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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 23, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. hello, i'm victoria derbyshire. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. conservative mps back social care reforms in england, despite 19 voting against their own government. critics warn poorer households may end up losing out. one former health secretary says the plans aren't ideal — but they will make a difference. it's a step in the right direction. it will make it easier for many people to keep their homes. 46 people, including 12 children, have died after a bus crashed and caught fire in western bulgaria. the international red cross claims sanctions against the taliban are causing extreme hardship for ordinary afghans. a service will be held this morning in london's westminster cathedral to remember the british mp
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sir david amess — who was stabbed to death last month. the home office is to tell british councils to find accommodation for some of the unaccompanied children who crossed the english channel. hello, and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. a controversial change to the way people pay for social care in england has been narrowly backed by members of parliament, despite warnings that poorer households could end up paying disportionately more. the prime minister has insisted the new cap would still be "incredibly generous", but a number of his own mps still voted against the plans. our political correspondent helen catt reports. the cost of paying
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for care can be high. for some families it can wipe out nearly everything they've saved for. the government says its plan will stop that, but critics say not for everyone. it won the vote last night, but the result was tight. the ayes to the right, 272. the noes to the left, 246. so the ayes have it, the ayes have it. under the plan, if someone has a house worth £120,000, they'll still have to pay £86,000 themselves, even though they qualify for some council help. and they will be left with just over a quarter of the value of their home. if an individual has a house worth £500,000, they will have to pay £86,000, but will keep over 80% of the value of their house to pass on. let me remove all doubt on this issue. no one will lose from these reforms compared to the system we have now. and the overwhelming majority will win.
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labour argued the plan didn't live up to the government's promises. why has the government moved away from the position ofjust a few months ago, that it published ahead of a vote on increasing national insurance, a move to a policy now which disproportionately benefits those with greater assets, which surely cannot be fair? some tories were not happy either. there is real cause on these benches about the distribution of the relative losses, and the worry that those less well off are going to be hit hardest from the government's amendment tonight. 19 conservatives voted against the government. many more tories chose not to vote. that is despite ministers arguing the case strongly with their colleagues. it seems for some it's an argument they have yet to win. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. former health secretary and current chair of the health and social care select committee, jeremy hunt says the reforms are not ideal, but are still a step forward
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for poorerfamilies. it is a big disappointment that they've changed the way the cap is calculated, but it is nonetheless a step forward. it's a step forward for poorerfamilies, because at the moment your savings have to go down to £23,000 before you get any help with your care home costs if you've got dementia or something like that. under this change, you'll get help when they get down to £100,000 or less. so, it will be significant extra help, but i can't pretend it's not as much as we hoped for, and so that's why in the end i couldn't support it. 0ur chief political correspondent adam fleming told me more about the reaction to the proposals getting through. i think they will be relieved it got through but we're really looking at what's going to happen when this goes to the house of lords. all these arguments will be had again and there is the assumption in westminster that the peers are going to got this legislation and change it significantly.
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if you look at what mps were saying in parliament last night, i think if this vote was held again and this was the decisive moment of the last point in the legislation, then i think probably it would not have gone through, such other concerns amongst backbenchers. there's even people who voted in favour of the legislation last night who did with real misgivings. relief in the short term that it got through last night but seeing real problems ahead. it's hard to grasp what these reforms are. i've certainly found it hard and was asking people, what is the simplest way to describe the change? is it a fact that if you've got a house worth less, you will end up losing disproportionately more? the government is also struggling with this too, partly because it's a complicated set of reforms and everyone focuses on the cap but there's also changes
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to the levels of the means test at which you get support from the government. there are also some technical things in there like the level at which the government assesses what percentage of your costs of your care home are actually daily living costs that you're paying towards the accommodation rather than your care, stuff about that. then there's stuff about if you're getting means tested help, how much help you actually get from the state and how many of your own assets you then contribute too. the government would like us to look at that in the round. the message the government would like us to take is everyone would be better off under these proposals than under the current system. the problem is, not everyone will be better off under these proposals compared to the ideal version that was proposed by sir andrew dilnot, who first introduced the concept of the cap more than a decade ago. that's why this is such a communications challenge for the government, such
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an understanding challenge for you and me and why there are so many sources of controversy amongst backbenchers. on your question about who loses out, yes, the government's own graphs show that there is a group of people who have assets of between £50,000 and £150,000 who will be less well off under these new proposals than they would have been under the initial proposals for a cap that were put forward a few years ago and which we all thought was what was being introduced by the government a couple of months ago, and it turns out that is not what they're doing. i'm sorry it's such a complicated answer but this is what's going to be thrashed out. it's worth remembering, this cap doesn't come into force until october 2023 and it doesn't take into account care costs you've spent already. people will only start progressing towards the cap from october in two years' time.
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it will take people a couple of years to even reach the cap, so we won't really be able to judge what is actually going on until 2025, 2026. a bus crashed and caught fire on a motorway in western bulgaria overnight, killing at least 46 people, 12 of them children. it's not clear whether the fire started before — or after — the vehicle left the road. medical staff have told local reporters that survivors had to jump out of the windows to escape from the fire. the bus appears to have been returning to the north macedonian capital, skopje, from a holiday trip to neighbouring turkey when the accident happened near a village south of sofia. 0ur central europe correspondent nick thorpe told us the latest. well, different information, for example the emergency services in bulgaria and the local mayor of a village near the motorway. so, our understanding at this stage is the bus for unknown reasons veered off the road,
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hit the crash barrier, the local mayor said some 50 yards or so of the crash barrier was torn away and seems to have bounced back towards the middle of the motorway, where it burst into flames. the images are really shocking of that completely burnt out bus, very little chance for people on board to survive. we understand that seven passengers did manage to escape from that blazing inferno and they are being cared for in a hospital in nearby sofia. a senior red cross official says policies designed to withhold international funds from the taliban are depriving ordinary afghan people of the means of survival. speaking 100 days after the taliban swept to power across the country, dominik stillhart urged international donors to find creative ways to send funds to the country to stave off severe malnutrition. the bbc�*s yalda hakim is in kabul.
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at the food distribution centre in south—east kabul, the hungry wait. this is a nation on the brink of starvation. and for aid agencies, it's a race against time. emotions begin to run high. nafisa has arrived with her disabled son, pleading for help. the world food programme says they're doing everything they can, but it's not enough. nafisa tells me she's desperate.
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the taliban says the world needs to act. the international community has a hand in that, because they have imposed sanctions and other steps, which has led to a humanitarian crisis in afghanistan. i think there are many in the international community and other countries who are speaking about human rights and educating of human rights, they have such claims. they should reconsider, not take steps which lead to a humanitarian crisis in afghanistan.
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and these are the faces of the crisis. we've just come to the indira gandhi children's hospital, where there are many cases of children suffering from acute malnutrition. gulnara is three, so weak she can barely open her eyes. marwa is nearly one. it's notjust patients suffering. health care staff haven't been paid for months. every single person i'm speaking to has the same story. they can't pay for their ticket
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to come here, they can't pay for theirfood here. and she was just saying that someday they may have to admit her here as a malnutrition patient herself, because she doesn't know where she's going to get her next meal from. even before the taliban came to power, there was a humanitarian crisis in this country. drought, aid cuts and the economic collapse have turned crisis into catastrophe. yalda hakim, bbc news, kabul. european ministers are meeting in brussels to discuss coordinating their response to the increasing number of covid cases on the continent. governments have reintroduced restrictions and urged more people to get vaccinated, sparking protests. austria is the first eu country to re—introduce a nationwide lockdown. 0ur correspondent bethany bell has this report from vienna. vienna is cold and quiet.
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austria is back in lockdown after record numbers of new coronavirus infections. nonessential shops and restaurants are closed. the city's famous christmas markets were open last week. but now they're all boarded up. the government says the restrictions will last forjust under three weeks. after that, vaccinated austrians will be allowed to go out again, but the lockdown for the unvaccinated will continue. and there are even tougher measures to come. austria has announced plans to make covid jabs compulsory by february. austria's leader alexander schallenberg told us the move was necessary because of the country's low vaccination rate. simply, we have 66% of the population so far which has got the vaccine. this is too little, too late. and we have a political force
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in this country, the freedom party, which is openly running against vaccination, and saying, "this is bad for you, don't take it." so we have a very peculiar situation in austria. but it's controversial. sylvia, who suffers from allergies, is unvaccinated. she says getting the shots should be a personal choice. you read every day, you are guilty that we have lockdown, you are guilty that people are dying, you are guilty, guilty, guilty. i'm here since two years now, i have less contact, nothing. just go to work, see my family and be here in the garden. i'm not guilty of anything. but other austrians are queueing up for covid shots. the city of vienna has even started vaccinating young children, the first place in europe to do so.
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with the introduction of these new policies, austria knows europe and the world will be watching. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna. the headlines on bbc news. conservative mps back social care reforms in england, despite 19 voting against their own government. critics warn poorer households may end up losing out. 46 people, including 12 children, have died after a bus crashed and caught fire in western bulgaria. the home office is to tell british councils to find accommodation for some of the unaccompanied children who crossed the english channel. a funeral mass for the murdered mp sir david amess begins at westminster cathedral shortly. family members and politicians will pay tribute to sir david, who was stabbed to death at a constituency surgery in essex last month. yesterday, hundreds of people turned out as a memorial service
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was held in southend. frankie mccamley reports. a committed christian whose faith was immensely important. today, the funeral for sir david amess will reflect that, taking place at the roman catholic westminster cathedral, where hundreds of politicians willjoin sir david's family to pay their respects to the mp who loyally served his constituents for nearly four decades. a message from pope francis will be read out too. it follows a private memorial in southend yesterday for the mp, his body carried into st mary's church by firefighters from the local fire service. many of his friends, family and closest colleagues came to say their goodbyes. there's been flowers and letters and the books of condolences and services and gatherings, you know, since his tragic and untimely death, and it is in those moments
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when you stop to consider the manner of his death, that it really brings a lump to your throat and helps you understand why this is so painful for anybody, but particularly his family. applause followed on the streets outside, as the father of five's coffin passed the civic centre and ivy hall, where many met the mp at his constituency office. ijust wanted to pay my respects to such a wonderful, wonderful, wonderful man. i mean, we lived on the end of the road where the ivy hall was, and i had a flipping great liberal democrat board whenever there was canvassing, and he'd still come in for a coffee, because that's the kind of guy that he was. i wanted to pay my respects because i feel quite emotional and very sad, you know. i am still involved with the conservative party a lot. it's just we are all going to miss him. a feeling reflected in both yesterday and today's ceremonies, that aren't focusing on the brutal way sir david lost his life,
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but on the kind, committed way in which he lived it. frankie macaulay, bbc news. and let'sjoin frankie, who's at westminster cathedral. good morning. so far this morning we've seen some very high profile mps are rising. the prime minister borisjohnson has arrived a bit earlier we saw the labour leader sir keir starmer. we've seen the chancellor of the exchequer rishi sunak as well as previous prime ministers including david cameron and theresa may. many still arriving, we are waiting for the last few guests. we are expecting around 800 people this morning. just behind me, you can see the doormen and women from westminster cathedral, they are performing a guard of honour as sir david's
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coffin arrives. this service will last 90 minutes, it's going to be very emotional, notjust the politicians who worked with sir david but the community and his family who were at the very heart of this. we'll hear a written message from pope francis and a eulogy from sir david's close friend, former tory mp ann widdecombe. many people have arrived and there's a high police presence. lots of roads have been closed as there is high security and there are lots of police he had too. following on from this service at midday, many of sir david's close friends and family are going to leave the service and go to a private burial where the mp will be laid to rest.— a vigil has been held in the us state of wisconsin for the five people who were killed after a man drove his car into a christmas parade.
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waukesha police said the suspect will appear in court later today — but officers say the incident was not an act of terrorism. 0ur north america correspondent, barbara plett usher reports. how could something so horrifying have happened in this city? this was a moment to share such unanswerable questions, so many people had them. to come together in grief, but the community is still in shock. she told me that she had just witnessed someone get run over and i asked is the person 0k? then she just broke down and i turned around and came to get her because it was so scary. i knew she was going to need someone so we had lots of hugs last night. we were feet from getting hit and i watched a little boy go down right in front of me and people fly off the hood of the car. it's images i will never forget.
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this little girl narrowly escaped with her life. she had no idea what was hurtling towards her. and here is the moment when the joy and festivity of the christmas parade turned to horror and tragedy. a vehicle travelling at full speed struck members of a marching band. the driver continued forward, hitting and running over others in his path. people, families and children ran for their lives. 0thers tried to save those trampled on the pavement. it wasjust carnage. i am liking it to a war zone. there were adults, children, that were injured. some of our first responders were there with their families. they left their families to treat people, helped with instant command, helped transport. the suspect is a local man, darryl brooks, he posted this video on his youtube video, including what looks like the red vehicle used in the hit and run.
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court documents show he has a lengthy criminal record. police said he had fled a domestic disturbance, that he had acted alone and intentionally. they have drawn up homicide charges against him. at the scene of the crime the police cordon has come down and the road has reopened, but nothing feels back to normal and it won't for a very long time. barbara plett—usher, bbc news, waukesha, wisconsin. ministers are to tell councils across the uk that they must take some of the unaccompanied children who have been crossing the english channel in small boats. more than a hundred migrant children are currently living in hotels because a voluntary scheme hasn't provided enough accommodation. local government sources say there are concerns about the funding councils will receive. nick forbes is chair of the local government association's asylum, refugee and migration task force. he is also a labour politician who serves as the leader of newcastle city council. the vast majority of councils have
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stepped forward to offer these children a fresh start in life. there is a small handful of councils, somewhere in the region of 15—30 out of the whole country who haven't taken any yet. i'm very disappointed by that. i can fully understand why the government would want to act to make sure that every local authority takes their fair share. but we also need to make sure that the government works with us to fix the problems in the chaotic asylum system, which is causing some councils reluctance in stepping forwards. issues like the national shortage of social workers, the national shortage of foster care placements, and of course the resources to be able to support children who need to be looked after, notjust in the short term but in the long term if they become long—term responsibilities. authorities like mine in newcastle have really been putting our shoulder to the wheel
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and taking more than ourfair share of such children, because we think it's the right and moral thing to do. i hope that those councils who haven't yet taken any unaccompanied children will come forward and do so we can solve this national crisis. we are only talking about 100 children. i appreciate the shortage of social workers and foster placements, of course, but can it be that difficult? well, we agreed as part of the voluntary scheme in newcastle that we would take six of that 100. in fact, we've taken 16. the reason we were able to do that was because we run a specific campaign to recruit more foster carers, specifically who wanted to look after unaccompanied asylum seeking children. there is no reason why other councils couldn't do that too. that's on top of the number of children that we have who came to the city presenting as adults, who actually when they were assessed turned out to be children,
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or the children who in newcastle dropped off from the back of lorries in some cases. and of course the unaccompanied children crossing the channel that are in kent to be dispersed is a very small amount of the number of children in the asylum and refugee system overall. all of whom need assessment, all of whom need long—term care, all of whom need long—term support. and we have a real challenge around making sure the system is fit for purpose for the future. our offer to government as a group of councils speaking up for these children is to say, work with us to design a better system, one which is fairer, properly resourced and which gives these kids the best chance of a fresh start in life. what money does central government give to a council like yours, for example, in order to look after some of these children? we get an amount of money which covers the cost of foster care plus some additional support.
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one of the challenges and one of the reasons why some councils i think aren't coming forward is because if a child is required to be looked after and categorised as a looked after, then it's actually the council's responsibility to look after them until the age of 25, and the funding at the moment runs out when the child is 21. there are four years of that child's adult life that the council is responsible forfor which there is no national funding, and that's one of the bits of the jigsaw that we need to put in place in order to make sure that councils aren't financially at risk. we are doing that because we think it's the right thing to do and there's no reason why other councils shouldn't step forward in the short term and make sure these kids have a decent home rather than being stuck in hotel accommodation, while we work a rare manuscript showing calculations made by albert einstein, as he tried to formulate his general theory of relativity, is now on sale in paris.
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the sa page document is brimming with equations. it's being auctioned for an estimated price of more than three million dollars. it's one of only two documents showing einstein's workings on one of the seminal breakthroughs in modern physics. translation: what i find translation: what | find particularly _ translation: what i find particularly touching - translation: what i find particularly touching when j translation: what | find - particularly touching when reading it is we have this sort of monolithic and infallible image of einstein as an absolute genius, who from the first calculation finds the right equation. but this manuscript shows einstein was intelligent but he was a scientist and just like any other, he goes through phases of doubt. einstein makes errors in this manuscript, and i think that makes it even greater, because we see the persistence. the headlines on bbc news... conservative mps back social care reforms in england, despite 19 voting against their own government. critics warn poorer households may end up losing out. one former health secretary says the plans aren't ideal but they will make a difference. it's a step in the right direction. it will make it easier for many
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people to keep their homes. 46 people, including 12 children, have died after a bus crashed and caught fire in western bulgaria. the international red cross claims sanctions against the taliban are causing extreme hardship for ordinary afghans. a service is due to begin in london's westminster cathedral to remember the british mp sir david amess — who was stabbed to death last month. the home office is to tell british councils to find accommodation for some of the unaccompanied children who crossed the english channel. a funeral mass for the murdered mp, sir david amess, is underway at sir david amess, is under way at westminster cathedral this morning. family members and politicians will pay tribute to sir david, who was stabbed to death at a constituency surgery in essex last month. former conservative mp, ann widdecombe will read a eulogy to sir david. she spoke to us ahead of the service. all of us are feeling very,
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very sad but on the other hand we are also celebrating today, we are celebrating a life. and i feel very strongly that we must remember david not for how he died, but for how we lived and for but for how he lived and for the causes that he fought for. how important is the service today? this is the full requiem mass, this is david's funeral today. so this is very, very important, not only because a lot of important people are here, the papal nuncio is here, the pope has sent a message, other senior politicians will be here, it isn'tjust because of that, it is because this is an opportunity to pay our respects for everything that david did and of course to commend his soul unto almighty god. you mentioned a message from the pope. how did you feel when you heard he had spoken to him? i thought it was wonderful. david led the all parliamentary group for the holy see, which is the vatican.
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he led that group, therefore he occasionally met the pope and it was just wonderful to know, bearing in mind david wasn't a member of the government, he wasn't a senior minister, but to the pope he was probably one of the most important people in britain. more now on the government's controversial change to the way people pay for social care in england. the move was narrowly backed by mps last night, despite warnings that poorer households could end up paying disportionately more. earlier on the programme we heard from baroness ilora finlay who sits in the house of lords but isn't affiliated to any particular party. she wants the government to be clearer with its plan. i think we want to see the detail behind these. we want to see the assessment of all the finances and all the flows and how the money will flow. untilwe all the flows and how the money will flow. until we do that i think the house of lords will have a lot of
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questions to ask. but house of lords will have a lot of questions to ask.— house of lords will have a lot of questions to ask. but if you can't describe it _ questions to ask. but if you can't describe it to _ questions to ask. but if you can't describe it to people, _ questions to ask. but if you can't describe it to people, how - questions to ask. but if you can't describe it to people, how are i describe it to people, how are people who are going to be impacted by this policy going to know what on earth is happening to them? well. earth is happening to them? well, let's be clear. _ earth is happening to them? well, let's be clear, this _ earth is happening to them? well, let's be clear, this is _ earth is happening to them? well, let's be clear, this is being - earth is happening to them? well, let's be clear, this is being put - earth is happening to them? -ii let's be clear, this is being put in the commons and the legislation has to come to the house of lords. the house of lords will do what it does well, which is scrutinise a line by line. we may amend, we may suggest constructive amendments to the government, and we may say to the government, and we may say to the government think again if we are not comfortable with the detail that is in there. but i think there are a lot of questions that we will be asking. so to try to explain it to people out in the population i would suggest that is a little bit early because we still have to debate the detail of this.— detail of this. let's go through a coule of detail of this. let's go through a coume of the — detail of this. let's go through a couple of the points _ detail of this. let's go through a couple of the points and - detail of this. let's go through a couple of the points and i - detail of this. let's go through a couple of the points and i will. detail of this. let's go through a l couple of the points and i will see what you feel about them. by october
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2023, anyone with assets of up to £100,000 will be able to get some form of financial support, means tested financial support from their local authority, towards their care costs. are you happy with that? we have costs. are you happy with that? - have known something has to be done about social care for a very long time and government after government have kicked it into the long grass. so on the positive side i would say at least this is being addressed, but whether this is adequate enough and whether this will be equitable across the country or not, that is something that we have to look at. it is really important. this something that we have to look at. it is really important.— it is really important. this is an improvement— it is really important. this is an improvement on _ it is really important. this is an improvement on the _ it is really important. this is an improvement on the previous l improvement on the previous suggestions because at the moment you can only get financial support from your local authority if you have got assets up to 20 3000, 250 and this has push that to 100,000, so more people will benefit from the means tested support from their
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local authority. £31 means tested support from their local authority.— local authority. of course it is a aood local authority. of course it is a good thing _ local authority. of course it is a good thing if — local authority. of course it is a good thing if more _ local authority. of course it is a good thing if more people - local authority. of course it is a i good thing if more people benefit, but we need to question exactly what is included and exactly what is not included in that financial support. right. what do you think of this part of it. if you have a family home in burnley worth £100,000 compared to a family home in london worth £1 million, both families will spend up to £86,000 on their care. so disproportionately the people with the lower valued house will spend more. with the lower valued house will spend more-— with the lower valued house will spend more. exactly, and that is where there _ spend more. exactly, and that is where there is _ spend more. exactly, and that is where there is a _ spend more. exactly, and that is where there is a really _ spend more. exactly, and that is where there is a really big - spend more. exactly, and that is. where there is a really big problem because if a0 years ago you bought a house down in the south—east or you spent the same amount and bought a house in the north—east, the differential because of inflation in house prices means that gap has widened enormously, so your investment down south will have reaped a great deal more. now, we
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need people to live all over the uk and work all over the uk and i think it is going to be really important that we don't find people retrospectively penalised because they lived in areas where house prices have not gone up. so there is a real problem there. it could be the plot of a hollywood blockbuster — going into space to smash an asteroid off course with earth. but that's what nasa will be testing this week as it sends a machine into orbit that can redirect space rocks, which could protect the planet from any dangerous collisions in the future, as sean dilley reports. asteroids are just one of the long—term threats to the survival of our planet. millions of the rocky masses have been floating around space since the formation of our solar system a.5 billion years ago. but now nasa is preparing to launch a spacecraft from california that will be guided remotely to crash into a pair asteroids called dydimos and dimorphus. neither presents any risk to earth but scientists want to test whether it is possible to change
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the course of the large asteroids even by a tiny fraction. the impacts will not happen until september next year, but when it does, it will deliberately strike at around 15,000 miles an hour. no known asteroid wider than 1a0 metres is expected to hit earth in the next 100 years, but if nasa's experiment is successful, future generations could be protected. sean dilley, bbc news. you may have noticed black friday is almost upon us. what started as a shopping phenomenon in america, taking advantage of the holiday break for thanksgiving but it's now spread to the uk, europe and even further afield. despite the publicity for it, the british independent retailers association says most independent shops in the uk will be boycotting the event. with me is claire leigh, who owns and runs the two—ducks store in woking — an independent lifestyle store. and also i'm joined by andrew goodacre, chief executive of the british independent retailers. (guest 2)
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claire, why don't you like it? that is not claire, why don't you like it? that is rrot how — claire, why don't you like it? that is rrot how i _ claire, why don't you like it? that is not how i would _ claire, why don't you like it? that is not how i would put _ claire, why don't you like it? that is not how i would put it. - claire, why don't you like it? trisgt is not how i would put it. i understand the appeal to buyers, everyone loves a bargain. but people need to understand the impact it has on small businesses who cannot really compete in this arena. once we have paid for our stock and we have packed it in all the costs of running a bricks and mortar store, then additionally this year you have got issues of extra costs with brexit and supply chain issues with covid, then there really is not much wiggle room for discounting at that point. it is a huge risk for small stores to buy in bulk with such an unpredictable event. what stores to buy in bulk with such an unpredictable event.— stores to buy in bulk with such an unpredictable event. what is your messa . e unpredictable event. what is your message to _ unpredictable event. what is your message to consumers _ unpredictable event. what is your message to consumers then? - unpredictable event. what is your message to consumers then? my| message to consumers then? m message to consumers then? m message to consumers then? m1 message to consumers then? m1 message to consumers is message to consumers then? m1: message to consumers is i message to consumers then? m1 message to consumers is i suppose we are supporting holly tucker this year, the founder of not on the high
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street. she has an initiative called colour friday which is about encouraging people to just think about sharing some of their spend with small stores, making at least one or two purchases, if they want to see them continuing.— to see them continuing. andrew goodacre, _ to see them continuing. andrew goodacre, what _ to see them continuing. andrew goodacre, what is _ to see them continuing. andrew goodacre, what is your - to see them continuing. andrew goodacre, what is your take - to see them continuing. andrew goodacre, what is your take on | to see them continuing. andrew - goodacre, what is your take on black friday in terms of your members? our members are saying it is not an event _ members are saying it is not an event that— members are saying it is not an event that works for them. some don't _ event that works for them. some don't like — event that works for them. some don't like it— event that works for them. some don't like it and many of the retailers _ don't like it and many of the retailers never compete on price because — retailers never compete on price because they do not have the volume to do so— because they do not have the volume to do so and — because they do not have the volume to do so and black friday is a volume — to do so and black friday is a volume event. you need to sell a huge _ volume event. you need to sell a huge amount of volume or product in order— huge amount of volume or product in order to _ huge amount of volume or product in order to make the margin so you can make _ order to make the margin so you can make a— order to make the margin so you can make a discount. it does not work for independent retailers as part of their business model and that is what _ their business model and that is what our— their business model and that is what our members are telling us. even _ what our members are telling us. even more — what our members are telling us. even more so this year because of the other— even more so this year because of the other challenges in the sector that claire — the other challenges in the sector that claire alluded to in terms of
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sorority— that claire alluded to in terms of supply chain and inflation coming through. — supply chain and inflation coming through, and certainty on the supply chain— through, and certainty on the supply chain and _ through, and certainty on the supply chain and the need to maximise every bit of— chain and the need to maximise every bit of income — chain and the need to maximise every bit of income this year because of the last— bit of income this year because of the tast18 — bit of income this year because of the last 18 months we have all had. i don't _ the last 18 months we have all had. i don't know— the last 18 months we have all had. i don't know if you saw the research from which today which suggested 90% of black friday deals where the same price or cheaper in the six months before black friday.— price or cheaper in the six months before black friday. yes, and i have not seen the — before black friday. yes, and i have not seen the research _ before black friday. yes, and i have not seen the research but _ before black friday. yes, and i have not seen the research but i - before black friday. yes, and i have not seen the research but i heard i before black friday. yes, and i have not seen the research but i heard it| not seen the research but i heard it reported _ not seen the research but i heard it reported this morning on the way to woric _ reported this morning on the way to woric that — reported this morning on the way to woric that is — reported this morning on the way to work. that is part of the problem. large _ work. that is part of the problem. large retailers who have embraced btack— large retailers who have embraced black friday and turned it from one day of _ black friday and turned it from one day of the — black friday and turned it from one day of the year to this year a whole month— day of the year to this year a whole month of— day of the year to this year a whole month of activity, but the consumer is getting _ month of activity, but the consumer is getting wiser and more cynical about— is getting wiser and more cynical about it — is getting wiser and more cynical about it and they are used to seeing special— about it and they are used to seeing special offers all the way through the year. — special offers all the way through the year, so is lack friday the special— the year, so is lack friday the special event it used to be and i am not convinced it is.— not convinced it is. claire, how important _ not convinced it is. claire, how important is — not convinced it is. claire, how important is christmas - not convinced it is. claire, how important is christmas for - not convinced it is. claire, how important is christmas for you | not convinced it is. claire, how - important is christmas for you and for your livelihood to keep going this year? it
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for your livelihood to keep going this ear? , , ., this year? it is hugely important. it has been _ this year? it is hugely important. it has been a _ this year? it is hugely important. it has been a very _ this year? it is hugely important. it has been a very turbulent - this year? it is hugely important. it has been a very turbulent year| it has been a very turbulent year and black friday pushes a lot of people's spending right back to december, whereas it used to be evenly spread through november, so there is a lot more pressure on the cash flow situation with a small business. there is a lot more pressure on december being a really successful month for us. so black fridayjust pushes people back and it also increases the consumer expectation on discounting. so they are more tempted to wait for a discounted product rather than pay a full price. it has just added extra pressure to us really and we need to make december really important. thank you for talking to us, good luck. clearly and andrew goodacre. ?
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claire lee. ? claire lee. earlier this hour we showed yalda hakim's report on the plight of afghans struggling with what she described as a humanitarian catastrophe. all day we are bring special coverage from afghanistan marking the one hundredth day since the taliban swept to power there. in her earlier report we saw some of yalda's interview with the taliban's spokesman, suhail shaheen. we'll listen now to some more of that interview where yalda asks when it will be that all women and girls will be allowed to freely work and study. we have the policy that women have the right to have access to education and work, so the policy is there. but now coming to implementation in some provinces this policy has been implemented and in some others it is under way to be implemented. so we do not have any problem that women have work. so we do not have any problem
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that women have work. do you regret that girls in this country and women for the last 60 three, 6a, 66 days now have been denied the right to go to school? no, for women they will be promoted. they will not lose one year. all girls will be promoted. kabul collapsed all of a sudden so we had not worked out how about the universities, the female and the male students, so we faced everything all of a sudden. so girls can be hopeful that after the winter break they can return to school? yes. there will be a taliban announcement? yes, i think if you follow it has already been announced by me.
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mrof mr of the provinces, it was announced by him after the winter break the girls can return? hopefully it will happen? the un says this country is heading towards catastrophe, towards starvation, the famine, the hunger, the poverty. what do you think will be the end result? if they are saying this, the country is heading towards catastrophe, starvation, a humanitarian crisis, then it is their responsibility to take action, proper action, to prevent all these tragedies.
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back. have any countries within the international community indicated they are willing to work with the taliban and work with you to deal with a humanitarian crisis as well as recognition, legitimising the government? all countries, including europe, and even the us, they are working with us. so all countries are willing and actually interacting with us. they want to work with us. the only question is they are not recognising us. i think they are putting pressure, but their pressure is negatively impacting the people of afghanistan. you are two children, malnutrition and all these things. it is not our action, it is because of their action. we are ready to talk if there is any issue, through
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understanding, through talks, through convincing each other, we can reach a solution, then why those sanctions? the can reach a solution, then why those sanctions? .,. , can reach a solution, then why those sanctions? .. , ., sanctions? the fact is that the un sa s this sanctions? the fact is that the un says this country _ sanctions? the fact is that the un says this country is _ sanctions? the fact is that the un says this country is heading - sanctions? the fact is that the un l says this country is heading towards catastrophe, toward starvation, the famine, the poverty. what do you think will be the end result? if they are saying the country is heading towards catastrophe, starvation, a humanitarian crisis, thenit starvation, a humanitarian crisis, then it is their responsibility to take action, proper action in order to prevent all these tragedies. and we'll have more on the situation in afghanistan when yalda hakim presents a special one hour programme live from kabul at 1300 gmt marking one hundred days since the taliban came to power. france's prime minister, jean castex, has appealed for calm
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in the country's overseas territory of guadeloupe, after days of unrest sparked by anger at coronavirus restrictions. courtney bembridge reports. quiet on the streets of guadeloupe, after days of violent riots. schools have been closed, shops shuttered and tourists notably absent. but there are many reminders of the anger here in recent days. the school, and after they put fire, and fire all the buildings burned, but after, i don't know how, it crossed over the street and the fire came to my building. so, i lost everything. the protests broke out after the french government announced compulsory vaccinations for health care workers. paris sent in elite police and counterterrorism officers to try to quell the violence.
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translation: it is a small, - violent minority that robs stores, blocks roads, holds motorists for ransom, prevents sick people from accessing vital care, and even sheets at law enforcement. and even shoots at law enforcement. i condemn these acts of violence in the strongest possible terms. the protests have also revealed a deeper discontent over the relationship between france and its overseas territories. vaccination rates in the caribbean, indian ocean and pacific territories have generally been far lower than those on the mainland. in guadeloupe, only a6% of adults have received one dose. courtney bembridge, bbc news. a rapper whose popular song has been banned in mainland china
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says he has no regrets about being blacklisted. name—wee's social media accounts were blocked after the song, which makes fun of beijing and young chinese nationalists on social media, went viral.
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security forces in uganda have arrested at least 100 people following the twin bombings in the heart of the capital kampala a week ago. at least seven suspects were also killed while allegedly resisting arrest. police blamed the attacks on allied democratic forces, a local islamist group which has been based in the eastern democratic republic of congo
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for more than 20 years, and are believed to have ties to the so—called islamic state. in this report, the bbc s patience atuhaire in kampala examines the links between the adf and is. last week's blasts stand what should have been a normal business day into one of tragedy and morning. the situation was planned into chaos as the city was rocked by explosions. translation: some of the people were saying get down, stay down. i was confused, i try to dive under a car, i was all alone, i was bleeding heavily. i was all alone, i was bleeding heavil . , ., , i was all alone, i was bleeding heavil. , ., , ., ,, heavily. the explosions happened within a kilometre _ heavily. the explosions happened within a kilometre of— heavily. the explosions happened within a kilometre of each - heavily. the explosions happened within a kilometre of each other l heavily. the explosions happened i within a kilometre of each other and hit one of the most highly policed parts of kampala. a minute's walk in that direction is the main gate of
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parliament and near here is the city authority headquarters. what is worrying is, if the bombers can attack this close to the heart of government what else are they capable of? please believe the allied democratic forces are behind these attacks. the group was originally formed by ugandans disgruntled with government and was rooted out of its base in the western region by government forces in the early to thousands. it led to the democratic republic of congo. his leader was arrested in 2015 and extradited to uganda and put on trial for terrorism. since around 2017 the adf seems to have been revitalised, displaying a more jihadist character. an ex fighter recently arrived back in uganda who has since received government amnesty and says the group now calls
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itself the mtm and takes instructions from so—called islamic state. instructions from so-called islamic state. ., , , ., ., state. the group is no longer called adf, it is now — state. the group is no longer called adf, it is now mtm _ state. the group is no longer called adf, it is now mtm and _ state. the group is no longer called adf, it is now mtm and has - state. the group is no longer called adf, it is now mtm and has an - adf, it is now mtm and has an allegiance to the eis. there was a time when al—baghdadi was still alive. they have only one leader, won government. all fighters know this, they are ala's fighters, a la's army. this, they are ala's fighters, a his army-— this, they are ala's fighters, a la's army. this young man was lowered under— la's army. this young man was lowered under the _ la's army. this young man was lowered under the guise - la's army. this young man was lowered under the guise of - la's army. this young man was i lowered under the guise of being offered a job in the drc. the government says the group has been recruiting using such tactics especially in poor areas. the ugandan government has built its legacy on bringing peace within its borders and has always claimed that the adf is a spent force. so are the authorities failing to secure the country's capital against terrorism? country's capital against terrorism ? they country's capital against terrorism? they did not cross the barrier, they did not enter cps, they did not enter parliament, they did not enter
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into the building, they did it on the road. because of the nature of terrorism, because they are at risk carrying backpacks like students, of course we cannot please everybody and start undressing and checking everybody. but the security was in place and they could not enter these institutions where they could have caused more damage. the institutions where they could have caused more damage.— institutions where they could have caused more damage. the adf teaming u . caused more damage. the adf teaming u- with caused more damage. the adf teaming up with islamic— caused more damage. the adf teaming up with islamic state _ caused more damage. the adf teaming up with islamic state seems _ caused more damage. the adf teaming up with islamic state seems to - caused more damage. the adf teaming up with islamic state seems to have - up with islamic state seems to have given it a major boost and turned it into a lethal force that does not only threaten uganda, but that some fear may soon spread across eastern africa. amazon and apple have been hit by a 200 million euro fine by the italian antitrust authority. two of the world s largest companies allegedly colluded in anti—competitive behaviour during the sale of apple and beats products. the competition watchdog said the companies had violated eu rules.
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in a statement, the antitrust authority said that the companies "barred official and unofficial resellers of apple and beats products from using amazon, allowing the sale of those products in that marketplace only to amazon and to selected parties in a discriminatory manner. amazon denied wrongdoing and said it would apeal the fines. the cruelty—free cosmetics company lush says it's closing its accounts on some of the most popular social media networks. the company says social media harms society, and it compares the current situation to when "climate change was ignored and belittled for decades." from friday, lush will abandon instagram, facebook, tiktok, and snapchat in all of the a8 countries where it operates. it will continue to update its twitter and youtube pages until it finds "better and safer" ways to communicate with the world. here's some good news from a zoo in germany, which is welcoming polar bear twins!
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they are so divine and tiny. here you can see their proud mother, known as sizzel, taking care of her new babies. german media say she's doing a greatjob. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. for many of us there is a lot more clout around today than yesterday. high pressure is still dominating our weather and it will be windy in the north of scotland, notjust today, but tonight and into tomorrow and then later a weather front arrives bringing rain. we have sunshine in parts of east anglia, the midlands and the south—west. showers clipping kent and the channel islands and we will see breaks in the cloud as we push further north. but in the north it will be cloudy with patchy rain continuing on and off. strong winds as well, especially with exposure. for northern ireland bright spells
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develop, as in parts of northern england, wales and the midlands. but for many it will be cloudy and when we have got that break, it is in east anglia, the south midlands and the south—west. showers continue in the south—west. showers continue in the islands and kent. the temperatures are about 9—11. the average at this time in november is 7-11, average at this time in november is 7—11, so we are almost bang on. this evening and overnight still a lot of cloud pushing southwards. a lot of cloud pushing southwards. a lot of cloud in the far south—east. locally there will be a frost and at the same time the weather front arrives bringing rain into parts of scotland and northern ireland. temperatures between three and 7 degrees. tomorrow the weather front sinks south, taking the rain with it. any patchy fog in the far south—east will be slow to live. there will be brighter breaks here and there. on the other side of the front we will see a return to sunshine and showers
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in scotland and northern ireland, but it will be windy in the far north. thursday we say goodbye to that weather front. we have got northerly winds, clear skies, a fair bit of sunshine, but we could see some showers and the showers on the hills in the north of scotland are likely to be wintry. it will be cooler than on wednesday. friday has an area of low pressure coming our way bringing rain and strong winds. wintry and is especially so on the hills. these are our temperatures. it will feel cold. we are looking to a range of about 6—9 as we head towards the south.
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hi, this is bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. the headlines at 11... conservative mps back social care reforms in england, despite 19 voting against their own government. critics warn poorer households may end up losing out. a6 people, including 12 children, have died after a bus crashed and caught fire in western bulgaria. a service is being held this morning at westminster cathedral to remember sir david amess — the mp who was stabbed to death last month. the international red cross claims sanctions against the taliban are causing extreme hardship for ordinary afghans. and after 2a hours and more than 100 miles, kevin sinfield raises more than £800,000 for motor
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neurone disease. a controversial change to the way people pay for social care in england has been narrowly backed by mps, despite warnings that poorer households could end up paying disportionately more. the prime minister has insisted the new cap would still be "incredibly generous", but a number of his own mps still voted against the plans. our political correspondent helen catt reports. the cost of paying for care can be high. for some families it can wipe out nearly everything they've saved for. the government says its plan will stop that, but critics say not for everyone. it won the vote last night,
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but the result was tight. the ayes to the right, 272. the noes to the left, 2a6. so the ayes have it, the ayes have it. under the plan, if someone has a house worth £120,000, they'll still have to pay £86,000 themselves, even though they qualify for some council help. and they will be left with just over a quarter of the value of their home. if an individual has a house worth £500,000, they will have to pay £86,000, but will keep over 80% of the value of their house to pass on. let me remove all doubt on this issue. no—one will lose from these reforms compared to the system we have now. and the overwhelming majority will win. labour argued the plan didn't live up to the government's promises. why has the government moved away from the position ofjust a few months ago, that it published ahead of a vote on increasing national insurance, and move to a policy now
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which disproportionately benefits those with greater assets, which surely cannot be fair? some tories were not happy either. there is real cause on these benches about the distribution of the relative losses, and the worry that those less well off are going to be hit hardest from the government's amendment tonight. 19 conservatives voted against the government. many more tories chose not to vote. that's despite ministers arguing the case strongly with their colleagues. it seems for some it's an argument they have yet to win. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. former health secretary and current chair of the health and social care select committee, jeremy hunt, says the reforms are not ideal, but are still a step forward for poorerfamilies. it is a big disappointment that they've changed the way the cap is calculated, but it is nonetheless a step forward. it's a step forward for poorerfamilies, because at the moment your savings have to go down to £23,000 before
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you get any help with your care home costs if you've got dementia or something like that. under this change, you'll get help when they get down to £100,000 or less. so, it will be significant extra help, but i can't pretend it's not as much as we hoped for, and so that's why in the end i couldn't support it. and in a little over an hour, we'll be answering your questions on the government's plan for social care. i'm for social care. sure you've got many of them. i have i'm sure you've got many of them. i have as well. do send them in to us on twitter, using the hash tag bbc your questions, or by emailing yourquestions@bbc. co. uk. that's coming up just after 12:30. a bus crashed and caught fire on a motorway in western bulgaria overnight, killing at least a6 people — 12 of them children. it's not clear whether the fire started before — or after — the vehicle left the road. medical staff have told local reporters that survivors had to jump out of the windows to escape
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from the fire. the bus appears to have been returning to the north macedonian capital, skopje, from a holiday trip to neighbouring turkey when the accident happened near a village south of sofia. our central europe correspondent nick thorpe has told us it's still not clear what caused the crash. well, different information, different sources of information, for example the emergency services in bulgaria and the local mayor of a village near the motorway. so, our understanding at this stage is that the bus for unknown reasons veered off the road, hit the crash barrier. the local mayor has said that some 50 yards or so of the crash barrier was torn away and it then seems to have bounced back towards the middle of the motorway, where it burst into flames. the images are really shocking of that completely burnt—out bus, very little chance for people on board to survive. we understand that seven passengers
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did manage to escape from that blazing inferno, and they're being cared for in a hospital in nearby sofia. a funeral mass for the murdered mp, sir david amess, is under way at westminster cathedral. family members and politicians are paying tribute to sir david, who was stabbed to death at a constituency surgery in essex last month. yesterday, hundreds of people turned out as a memorial service was held in southend. let's cross over to frankie mccamley, who's at westminster cathedral. good morning, victoria. inside, there is a very emotional and sad funeral service taking place, led by the archbishop of westminster. in the archbishop of westminster. in the past few minutes, he has read out a message sent from pope francis, paying tribute to sir david amess's family. really paying tribute to them. because of course todayit tribute to them. because of course today it is about them. much of the focus on them, and prayers for the
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mp. and a few moments, we are expecting more prayers from the conservative mp for rotherham, sarah champion, and andrew ros adele, d conservative mp for romford. there is also going to be a eulogy from a very close friend of sir david's family, the former tory mp ann widdecombe, who spoke to us earlier and told us about the grief the family was suffering, and how they have been really supported by the community. yesterday, there was a private memorial service that took place for their local community. at the moment, insight, there are around 800 guests, including sir david's family, mps past and present. we have seen former prime ministers, david cameron, theresa may, taking their seats. and joining them, borisjohnson and the labour leader, keir starmer. we havejust
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over an hour left. at around midday, we are going to see sir david's coffin living here and going to a private burial service where he will be laid to rest.— be laid to rest. thank you very much. ministers have announced that councils across the uk that they must take some of the unaccompanied children who have been crossing the english channel in small boats. more than 100 migrant children are currently living in hotels because a voluntary scheme hasn't provided enough accommodation. local government sources say there are concerns about the funding councils will receive. nick forbes is chair of the local government association's asylum, refugee and migration task force. he's also a labour politician who serves as the leader of newcastle city council. the vast majority of councils have stepped forward to offer these children a fresh start in life. there's a very small handful of councils, somewhere in the region of 15—30 out of the whole country who haven't taken any yet.
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i'm very disappointed by that. i can fully understand why the government would want to act to make sure that every local authority takes their fair share. but we also need to make sure that the government works with us to fix the problems in the chaotic asylum system, which is causing some councils' reluctance in stepping forward. issues like the national shortage of social workers, the national shortage of foster care placements, and of course the resources to be able to support children who need to be looked after, notjust in the short term but in the long term if they become our long—term responsibilities. authorities like mine in newcastle have really been putting our shoulder to the wheel and taking more than ourfair share of such children, because we think it's the right and moral thing to do. i very much hope that those councils who haven't yet taken any unaccompanied children will come forward and do so, so we can solve
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this national crisis. we're only talking about 100 children. i appreciate the shortage of social workers and foster placements, of course, but can it be that difficult? well, we agreed as part of the voluntary scheme in newcastle that we would take six of that 100. in fact, we've taken 16. the reason we were able to do that was because we ran a specific campaign to recruit more foster carers, specifically who wanted to look after unaccompanied asylum seeking children. there's no reason why other councils couldn't do that, too. that's on top of the number of unaccompanied children that we have who came to the city presenting as adults, who actually when they were assessed turned out to be children, or the children who in newcastle dropped off from the back of lorries in some cases. and of course the unaccompanied children crossing the channel that are in kent to be dispersed
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is a very small amount of the number of children in the asylum and refugee system overall. all of whom need assessment, all of whom need long—term care, all of whom need long—term support. and we have a real challenge around making sure the system is fit for purpose for the future. our offer to government as a group of councils speaking up for these children is to say, work with us to design a better system, one which is fairer, properly resourced and which gives these kids the best chance of a fresh start in life. what money does central government give to a council like yours, for example, in order to look after some of these children? we get an amount of money which covers the cost of foster care plus some additional support. one of the challenges and one of the reasons why some councils i think aren't coming forward is because if a child is required to be looked after and categorised as looked after, then it's actually the council's responsibility to look after them until the age of 25,
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and the funding at the moment runs out when the child is 21. so there are four years of that child's adult life that the council is responsible forfor which there is no national funding, and that's one of the bits of the jigsaw that we need to put in place in order to make sure that councils aren't financially at risk. we're doing that because we think it's the right thing to do and there's no reason why other councils shouldn't step forward in the short term to make sure these kids have a decent home rather than being stuck in hotel accommodation. let's try and find out a little bit more about that bus crash in western bulgaria overnight. the a6 holiday—makers have been killed, including 12 children. let's cross to sofia and speak to journalist desislav wyankulov.
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do we have any idea why that bus came off the road? the do we have any idea why that bus came off the road?— do we have any idea why that bus came off the road? the most likely thin that came off the road? the most likely thing that happened _ came off the road? the most likely thing that happened according - came off the road? the most likely thing that happened according to i thing that happened according to them _ thing that happened according to them is — thing that happened according to them is human error. the other thing is that— them is human error. the other thing is that it _ them is human error. the other thing is that it is _ them is human error. the other thing is that it is also a possibility that— is that it is also a possibility that the _ is that it is also a possibility that the bus malfunctioned in the last minute and something happened. those _ last minute and something happened. those are _ last minute and something happened. those are the two versions at the potice _ those are the two versions at the potice are — those are the two versions at the police are currently looking at. what _ police are currently looking at. what about the survivors? how many people managed to get out? because the bus caught fire at some point, we don't know whether it was before or after it crashed. haste we don't know whether it was before or after it crashed.— or after it crashed. we know about seven people _ or after it crashed. we know about seven people that _ or after it crashed. we know about seven people that managed - or after it crashed. we know about seven people that managed to - or after it crashed. we know about. seven people that managed to escape the burning bus. they have managed to escape _ the burning bus. they have managed to escape from the back of the bus. they to escape from the back of the bus. thev broke — to escape from the back of the bus. they broke one of the windows and managed _ they broke one of the windows and managed to escape with minor injuries, — managed to escape with minor injuries, according to the prime minister— injuries, according to the prime minister of north macedonia. they
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told him _ minister of north macedonia. they told him that they are ok, the hospitat— told him that they are ok, the hospital confirmed that, and let's hope _ hospital confirmed that, and let's hope that— hospital confirmed that, and let's hope that there are not going to be any more _ hope that there are not going to be any more casualties over here. nevertheless, so many people are dead over— nevertheless, so many people are dead over here that we now hear peopte _ dead over here that we now hear people asking for national morning or something like that, because this was the _ or something like that, because this was the most deadly car accident in recent— was the most deadly car accident in recent history. it is was the most deadly car accident in recent history-— recent history. it is hugely distressing. _ recent history. it is hugely distressing. the _ recent history. it is hugely distressing. the north - recent history. it is hugely - distressing. the north macedonian prime minister, i think i'm right in saying, said there was an explosion "from what he heard". he saying, said there was an explosion "from what he heard".— saying, said there was an explosion "from what he heard". he spoke with one of the survivors, _ "from what he heard". he spoke with one of the survivors, and _ "from what he heard". he spoke with one of the survivors, and he - "from what he heard". he spoke with one of the survivors, and he told - one of the survivors, and he told him that— one of the survivors, and he told him that they heard an explosion from _ him that they heard an explosion from the — him that they heard an explosion from the front of the bus. but some experts _ from the front of the bus. but some experts are — from the front of the bus. but some experts are thinking that that explosion was from a front tire. they— explosion was from a front tire. they currently don't know the truth
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about _ they currently don't know the truth about this — they currently don't know the truth about this because they are still working — about this because they are still working on it. most probably there was an— working on it. most probably there was an explosion, but no one knows if it was— was an explosion, but no one knows if it was from — was an explosion, but no one knows if it was from gasoline or from the tyre _ if it was from gasoline or from the re. ., ~' if it was from gasoline or from the re. ., ~ 1 ., if it was from gasoline or from the re. ., ~' i., ., if it was from gasoline or from the re. ., ~ i. ., ., ~ if it was from gasoline or from the re. ., ~ ., ., ~ ., , the headlines on bbc news... conservative mps back social care reforms in england, despite 19 voting against their own government. critics warn poorer households may end up losing out. a6 people, including 12 children, have died after a bus crashed and caught fire in western bulgaria. the international red cross claims sanctions against the taliban are causing extreme hardship for ordinary afghans. a senior red cross official says policies designed to withhold international funds from the taliban are depriving ordinary afghan people of the means of survival.
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speaking 100 days after the taliban swept to power across the country, dominik stillhart urged international donors to find creative ways to send funds to the country to stave off severe malnutrition. the bbc�*s yalda hakim is in kabul. at the food distribution centre in south—east kabul, the hungry wait. this is a nation on the brink of starvation. and for aid agencies, it's a race against time. emotions begin to run high. nafisa has arrived with her disabled son, pleading for help. the world food programme says they're doing everything they can, but it's not enough. nafisa tells me she's desperate.
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the taliban says the world needs to act. the international community has a hand in that, because they have imposed sanctions and other steps which has led to a humanitarian crisis in afghanistan. i think there are many in the international community and other countries who are speaking about human rights and
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educating of human rights, they have such claims. they should reconsider, not to take steps which lead to a humanitarian crisis in afghanistan. and these are the faces of the crisis. we've just come to the indira gandhi children's hospital, where there are many cases of children suffering from acute malnutrition. gulnara is three, so weak she can barely open her eyes. marwa is nearly one. it's notjust patients suffering.
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health care staff haven't been paid for months. every single person i'm speaking to has the same story. they can't pay for their ticket to come here, they can't pay for theirfood here. and she was just saying that someday they may have to admit her here as a malnutrition patient herself, because she doesn't know where she's going to get her next meal from. even before the taliban came to power, there was a humanitarian crisis in this country. drought, aid cuts and the economic collapse have turned crisis into catastrophe. yalda hakim, bbc news, kabul. a vigil has been held in the us state of wisconsin for the five people who were killed after a man drove his car into a christmas parade.
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waukesha police said the suspect will appear in court later today — but officers say the incident was not an act of terrorism. our north america correspondent, barbara plett usher reports. how could something so horrifying have happened in this city? this was a moment to share such unanswerable questions, so many people had them. to come together in grief, but the community is still in shock. she told me that she had just witnessed someone get run over and i asked is the person ok? then she just broke down and i turned around and came to get her because it was so scary. i knew she was going to need someone so we had lots of hugs last night. we were feet from getting hit and i watched a little boy go down right in front of me and people fly off the hood of the car. images i will never forget. this little girl narrowly escaped with her life.
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she had no idea what was hurtling towards her. and here, the moment when thejoy and festivity of the christmas parade turned to horror and tragedy. a vehicle travelling at full speed struck members of a marching band. the driver continued forward, hitting and running over others in his path. people, families and children ran for their lives. others tried to save those crumpled on the pavement. it wasjust carnage. i'm likening it to a war zone. there were adults, children, that were injured. some of our first responders were there with their families. they left their families to treat people, helped with instant command, helped transport. the suspect is a local man, darryl brooks, an aspiring rapper —
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he posted this video on his youtube video, including what looks like the red vehicle used in the hit and run. court documents show he has a lengthy criminal record. police said he had fled a domestic disturbance, that he had acted alone and intentionally. they have drawn up homicide charges against him. at the scene of the crime, the police cordon has come down and the road has reopened, but nothing feels back to normal and it won't for a very long time. barbara plett usher, bbc news, waukesha, wisconsin. the cruelty—free cosmetics company lush says it's closing its accounts on some of the most popular social media networks. the company says social media harms society, and it compares the current situation to when "climate change was ignored and belittled for decades". from friday, lush will abandon instagram, facebook, tiktok, and snapchat in all of the a8 countries where it operates. it will continue to update its twitter and youtube feeds until it finds "better and safer" ways to communicate with the world. a mum from leicestershire says herfamily has received more than 300 packets of crisps
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in donations — one of the only things her daughter will eat. last week, we heard how four—year—old ava has delayed development and due to an eating disorder, the crisps form a major part of her diet. walkers has since said it was working to resolve the supply problems. earlier, i spoke to mum michelle and a clinical psychologist from the university of birmingham, gillian harris. we've received so many packages on our doorstep, being sent to the bbc, to family members. people have tracked me down on social media and sent us loads of packets. iloathed tracked me down on social media and sent us loads of packets.— sent us loads of packets. what do ou think sent us loads of packets. what do you think of _ sent us loads of packets. what do you think of that? _ sent us loads of packets. what do you think of that? it _ sent us loads of packets. what do you think of that? it is _ sent us loads of packets. what do you think of that? it is really - you think of that? it is really appreciated. _ you think of that? it is really appreciated, and _ you think of that? it is really appreciated, and other- you think of that? it is really i appreciated, and other families you think of that? it is really - appreciated, and other families have appreciated, and otherfamilies have reached out to say they have been struggling. so i've managed to forward on quite a lot to other people are struggling in the uk. have you actually counted them? is it more than 300?— it more than 300? there are a lot more to come. _ it more than 300? there are a lot more to come. and _ it more than 300? there are a lot more to come. and i've _ it more than 300? there are a lot more to come. and i've got - it more than 300? there are a lot more to come. and i've got lots l it more than 300? there are a lot| more to come. and i've got lots of families waiting over the uk, so i will be posting those out for the rest of the week, i think. find
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will be posting those out for the rest of the week, i think. and i'm assumin: rest of the week, i think. and i'm assuming ava _ rest of the week, i think. and i'm assuming ava is _ rest of the week, i think. and i'm assuming ava is pleased - rest of the week, i think. and i'm assuming ava is pleased about i rest of the week, i think. and i'm i assuming ava is pleased about this? she is. barry. you assuming ava is pleased about this? she is- barry-— assuming ava is pleased about this? she is. barry. you talked about some ofthe she is. barry. you talked about some of the trolling — she is. barry. you talked about some of the trolling you _ she is. barry. you talked about some of the trolling you had _ she is. barry. you talked about some of the trolling you had received i of the trolling you had received over social media, peoplejudging you, calling you a bad parent. but this response shows that there are some really kind people out there are still, doesn't it? taste some really kind people out there are still, doesn't it?— are still, doesn't it? we have received _ are still, doesn't it? we have received so _ are still, doesn't it? we have received so many _ are still, doesn't it? we have received so many e-mail- are still, doesn't it? we have received so many e-mail andj received so many e—mail and messages. some advice, and lots of people said that they didn't realise they had the condition and how they have looked into it and followed links to the charity, and the support groups on facebook. they now realise this is what they have had now for 10—20 years. it’s realise this is what they have had now for 10-20 years. it's amazing how 'ust now for 10-20 years. it's amazing howjust talking _ now for 10-20 years. it's amazing howjust talking about _ now for 10-20 years. it's amazing howjust talking about it - now for 10-20 years. it's amazing howjust talking about it once i now for 10-20 years. it's amazing howjust talking about it once can| howjust talking about it once can raise such awareness. let me bring in gillian, an expert in child eating disorders. tell us what it
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stands for? what does it mean? in stands for? what does it mean? i�*i practical terms, stands for? what does it mean? i�*i practicalterms, it stands for? what does it mean? i�*i practical terms, it means that people can only eat a limited range of foods, and it is based on sensory hyperreactivity. the foods that they eat will be the standard, dry carbohydrate that is easily processed. another child i was speaking to the other day who will eat things like crisps or chips, or what people term junk food, but it is easily processed high calorie food. and it is because of their sensory needs.— food. and it is because of their senso needs. ., ., sensory needs. how do you develop this, or is it— sensory needs. how do you develop this, or is it genetic? _ sensory needs. how do you develop this, or is it genetic? i— sensory needs. how do you develop this, or is it genetic? i think- sensory needs. how do you develop this, or is it genetic? i think it i this, or is it genetic? ithink it is basically — this, or is it genetic? ithink it is basically genetically - this, or is it genetic? i think it i is basically genetically determined. sensory hyperreactivity, the research that we do, the best predictor of food fuzziness on all
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levels, and of course you will get anxiety underneath as well. and of course, it is more prevalent on the autism spectrum, but that is only because it is associated with sensory hyperreactivity. we did an audit of the children i see, and for most of those children, 97%, it will be there noticeable before the child is three. ., ., ., ., �*, is three. from a mum or dad's point of view, is three. from a mum or dad's point of view. how— is three. from a mum or dad's point of view. how do _ is three. from a mum or dad's point of view, how do you _ is three. from a mum or dad's point of view, how do you manage - is three. from a mum or dad's point of view, how do you manage it? i i of view, how do you manage it? i think it is more what you don't do. you don't bribe, you don't stop, all of the things you might be told to do. you give the child to the foods that they do want, because it is important that they grow when they are that young. and then you try to get help with sensory
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desensitisation. if they are older, we give them cognitive behavioural therapy. we know that works as well. you need help from an experienced dietician. training to let you know or assess which vitamins or minerals your child will need. haifa or assess which vitamins or minerals your child will need.— or assess which vitamins or minerals your child will need. how common of a roblem your child will need. how common of a problem is — your child will need. how common of a problem is it? _ your child will need. how common of a problem is it? when _ your child will need. how common of a problem is it? when i— your child will need. how common of a problem is it? when i spoke i your child will need. how common of a problem is it? when i spoke to i a problem is it? when i spoke to michelle last week, it was the first time i had heard of this eating disorder. �* , ' . time i had heard of this eating disorder. �* , , . ., disorder. it's difficult to tell because there _ disorder. it's difficult to tell because there is _ disorder. it's difficult to tell because there is no - disorder. it's difficult to telll because there is no standard disorder. it's difficult to tell- because there is no standard method of assessment, and there are no standard care pathways at the moment. children and adults will turn up in different places. they might turn up to a psychologist, a dietician, a gp. it is not noted it so we don't know. when i'm working out of the hospital in birmingham
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where i used to work, i used to think that i would have one child in every school. so it will be one child in about 600. in the states, they assess 3% of the population, but they do tend to over diagnose quite a bit in america.— quite a bit in america. michelle, iioin quite a bit in america. michelle, going back _ quite a bit in america. michelle, going back to — quite a bit in america. michelle, going back to you. _ quite a bit in america. michelle, going back to you. in _ quite a bit in america. michelle, going back to you. in terms i quite a bit in america. michelle, going back to you. in terms of i quite a bit in america. michelle, i going back to you. in terms of ava, as she grows up, what are your hopes for her when it comes to her eating? ava's got lots of care needs from her genetic syndrome, so we would like to see progress with all of the development. we would like to be able to talk, swallow food, walk outside. it isjust able to talk, swallow food, walk outside. it is just one of the many things we hope, and we continue to work with lots of professionals and we have support from the dietician and all the different professionals that work with her, whereas lots of families don't have that support. let us bring you the weather now.
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that cloud will be with us for most of the day, producing patchy light rain through north—west scotland. we have got some strong winds and it will be thick enough for some drizzle across north—west england and north—west wales. patchy fog is slow to left, and we have got this sliver of sunshine. as we head onto the evening and overnight, showers that were across kent and the channel islands will continue. a fair bit of cloud around and a weather front fair bit of cloud around and a weatherfront bringing fair bit of cloud around and a weather front bringing rain across scotland and northern ireland. here, too, we are looking at a local frost. you will see the cloud to push southwards. there will be some brighter breaks here and there. rain coming in over northern england and north wales, and behind that for scotland and northern ireland. some of the showers wintry on high
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ground.
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hello, this is bbc news with victoria derbyshire. the headlines: conservative mps back social care reforms in england, despite 19 voting against their own government. critics warn poorer households may end up losing out. a6 people, including 12 children, have died after a bus crashed and caught fire in western bulgaria. a service is being held this morning at westminster cathedral to remember sir david amess, the mp who was stabbed to death last month. the international red cross says sanctions against the taliban are causing extreme hardship for ordinary afghans. and after 2a hours and more than 100 miles, rugby league legend kevin sinfield raises more than £800,000 for motor neurone disease. sport — and for a full round up,
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from the bbc sport centre, here's olly foster. good morning. it's a big couple of days of champions league football coming up, certainly a big day for michael carrick. two days after manchester united sacked ole gunnar solskjaer, he's in caretaker charge for their match against villareal in spain. a win would see united through to the knockout stage, but if they slip up then qualification will go down to the final group game. carrick, who won the champions league as a player in 2008, has been promoted from first team coach to hold the reins until the club finds a full—time manager. it isa it is a big game, obviously for us in terms of any group stages and trying to get through on that. and i willjust go about myjob exactly as i normally would and trust the people have got behind me and the staff and the players and be positive and look forward to the game. it's a fantastic game to be
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playing and a fantastic game of football. these are the nights that you are tested and that you remember when you are pushed to the limit and, you know, the ones when you find out really what you have got. manchester united kick off at 5.a5 in spain. it's an eight o'clock kick—off at stamford bridge where chelsea need just a point againstjuventus to make it through to the last 16. the italians have already qualified but there's still a bit at stake because finishing top of the group could be all important. romelu lukaku is expected to be available for the first time since injuring his ankle earlier this month, but chelsea have done pretty well without him. we always had the options. it's on the players when they are needed and they have the chance to show their potential, they need to show it and they need to be ready. that's life at chelsea. and that this is what they do in a very impressive way. and we always have options and when we play with romulu and when they
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are not available, we try to find a solution and that is why we have a big squad. england's netballers will host australia, new zealand and south africa in the quad series injanuary at the copper box arena in london. it'll be really useful preparation for england ahead of the defence of their commonwealth games title in birmingham next summer. they're ranked third in the world, behind australia and new zealand. head coachjess thirlby says hosting the series in front of fans will make the series really special. australia diamonds won the last quad series in 2019. australian preparations for the ashes that starts two weeks tomorrow are far from ideal. cricket tasmania say that the treatment of their player tim paine by cricket australia has been "appalling". paine stepped down as captain last week over an investigation into sexually explicit texts he sent to a female colleague in 2017.
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paine said he was "exonerated" following an integrity review but stood down after learning the messages were to be made public. the current cricket australia chair says paine should never have been made captain in the first place. it's still to be decided by selectors if paine, who keeps wicket, will feature in the ashes. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. the front page for the twists and turns of the manchester united management, the psg players are expecting pochettino to leave and zinedine zidane taking over. that is all for now. more now on the government's controversial change to the way people pay for social care in england. the move was narrowly backed by mps last night, despite warnings that poorer
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households could end up paying disportionately more. we can speak now to nadra ahmed, the executive chair of the national care association — which represents small and medium—sized care homes. thank you for talking to us. how might these plans affect care homes? i think technically they do not affect any care homes as much, but they do affect the people who might be looking at our services and wanting to come into our services. i think from our perspective this is a really important piece of legislation that will impact on the ability of relatives and, indeed, individuals themselves to make choices around where they might be able to be cared for best. find choices around where they might be able to be cared for best.— able to be cared for best. and can ou work able to be cared for best. and can you work out _ able to be cared for best. and can you work out from _ able to be cared for best. and can you work out from these - able to be cared for best. and can you work out from these reforms, because they are quite complicated, how it will affect people who want to use your care homes? i how it will affect people who want to use your care homes?- to use your care homes? i think it is the complexity _
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to use your care homes? i think it is the complexity of _ to use your care homes? i think it is the complexity of where - to use your care homes? i think it is the complexity of where it i to use your care homes? i think it is the complexity of where it all i is the complexity of where it all states. because of that last—minute of last week, what it has me difficult to understand, really, is how the split is going to be made about which bit of the funding will hit your metre and when it starts to clock down. because obviously know what we do know is local authorities, their contribution will not be part of it, so it is at your contribution when it kicks in. and i think the impact assessment has not been published that we can understand exactly how that might impact people in the north, in the south. i think there is so much concern. so we have had some queries today from providers who are saying, we are being asked the question, we can't give financial advice, that is not our role. so i think there are a lot of people very uncertain about,
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are they going to have to sell their home? at what point will they have to sell their homes? people are really worried, that sort of age group are talking about, we do not want to be in debt to anybody, what will this mean? at what point? i think there are too many factors that have not been clarified and that, i think, that have not been clarified and that, ithink, is that have not been clarified and that, i think, is demonstrated that have not been clarified and that, ithink, is demonstrated by how close this photo really was with a government that has such a large majority. —— there is —— vote. -- vote. people will not have to pay more than — -- vote. people will not have to pay more than £86,000 _ -- vote. people will not have to pay more than £86,000 to _ -- vote. people will not have to pay more than £86,000 to the - -- vote. people will not have to pay more than £86,000 to the care i -- vote. people will not have to pay more than £86,000 to the care and once people reach that figure, the state will pay for the rest of their care, but what people will be paying for is at the medical care, not food, accommodation, energy, etc in the care home. this is it accurate to call it a capital? this
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the care home. this is it accurate to call it a capital?— to call it a capital? this is such a iood to call it a capital? this is such a good question — to call it a capital? this is such a good question because - to call it a capital? this is such a good question because actually. to call it a capital? this is such a i good question because actually -- a good question because actually —— a cap at all? depending on how it will be divided, the ss care needs, it will depend on the assessment. where will depend on the assessment. where will that assessment be set —— the assessment of the care needs. will that a limit the number of people who will be able to be supported in care settings? because of the envelope they will get? all of these are questions but to reach that amount may take a little bit of time. what we know is people who are coming into care settings are really towards the end of their lives so will they reach that cap? bullet
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happen? will they be depleting their assets? and if your assets are smaller, it will have a greater impact. if they are substantial, it may not have a knock on your finances at all. thank you very much for talking to us, executive care of the national kid association, nadra ahmed. —— national care association. all day we are bringing you coverage from afghanistan marking the 100th day since the taliban swept to power there. yalda hakim has been talking to a taliban spokesman, suhail shaheen. she asks when it will be that all women and girls will be allowed to freely work and study. we have the policy that women have the right to have access to education and work, so the policy is there. but now coming to implementation — so in some provinces this policy has been implemented and in some others
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it is under way to be implemented, so we do not have any problem that women have work. do you regret that girls in this country and women for the last 63, 6a, 66 days now have been denied the right to go to school? no, for women they will be promoted. they will not lose one year. all girls will be promoted. kabul collapsed all of a sudden so we had not worked out how about the universities, female and male students, so we faced everything all of a sudden. so girls can be hopeful that after the winter break they can return to school? yes, yes. there will be a taliban announcement? yes, i think if you follow it has
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already been announced by me. and the other day it was announced by the minister of prevention of vices and promotion of virtues. it was also announced by him a few days ago. but a timescale? like maybe after the winter break girls can return? i expect and i hope that. and if it doesn't happen, what will you do? i think it is a policy — why should it not happen? so you're hopeful that it will happen? yes, yeah. are you worried about how the taliban will govern over this country going forward given the virtual economic collapse of this country? the international community has a hand in that because they have imposed sanctions and other steps which has led to a humanitarian crisis in afghanistan. i think the international community and other countries who are speaking
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about human rights and advocating human rights, they have such claims, they should reconsider not to take steps which lead to humanitarian crisis in afghanistan. have any countries within the international community indicated they are willing to work with the taliban and work with you to deal with the humanitarian crisis, as well as recognition legitimising the government? all countries, including europe, and even the us, they are working with us. so all countries are willing and actually interacting with us and they want to work with us. the only question is that they are not recognising us. i think they are putting pressure, but their pressure is negatively impacting the people of afghanistan. you refer to children, malnutrition and all those things —
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it's not because of our action, it is because of their action. we are ready to talk if there is any issue. through understanding, through talks, through convincing each other, we can reach a solution, then why those sanctions? but the fact is that the un says this country is heading towards catastrophe, toward starvation, the famine, the hunger, the poverty. what do you think will be the end result? if they are saying the country is heading towards catastrophe, starvation, a humanitarian crisis, then it is their responsibility to take action, proper action in order to prevent all these tragedies. the headlines on bbc news...
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conservative mps back social care reforms in england, despite 19 voting against their own government. critics warn poorer households may end up losing out. a6 people, including 12 children, have died after a bus crashed and caught fire in western bulgaria. a service is being held this morning at westminster cathedral to remember sir david amess, the conservative mp who was stabbed to death last month. the consumer group which? has found more than 90% of black friday deals were the same price or cheaper in the six months before the sales event last year. the consumer rights campaign group is urging shoppers to make sure discounts are "truly genuine" ahead of this year's sales. earlier i spoke to independent shop owner claire leigh from woking, who told us she won't be taking part in black friday.
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i totally understand the appeal of black friday to consumers. i mean, everyone loves a bargain, don't they? but i think people also need to understand the impact it has on small businesses who just can't really compete in this arena. once we have paid for our stock and then factored in all the costs of running a bricks and mortar store, additionally this year you have issues of extra costs with brexit and supply chain issues with covid, then there isn't really much wriggle room for discounting at that point, and it's a huge risk for small stores to buy in bulk with such an unpredictable event. joining me now is the magazine editorfor which?, harry rose. tell us about your investigation in terms of what was on sale in the price last year. brute terms of what was on sale in the price last year-— terms of what was on sale in the price last year. we looked at over
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200 products _ price last year. we looked at over 200 products around _ price last year. we looked at over 200 products around black i price last year. we looked at over 200 products around black friday| price last year. we looked at over i 200 products around black friday in 2020 and, as you siding your intro, we found that more than nine in ten of those products were cheaper in the six months before. in the vast majority of them are cheap and afterwards as well. so it goes to show, basically, while there are a small number of deals around on black friday, and if you do your research, it is possible to find those, the vast majority are not worth getting excited about and it absolutely pays to keep your nerve and seek out only those bargains that you absolutely are confident in. �* �* ., , ., ., in. and if i'm doing this are doing an hini in. and if i'm doing this are doing anything illegal? _ in. and if i'm doing this are doing anything illegal? it _ in. and if i'm doing this are doing anything illegal? it depends i in. and if i'm doing this are doing anything illegal? it depends howl anything illegal? it depends how thins are anything illegal? it depends how things are presented. _ anything illegal? it depends how things are presented. if- anything illegal? it depends how things are presented. if you're i things are presented. if you're advertising something with what is known as a set price, saying it was £100 is now 50p, depends when it was 50 p. for example, if it was 100 ——
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£50. if it was between that during the time it could be considered not genuine and they could get in trouble for that legally, but it is sometimes difficult to pin these things down because there are a lot of grey areas. unfortunately, retailers do, as we have found, like to push their luck on occasions. hagar to push their luck on occasions. how do we as consumers _ to push their luck on occasions. how do we as consumers know if they are telling the truth or not? i think the key is to do your research. there are websites out there, price runner is one, where you can actually look at prices from days and weeks to see whether the current prices something to get excited about or not. we have done a huge amount of research here so we publish a wealth of information on the which? website to get those
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bargains and avoid those not worth it. don't impulse buy and panic, stick to your guns and you should be fine. ., , ., , .,, ., fine. you should be able to find that, for example, _ fine. you should be able to find that, for example, if _ fine. you should be able to find that, for example, if a - fine. you should be able to find that, for example, if a seller i fine. you should be able to find. that, for example, if a seller had actually raised because of something in previous days and weeks in order to make it look like there was a big discount on a black friday? absolutely. that is one of the tactics we have seen time and time again and if you know something has been cheaper if you weeks before black friday, the chances are it will be that cheap again over the next weeks and months so unless you have a particular reason why you need something right now, more often than not, just bide your time and look for those even better deals to return. ~ ., ., ~ look for those even better deals to return. ~ ., ., ,, , ., , return. will do. thank you very much, return. will do. thank you very much. hadi- — return. will do. thank you very much, hadi. hadi— return. will do. thank you very much, hadi. hadi rose, i return. will do. thank you very i much, hadi. hadi rose, magazine editorforwhich?. —— harry much, hadi. hadi rose, magazine editorfor which?. —— harry row�*s.
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european ministers are meeting in brussels today to discuss a coordinated response to the fast—climbing covid cases on the continent. governments have reintroduced some restrictions and urged more people to get vaccinated, sparking protests. austria is the first eu country to re—introduce a nationwide lockdown. our correspondent bethany bell has this report from vienna. vienna is cold and quiet. austria is back in lockdown after record numbers of new coronavirus infections. nonessential shops and restaurants are closed. the city's famous christmas markets were open last week. but now they're all boarded up. the government says the restrictions will last forjust under three weeks. after that, vaccinated austrians will be allowed to go out again, but the lockdown for the unvaccinated will continue. and there are even tougher measures to come. austria has announced plans to make covid jabs compulsory by february.
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austria's leader, alexander schallenberg, told us the move is necessary because of the country's low vaccination rate. simply, we have 66% of the population so far which has got the vaccine. this is too little, too late. and we have a political force in this country, the freedom party, which is openly running against vaccination, and saying, "this is bad for you, don't take it." so we have a very peculiar situation in austria. but it's controversial. silvia, who suffers from allergies, is unvaccinated. she says getting the shots should be a personal choice. you read every day, "you are guilty that we have lockdown, you are guilty that people are dying, you are guilty, guilty, guilty". i'm here since two years now, i have less contact, nothing. just go to work, see my family and be here in the garden. i'm not guilty of anything.
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but other austrians are queueing up for covid shots. the city of vienna has even started vaccinating young children, the first place in europe to do so. with the introduction of these new policies, austria knows europe and the world will be watching. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna. a rare manuscript showing calculations made by albert einstein, as he tried to formulate his general theory of relativity, is now on sale in paris. co—authored with his friend, michele besso, the 5a page document is brimming with equations and formulae. it's being auctioned for an estimated price of more than $3 million. it's one of only two documents showing einstein's workings on one of the seminal breakthroughs in modern physics. translation: what i find - particularly touching when reading the manuscript is we have this sort of monolithic and infallible image
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of einstein as an absolute genius who, from the first calculation, finds the right equation. but this manuscript shows einstein was intelligent but he was a scientist and just like any other he goes through phases of doubt. einstein makes errors in this manuscript and that, i think, makes it even greater in a way because we see the persistence. rugby league legend kevin sinfield has, in the last 2a hours, walked 101 miles in order to raise money for a motor neurone disease, which his friend and former team—mate rob abbado has. he crossed the line in the middle of —— rob burrow. he crossed the line during bbc breakfast. sally nugent met him as he crossed the line. you've done it! that's all that you need to know. how lovely is it to get this welcome here back at headingley?
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yeah, it's brilliant. it's brilliant. just to see rob again, lindsay and macy running with us. the team have been incredible. david ran all 101 miles too. it's been a real team effort from all that crew there. i never would have got it done without them. so much went on behind the scenes, in the little breaks. people were just chasing round for bits and pieces for us. the support along the route has been incredible right from the start, and then you see this here, so. tell me this, you said you wanted it to be difficult, you said you were going to go to dark places. did you know how dark that was going to be? probably not, no. it was certainly a battle. we wanted a battle and we got one. but we got here. both dave and i are broken. i know. i don't know when i'll be able to run again. i know. in a couple of weeks. not for a long time! in a couple of weeks. just tell me, how important is it for yourfriend rob what you have all achieved today? i know it's about the team. how important is it? yeah, he knows how much
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we love and care about him. to get a chance to show him again is wonderful and i just whispered in his ear then ironically, the back end were really, really tough, but the seventh one was horrendous. the seventh? the seventh. we were coming out of nottingham and said, "he's done it on purpose. he's played a part in making this, he's made this really difficult for us and he'll be laughing at home". those guys have been absolutely awesome. i mentioned before, chris who was part of it last year, he tested positive for covid on sunday morning, which meant he was ruled out. so, heartbroken for him. tell me about martin, because i had a chat to martin about 3:30am and he said he's been singing you songs. how did he keep you going? you know, you expect him to get tired but he just doesn't. he just continues, he's just relentless, but he's absolutely brilliant. just the team have been wonderful.
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it's a lot bigger than what we started with last year, as you can see. year, as you can see — sport scientist, doctor, physio, nutritionist. it's just been completely awesome. and to raise around £800,000 so far. —— has raised. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. for many of us, there's a lot more cloud around today than there was yesterday. now, high pressure is still dominating our weather. you can see from the isobars it's going to be windy across the north of scotland, not just today, but also tonight and into tomorrow, and then later a weather front arrives, bringing in some rain. but we do have some sunshine across parts of east anglia, the midlands and the south—west. showers still clipping kent and the channel islands, and we'll see breaks here and there in the cloud as we push further north. but in the north, generally, it is going to be cloudy with patchy rain continuing on and off across the far north and west of scotland, and don't forget — strong winds as well, especially with exposure. for northern ireland, you'll see some bright spots develop,
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as we will across parts of northern england and also parts of wales and the midlands. but for many, it is going to be cloudy. and you can see where we've got that brighter break across parts of east anglia, the south midlands and the south—west with the showers continuing in the channel islands and also kent. now, these are our temperatures, nine to about 11 degrees. the average at this stage in november is roughly seven to 11 north to south, so we're almost bang on there. as we head on through the evening and overnight, still a lot of cloud pushing southwards. under clear skies in the far south—east, we could see some patchy mist and fog reform and, locally, a frost. and at the same time, our weather front arrives, bringing rain across parts of scotland and northern ireland. temperatures falling away to between three and about seven degrees. now, tomorrow, the weather front sinks south, taking its rain with it. any patchy fog that's formed overnight in the far south—east will be slow to lift. there will be some brighter breaks here and there, but on the other side of the front for scotland and northern ireland, we'll see a return to sunshine and showers, but some of the showers
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will be wintry on the hills, and still windy in the far north. thursday, we say goodbye to that weather front, it pushes away. we've got northerly winds, some clear skies, a fair bit of sunshine, but in windward coasts, we're likely to see some showers, and some of the showers in the hills in the north of scotland are likely to be wintry, and it's going to be a cold day, cooler than on wednesday. friday's got an area of low pressure coming our way, bringing some rain with it and strong winds as well — wintriness, especially so on the hills. these are our temperatures. it's going to feel cold. we're looking at a range of six to about nine degrees as we head down towards the south.
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hello, this is bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. here are the headlines... conservative mps back social care reforms in england — despite 19 voting against their own government. critics warn poorer households may end up losing out compared to wealthier ones. a6 people, including 12 children, have died after a bus crashed and caught fire in western bulgaria. a service is being held this morning at westminster cathedral to remember sir david amess — the mp who was stabbed to death last month. the international red cross say sanctions against the taliban are causing extreme hardship for ordinary afghans. the home office tells councils
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to find accommodation for some of the unaccompanied children who crossed the english channel. and after 2a hours and more than 100 miles, rugby league legend kevin sinfield raises more than £800,000 for motor neurone disease. a controversial change to the way people pay for social care in england has been narrowly backed by mps, despite warnings that poorer households could end up paying disportionately more. the prime minister has insisted the new cap would still be "incredibly generous", but a number of his own mps still voted against trhe plans. our political correspondent helen catt reports. the cost of paying for care can be high. for some families, it can wipe out nearly everything they've saved for. the government says its plan will stop that, but critics say not for everyone. it won the vote last night,
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but the result was tight. the ayes to the right, 272. the noes to the left, 2a6. so the ayes have it, the ayes have it. under the plan, if someone has a house worth £120,000, they'll still have to pay £86,000 themselves, even though they qualify for some council help. and they will be left with just over a quarter of the value of their home. if an individual has a house worth £500,000, they'll have to pay £86,000, but will keep over 80% of the value of their house to pass on. let me remove all doubt on this issue. no—one will lose from these reforms compared to the system we have now. and the overwhelming majority will win. labour argued the plan didn't live up to the government's promises. why has the government moved away from the position ofjust a few months ago, that it published ahead of a vote
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on increasing national insurance, and move to a policy now which disproportionately benefits those with greater assets, which surely cannot be fair? some tories were not happy either. there is real cause on these benches about the distribution of the relative losses, and the worry that those less well off are going to be hit hardest from the government's amendment tonight. 19 conservatives voted against the government. many more tories chose not to vote. that's despite ministers arguing the case strongly with their colleagues. it seems for some it's an argument they have yet to win. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. and in a little under an hour, we'll be answering your questions on the government's plan for social care. whatever your question is, whether it is about the £86,000 cap, or whether it will affect if you need
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to sell your house or not, do send your question to us. do send them in to us on twitter, using the hashtag bbc your questions, or by emailing yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. that's coming up just after 12:30. staying with social care, our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, told me more about the reaction to the proposals getting through. i think they'll be relieved it got through but warily looking at what's going to happen when this goes to the house of lords. all these arguments will be had again and there is the assumption in westminster that the peers are going to gut this legislation and change it quite significantly. if you look at what mps were saying in parliament last night, i think if this vote was held again and this was the decisive moment of the last point in the legislation, then i think probably it would not have gone
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through, such are the concerns amongst backbenchers. there's even people who voted in favour of the legislation last night who did with real misgivings. so relief in the short term that it got through last night, but seeing real problems ahead. it's quite hard to grasp what these reforms are. i've certainly found it hard and was asking people, what is the simplest way to describe the change? is it a fact that if you've got a house worth less, you will end up losing disproportionately more? the government is also struggling with this, too — partly because it's a complicated set of reforms and everyone focuses on the cap but there's also changes to the levels of the means test at which you get support from the government. there are also some technical things in there like the level at which the government assesses what percentage of your costs of your care home are actually daily living costs that you're paying
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towards the accommodation rather than your care, stuff about that. then there's stuff about if you're getting means tested help, how much help you actually get from the state and how many of your own assets you then contribute to that, too. the government would like us to look at that all in the round. the message the government would like us to take is everyone would be better off under these proposals than under the current system. the problem is, not everyone will be better off under these proposals compared to the ideal version that was proposed by sir andrew dilnot, who first introduced the concept of the cap more than a decade ago. that's why this is such a communications challenge for the government, such an understanding challenge for you and me, and why there are so many sources of controversy amongst backbenchers. on your narrow question about who loses out, yes, the government's own graphs show that there
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is a group of people who have assets of between £50,000 and £150,000 who will be less well off under these new proposals than they would have been under the initial proposals for a cap that were put forward a few years ago, and which we all thought is what was being introduced by the government a couple of months ago, and it turns out that is not what they're doing. i'm sorry it's such a complicated answer but this is what's going to be thrashed out. it's worth remembering, this cap doesn't come into force until october 2023 and it doesn't take into account care costs you've spent already. so people will only start progressing towards the cap from october in two years' time. it will take people a couple of years to even reach the cap, so we won't really be able to judge what is actually going on until 2025, 2026. a6 people — including 12 children — are now known to have died in bulgaria in what's
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believed to be the country's deadliest ever road accident. a tourist bus crashed and burst into flames on a motorway in the middle of the night. the passengers, who were all from north macedonia, were returning from a weekend away in turkey. here's our central europe correspondent, nick thorpe. the tourist coach registered in north macedonia veered off the motorway to hitch the crash barrier. it tore away 50 metre section and then burst into flames. no other vehicles were involved. the bus was the last of four travelling in a convoy across bulgaria from turkey to north macedonia. tourists, including many children, on their way home from a weekend in istanbul. top officials, including the prime minister is of both countries, visited the scene of the accident, then went to meet survivors who were being treated in a sofia hospital. translation: it is being treated in a sofia hospital. translation:— being treated in a sofia hospital. translation: it is a tragedy that
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has su . ars translation: it is a tragedy that has sugars and — translation: it is a tragedy that has sugars and caused _ translation: it is a tragedy that has sugars and caused asked i translation: it is a tragedy that has sugars and caused asked to i translation: it is a tragedy that i has sugars and caused asked to react as soon as possible. what led to the death of a6 people, and what care can be offered to those that survived? —— shook us. fiur can be offered to those that survived? -- shook us. our fellow citizens who _ survived? -- shook us. our fellow citizens who are _ survived? -- shook us. our fellow citizens who are alive, _ survived? -- shook us. our fellow citizens who are alive, thank i survived? -- shook us. our fellow citizens who are alive, thank god, | citizens who are alive, thank god, have _ citizens who are alive, thank god, have their— citizens who are alive, thank god, have their memories and reflections about— have their memories and reflections about how— have their memories and reflections about how this happened. the causes ofthe about how this happened. the causes of the accident _ about how this happened. the causes of the accident are _ about how this happened. the causes of the accident are not _ about how this happened. the causes of the accident are not yet _ about how this happened. the causes of the accident are not yet known. i of the accident are not yet known. the mayor of a nearby village told local media that this particular section of the motorway has many potholes and is a blackspot for accidents. visibility was also bad with recent rain. the bulgarian authorities have promised a full enquiry. nick thorpe, bbc news.
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a funeral mass for the murdered conservative mp, sir david amess, has been held at westminster cathedral. family members and politicians were paying tribute to sir david, who was stabbed to death at a constituency surgery in essex last month. yesterday, hundreds of people turned out for a memorial service held in southend. let's cross over to frankie mccamley, who's at westminster cathedral. good afternoon, victoria. at the moment, — good afternoon, victoria. at the moment, we are waiting for sir david's — moment, we are waiting for sir david's coffin to leave the cathedral. he will be heading over to a private burial which will be attended — to a private burial which will be attended by his close friends and family _ attended by his close friends and family. you can see behind me now many— family. you can see behind me now many of— family. you can see behind me now many of the — family. you can see behind me now many of the 800 guests leaving. they have been_ many of the 800 guests leaving. they have been here for this 90 minute ceremony — have been here for this 90 minute ceremony. we have seen high profile politicians, _ ceremony. we have seen high profile politicians, including the prime minister~ — politicians, including the prime minister. we understand he just left through— minister. we understand he just left through a _ minister. we understand he just left through a side door. the labour leader. — through a side door. the labour leader, many cabinet ministers. we saw the _ leader, many cabinet ministers. we saw the chancellor of the exchequer. and former— saw the chancellor of the exchequer. and former prime ministers, including _ and former prime ministers, including david cameron, theresa may and sir— including david cameron, theresa may and sirjohn_ including david cameron, theresa may and sirjohn major. it really does
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feel like — and sirjohn major. it really does feel like today westminster has paused — feel like today westminster has paused. they paused for a colleague, the family— paused. they paused for a colleague, the family paused for a loved one, and this— the family paused for a loved one, and this sad, emotional funeral this morning _ and this sad, emotional funeral this morning. inside the service, which wasted _ morning. inside the service, which was ted by— morning. inside the service, which was led by the archbishop of westminster, there was a real focus on sir— westminster, there was a real focus on sir david's family, many paying tribute _ on sir david's family, many paying tribute to— on sir david's family, many paying tribute to them, many heartfelt condolences, and even a message from pope francis, _ condolences, and even a message from pope francis, who praised the mp for what he _ pope francis, who praised the mp for what he called devoted to public service — what he called devoted to public service. we also hurt a eulogy delivered _ service. we also hurt a eulogy delivered by one of the mp's close friends, _ delivered by one of the mp's close friends, and widdecombe. she had some _ friends, and widdecombe. she had some light—hearted memories. she spoke _ some light—hearted memories. she spoke about how sir david love to talk to _ spoke about how sir david love to talk to absolutely everyone, and his love for _ talk to absolutely everyone, and his love for animals. how his wife used toioke _ love for animals. how his wife used toioke that— love for animals. how his wife used tojoke that she had no idea what tojoke that she had no idea what animal— tojoke that she had no idea what animal sir— tojoke that she had no idea what animal sir david would be trying to adopt— animal sir david would be trying to adopt today, because he really did love animals. and i think it is very
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important — love animals. and i think it is very important to — love animals. and i think it is very important to mention that it is very fitting _ important to mention that it is very fitting that — important to mention that it is very fitting that the funeral today is taking — fitting that the funeral today is taking place here at westminster cathedral, because 37 years ago this is where _ cathedral, because 37 years ago this is where sir— cathedral, because 37 years ago this is where sir david and his wife, julia, _ is where sir david and his wife, julia, were _ is where sir david and his wife, julia, were married. this is where their— julia, were married. this is where their life — julia, were married. this is where their life began. today, this is where — their life began. today, this is where they say their goodbyes. thank ou. the headlines on bbc news... conservative mps back social care reforms in england — despite 19 voting against their own government. critics warn poorer households may end up losing out compared to wealthier ones. a6 people, including 12 children, have died after a bus crashed and caught fire in western bulgaria. and after 2a hours and more than 100 miles, rugby league legend kevin sinfield raises more than £800,000 for motor
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neurone disease. time for the sport now. champions leaiue time for the sport now. champions league football _ time for the sport now. champions league football coming _ time for the sport now. champions league football coming up. - time for the sport now. champions league football coming up. a i time for the sport now. champions league football coming up. a very | league football coming up. a very big day for michael carrick after manchester united... he is an caretaker charge. a win would see united through to the knockout stage, but if they slip up the qualification will go down to their final group game. he has been promoted from first team coach to hold the reins until the coach finds a full—time manager. it’s hold the reins until the coach finds a full-time manager.— a full-time manager. it's a fantastic — a full-time manager. it's a fantastic game _ a full-time manager. it's a fantastic game to - a full-time manager. it's a fantastic game to be i a full-time manager. it's a i fantastic game to be playing in, a fantastic— fantastic game to be playing in, a fantastic game to be playing in, a fantastic game of football. these early _ fantastic game of football. these early nights that you remember when you are _ early nights that you remember when you are pushed to the limit. the ones _ you are pushed to the limit. the ones where _ you are pushed to the limit. the ones where you find out what you've
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-ot. ones where you find out what you've not. ., ones where you find out what you've i at, ., , ones where you find out what you've ot. ., , , ones where you find out what you've got. that is eight 5:45pm kick-off in sain. manchester united kick off at 5.a5, it's an 8 o'clock kick—off at stamford bridge where chelsea need just a point againstjuventus to make it through to the last 16. the italians have already qualified but there's still a bit at stake because finishing top of the group could be all important. romelu lukaku is expected to be available for the first time since injuring his ankle earlier this month, but chelsea have done pretty well without him. we always has the options. it is on the players when they are needed. and then they have the chance to show their potential. they need to show their potential. they need to show it and they need to be ready. that is life at chelsea and this is what they do in a very impressive away. we always have options, and when we play with rommel lw, we play with ron below. when they are not available, we try to find a solution.
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—— romelu. england's netballers will host australia, new zealand and south africa in the quad series injanuary at the copper box arena in london. it'll be really useful preparation for england ahead of the defence of their commonwealth games title in birmingham next summer. they're ranked third in the world, behind australia and new zealand. head coachjess thirlby says hosting the series in front of fans will make the series really special. the first ashes test starts two weeks tomorrowbut australian preparations for the series are farfrom ideal. cricket tasmania say that the treatment of their player tim paine by cricket australia has been "appalling". paine stepped down as captain last week over an investigation into sexually explicit texts he sent to a female colleague in 2017. paine said he was "exonerated" following an integrity review but stood down after learning that the messages were to be made public. the current cricket australia chair says paine should never have been allowed to become captain in the first place. it's still to be decided by selectors if paine
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will feature in the ashes. that's all the sport for now. i have updates throughout the rest of the afternoon. a senior red cross official says policies designed to withhold international funds from the taliban are depriving ordinary afghan people of the means of survival. speaking 100 days after the taliban swept to power across the country, dominik stillhart urged international donors to find creative ways to send funds to the country to stave off severe malnutrition. yalda hakim is in kabul. at the food distribution centre in south—east kabul, the hungry wait. this is a nation on the brink of starvation. and for aid agencies, it's a race against time. emotions begin to run high. nafisa has arrived with her disabled son, pleading for help.
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the world food programme says they're doing everything they can, but it's not enough. nafisa tells me she's desperate. the taliban says the world needs to act. the international community has
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a hand in that, because they have imposed sanctions and other steps which has led to a humanitarian crisis in afghanistan. i think there are many in the international community and other countries who are speaking about human rights and educating of human rights — they have such claims. they should reconsider, not to take steps which lead to a humanitarian crisis in afghanistan. and these are the faces of the crisis. we've just come to the indira gandhi children's hospital, where there are many cases of children suffering from acute malnutrition. gulnara is three, so weak she can barely open her eyes. marwa is nearly one.
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it's notjust patients suffering. health care staff haven't been paid for months. every single person i'm speaking to has the same story. they can't pay for their ticket to come here, they can't pay for theirfood here. and she was just saying that someday they may have to admit her here as a malnutrition patient herself, because she doesn't know where she's going to get her next meal from. even before the taliban came to power, there was a humanitarian crisis in this country. drought, aid cuts and the economic collapse have turned crisis into catastrophe.
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yalda hakim, bbc news, kabul. and we'll have more on the situation in afghanistan when yalda hakim presents a special one—hour programme live from kabul at 13:00 gmt — marking 100 days since the taliban came to power. the use of the oxford—astrazeneca covid—19 vaccine for older people in the uk may have limited hospital admissions, according to the pharmaceutical giant. it's chief executive, pascal soriot, said britain had a big peak of infections but "not so many hospitalisations relative to europe". the antibody responses what drives the immediate reaction of the body when you are attacked by the virus, and the t cell response takes a little longer to come in. maybe a couple of days. but it is actually more durable, it lasts longer, antibody remembers that longer.
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everybody is focused on antibodies, but you see antibodies decline through time, up to a point in time for the antibody level is quite low. what remains is this t cell response, and those t cells are dormant. as soon as the virus attacks you, they wake up and they come to the rescue and they defend you. but it takes them a little while. you may be infected, but then they come to the rescue and you don't get hospitalised. his comments come as european _ don't get hospitalised. his comments come as european countries - don't get hospitalised. his comments come as european countries across i come as european countries across the continent have seen strong opposition as governments scrambled to respond to a fresh wave of covid—19 with restrictions and lockdown. could the uk be next?
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our health reporter jim reed joins me now. in earlier waves of this virus, we have _ in earlier waves of this virus, we have seen— in earlier waves of this virus, we have seen a _ in earlier waves of this virus, we have seen a similar thing here. scientists— have seen a similar thing here. scientists have been grappling with this question of could be next? are essentially— this question of could be next? are essentially ahead of what is going on in _ essentially ahead of what is going on in continental europe? the caveats. — on in continental europe? the caveats. a _ on in continental europe? the caveats, a lot of uncertainty and the one — caveats, a lot of uncertainty and the one thing we have learned from this virus— the one thing we have learned from this virus is— the one thing we have learned from this virus is that we are never quite — this virus is that we are never quite sure _ this virus is that we are never quite sure where it's going to take us next _ quite sure where it's going to take us next. the big people we have been speaking _ us next. the big people we have been speaking to— us next. the big people we have been speaking to are optimistic, hopeful that we _ speaking to are optimistic, hopeful that we are not going to see the kind of— that we are not going to see the kind of increase is that we have seen _ kind of increase is that we have seen elsewhere in europe. we can show— seen elsewhere in europe. we can show you — seen elsewhere in europe. we can show you this graph of how the uk at the moment is comparing with countries _ the moment is comparing with countries like the netherlands and austria. _ countries like the netherlands and austria, and you will be able to see that from _ austria, and you will be able to see that from the beginning of the summer. _ that from the beginning of the summer, from june and july, we that from the beginning of the summer, fromjune andjuly, we had an increase _ summer, fromjune andjuly, we had an increase of infections in this country— an increase of infections in this country that wasn't seen in other parts _ country that wasn't seen in other parts of— country that wasn't seen in other parts of europe. we stayed at a fairly— parts of europe. we stayed at a fairly high— parts of europe. we stayed at a fairly high level, around 40—45—
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50,000 — fairly high level, around 40—45— 50,000 cases per day, whereas other parts of— 50,000 cases per day, whereas other parts of europe are much lower than us. parts of europe are much lower than us recently— parts of europe are much lower than us. recently what you have seen is this a _ us. recently what you have seen is this a spike — us. recently what you have seen is this a spike in other parts of europe _ this a spike in other parts of europe that we have seen earlier in the pandemic, where other parts of europe _ the pandemic, where other parts of europe are — the pandemic, where other parts of europe are seeing this exponential rise, almost vertical in this graph, that we _ rise, almost vertical in this graph, that we are — rise, almost vertical in this graph, that we are not seeing in this country _ that we are not seeing in this country. we have been bumbling along at the _ country. we have been bumbling along at the same _ country. we have been bumbling along at the same sort of level. there are two main _ at the same sort of level. there are two main reasons, one is that we saw the delta _ two main reasons, one is that we saw the delta wave of infection caused by the _ the delta wave of infection caused by the delta variant much earlier in this country, and then it spread to europe _ this country, and then it spread to europe. that is far more transmissible than early forms of the disease. we saw that here early and then— the disease. we saw that here early and then it — the disease. we saw that here early and then it was reflected later in other— and then it was reflected later in other parts of europe. and we made the decision— other parts of europe. and we made the decision to unlock earlier. you remember— the decision to unlock earlier. you remember freedom day on the 19th of july, where _ remember freedom day on the 19th of july, where essentially most restrictions were lifted. they kept
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restrictions were lifted. they kept restrictions much more severe restrictions much more severe restrictions and other parts of europe — restrictions and other parts of europe are much later, and even then things— europe are much later, and even then things like _ europe are much later, and even then things like mask mandates were kept in law— things like mask mandates were kept in law in_ things like mask mandates were kept in law in other parts of europe are much _ in law in other parts of europe are much longer. as a result, when those were lifted, _ much longer. as a result, when those were lifted, you saw this sudden increase — were lifted, you saw this sudden increase in— were lifted, you saw this sudden increase in other parts of europe that you — increase in other parts of europe that you haven't seen so far in this country— that you haven't seen so far in this country at — that you haven't seen so far in this country at least. 30 that you haven't seen so far in this country at least.— country at least. so what does it mean for christmas? _ country at least. so what does it mean for christmas? the i country at least. so what does it mean for christmas? the hope l country at least. so what does it | mean for christmas? the hope is that, as mean for christmas? the hope is that. as a — mean for christmas? the hope is that, as a result _ mean for christmas? the hope is that, as a result of— mean for christmas? the hope is that, as a result of all— mean for christmas? the hope is that, as a result of all that, - mean for christmas? the hope is that, as a result of all that, we i that, as a result of all that, we have _ that, as a result of all that, we have built _ that, as a result of all that, we have built up immunity in the population, both through vaccination, we have had more time for people _ vaccination, we have had more time for people to be vaccinated, and for a booster_ for people to be vaccinated, and for a booster vaccinations to start to be put _ a booster vaccinations to start to be put in — a booster vaccinations to start to be put in place, and for people to -et be put in place, and for people to get infected. this is a very brutal way of— get infected. this is a very brutal way of looking at it, but for example _ way of looking at it, but for example schoolchildren, when they went back — example schoolchildren, when they went back in this country, with a very— went back in this country, with a very high— went back in this country, with a very high rates in secondary school children— very high rates in secondary school children in— very high rates in secondary school children in september and october lime _ children in september and october time the — children in september and october time. the idea is that that has built— time. the idea is that that has built up— time. the idea is that that has built up a _ time. the idea is that that has built up a form of natural immunity in the _ built up a form of natural immunity
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in the population. looking at this bar chart, — in the population. looking at this parcharl, it_ in the population. looking at this bar chart, it is quite complicated, and essentially what they are showing _ and essentially what they are showing here is how vulnerable various— showing here is how vulnerable various countries are to covid—19 this winter. _ various countries are to covid—19 this winter, how likely chunks of the country are to go into hospital. you will— the country are to go into hospital. you will see — the country are to go into hospital. you will see that england on this is ri-ht you will see that england on this is right at— you will see that england on this is right at the — you will see that england on this is right at the bottom, the least vulnerable country to another wave of covid-19. — vulnerable country to another wave of covid—19, according to these calculations. whereas at the top you have countries like romania, greece and germany, which are currently seeing _ and germany, which are currently seeing this— and germany, which are currently seeing this extra waiver. the hope is that— seeing this extra waiver. the hope is that this — seeing this extra waiver. the hope is that this combination of vaccination and previous infection in the _ vaccination and previous infection in the most — vaccination and previous infection in the most vulnerable means that adversely— in the most vulnerable means that adversely we are better protected than other countries going into christmas and the winter, when we are more _ christmas and the winter, when we are more likely to mix more and stay indoors _ are more likely to mix more and stay indoors more. are more likely to mix more and stay indoors more-— are more likely to mix more and stay indoors more. hopefully we in the uk are not going — indoors more. hopefully we in the uk are not going to _ indoors more. hopefully we in the uk are not going to see _ indoors more. hopefully we in the uk are not going to see the _ indoors more. hopefully we in the uk are not going to see the same - indoors more. hopefully we in the uk are not going to see the same level. are not going to see the same level of infection so they are seeing in europe? it of infection so they are seeing in
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euro e? , ., of infection so they are seeing in euroe? , ., _ of infection so they are seeing in euroe? , ., ., , europe? it is worth saying that this came at a price- — europe? it is worth saying that this came at a price. we _ europe? it is worth saying that this came at a price. we had _ europe? it is worth saying that this came at a price. we had dated - europe? it is worth saying that this came at a price. we had dated to l came at a price. we had dated to date _ came at a price. we had dated to date showing in the last week 1200 people. _ date showing in the last week 1200 people, another 1200, have lost their— people, another 1200, have lost their lives— people, another 1200, have lost their lives to covid—19 in people, another 1200, have lost their lives to covid—19injust people, another 1200, have lost their lives to covid—19 in just a week — their lives to covid—19 in just a week. these rates are much higher than they— week. these rates are much higher than they are elsewhere in europe. the hope _ than they are elsewhere in europe. the hope is — than they are elsewhere in europe. the hope is that by having higher rates _ the hope is that by having higher rates of— the hope is that by having higher rates of infection and sadly hospitalisation and death through the period over the summer when things— the period over the summer when things like — the period over the summer when things like flu and hospitals were less busy, — things like flu and hospitals were less busy, the hope is that we are now tletter— less busy, the hope is that we are now better prepared, less vulnerable, going into that widget period _ vulnerable, going into that widget period. another thing, the booster roll-out _ period. another thing, the booster roll-out in — period. another thing, the booster roll—out in this country. because we had first— roll—out in this country. because we had first doses, second doses of vaccines— had first doses, second doses of vaccines earlier in this country than _ vaccines earlier in this country than elsewhere in europe, it meant we had _ than elsewhere in europe, it meant we had to— than elsewhere in europe, it meant we had to put in place eight booster vaccination — we had to put in place eight booster vaccination programme earlier as well to— vaccination programme earlier as well to deal with fading levels of protection from that vaccine. if you look at _ protection from that vaccine. if you look at how — protection from that vaccine. if you look at how well we are doing with the booster roll—out compared to
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other— the booster roll—out compared to other countries, austria and germany, _ other countries, austria and germany, we are rolling out booster is much _ germany, we are rolling out booster is much more quickly. and the hope is much more quickly. and the hope is that— is much more quickly. and the hope is that that, — is much more quickly. and the hope is that that, plus previous vaccination, plus previous infection, it means that we hopefully won't see that increase of infections _ hopefully won't see that increase of infections that we have seen elsewhere. if you want more information on this, it is worth looking — information on this, it is worth looking at— information on this, it is worth looking at the bbc website today. my colleague _ looking at the bbc website today. my colleague has written a long, detailed _ colleague has written a long, detailed article that explains this. a lot _ detailed article that explains this. a lot more detail, a lot more clearly— a lot more detail, a lot more clearly than it is possible to do on television — clearly than it is possible to do on television. . ~' , ., , clearly than it is possible to do on television. ., ,, , ., , . ministers have confirmed that all uk councils are to be forced to care for unaccompanied children who travel across the channel in small boats. the home office says it's taking "urgent steps to allocate places in care for migrant children. it says a decision
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to send a young asylum seeker to a particular authority will depend on the number of children it already has in its local population, the number of asylum seekers it is already supporting and the pressures its children's services are already experiencing. let's talk to our news reporter simonjones in dover. tell us the latest in terms of the kind of people who are coming over? we have been speaking a lot in recent weeks about the record number of people who have been crossing the channel, arriving here in dover in small boats. almost 26,000 people so far this year. among them are hundreds of children, but most of the children are arriving with family members. but others do arrive unaccompanied, and it is that we are talking about today. because at the moment most of the children arriving without family members, arriving here in kent, become irresponsible of kent county council. unlike adults, who are transferred around
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the country, the responsibility falls on the local authority here when it comes to those children. and kent county council has been saying that it simply cannot cope with the numbers. it says in the past couple of months 250 unaccompanied children have come into its care. it is already caring for around 400 asylum seeking children. until now, there has been a voluntary transfer scheme. basically, the government has asked councils right across the country to take in some of these children. some councils have come forward and done that, but simply not enough. the government is saying today to councils, this scheme is going to be compulsory unless you have a very good reason not to take in any of these children. there has been some resistance from local authorities who say they are already stretched. the government is saying, no, they need to step up and play their part. kent county council had threatened to take legal action against the home secretary herself because they said the situation was
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so dire. now the government are agreeing with kent county council that other councils will have to step forward and play a role in this. . ~ step forward and play a role in this. ., ,, , ., step forward and play a role in this. ., ~' , ., , step forward and play a role in this. ., ,, i. , . step forward and play a role in this. ., ~' , ., , . ,, ., this. thank you very much, simon. time for a — this. thank you very much, simon. time for a look _ this. thank you very much, simon. time for a look at _ this. thank you very much, simon. time for a look at the _ this. thank you very much, simon. time for a look at the weather. - things are set to turn colder and much more unsettled later. today will be remembered as one of the comma, now the days of the week. quite a lot of cloud up to the west of the uk, best of the sunshine to eastern and southern parts and temperatures generally around where they should be. big areas of cloud floating around, fog patches down to the south—east and at this band of rain will work in towards parts of northern scotland and northern ireland overnight. temperatures hovering above freezing for most of us that this band of rain will sink its way eastwards through the day tomorrow and behind this rain band, the air will be turning colder. it will brighten up for some sunshine for scotland and northern ireland,
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but some showers too. the wintry showers across goal and, increasingly blustery and cold, setting the scene as we head towards the end of the week. temperatures will be dropping away, some rain but also perhaps some sleet and snow and at the chance for a released army into the week. —— a really stormy end to the week. hello, this is bbc news
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with victoria derbyshire. the headlines: conservative mps back social care reforms in england, despite i9 voting against their own government. critics warn poorer households may end up losing out. 46 people, including 12 children, have died after a bus crashed and caught fire in western bulgaria. a service has been held at westminster cathedral to remember sir david amess, the conservative mp who was stabbed to death last month. the international red cross claims sanctions against the taliban are causing extreme hardship for ordinary afghans. now on bbc news, your questions answered. you've been sending in your questions on the government's social care plan. with me to answer them is sally warren, the director of policy at the king's fund, an organisation which
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researches health care. thank you for talking to us. first a quick question, which is a dead simple compared to the rest of them. in henderson, when do the rules come into effect? irate in henderson, when do the rules come into effect? ~ ., ., . into effect? we are anticipating they come _ into effect? we are anticipating they come in — into effect? we are anticipating they come in from _ into effect? we are anticipating they come in from october- into effect? we are anticipating| they come in from october 2023 into effect? we are anticipating - they come in from october 2023 but worth remembering where we are in the process. mps voted for this change last night, but now it needs to go to the house of lords who will have a choice about voting for these changes are not and we expect that to happen early in the new year so we do not know for definite that is a final decision, but if it sticks this way, it is october 2023. before i car on this way, it is october 2023. before i carry on with _ this way, it is october 2023. before i carry on with questions _ this way, it is october 2023. before i carry on with questions from - this way, it is october 2023. before i carry on with questions from of. i carry on with questions from of years, i would like you, sally, to sum up, if you can, but this new policy is in plain english, please. of course. it is a complicated policy but what mps voted for yesterday was to have a cat cost for social care but to change how it
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works. —— capped. if we need care during her working life or later, we could face unlimited cost but this would limit it to £80,000 over their lifetime. those with low levels of assets who would get support along the way from local government, that support will not count toward that cap so people with lower levels of wealth and income will have to pay the 80,000 just like people with higher levels of wealth. i do think it is accurate _ higher levels of wealth. i do think it is accurate to _ higher levels of wealth. i do think it is accurate to call _ higher levels of wealth. i do think it is accurate to call it _ higher levels of wealth. i do think it is accurate to call it a _ higher levels of wealth. i do think it is accurate to call it a cap - it is accurate to call it a cap because it is only a cap for medical care so we could still face unlimited cost when it comes to paying for our food in a care unlimited cost when it comes to paying for ourfood in a care home or our accommodation in a care home? so the cap is a cap on her personal care costs. if so the cap is a cap on her personal care costs— care costs. if somebody is any residential _ care costs. if somebody is any residential care _ care costs. if somebody is any residential care home - care costs. if somebody is any residential care home a - care costs. if somebody is any. residential care home a nursing home, the government is introducing what it is calling daily living costs which will be set by the government at a notional amount
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which is a contribution to your daily living costs, rather than exact costs so the government confirmed last week these would be set at £200 a week but the idea is thatis set at £200 a week but the idea is that is affordable from a state pension so should be affordable to income and does not require people to use their savings or assets. i think it is accurate to say it is a cap on personal care costs, but if you are receiving care in a care home, you need to pay towards your daily living costs, just as you would need to pay for your heating and food if you are receiving care in your own home.— in your own home. understood. vincent asks. — in your own home. understood. vincent asks, is _ in your own home. understood. vincent asks, is at _ in your own home. understood. vincent asks, is at the - in your own home. understood. vincent asks, is at the cap - in your own home. understood. vincent asks, is at the cap per i vincent asks, is at the cap per person or per couple? kneecap as per erson. person or per couple? kneecap as per person- you _ person or per couple? kneecap as per person- you may— person or per couple? kneecap as per person. you may be _ person or per couple? kneecap as per person. you may be a _ person or per couple? kneecap as per person. you may be a couple -- - person or per couple? kneecap as per person. you may be a couple -- the l person. you may be a couple —— the cap. when we come in to thinking about people with assets, they are shared between the couple in an agreed way, according to the law, so the value of your house will be shared between the two members of
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the couple. shared between the two members of the coule. , ,, shared between the two members of thecoule. ,, the couple. philippa russell says, like many family _ the couple. philippa russell says, like many family carers, - the couple. philippa russell says, like many family carers, i - the couple. philippa russell says, like many family carers, i have i like many family carers, i have incurred catastrophic costs in trying to give my husband are some good years at the end of his life. i had to sell my beloved family home and it was really hard. how will people of working age and living in their own homes be expected to pay for their care? their own homes be expected to pay fortheir care? i their own homes be expected to pay fortheir care? lam their own homes be expected to pay for their care? i am 83 and hope and pray i do not develop any care needs myself. it pray i do not develop any care needs m self. , ., ., , ., myself. it is a great question. it has a couple — myself. it is a great question. it has a couple of _ myself. it is a great question. it has a couple of different - myself. it is a great question. it has a couple of different angles| myself. it is a great question. it i has a couple of different angles to that. working age adults who have a disability do tend to have lower levels of assets and wealth because they have had less opportunity to build up assets over their lifetime so they are much more likely to get means tested support and part of the government's proposals is to increase at the generosity from 23,000 to 100,000 so people of working age will get more financial support and a little bit of support along the way, but the change last
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week also means it takes them longer to reach the cap before they get completely free care. that is obviously a real challenge for people of working age. it is also important that people are living in their own homes whilst receiving care, a lot of detailed exemptions that are when your house does or doesn't count. it is difficult to get individual advice about people's circumstances but there are exemptions and it is possible to have a deferred payment agreement with your local authority where, in effect, you chose to defer payment of your care costs until death so it can be taken out of your estate at the point of your death rather than you needing to find money at the time of your care.— time of your care. that is interesting _ time of your care. that is interesting because - time of your care. that is interesting because the l time of your care. that is i interesting because the next question is from david and carmel, to keep all of your assets, for example your house, could you take out an insurance policy to cover at the £86,000? so you can keep all of your assets question mark at the moment, there are no insurance policies that allow you to do that because this is a new policy. {line
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policies that allow you to do that because this is a new policy. one of the consequences _ because this is a new policy. one of the consequences of _ because this is a new policy. one of the consequences of this _ because this is a new policy. one of the consequences of this new - because this is a new policy. one of. the consequences of this new system we think is there will be different financial services that will be available for helping people make different choices and that might be an insurance scheme that allows you to ensure that verse 86,000 or equity release where you can use the equity release where you can use the equity in your house to pay for care or top up insurance schemes where you might think, once i reach the cap, actually want higher quality care than the government might otherwise pay for me so i want to top up. what we expect to see as financial services will start to increase the number of products that are on the market from about 2023-2024 are on the market from about 2023—2024 onwards to start to improve people's choice about how to best plan and prepare for their own care. , ~ . ~' best plan and prepare for their own care. ~' , care. chris walker says, where is that £86,000 — care. chris walker says, where is that £86,000 to _ care. chris walker says, where is that £86,000 to come _ care. chris walker says, where is that £86,000 to come from? - care. chris walker says, where is that £86,000 to come from? | | care. chris walker says, where is i that £86,000 to come from? i have care. chris walker says, where is - that £86,000 to come from? i have a house with but i do not have 86 gun tucked away under the mattress. that comes -- a —
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tucked away under the mattress. that comes -- a house _ tucked away under the mattress. jr�*ué�*jf comes —— a house worth £250,000. you could use a local authority route, deferred payment or through equity release schemes with financial services. there are ways for you to access that money earlier when you need it for your care journey rather than needing to sell your house at that point so it makes it your morning control about when you were release the assets and equity from your house. == release the assets and equity from your house-— your house. -- more in control. if there is a — your house. -- more in control. if there is a spouse _ your house. -- more in control. if there is a spouse living _ your house. -- more in control. if there is a spouse living in - your house. -- more in control. if there is a spouse living in the - there is a spouse living in the family home, will the government still take the amount owed when the occupying spouse dies? what still take the amount owed when the occupying spouse dies? what normally ha--ens occupying spouse dies? what normally happens with — occupying spouse dies? what normally happens with the _ occupying spouse dies? what normally happens with the exemption _ occupying spouse dies? what normally happens with the exemption is - occupying spouse dies? what normally happens with the exemption is if - occupying spouse dies? what normally happens with the exemption is if a - happens with the exemption is if a spouse is still living in the family home, it is not taken into account in the means tested so it means people in that circumstance may well get some and chill support along the cap. == get some and chill support along the ca . _ , ., get some and chill support along the ca -. ,., ., . ., get some and chill support along the cap. -- some financial support. that is interesting. _ cap. -- some financial support. that is interesting, i— cap. -- some financial support. that is interesting, i didn't— cap. -- some financial support. that is interesting, i didn't do _ cap. -- some financial support. that is interesting, i didn't do that - cap. -- some financial support. that is interesting, i didn't do that and i is interesting, i didn't do that and i'm not sure people know that. let me is the question again and you tell us again. if there is a spouse and they are living in the family home, will the government take... i5
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home, will the government take... i3 still living in the home, it is exempt from the means test so that means you will get a little bit of financial help from the government if your assets are below £100,000 without your house but he will still need to pay the full £86,000 to reach the cap if you're one of the unlucky people with a very long journeys. at that case, the £86,000 could be funded through a deferred payment agreement, or equity release, arson savings that you could do that. yes, —— or savings. in that circumstance, you may also get financial support through the means tested system. tow;t get financial support through the means tested system.— means tested system. tony and treasure say. — means tested system. tony and treasure say, my _ means tested system. tony and treasure say, my wife _ means tested system. tony and treasure say, my wife and - means tested system. tony and treasure say, my wife and i - means tested system. tony and | treasure say, my wife and i have means tested system. tony and i treasure say, my wife and i have a shared awning housing association house and the property is worth
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about £190,000, we had a 50% share. how will the reforms affect us and other shared ownership people? at, other shared ownership people? great question. my understanding of how this works as we look at the equity you own so if you have a 50% ownership, that means you have 50% of that value of the house so that would be 190,000, 95,000 so that will be the assets you and your partner have so that will be considered any means test. i will say, you can get a really complicated rules and regulations about how the means test works, the government have not published all of those detailed regulations yet, so as ever, people should talk to their local authority or financial adviser about it, but my understanding is it would be the equity you own, in this case 50%. , .,, �*, would be the equity you own, in this case50%. , k, case 50%. our people's pension taken into account — case 50%. our people's pension taken into account when... _ case 50%. our people's pension taken into account when... what _ case 50%. our people's pension taken into account when... what people - into account when... what people look at on — into account when... what people look at on both _ into account when... what people look at on both the _ into account when... what people look at on both the income - into account when... what people look at on both the income you i into account when... what people i look at on both the income you have an income assumed by the assets you
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own. in the case with the skin, in most cases it is assumed that your income will pay for your daily living costs and your assets paying for some of your care costs if you do not have enough income to do that. it is your own choice about how much of the £86,000 you're paying from your income or assets and if you're lucky enough to mean you can pay for some of all of that without using your assets, that is absolutely fine. it is not that the £86,000 must come from a housing assets, but for a lot of people that is the most obvious place where they have money in value they can tap into, particularly in later life. two moore, brian says while the financing of social care always placed on homeowners when an increasing number of the population rental property? how much will they contribute to their care? i rental property? how much will they contribute to their care?— contribute to their care? i think that is will— contribute to their care? i think that is will when _ contribute to their care? i think that is will when we _ contribute to their care? i think that is will when we really - contribute to their care? i thinkj that is will when we really think about different generations and when they need care. we have been debating how to pay for social care reforms in england, particularly
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when baby boomers will be starting to need it from this time onwards. this generation only a lot of their own homes so it is reasonable to think that says a source of funding and finance. obviously for people of the younger generation who may be thinking about saving for pensions, for house—buying, this is something which is about how can they plan for their old age in 20,30, which is about how can they plan for their old age in 20, 30, 40 years time when they might need care. frank says, if i have no assets and a need to go into care, will i need to pay? how do i pay if i have nothing? if to pay? how do i pay ifi have nothing?— to pay? how do i pay ifi have nothinu? ., ., ., ,, , to pay? how doipayifi have nothint? ., ., , nothing? if you have no assets, you will be supported _ nothing? if you have no assets, you will be supported by _ nothing? if you have no assets, you will be supported by government i will be supported by government through the means tested assistance so if you have a less than £20,000, you will get care for free. you might need to contribute to your income, so your state pension, but he will not be expected to spend money you do not have. this means you will continue to get support as long as you have eligible care needs and as long as the means test means you get that access, you will get your care paid for by government. it
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is not that he will be left to kind of have no care or ability to get the care you need.— the care you need. thank you very much. i the care you need. thank you very much- i am _ the care you need. thank you very much. i am sure _ the care you need. thank you very much. i am sure we _ the care you need. thank you very much. i am sure we will _ the care you need. thank you very much. i am sure we will come i the care you need. thank you very| much. i am sure we will come back the care you need. thank you very i much. i am sure we will come back to the sb four october 2023, but thank you for the moment, sally one, director of policy —— sally warren. the headlines on bbc news... conservative mps back social care reforms in england, despite 19 voting against their own government. critics warn poorer households may end up losing out. 46 people, including 12 children, have died after a bus crashed and caught fire in western bulgaria. a service has been held this morning at westminster cathedral to remember sir david amess, the conservative mp who was stabbed to death last month.
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a funeral mass for the murdered mp, sir david amess, took place at westminster cathedral this morning. family members and politicians paid tribute to sir david, who was stabbed to death at a constituency surgery in essex last month. the roman catholic duty priest for parliament, canon pat browne, read the homily. just over 38 years ago, david amis, julia —— amess, julia and myself stood here. they were getting married and i was officiating at their wedding. married and i was officiating at theirwedding. he married and i was officiating at their wedding. he was at the newly elected mp for basildon, just three months into thejob. in elected mp for basildon, just three months into the job. in the years that followed, i baptised all of his children, david james, catherine,
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serra, alexander and florence. and more recently, five years ago —— sarah. recently i buried his mother at the great age of 104. since my appointment to parliament 12 years ago now, david's office was one place i was always made welcome for a cup of tea and a chat. so we go back a long way. sadly, my last visit to his office was on that awful friday afternoon. i had just finished a wedding blessing in the chapel and heard the tragic news. i went over immediately to see his staff. they were devastated. there were tears and it struck me forcefully, these people were not
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just his staff, they were his friends. and they loved him. they were his team, his collaborators in the work, his work for the constituents of southend west. friendship was a david's a great gift to others. notjust friendship was a david's a great gift to others. not just to friendship was a david's a great gift to others. notjust to those who worked alongside him and agreed with him, but to everyone in the house, including those who did not share his political or religious views. the morning after he was murdered, a very senior labour politician was interviewed on radio four about david. she and he came into parliament at the same time in 1983. when the country and politics was a very polarised. she had made up was a very polarised. she had made up her mind not to have friendly
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relations with any opposition mps. when she met david this was a promise to herself that she was unable to keep. she told listeners that morning that promise was impossible to sustain with david amis because he was so friendly and prepared to work together with other mps —— david amess, to work together with other mps and common causes. he was a true bridge builder. to see the prime minister and leader of the opposition stand shoulder to shoulder in silence and prayer, paying respects in southend after his death and have them reach across the chamber in unity and fellowship was something parliament does not see very often. david's death was the catalyst for everyone in
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parliament realising their oneness as a community, working differently, yes, but together for the good of the nation in our world. but his success in bringing this about could also be measured when he was alive. david could laugh at himself and, in doing so, he brought many people together. many of you will know of any boiled sweet episode when in saint peter�*s square in rome, as eddie pope was passing by, how he struggled to find in his pockets his rosary beads —— as the pope was passing by. he wished the pope to bless them, but instead he found a boiled sweet which pope benedict graciously blessed and passed on.
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and then at the council chambers in southend when he became sir david, why did you do it, he was asked? that is what knights do, he said. these are things enabled others to laugh with him. has genuine charm, wit and warmth broke through many barriers as he looked for those things and others that they could agree on and work together on. david was also serious. for him, life was a gift to be gratefully accepted, cherished, nourished and lived to the full. he literally took his life in his two hands and threw himself into it. and he died doing so, in a service of others. as a today's gospel tells us a man can have no greater love than to lay down his
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life for his friends. his constituency members, his country. and david did so. his catholic faith informed his passionate commitment to the very right to life, to human dignity, to the common good, but it was also rooted in his absolute conviction that an mp's first priority was to their constituents. it was the death of a constituent from hypothermia which led to his successful private members' bill on fuel poverty. he championed endometriosis uk, prostate, the music project we heard singing here this morning, animal welfare, and
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many, many other causes. he was very much his own man and was prepared to swim against the tide when it was a matter of conscience, whether or not people agreed or disagreed with her money —— with him on a political issue, no one could disagree with his integrity, exercised at times at great cost to himself. the cost is great cost to himself. the cost is great too for the spouses and children of a member of parliament or, indeed, anyone who works in public service. many a family evening or day out together have to be sacrificed because of the elected person's many other commitments. but
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if the costs were great to julia person's many other commitments. but if the costs were great tojulia and her children, and it was, the value of what they had enabled david to do for his constituents and for the nation was brought home to them in an overwhelming way when they witness the outpouring of love and respect people expressed in both chambers of parliament and any country at and beyond. although there are many important people here this morning, there is a funeral mass is, at its heart, a family funeral. where a wife and children are given back to god the one he generally is the —— generously gave
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them, the man they loved. any words of that first scripture reading, he is going from them so violent they looked like a disaster, his leaving like annihilation. but david knew however he would go, and edgerley and his family as people of faith no ——julia and his and his family as people of faith no —— julia and his family as people of faith no he is now at peace. i want to finish some words whichjulia sent me at the week from journal of a soul. he says, death is the future for everyone. it is at the last post of this life and the river valley of the next. it is the end of our
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present life and the parting of loved ones and the setting out into the unknown —— reveille of the next. death, like birth, his only transformation, and other birth. when we die, we shall change our state, that is all. and with faith in god, that is as easy and natural as going to sleep here and waking up there. the cruelty—free cosmetics company lush says it's closing its accounts on some of the most popular social media networks. the company says social media harms society, and it compares the current situation to when "climate change was ignored and belittled for decades". from friday, lush will abandon instagram, facebook, tiktok, and snapchat in all of the 48 countries where it operates. it will continue to update
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its twitter and youtube pages until it finds "better and safer" ways to communicate with the world. a rare manuscript showing calculations made by albert einstein, as he tried to formulate his general theory of relativity, is going up for auction in paris. co—authored with his friend, michele besso, the 54—page document is brimming with equations and formulae. it's being auctioned for an estimated price of more than £2.25 million. it's one of only two documents showing einstein's workings on one of the seminal breakthroughs in modern physics. translation: what | find - particularly touching when reading the manuscript is we have this sort of monolithic and infallible image of einstein as an absolute genius who, from the first calculation, finds the right equation. but this manuscript shows einstein was intelligent but he was a scientist and just like any other he goes through phases of doubt.
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einstein makes errors in this manuscript and that, i think, makes it even greater in a way because we see the persistence. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good afternoon. today is one of the calmer, milder days of the week, certainly compared to some of what is to come. because it is going to turn colder with, yes, some rain, but also possibly some sleet and snow at times. and the potentialfor a really stormy and to the beak. —— the potential for a —— the potentialfor a really —— the potential for a really stormy end to the week. but for the time being, things are relatively quiet. quite windy across the north of the uk. big areas of cloud floating around, the potential of some fog patches down to the south—east and this band of rain working and across parts of scotland and northern ireland by the end of the night. temperatures for most of us hovering above freezing. tomorrow we will have this band of rain, a cold front which will be pushing its way southwards and
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eastwards. as of the name suggests, the air behind this front will be turning colder. ourfrontal system marked out by this band of cloud and rain sinking southwards. ahead of quite a lot of cloud, some early mist and fog in places, some sunny spells, too. behind our weather front, especially for scotland and northern ireland, things will turn much brighter with lots of sunshine. but some showers which will be wintry of high ground in scotland. it will turn increasingly blustery and increasingly cold. and all of us will be in the cold air for thursday. quite a brisk northerly wind. only slowly easing during the day. sunny spells for many. some showers for coastal parts, and wintry showers over high ground in northern scotland. and temperatures in single digits for just about all of us. and then we get to friday, and this is friday's weather maker — a deep area of low pressure diving down from the north, heavy rain and strong winds. but with some cold air wrapping into this weather system, there is the potentialfor some of the rain to turn to sleet and snow.
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and it really depends upon just how cold the air gets. so, yes, we will see areas of showery rain thinking southwards, —— sinking southwards. perhaps sleet and snow, especially over high ground but possibly to low levels, especially in northern scotland. it is going to be a very cold day and a very windy day. in fact, we could see damaging winds developing in places during friday night. gales possible, especially towards the north and east. the threat of windy and wintry weather — it's worth staying tuned to the forecast.
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hello, i'm yalda hakim. welcome to this bbc news special programme on afghanistan — 100 days after the taliban returned to power. taliban forces captured kabul on 15th august, emboldened by the withdrawal of foreign troops. in the one hundred days since then, how much has changed? afghanistan's democratically—elected government was replaced by an unelected, caretaker cabinet
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made up exclusively of men who are senior taliban figures.

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