population is currently vaccinated. the kenyan government is confident it has enough our correspondent rhoda odhiambo is in nairobi. why has the government decided to act in this way now? it why has the government decided to act in this way now?— act in this way now? it was 'ust like ou act in this way now? it was 'ust like you mentioned. if i act in this way now? it was 'ust like you mentioned. if we i act in this way now? it wasjust like you mentioned. if we look| like you mentioned. if we look at the numbers that have been reported by the government, a few people that
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turned out to be vaccinated. and there are various reasons. some do not trust the vaccines that are being offered right now. also looking at how the country is divided, ruralareas. in ruralareas people do want to vaccines but it just not circulated wide enough. it's more of an issue of access and also the information that's being circulated out there in terms of covid—19 vaccines and why it's important. earlier on when before the vaccines came into the country the vaccines came into the country the health minister made some comments that are currently now being sought where he questioned the efficacy of the visor vaccine. it's people becoming reluctant to get covid—19 vaccines. this is why the move that he announced on sunday making sure that people do get vaccinated because a target was set earlier this year to vaccinate at least 10 million canyons by december.— least 10 million canyons by december. , , ., ., ~ december. this is a huge undertaking riven that december. this is a huge undertaking given that under _ december. this is a huge undertaking given that under 1096 _ december. this is a huge undertaking given that under 1096 of _ december. this is a huge undertaking given that under 1096 of the _ given that under 10% of the population is currently double vaccinated. does the government of the practical resources to deliver this in a few weeks? that's the
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question everyone is asking. the timeframe that is been set is less than four weeks. if we look at the vaccines are currently being used in the country, most of them are double those vaccines put up the interval is about six weeks. even if we say they're expecting the government expecting about 8 million doses there is no certainty that they will get the vaccines that are needed. if we look at how vaccine supplies are trickling into nairobi and across a continent there is no guarantee that these vaccines will arrive at the deadline also if we look at implementation of how they're going to ensure that these people before you go to a restaurant, public transport, how you're going to ensure that people show proof and who going to look at the proof vaccine certificate that you are vaccinated. vaccine certificate that you are vaccinated-— vaccine certificate that you are vaccinated. ~ .,, ., , ., , vaccinated. most of these details have not been _ vaccinated. most of these details have not been published, - vaccinated. most of these details have not been published, the i have not been published, the government has not come out to say how they're going to implement it. hopefully they will, in december by the 20th. because this is supposed
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to take place by the 21st of december.— to take place by the 21st of december. as we've been reporting, countries across europe are bringing getting tough on people who are not vaccinated. in tough measures to combat coronavirus. this could affect millions of people potentially if they don't need the vaccination deadline of late december. europe is far and away the worst hit region. in the world at the moment — as this chart shows. compared to asia, north america, and south america — europe is the only continent where deaths are steadily increasing. the same is true for the numbers of cases too. some of this is due to low rates of vaccination — particularly in eastern europe. in bulgaria only 25% of people are fully vaccinated. in romania, it's 38%. other countries are doing better but still not enough to stop the spread. in austria, 64% of people are fully vaccinated. in germany, it's 67%. scott marcus is from the think tank bruegel, in bonn.
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many of these are countries that were previously behind the iron curtain where confidence in government is less. within germany and our eastern regions also are behind the iron curtain. some of the errors that have problems also bavaria which are always western germany. you will see different impacts again in different areas based on attitudes. if you look at spain, portugalto based on attitudes. if you look at spain, portugal to a large degree france and italy you have much fewer problems and much higherfraction of the population vaccinated. and that's true. spain, portugal and france all have higher vaccination rates — and lower infections. but low rates of vaccination aren't the only factor driving the spread. hans kluge covers europe, for the world health organisation. three factors at stake for the first one is what we called the winter seasonality. the second one, important one, so we are far too many people susceptible to the virus.
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either due to waning of vaccine derived immunity, particularly after 30 weeks and of course, a considerable a considerable group of people unvaccinated. the third one is say origin is so called belter dominant. we know that the delta variant is much more transmissible. so it's notjust about vaccination. two countries we reported on earlier in the programme are the netherlands, and belgium. both are seeing a surge of cases — despite having high levels of vaccination. the netherlands, has 73% fully vaccinated — belgium, has 74%. natasha loder is health policy editor at the economist. thank you forjoining us. what is your assessment or explanation for why europe is suffering physically at the moment?— at the moment? you've got a confluence — at the moment? you've got a confluence of _ at the moment? you've got a confluence of factors - at the moment? you've got a confluence of factors going i at the moment? you've got a l confluence of factors going on. at the moment? you've got a - confluence of factors going on. some of your previous commentators have explained well you've got low vaccination rates in some country, waiting efficacy of vaccines causing
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a rise in cases. then you've got a seasonal effect which is notjust on the virus itself its also behavioural, driving people indoors, less socialising maybe they are set “p less socialising maybe they are set up as well of all these restrictions. it all adds up to a lot of trouble. in holland and the other country you mentioned that had higher vaccination rates, there are still not as high as we would like. in the countries that are doing relatively well we are seeing 80, 80 5% vaccination rates in the country. that's where we need to be. if you're not there and you are heading into winter running hot, as it were, there is trouble ahead. haifa into winter running hot, as it were, there is trouble ahead.— there is trouble ahead. how do you assess the difference _ there is trouble ahead. how do you assess the difference at _ there is trouble ahead. how do you assess the difference at the - there is trouble ahead. how do you i assess the difference at the moment between the experience of some countries on the continent of europe and the uk?— and the uk? there's a lot going on and the uk? there's a lot going on and it depends _ and the uk? there's a lot going on and it depends on _ and the uk? there's a lot going on and it depends on which _ and the uk? there's a lot going on and it depends on which country i and it depends on which country you're talking about. when i look at central and eastern europe i think
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there's a lot more hesitancy going on there. potentially driven by a lot of misinformation, potentially some of it from russia for example. in other countries there are long running hesitancy towards vaccination. although in france they overcame that with some quick, smart policies earlier on this year. which saw them introducing passports to get into certain places. there a lot going on. in britain i think we've done reasonably well in getting our aduu done reasonably well in getting our adult vaccinated. and we got ahead early and i think that's been great and there's been quite a wide acceptance of vaccines in this country. been a bit slow on children's vaccines but nonetheless i think wearing a relatively good place although it could be better. there might be some people thinking europe has had an excellent supply of vaccines, almost all year to prepare the winter, if it's in this
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situation is is just prepare the winter, if it's in this situation is isjust what prepare the winter, if it's in this situation is is just what were looking at each winter from now on? it dddeee depends on whether you can get people to take vaccines. and that's really what it comes down to. some countries you have that long—standing problems of trust, trust with authority, trust in institutions, trusting each other. vaccination is a social phenomenon well. when countries. equities the other people getting vaccinated you're more likely to get vaccinated yourself. so really these are long—standing issues that you can erase quickly. yes, these countries could see this year in and year out unless they do not deal with the underlying issues was up one thing i would say is that we have got antiviral pills coming online which could actually make a difference in winters of the future. you will be able to give antiviral pills to people who get sick and prevent them from going to hospital. that could come sooner this year we help as
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well. . ~ come sooner this year we help as well. ., ,, , ., ., stop these are important and pressing times for british business. today in the north east of england the conference was addressed by the prime minister.— prime minister. good morning everybody- — prime minister. good morning everybody. fantastic - prime minister. good morning everybody. fantastic to i prime minister. good morning everybody. fantastic to be i prime minister. good morning l everybody. fantastic to be here. prime minister. good morning i everybody. fantastic to be here. in time for the big net exporting regions in the whole of the uk. it regions in the whole of the uk. it was in an orthodox start to the speech but soon we are into it more unusual territory when presenting his ten—point plan to support business is going green or mr johnson compared himself to moses. he also quoted lenin and then made this pledge for electric cars. mar; this pledge for electric cars. may not verbal likes _ this pledge for electric cars. 1— not verbal likes does not have that room room that you love but they so much torque that they move off the line faster than a ferrari. ibis much torque that they move off the line faster than a ferrari.— line faster than a ferrari. as the dail mail line faster than a ferrari. as the daily mail noted _ line faster than a ferrari. as the daily mail noted mr _ line faster than a ferrari. as the daily mail noted mrjohnson i daily mail noted mrjohnson attempted an impression of a perpetual engine...
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with safer streets, with local schools with fantastic broadband. but with local schools with fantastic broadband-— with local schools with fantastic broadband. �* ., , broadband. but at this point the prime minister _ broadband. but at this point the prime minister losses _ broadband. but at this point the prime minister losses place i broadband. but at this point the prime minister losses place and| broadband. but at this point the i prime minister losses place and for 21 long sec. he couldn't find it again. 21 long sec. he couldn't find it aaain. forgive me. forgive me. no doubt in his relieved — forgive me. forgive me. no doubt in his relieved mr _ forgive me. forgive me. no doubt in his relieved mrjohnson _ forgive me. forgive me. no doubt in his relieved mrjohnson then - his relieved mrjohnson then returned to the script. before he was finished he wanted to talk about a family day out. yesterday i went as we all must to a big world. if you been to peppa
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big world, hands given peppa big world. not many hands. the prime minister went on two pepper big world is very much my kind of place. it went on two pepper big world is very much my kind of place.— much my kind of place. it has very say streets- _ much my kind of place. it has very say streets. discipline _ much my kind of place. it has very say streets. discipline in _ say streets. discipline in schools... heavy emphasis on new mass transit systems, i noticed. the ft was paying _ mass transit systems, i noticed. the ft was paying close attention in a fact checker to share with you jim rights... and whilejim was clearing that up, you may have noticed the sign behind mrjohnson. seize the moment it said. and peppa pig world certainly did. it put out a statement... here is the prime minister
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on the day out in question. and once the speech was over, one reporter decided to ask what a lot of people were thinking. in your speeches is a knows, you lost your place you our furniture and about the preferred. 115 and about the preferred. is everything 0k? and about the preferred. is everything ok? i think that people -ot everything ok? i think that people got the _ everything ok? i think that people got the vast majority of the points i want _ got the vast majority of the points i want to— got the vast majority of the points i want to make and i thought it went well. is everything 0k he was as? not least the colleagues in street told the bbc... lauren cooper tweeted. .. lauren cooper tweeted... ? lauren coopertweeted... ? goons berg. the opposition labour party said...
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business leaders will have to consider what they are in the speech. when chief executive told the guardian it was interesting that he asked a group of business leaders in the northeast if you travelled six hours... interesting as one—word as we been hearing, others are being used to. same as it may in a few minutes were going to take a detailed look at chili's election. there is a far right candidate, he is the front runner, he sent a final—round against the left—wing candidate will take you through all the policies and whether they fit into south american politics. the abandons capture of kabul in august as shock waves around her region. we have been given rare access to this
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massive military drill involving russian and troops. courage it stan is making sure it's ready for life with its new neighbour. but russia and it central asian allies don't see taliban fighters as the main threat here. this exercise are happening here in tajikistan just 20 km from the border with afghanistan. they are structured around coming from neighbouring country. this exercise are aiming to show that everyone in the wider region is watching developments in afghanistan very closely. all border crossings have been closed since mid september. while they deter smugglers and potential militants they also have made it hard for afghan refugees to flee. we meet one woman who has made it through. she
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is an ethnic minority who have been targeted in afghanistan for decades. translation: life became unbearable this and they are doing terrible things torturing people and forcing unmarried girls to marry against their will. unmarried girls to marry against theirwill. her life unmarried girls to marry against their will. her life in tajikistan is still hard. there are no refugee camps there. she has been left to fend for herself. despite tajikistan is initial promise to look after refugees claiming asylum here is difficult. after this interview the authorities boarded the woman we spoke to. she is now back in afghanistan and a you managed account where she faces the threat of persecution by the taliban. this is outside source live
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from the bbc newsroom. 0ur lead story. police in wisconsin say they will charge the man who drove a car into a caresses parade with intentional homicide. the big victory in regional elections. president madero sparty 120 of the 23 say governorships are up 120 of the 23 say governorships are up for grabs. 120 of the 23 say governorships are upfor grabs. he 120 of the 23 say governorships are up for grabs. he called ita it a good harvest. the opposition meanwhile only 13. the reason this matters is that many years the opposition parties actuallyjust part years the opposition parties actually just part and years the opposition parties actuallyjust part and venezuela selections. they previously claimed the entire process was wrecked against them. katie watson is in venezuela for us. she is not in the capital but she is in the west of the country. thank you forjoining us. tell us more about the part of venezuela you're in ny we need to pay attention to regional
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elections. to pay attention to regional elections-— to pay attention to regional elections. ~ ., ., , ., elections. we are in the oil capital of venezuela _ elections. we are in the oil capital of venezuela or _ elections. we are in the oil capital of venezuela or formally. - elections. we are in the oil capital of venezuela or formally. we - elections. we are in the oil capital| of venezuela or formally. we want elections. we are in the oil capital. of venezuela or formally. we want to consider were different and see what what was beyond caracas. it's devastating here in terms of the poverty. just to remind you there is three and four people live in extreme poverty. here it feels like it's been destroyed really. what was a wealthy oil industry is now no longer. we've been speaking to people here who are very angry with politicians on other side. i think that's what's important about these elections is that yes, it was a comeback for the opposition for the people here certainly want change. but they are just as fed up with whether it's governments they want to see go or don't have any alternative in terms of opposition because they feel the opposition is been so divided. that's what we seen in these elections. the opposition
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couldn't get to gather and come up with a unified response. so the overall view is they don't want madero and power but what they want to do differently is dependent on who you speak to in the weak point of the opposition when we see this boat. ~ . , . of the opposition when we see this boat. ~ ., , ., ., boat. what is the attitude of the most powerful _ boat. what is the attitude of the most powerful countries - boat. what is the attitude of the most powerful countries in - boat. what is the attitude of the most powerful countries in the l most powerful countries in the region? there was a point to l it back with some countries such as in south america but north america where not recognising madero as the leader of the country. i where not recognising madero as the leader of the country.— leader of the country. i think nearly three _ leader of the country. i think nearly three years _ leader of the country. i think nearly three years ago - leader of the country. i think nearly three years ago we i leader of the country. i think. nearly three years ago we had leader of the country. i think - nearly three years ago we had the leader of the national assembly who declared himself interim president. people thought that was a massive change for venezuela. as political change for venezuela. as political change at the top end country after country decided to back him as leader. what's been so fascinating coming here over the last few years and saying that he is still in the presidential palace. one why does popularity has waned and is gotten less support than he did. again
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speaking to people in venezuela there is a realfeeling speaking to people in venezuela there is a real feeling that politicians have almost abandoned people. it still hard to find food, work, hard to access money and decent health care and education. these are daily challenges for the venezuelans. and many people have given up on politics altogether. which is why was as a joke mode turn out with just over 48%. and which is why was as a joke mode turn out with just over 4896.— out with 'ust over 4896. and at 40% fi . ure out with just over 4896. and at 4096 figure would _ out with just over 4896. and at 4096 figure would appear _ out with just over 4896. and at 4096 figure would appear to _ out with just over 4896. and at 4096 figure would appear to be _ out with just over 4896. and at 4096 figure would appear to be low- out with just over 4896. and at 4096 figure would appear to be low but l out with just over 4896. and at 4096 figure would appear to be low but i | figure would appear to below but i wonder if regional elections have lower turnouts the national elections anyway or is that is low as it seems?— elections anyway or is that is low as it seems? ., j , as it seems? overall they've been... we seen a — as it seems? overall they've been... we seen a trend _ as it seems? overall they've been... we seen a trend much _ as it seems? overall they've been... we seen a trend much lower. - as it seems? overall they've been... we seen a trend much lower. it - as it seems? overall they've been... we seen a trend much lower. it did l we seen a trend much lower. it did not back in 2018 with the presidential elections and it was mr maduro and the opposition candidate and there was a real feeling that it was effectively the government. it was effectively the government. it was effectively the government. it was effectively mr maduro running
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and winning. it was an election that nobody recognises up i think people here feel they have given up, there is no path forward. that's what so difficult is where it is the opposition go? this is interesting, it because the map now is for what's can happen in the next three years? 2024 other presidential elections. the fact that the opposition have got three governorships, what can they do their to turn the tables when it comes to politics? certainly the government is in a strong position and the opposition is to work out its strategy beyond these elections. . ~ you forjoining us live from venezuela. a private investigator has been describing the lengths he says he went to around 15 years ago to get information about prince harry and his then girlfriend. speaking for the first time gavin burrows has told the bbc that he targeted her voicemails for
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a newspaper. prince harry is part of a newspaper. prince harry is part of a newspaper. prince harry is part of a news group and ongoing legal action against the news of the world and the sun that could culminate in and the sun that could culminate in a trial. the private investigator is a trial. the private investigator is a witness in the legal case. his claims have yet to be heard in court and are strongly disputed by the publisher of both papers. newsgroup. newspapers have previously accepted that some unlawful activity did occur at the news of the world but denies wrongdoing at the sun. here is the bbc�*s media editor was his report contains a flash photography. what's referred to as the invisible contact behind closed doors, between the institution and the tabloids. the duke of sussex regularly speaks out about what he sees as the ills of modern media. his difficult relationship with the press goes back to his youth and the culture of the tabloids in the mid to thousands when subjects of interest to them and included his then girlfriend chelsea davey. this private
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investigator is a witness in legal cases against the news of the world and the sun brought by prince harry and the sun brought by prince harry and others which claim harry became and others which claim harry became a victim of media intrusion from his teens. the duke is also taking legal action against mirror group newspapers. karen barro says he targeted davey for the news of the world. . , . targeted davey for the news of the world. ., , ., ., ., targeted davey for the news of the world. .,, ., ., ., ., . ., world. there was a lot of voice mail hacking going _ world. there was a lot of voice mail hacking going on — world. there was a lot of voice mail hacking going on for— world. there was a lot of voice mail hacking going on for the _ world. there was a lot of voice mail hacking going on for the vallarta . hacking going on for the vallarta surveillance went on on her phone, on her columns. chelsea would brag to her friends when she was going to see him. find to her friends when she was going to see him. �* ,., to her friends when she was going to see him. �* , see him. and so her life became an ob'ect of see him. and so her life became an object of obsession _ see him. and so her life became an object of obsession for _ see him. and so her life became an object of obsession for you - see him. and so her life became an object of obsession for you guys - see him. and so her life became an object of obsession for you guys as| object of obsession for you guys as well? , ~ . ., object of obsession for you guys as well? , ~ , ., object of obsession for you guys as well? , ~ well? yes. medical records, had she had an abortion, _ well? yes. medical records, had she had an abortion, sexual— well? yes. medical records, had she had an abortion, sexual diseases, i had an abortion, sexual diseases, ex—boyfriends. basically it was part of a group of people that robbed him of a group of people that robbed him of his normal teenage years. the la er of his normal teenage years. the lawyer representing the group of litigants which includes prince harriet says that while most victims of hacking have settled some have
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not. ., . ., ., , ., ., of hacking have settled some have not. ., ., , ., ., ., not. certain claimants want to have their day in — not. certain claimants want to have their day in court. _ not. certain claimants want to have their day in court. and _ not. certain claimants want to have their day in court. and to _ not. certain claimants want to have their day in court. and to see - not. certain claimants want to have their day in court. and to see there j their day in court. and to see there be a their day in court. and to see there he a trial_ their day in court. and to see there he a trial so— their day in court. and to see there be a trial so that the newspapers are held — be a trial so that the newspapers are held to— be a trial so that the newspapers are held to account for what they did. ~ ., , are held to account for what they did. meghan marcos privacy case auainst did. meghan marcos privacy case against the _ did. meghan marcos privacy case against the mail— did. meghan marcos privacy case against the mail on _ did. meghan marcos privacy case against the mail on sunday - did. meghan marcos privacy case against the mail on sunday has l did. meghan marcos privacy case - against the mail on sunday has made headlines was of her husbands ongoing legal battle could be an even bigger moment. how big a moment in british public life do you think it could be of prince harry gets his day in court as he seems to want? i think will be massive. it's very striking — think will be massive. it's very striking that he keeps going. all the other— striking that he keeps going. all the other people up until now have settled. _ the other people up until now have settled. a — the other people up until now have settled, a financial settlement with no admission of guilt on either side _ no admission of guilt on either side. ., ., , .,, no admission of guilt on either side. ., ., , ., side. over a thousand people have settled over— side. over a thousand people have settled over a _ side. over a thousand people have settled over a thousand _ side. over a thousand people have settled over a thousand people - side. over a thousand people havej settled over a thousand people are settled over a thousand people are settled and there are few hazards for the prince harry is one of those with he does not want to beat 1001. with he does not want to beat1001. prince harry says he wants reform of the media. this ongoing case which could culminate in a trial shows he intends to use the law as one tool to achieve his ends. just before we go to return to our lead story for
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the police in wisconsin say a driver who drove into a crowd at a christmas parade on sunday killing five people will be charged with intentional homicide. in a press conference police that they've now ruled out the incidents as terrorism and believe the driver was acting alone. this is the police chief speaking a short while ago. i just speaking a short while ago. i 'ust received information i speaking a short while ago. i 'ust received information that i speaking a short while ago. inst received information that to of the 48 children in critical condition. we have information that the suspect prior to the incident was involved in a domestic disturbance which was just minutes prior. in the suspect left that scene just prior to our arrival to that domestic disturbance.— arrival to that domestic disturbance. , ., disturbance. there is more information _ disturbance. there is more information on _ disturbance. there is more information on the - disturbance. there is more - information on the circumstances in which that car drove into the christmas parade online through bbc news either by browser or if you don't have the bbc news app on your smartphone which of a type of smartphone which of a type of smartphone you use you can download
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it very easily. just search for bbc news and the rest will follow. thanks very much for watching. see you soon. good evening. monday turned into a cold but bright day for many of us. i can promise plenty more cold weather this week but tuesday may not be quite such a bright affair because on the earlier satellite picture you can see this big bank of cloud working down from the north. that cloud will become more extensive as we head through tonight. where cloud does become widespread across scotland, northern ireland and parts of northern england it will hold the temperatures up so not as cold as it was last night for many spots here. the lowest temperatures to be found further south through the midlands and parts of wales in southern england where the skies remain clear and we will see values to around minus two celsius. but some fog patches are likely through parts of wales and into the midlands, some of that fog quite slow
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to clear during tomorrow. generally speaking, it southern areas, parts of the midlands, wales, southern england and will see the best of the sunshine through the day. although some showers will still graze into parts of essex, kent and the channel islands. further north more in the way of cloud with the odd spot of light rain or drizzle here and there. temperatures, will if anything, just a notch up from where they have been today, up to nine or ten degrees. into wednesday we see a band of rain starting to push its way southwards and eastward. this band of rain is associated with a cold front. so behind it the air will be turning colder. brightening up through the afternoon for scotland and northern ireland but with a strengthening wind, some showers and in increasingly cold feel. as we move out of wednesday and into thursday the cold front continues to journey southeastward. behind it, follow the white lines, the isobars all the way up to the north, all the way up to the arctic. that is where the air will be coming from during thursday. so a very chilly feeling day, a frosty start is likely. but we should see brighter skies returning with lots of sunshine.
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scattered showers around coastal fringes which could be wintry over high ground. showers could well turn wintry to low levels for a time in northern scotland. afternoon highs just five to eight, maybe nine degrees at best. and then for friday it stays cold but it also turns much more unsettled as this deep area of low pressure dives down from the north. that will bring increasingly strong winds, particularly up towards the north and west of the uk. we will see showers or longer spells say rain, there is the potential for some sleet and snow to mix in with the showers. particularly over high ground in the west and it is going to feel very cold indeed.
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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 8pm: mps prepare to vote on the prime minister's plans to overhaul social care in england. borisjohnson insists his proposals will end a long—standing social injustice. labour calls it daylight robbery. police name the suspect in the wisconsin attack as 39—year—old darrell edward brooksjunior. five people were killed and 48 others injured, including two children, when a car ploughed into a christmas parade. we are confident he acted alone. there is no evidence that this is a terrorist incident. bulb, the gas and electricity provider, goes into administration, affecting almost 2 million customers in the uk. a bbc investigation discovers that the deaths of two women,

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