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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 23, 2021 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines: the ayes to the right, 272. the noes to the left, 246. | borisjohnson gets his social care changes through the commons, despite significant concerns from some mps that poorer people in england will be harder hit. 46 people die after a coach crashed and burst into flames in bulgaria — 12 of the dead were children. people in northern ireland are being asked to work from home, where possible, in a bid to stop the spread of covid 19. two men are arrested on suspicion of murder after a couple in their thirties were killed in somerset, local
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people have spoken of their shock. it's the children i can't forget, for what they've seen. it's scary. a requiem mass at westminster cathedral for the mp sir david amess — stabbed to death last month. and he's done it — rugby league star kevin sinfield completes his epic run for charity. 101 miles in 2a hours. hello, and if you'vejustjoined us, welcome to bbc news. borisjohnson has narrowly succeeded in getting mps to back his controversial plans for a new cap on the cost of social care in england, but there was a substantial tory rebellion. the plans change the way the cap
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of £86,000 is calculated, and critics say say poorer people are disproportionately affected. the prime minister claims the plans are "incredibly generous." the proposals went through but mrjohnson�*s commons majority was cut from 80 to 26. 0ur political correspondent lone wells reports. does the prime minister have enough support? l has he made a pig's ear of it? it's a question getting louder in westminster after borisjohnson faced some dissent from his own side over the government's less generous than expected social care plans. the plans are are more generous than the current system because anyone with assets under £100,000 will get some state support that is means tested, and everyone will pay a maximum of £86,000 for their care. but any council support won't count towards that cap. this means someone with a family home worth £100,000 or less and somebody with a £1 million home would both need to spend £86,000 on care, even if one is eligible for help.
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often people with dementia, which is incredibly unfair in the way it affects people, and can face catastrophically high care costs, so we do have concerns with the suggestions that people perhaps in different parts of the country who have worked all their lives, but by virtue of the fact of the assets they may or may not have may be treated differently. we think that is a problem. the plans narrowly passed last night, but this disparity is what is troubling some conservative mps, who fear, as one put it, about ending up on the wrong side of the argument. the significant conservative rebellion last night came after a speech to the cbi conference of business leaders where the prime minister lost his place in his notes and got sidetracked about his visit to peppa pig. forgive me. some this morning, even the former health secretaryjeremy hunt, who abstained from backing
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borisjohnson�*s plans last night, have been forgiving to him. the speech didn't go particularly well, but i think the bigger picture is the things that matter to ordinary people, for example, the booster programme, which is by far the biggest anywhere in europe, means that we have a better chance of having a normal christmas this year than many countries in europe. i think in the end that is the kind of thing that will matter more to most people. but some of those who represent ordinary people, mps, feel their patience is wearing thin. after a rocky few weeks of difficult headlines about sleaze, less generous plans for railways and now social care, some of those who didn't back the government last night feels it's not good enough for ministers to just say, "trust us, we have done the sums." they want more assurances the plans they're being asked to vote on have been properly thought through. the government insists on this issue of social care that everyone will be better off by having this £86,000 cap. no one will lose from these reforms compared to the system we have now, and the overwhelming
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majority will win. downing street say there is an impact assessment of how these social care plans will affect people, but it hasn't yet been published. but this isn't the end of the road for the plans, which could still be challenged as they go through the house of lords. any changes suggested by the lords could be bounced back to mp5, meaning borisjohnson and ministers have work to do if they are to cool the house of lords will do what it does well but to scrutinise line by line, we may amend and remain suggest constructive things to the government and we may say think again if we are not comfortable with the detail that is in there. any changes suggested by the lords could be bounced back to mp5, meaning borisjohnson and ministers have work to do if they are to cool concerns on their own side. 46 people have been killed in bulgaria after a coach crashed
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and burst into flames in the middle of the night. the passengers were all from north macedonia, returning from a weekend in turkey. twelve of the victims were children. it's the worst coach crash in europe in a decade. nick thorpe reports. soon after two in the morning local time, the tourist coach registered in north macedonia veered off the motorway to hit the crash barrier. it tore away a 50—metre section, then burst into flames. no other vehicles were involved. the bus was the last of four travelling in a convoy across bulgaria, from turkey to north macedonia. tourists, including many children, on their way home from a weekend in istanbul. top officials, including the prime ministers of both countries, visited the scene of the accident, then went to meet survivors who were being treated in a sofia hospital. | translation: it's a tragedy that | shook us and which has demanded
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from the bulgarian state to react as quickly as possible, to investigate this road accident. what are the reasons for it? what led to the death of 46 people? and what care can be offered to those that survived? translation: i believe it to the bulgarian experts l and professionals to analyse the causes of the incident. 0ur fellow citizens who are alive, thank god, have their memories and reflections about how this happened. the causes of the accident are not yet known. the mayor of one nearby village told local media that this particular section of the motorway has many potholes and is a blackspot for accidents. visibility was also bad with recent rain. the bulgarian authorities have promised a full enquiry. nick thorpe, bbc news. hundreds of politicians have joined the family of the conservative mp, sir david amess, for a requiem mass in his memory at westminster cathedral. the pope sent a message, praising sir david's years of "devoted public service". he was stabbed to death
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while holding a surgery in his southend west constituency last month. damian grammaticas reports. in the heart of westminster, they gathered today. prime ministers past, along with cabinet members, friends and colleagues, all mourning their loss. yesterday in southend it was sir david amess�*s private family service, today the political world turns out to say goodbye to a man liked on all sides. a silence fell, sir david amess�*s coffin arrived and there was an honour guard of house of commons staff. it was a mark of the man he was, generous and kind to everyone regardless of station. united in loss, they marked the death of sir david today.
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there was even a special message from the pope. it is my honour and sad duty to convey this message from the holy father, francis. sir david was a committed catholic, he had met the pope, who said sir david's was an example to follow. commending sir david's soul to the loving mercy ofjesus christ our saviour, the holy father prayed that all who honour his memory will be confirmed in the resolve to reject the ways of violence, to combat evil with good and to help build a society of ever greater justice, fraternity and solidarity. sir david amess�*s death, stabbed in his constituency, was shocking, but today it's the fond memories those closest to him wanted to dwell on.
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we are all feeling very, very sad but today we are also celebrating, celebrating life. i feel very strongly that we must remember david not for how he died but how he lived and the causes he fought for. an mp for almost a0 years, sir david never became a minister or party grandee — he was driven not by ambition but a desire to make a difference. his passions often local and personal. a very sad day, my best friend in parliament, i have known him a0 years. when i was first elected in 2001 he was there to greet me and take me in. i will miss him but neverforget him. sir david amess, remembered and missed.
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above all, this was about honouring a politician for how he lived and the many lives he touched. we're hoping to talk to speaker of the house, sir lindsay hoyle shortly. stay tuned for that. two men have been arrested on suspicion of murder, after a couple in their thirties were killed in a village in somerset. stephen and jennifer chapple were found with serious injuries in norton fitzwarren, near taunton, on sunday evening and died of their wounds. two young children were also inside the property but were unharmed. 0ur correspondentjon kay has the latest. it was 9:a5pm on sunday evening that police were called to this quiet cul—de—sac, dragon rise, in norton fitzwarren, to a house on the left—hand side where the police van is. it was there they found this couple, who have been named locally as stephen and jennifer chapple, badly injured. there were attempts to save them but they were pronounced dead at the scene. police are now searching
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this whole area. jennifer chapple, i understand, worked in a nearby garden centre in a coffee shop. colleagues told us she was a much loved friend. they are devastated by her loss. they are now thinking of the two young children who were then found on hurt inside the property. police say the youngsters are understandably distressed. they are receiving specialist help. specially trained officers are working with grieving relatives. i spoke to one neighbour a few moments ago. her name was teresa. it's the children i can't forget, for what they have seen. it's scary. absolutely scary for them. so young as well. two men, aged 3a and 67, have been arrested on suspicion of murder. now the police aren't giving any more information about what might have prompted what happened here,
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but they have told us that because there had been prior contact between officers and some of those involved, that there has been a mandatory referral of this case to the independent office for police conduct. police are searching this lunchtime. they have looking in drains and drones trying to capture photographic evidence as well. and in the past few minutes police have confirmed that the 67 year old man who's been arrested has been released under investigation — a second man remains in custody. i believe he is 34. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson gets his social care changes through the commons, despite concerns from some mps that poorer people in england will be harder hit. including someone his own side. —— some on his own side.
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46 people are dead after a coach crashed and burst into flames in bulgaria — 12 of those killed were children people in northern ireland are being asked to work from home, where possible, in a bid to stop the spread of covid—19. staying with that story... people in northern ireland are being urged by stormont ministers to work from home "where possible" in a bid to curb the spread of covid—19. current advice already states that people should work from home where they can but ministers said they were "strengthening" that message but not making a formal change to rules. our ireland correspondent, chris page, says it follows an executive meeting about how to tackle rising infections. yes, the second straight day of ministerial meetings, a measure of the rising concern about covid cases and hospitalisations here in northern ireland. no change to the legal measures, but there certainly is a change to the public messaging.
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and that is being strengthened, prior to today people were being told to prepare for a return to the office, and they could work from home when they can. now they are being told they should work from home unless they cannot. ministers say this is one of the key measures they hope will make a difference to bring down case numbers. they recognise, they say, it could be difficult for people depending on their circumstances. they are asking employers to try to do their best to facilitate more people working from home. also, there is going to be an increased focus on getting more people vaccinated, particularly getting more people to take up their third dose, there booster dose. and there will be advice on how people can limit their social contacts. no decision on mask wearing in terms of how it should be enforced. mask wearing is still compulsory in a number of indoor public spaces. there has been some political disagreement about exactly how and how tightly that should be enforced. officials are going to look at that and come back with some recommendations.
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but overall it is a shift in the public message and it is reflecting the feeling among ministers that things have to change for the better in order for people to have a decent christmas. our health correspondent jim reed has been looking at the picture in the uk. those headlines coming from austria, those pictures from the netherlands, and wondering, could we see a repeat, could we see a similar thing across the uk? and scientists we have spoken to are pretty optimistic that we are better protected in this country now than they may be in some other parts of continental europe. there are three main reasons for that. vaccination roll—out has gone quite well in this country. vaccination rates are quite high compared to other parts of continental europe. we also had quite high levels of infection over the summer, so building levels of immunity in the population.
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also, the booster campaign chris was talking about, those third doses, has really been gathering pace. 85% of over 805 in england have had that third dose. it is worth saying that building up that immunity has come to a certain extent at a price. in terms of the number of people in the summer that had to go into hospital or lost their lives. another 1200 deaths due to covid in the most recent week. but politicians seem to be indicating that the chance of big, severe restrictions coming in seems unlikely at the moment. instead, some changes to guidance. chris was mentioning the changes in northern ireland. in england, today's new guidance says people in crowded spaces should use a lateral flow test before they do that. at the moment it seems unlikely we will have big changes to regulations across the uk. thank you. returning to 1 of our earlier stories, which was the death of sir
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david amess and that memorial ceremony. i m nowjoined by speaker of the house, sir lindsay hoyle, who was a friend ? and of course colleague — of sir amess. yes, a mix of emotions, the tributes were absolute break absolutely captured —— the tributes absolutely captured —— the tributes absolutely captured david because he brought all politics together. once again today, we saw politics being brought together, stood together, united in ourfight together, stood together, united in our fight against together, stood together, united in ourfight against terrorism. together, stood together, united in our fight against terrorism. just what david would have stood for and he is that kind of person who you could rely on. i would say he was a great friend to me, a great supporter to me and i've got to say it was a tragic loss but actually it was bringing people there and the way that people are speaking about david. everyone was moved in the cathedral today without doubt. we have all lost a great friend, great
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colleague, but none more so than his family who suffered the greatest loss as well. we family who suffered the greatest loss as well-— family who suffered the greatest loss as well. ~ . ., , , ., loss as well. we certainly seem to net there loss as well. we certainly seem to get there on _ loss as well. we certainly seem to get there on a _ loss as well. we certainly seem to get there on a day _ loss as well. we certainly seem to get there on a day like _ loss as well. we certainly seem to get there on a day like today - loss as well. we certainly seem to get there on a day like today and l get there on a day like today and i'm sure that was marked in the course of the service at westminster cathedral. talking about the parliament, we've had a lot of tributes from members led by yourself but very striking to see those pictures of guard of honour, members of staff, people you have known him as long as his colleagues, old retainers in the house, what they have to say about him to you? that was a mark of respect, wasn't it? not only was he a friend of the mp5, use a friend of staff, he mps, use a friend of staff, he jovial, kind, took time out to go and speak to them and i think that is why today was so important, they moved the start of the sitting house of commons to enable the staff we wanted to show their respect and the guard of honour they provided was moving in itself. it was down to
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all. did not matter, that he wanted to know everybody, wanted to talk to everybody for you was a great time kind of person, really was that kind of mp that everyone wanted and 1 who stood up to his constituents, metered with his constituents, delivered on —— met with his constituents, and he was logged right across this house. as i say, everybody held him in great esteem and that respect is shown by the staff today and i cannot pay highest regard for the way that our staff said we want to be part of the service. they gave their time, they wanted to do it right and i've got to say, nobody wants to ever anybody�*s death but what i've got to say as it was a fitting tribute that was put on today by all.- say as it was a fitting tribute that was put on today by all. thank you very much- —
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let us cross to nicola sturgeon. scotland's first minister is addressing now holyrood. have now had a 1st dose _ addressing now holyrood. have now had a 1st dose and _ addressing now holyrood. have now had a 1st dose and 3,000,940 - had a 1st dose and 3,000,940 thousand 314 have had both doses. in total now, they are double vaccinated. it was... in line with advice, were preparing to offer a 2nd dose is 216 and 17 —year—olds. as of now, on 1st, 2nd, 3rd and booster doses, scotland are still the most vaccinated part of the uk and i want again to record my thanks for delivering the vaccine programme. looking across europe, we can see very clearly that the
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situation is deteriorating again. as a result, covid measures are being tightened or reintroduced in many countries for example ireland, the netherlands, germany and slovak. the most of your end of the spectrum, austria is back in full lockdown and is mandating can also revaccination. —— and in slovakia. —— compulsory vaccination. governments are being forced to take difficult and invidious decisions and that is true here in scotland as well. thankfully we are not at the stage seeing the rapid rise in cases that others are experiencing, the situation does remain precarious. aces are on the rise to a greater or lesser extent in countries all around us including yourin in countries all around us including your in the uk and we are also entering a period when understandably people will be socialising and mixing more than normal. even though our position now
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is relatively stable compared to some other countries, we must continue to take care and we must not allow ourselves to be lulled into any false sense of security so let me now give more detail in the recent trend we are seeing here. last week, i noted that cases had increased gradually over the previous fortnight from just over 2500 new cases per day to just over 3000. since then, the situation appears to have stabilised again and in the past 7 days, the average number of new cases being recorded each day has fallen from just over 3000 to just each day has fallen from just over 3000 tojust under 3000. it each day has fallen from just over 3000 to just under 3000. it has each day has fallen from just over 3000 tojust under 3000. it has been a fall of around 3%. however, there continues to be quite a marked variation between different age groups and the over 605 have ca5e5 falling by 19% and this at least in part is very likely to reflect the good progress of the booster program. in the under 605, there was
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only a very slight decline, a small fall in cases in those aged under 25 was almost balanced out by a very small increase in the other age band5 under 60, 50 in younger age groups, ca5e5 band5 under 60, 50 in younger age groups, cases have been broadly group5, cases have been broadly 5tatic over the past week and that said, a number of different factors will be at play over the next few weeks and the combination of these make5 weeks and the combination of these makes it quite difficult to be certain about the course the pandemic will take over the festive period and into january. only1 hand,it period and into january. only1 hand, it was the booster programme will continue to gather pace and more people in younger age groups will receive their primary vaccination 50 we can expect the combined effect of vaccination to bear down on transmission and we also hope reducing the numbers who will become 5eriou5ly unwell a5 a result of getting the virus. on the other hand, we can expect more indoor mixing to take place as the weather gets colder and of course as weather gets colder and of course as we head towards the festive season. in addition, there is likely to be
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some waning vaccine immunity which says why boost the jag5 matter 50 5ay5 why boost the jag5 matter so much and these latter factor5 5ay5 why boost the jag5 matter so much and these latter factors will increase ri5k5 much and these latter factors will increase risks of transmission. while the cases are stable ju5t increase risks of transmission. while the cases are stable just now, it is also the fact that infection rates remain too high and higher than we want them to be and all that is putting significant and sustained pressure on the nhs. in the past week, the number of people in hospital with covid is fallen only slightly from 779 2 743 and the number of people in intensive care has risen very slightly from 57 to 60. the number of patients in hospital with covid is high on the nhs is dealing with the backlog of care created by earlier phases of the pandemic and of course the peak of the winter flu season coupled with other winter pressures are possibly still lies ahead of us. taking all of this into account and adding the fact that the r number is
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hovering at or slightly above 1, the conclusion is that our situation is definitely more positive than we might have expected to be at point but it is still precarious. we need to get the r number back below1 and that means having in place a range of proportionate protections to keep the country are safe as possible while we continue to leave as —— live as freely as possible which is why the cabinet decided this morning to retain for a further period all of the remaining legal protections such as the requirement to wear face coverings and, subject to a change i will set out shortly, to keep in place the covid supplication scheme and intensify our public information campaign in the weeks ahead. i want to know set out and really emphasised today the range of protections that we judge to be essential and i want to stress that were essential. if we are to navigate this winter as safely as possible and crucially without the
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need to reintroduce more owners restrictions. as we approach the festive season, i am appealing fresh to everyone across the country to comply with all of these protections with renewed care and commitment, to keep ourselves safe but also to show our solidarity to those around us. firstly, vaccination. the duty of government is to deliver the vaccine programme, especially at this stage, boosters, as rapidly as possible and right now that is my government art. more than 1.4 million people, just over 30% of the total population, have so far had a booster or 3rd dose and within the most vulnerable groups, many of those at highest clinical risk have a booster of the most. we are already seeing the positive impact of roosters in the case numbers so the program is going exceptionally well but we are doing
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everything possible and will continue to do everything possible to speed it up further. delivering the program as quickly as possible is of course the government's responsibility although of course we are reliant on and eternally grateful for the commitment of nhs workers in delivering it. the duty and responsibility though of all of us are citizens is to get vaccinated as soon as we are able, so if you are not yet having a dose of a vaccine that you're eligible for, please make arrangements get it now. this is even more vital if you are planning to socialise at all over the festive period. if you're meeting up with loved ones and you're not as fully vaccinated as you're not as fully vaccinated as you could, you're putting them at unnecessary risk and to be blunt, you could be putting their lives in danger. the most precious gift we can give anyone this christmas is to be vaccinated and also tested which i will say more about shortly, before we meet, hug or spend any time with them, so if you have not had a 1st or 2nd dose yet, it is not
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too late so please those who —— please do so now and get a booster as soon as you are able as a booster jab enables the risk of symptomatic infection by more than 80%, so it is notjust infection by more than 80%, so it is not just a infection by more than 80%, so it is notjust a small top up. getting your is every bit as bit as important as getting the initial vaccines. if you're aged over 50 or are in1 vaccines. if you're aged over 50 or are in 1 of the higher risk and over 24 weeks from your 2nd jag, you need to book an appointment via the nhs form or the helpline number which is over 800 oh 30 8013. if you live in many parts of the island areas which does not use online booking, you will be contacted by your health board but for anyone else, please use nhs in form or call the helpline on booster for use nhs in form or call the helpline on boosterfor a soon use nhs in form or call the helpline on booster for a soon as you're eligible which is 24 weeks after your 2nd dose, do not, for example, wait until after the christmas holiday period is over. for those
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aged 40 — 49 run next in line for boosters and 416 and 17 —year—olds who will now be offered a 2nd dose, on booking appointments will be available very soon. above all, today, i want to reinforce this vital message to every person eligible for vaccination including pregnant women. whether for eligible for vaccination including pregnant women. whetherfor a eligible for vaccination including pregnant women. whether for a 1st, 2nd, 3rd or boosterjag, please book an appointment without delay and get your flu an appointment without delay and get yourflu jag, too, if an appointment without delay and get your flu jag, too, if you're eligible for that. getting vaccinated does remain the single most important thing any of us can do to protect ourselves, our loved ones and our communities and you could well be saving your own life and the lives of your love ones, you will be helping the nhs and you will be maximising our chances of getting through this winter without need for further restrictions. the vaccine programme is the bedrock of our fight against covid was are the protections are vitally important, to. scottish government will be intensifying our public awareness and information campaigns over the winter period to make sure everyone
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knows what is being asked of us so when you see those adverts, please take a moment to listen and remind yourself of the protections that will help you and others safe. what are those other protections? firstly, as well as vaccination, we are asking everyone to take regular lateral flow test. we have been asking people to do this routinely, twice a week, however, over the festive period, we are asking for extra effort and so this next request is vitally important. on any occasion that you're socialising with others, whether that is going out for drinks or dinner, visiting someone at home, or even going shopping somewhere that might be crowded, please take an l ft test before you go and if it is positive, do not go and instead get a pcr test and self isolate while you await the result. this way you are minimising the risk of inadvertently passing the risk of inadvertently passing the virus on even if you do not have sim terms. —— if you do not have
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symptoms. and also in public transport, hospitality settings and indoors, this is a legal requirement to wear masks but a vital protection. a study published last week suggested face coverings may reduce the risk of transmission by over 50%. good ventilation also help so please open windows if you have people round and lastly please continue to work from home whenever possible. i know this isn't always easy for workers or convenient for employers, but it does make a difference and it will help us navigate our way through this difficult winter period. the average number of contacts people are having in the workplace has doubled in recent weeks and as we head deeper into winter this will create an increased risk of transmission, virus transmits when people interact and when go to work the interacting number of ways, travel, lunch breaks and after work, so number of ways, travel, lunch breaks and after work, 50 support for home
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working whenever possible remains one of the most effective protections we have at our disposal. let me turn to the covid certification scheme which cabinet also discussed this morning and set out the decisions we've reached and the rationale. for context it is worth bearing in mind that covid certification is far from worth bearing in mind that covid certification is farfrom unique worth bearing in mind that covid certification is far from unique to scotland and similar schemes are in place in many other parts of the world. in recent weeks certification schemes have been announced and reintroduced or extended in denmark, norway, sweden, northern ireland and elsewhere, many cover a wider range of premises in scotland but we must reach a decision is based on our own circumstances and so i can confirm the judgments we arrived at this morning are as follows, for at least a further three weeks we will retain vaccine certification for the venues and events currently covered by the scheme. that is late licensed premises with a designated area for
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dancing, and on seated indoor events of 500 people or more, unseated outdoor events of 4000 people or more and any event with 10,000 people or more. given the state of the pandemic it would not be appropriate to remove this protection against transmission at this stage. we have decided that from the 6th of december it will be possible to access venues or events covered by the scheme bike sharing proof of vaccination as now or a recent negative lateral flow test result. when we first launched the scheme at one of its objectives was to help drive up vaccination rates and this is still important but actual and projected uptake rates mean wejudge it actual and projected uptake rates mean we judge it possible to include testing and doing so will also make sure the scheme remains proportionate going forward and also help our wider efforts to stem transmission through greater use of natural more generally. finally, we
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considered the possible extension of the scheme to wider premises including indoor theatres, cinemas and other hospitality venues and this was a very finely balanced decision but i can confirm that at this stage we have decided not to extend the scope of the scheme. we have taken account of the fact that although our situation is precarious, cases are currently stable and indeed a slightly declining and we have considered the inevitable impact vaccine certification has on the operation of businesses and concluded that at this stage extension would not be proportionate. we were also mindful of the need over the coming weeks of getting across the message that it is important to be vaccinated and tested ahead of socialising in any setting including in homes and shopping centres, notjust in those that might be covered by a certification scheme. i said we
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would take this decision with the utmost care and that is what we have done. it is important to stress that we must keep it as we do all possible protections under review, and if our situation does deteriorate it may yet be that extending covid certification is a more proportionate alternative to the reintroduction of any more own risk restrictions on hospitality, for example, and we will liaise closely with businesses about this and about what they must do in the coming weeks to minimise that risk. to begin to conclude, it is an understatement, i'm sure, to say that everyone is sick and tired of this virus and the impact, although less than in previous months, it is still having on our lives nevertheless, and i understand that and i share that sentiment. but i'm also gratefulfor all of and i share that sentiment. but i'm also grateful for all of the sacrifices everyone has made and continues to make and thanks to those sacrifices we are in a much stronger position now than i would
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have dared hope forjust stronger position now than i would have dared hope for just a stronger position now than i would have dared hope forjust a few stronger position now than i would have dared hope for just a few weeks ago. i can't emphasise strongly enough that our position is still precarious and the next couple of weeks pose risks, cases are rising in countries around us and the festive period will bring more travel and more socialising. that is to be welcomed because we all desperately want a more normal christmas than was possible last year but we must all of us take sensible precautions at and measures to reduce pressure on the nhs and avoid the possibility of renewed restrictions. we can all play a part so my request to everyone watching is as follows, and pass this on to friends and family, this is what everyone, government, businesses and individual citizens must do together as part of a social compact to keep each other as safe as possible and allow us to live as freely as possible. over the next crucial
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weeks please wear your face coverings and follow all advice on hygiene and ventilation, wash your hands and surfaces and keep windows open when you have people round, and if you have eased up on this, as i know many will have, now is the time for all of us to tighten up again. work from home if you can, if you think you could be working from home and you aren't, raised this with your employer and to employers, please facilitate home—working for a bit longer in as far as possible. to all of you, make sure you get all vaccine doses you are eligible for including the flow, and i will continue to make sure the government continues to roll out the vaccination programme as quickly as possible ? including the flu. on any occasion you intend to socialise whether that is in a pub restaurant or a shopping centre, do a lateral flow test first and if it is positive, don't go, self isolate and get a pcr test instead. government
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has made sure you can order these tests free or get them at a local pharmacy and if you don't have them already, now is the time to order some and keep your supply topped up over the next few weeks. all of these precautions really matter and they are part of our social compact and they will help protect us and all of those around us and they will help us protect the nhs and all of those working so hard on its front line right now. i ask everybody across the country to stick with these protections so that we can, i hope, have a much more normal christmas but do so without jeopardising our prospect of a much brighter new year as well. anki. ? thank you. brighter new year as well. anki. ? thank vow— brighter new year as well. anki. ? thank ou. ,, , ., ,, ., thank you. studio: nicola sturgeon there at the — thank you. studio: nicola sturgeon there at the scottish _ thank you. studio: nicola sturgeon there at the scottish parliament. i there at the scottish parliament. interesting tone to her remarks because although she was stressing the importance of maintaining normal precautions over covid she said although the situation remains
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precarious it was more positive than she had feared even a few weeks ago. the most significant element is that the decision not to extend further at the covid certification scheme and actually to allow people an alternative to showing they have been vaccinated if they had a recent natural flow test even though they are not always so reliable. ? lateral flow test. what did you make of her statement? you lateral flow test. what did you make of her statement?— lateral flow test. what did you make of her statement? you summed it up re of her statement? you summed it up pretty well- — of her statement? you summed it up pretty well- the _ of her statement? you summed it up pretty well. the idea _ of her statement? you summed it up pretty well. the idea briefly - of her statement? you summed it up pretty well. the idea briefly of - of her statement? you summed it up pretty well. the idea briefly of it - pretty well. the idea briefly of it being a precarious situation but positive and she said that figures had dropped slightly over the last week but there was still a concern about the winter period and people socialising indoors and looking ahead to christmas as well, where there is likely to be, there will be a lot more socialising and the risk of increased transmission. but certainly, as you say, the fact they are not going to extend the vaccine
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certification scheme, it is not going to be extended to cinemas, theatres, other live events, it will remain with nightclubs and large life events. that suggests there is positivity and optimism and also the fact they are going to allow the alternative of a negative lateral flow test instead of a proof of full vaccination to allow people access to those venues, that suggests a certain amount of confidence by the scottish government that if things carry on as they are at the moment, they will be able to manage the pandemic over the course of the festive season and over the course of january which really is the critical point that those weeks after christmas when there is the very much heightened danger of increased infections.— very much heightened danger of increased infections. figures out either today _ increased infections. figures out either today or _ increased infections. figures out either today or in _ increased infections. figures out either today or in the _ increased infections. figures out either today or in the last - increased infections. figures out either today or in the last few i increased infections. figures out l either today or in the last few days on the performance of hospitals in scotland, suggesting that a&e is
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improving, is that another indication that maybe the pressure on intensive care units and the effects on the health care service has plateaued? it is effects on the health care service has plateaued?— effects on the health care service has plateaued? it is definitely the case that there _ has plateaued? it is definitely the case that there have _ has plateaued? it is definitely the case that there have been - has plateaued? it is definitely the i case that there have been problems with a&e and the waiting time targets they are supposed to hit, supposed to be they see 84% of people within three hours and taking all the figures across scotland, that has not been achieved since july, 50 that gives an indication that there is pressure on those emergency services, and we know the nhs in scotland, like the rest of the uk, is under a lot of pressure at the moment, and that was not especially something nicola sturgeon referred to, and she did say the number of people with covid in hospital has reduced slightly although there are more people in intensive care but of course it has to be a factor because whether the nhs cannot sustain itself, and
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whether it can manage the pandemic, thatis whether it can manage the pandemic, that is absolutely a crucial part of the equation for the scottish government.— the equation for the scottish government. , ,, ., ., government. james shaw in glasgow, thanks forjoining _ government. james shaw in glasgow, thanks forjoining us. _ european ministers are meeting in brussels to discuss how to tackle the increasing number of covid cases on the continent. several governments have brought back restrictions and urged more people to get vaccinated, but the measures have sparked violent protests in some towns and cities. austria has re—imposed a nationwide lockdown. our correspondent bethany bell has this report from vienna. vienna is cold and quiet. austria is back in lockdown after record numbers of new coronavirus infections. nonessential shops and restaurants are closed. the city's famous christmas markets were open last week. but now they're all boarded up. the government says the restrictions will last
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forjust under three weeks. after that, vaccinated austrians will be allowed to go out again, but the lockdown for the unvaccinated will continue. and there are even tougher measures to come. austria has announced plans to make covid jabs compulsory by february. austria's leader alexander schallenberg told us the move was necessary because of the country's low vaccination rate. simply, we have 66% of the population so far which has got the vaccine. this is too little, too late. and we have a political force in this country, the freedom party, which is openly running against vaccination, and saying, "this is bad for you, don't take it." so we have a very peculiar situation in austria. but it's controversial. sylvia, who suffers from allergies, is unvaccinated. she says getting the shots should
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be a personal choice. you read every day, "you are guilty that we have lockdown, "you are guilty that people are dying, you are "guilty, guilty, guilty." i'm here since two years now, i have less contact, nothing. just go to work, see my family, and be here in the garden. i'm not guilty of anything. but other austrians are queueing up for covid shots. the city of vienna has even started vaccinating young children, the first place in europe to do so. with the introduction of these new policies, austria knows europe and the world will be watching. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna. a senior red cross official says policies designed to withhold international funds from the taliban are depriving ordinary afghan people of the means of survival. speaking 100 days after the taliban swept
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to power across the country, dominik stillhart urged international donors to find creative ways to send funds to the country to stave off severe malnutrition. the bbc�*s yalda hakim is in kabul. at the food distribution centre in south—east kabul, the hungry wait. this is a nation on the brink of starvation. and for aid agencies, it's a race against time. emotions begin to run high. nafisa has arrived with her disabled son, pleading for help. the world food programme says they're doing everything they can, but it's not enough. nafisa tells me she's desperate.
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the taliban says the world needs to act. the international community has a hand in that, because they have imposed sanctions and other steps, which has led to a humanitarian crisis in afghanistan. i think there are many in the international community and other countries who are speaking about human rights and educating of human rights, they have such claims. they should reconsider, not take steps which lead to a humanitarian crisis in afghanistan.
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gulnara is three, so weak she can barely open her eyes. marwa is nearly one. it's notjust patients suffering.
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health care staff haven't been paid for months. every single person i'm speaking to has the same story. they can't pay for their ticket to come here, they can't pay for theirfood here. and she was just saying that someday they may have to admit her here as a malnutrition patient herself, because she doesn't know where she's going to get her next meal from. even before the taliban came to power, there was a humanitarian crisis in this country. drought, aid cuts and the economic collapse have turned crisis into catastrophe. yalda hakim, bbc news, kabul.
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medical advice on treating new mothers with sepsis will be changed following the deaths of two women in kent shortly after they gave birth. the guidance is being revised in the wake of a bbc investigation which found they probably died after being infected with herpes while having caesarean sections. doctors had assumed that samantha mulcahy and kim sampson were suffering from a bacterial infection and didn't give them the anti—viral drugs that may have saved their lives. the east kent hospitals trust said it couldn't identify the source of the infection. new guidance from the clinical watchdog, nice, says people with mild depression in england should be prescribed exercise or therapy before medication. recommended treatments include mindfulness, meditation and counselling sessions — but doctors will be asked to include patients in conversations about what would suit them best. anti—depressant use has increased in recent years — with an estimated one in seven people in england taking them. councils across the uk will be forced to help care for some of the unaccompanied migrant children who cross the channel in boats. local authorities in kent and the south—east of england are struggling to find housing for everyone in need. a voluntary scheme hasn't produced enough accommodation, and more than a hundred migrant children are currently living in hotels.
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the former rugby league player, kevin sinfield, has completed a challenge to run 101 miles injust 24 hours, to raise money for charity. he did it in honour of his former team mate, rob burrow, who was diagnosed with motor neurone disease two years ago. the run, which began in leicester and ended at headingley stadium in leeds, has raised over £1 million. sally nugent was there to meet kevin as he crossed the finish line. kevin sinfield, finishing an epic challenge. he has run 101 miles in 24 hours. at the finish line, his former team—mate and best friend, rugby league legend rob burrow. rob was diagnosed with motor neurone disease back in 2019. don't make me cry. no, i'm not going to make you cry. you've done it. you've done it, that's all you need to know.
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i know. yeah, he knows how much we love and care about him. that was certainly a battle. we wanted a battle and we got one. three, two, one, go! cheering the challenge started in leicester. all along the route, members of the public encouraged their hero on. really, really buoyed by the support, its been incredible. i can't thank people enough. they've done a wonderful thing. really, really wonderful. i've not come across anybody so inspiring in a very, - very long time, and i wish him all the best _ kev is raising money for the motor neurone disease association and leeds hospital charity. mnd is a degenerative brain disorder. there is no effective treatment and no cure. rob's got the same strain of motor neurone as my sister had, who passed away last year, and it's just so... just so damn horrible.
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as day turned into night and the temperature dropped, this gruelling run, mile after mile, started to take its toll. obviously he's running on fumes, he is very emotional, very tired, but we are just all so proud of him. kevin sinfield entered the leeds rhinos stadium to a standing ovation, and this message from his best friend. recorded voice: thanks so much to all involved i with this amazing event. the money raised will help people to get a great facility for a new care centre and to help the mndf find a cure. today is an amazing day for the whole community, and it will benefit every sufferer. lastly, to my amazing friend kev, you don't realise the impact you have had on me and the whole mnd community. a remarkable feat of endurance which will help fund treatments and research into a cure for mnd. sally nugent, bbc news. let's cross to the commons
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where the culture secretary nadine dorries is giving evidence to the commons digital, culture, media and sport committee. the appointment of jess the appointment ofjess bremer as the head _ the appointment ofjess bremer as the head of— the appointment ofjess bremer as the head of news _ the appointment ofjess bremer as the head of news at _ the appointment ofjess bremer as the head of news at the _ the appointment ofjess bremer as the head of news at the bbc, - the head of news at the bbc, expressed _ the head of news at the bbc, expressed views _ the head of news at the bbc, expressed views opposing. the head of news at the bbc, - expressed views opposing brexit, would _ expressed views opposing brexit, would you — expressed views opposing brexit, would you have _ expressed views opposing brexit, would you have appointed - expressed views opposing brexit, would you have appointed that i would you have appointed that appointment— would you have appointed that appointment given _ would you have appointed that appointment given the - would you have appointed that appointment given the views l would you have appointed that . appointment given the views you would you have appointed that - appointment given the views you have expressed? _ appointment given the views you have expressed? l— appointment given the views you have ex - ressed? ., ., appointment given the views you have exressed? ., ., ., ., expressed? i am not going to get into a hypothetical _ expressed? i am not going to get into a hypothetical situation i expressed? i am not going to get into a hypothetical situation that| into a hypothetical situation that is both historic and not relevant to my role. if is both historic and not relevant to m role. ,., ., is both historic and not relevant to m role. ., , ., my role. if someone is in that osition my role. if someone is in that position which _ my role. if someone is in that position which you _ my role. if someone is in that position which you would i my role. if someone is in that i position which you would consider very influential— position which you would consider very influential and _ position which you would consider very influential and sensitive, i position which you would consider very influential and sensitive, and had expressed _ very influential and sensitive, and had expressed anti—brexit - very influential and sensitive, and had expressed anti—brexit views, | very influential and sensitive, and i had expressed anti—brexit views, is that an _ had expressed anti—brexit views, is that an appropriate _ had expressed anti—brexit views, is that an appropriate appointment i had expressed anti—brexit views, is| that an appropriate appointment for someone _ that an appropriate appointment for someone who— that an appropriate appointment for someone who has _ that an appropriate appointment for someone who has done _ that an appropriate appointment for someone who has done that? - that an appropriate appointment for someone who has done that? i’m“. that an appropriate appointment for someone who has done that? i'm not aroin to someone who has done that? i'm not going to get — someone who has done that? i'm not going to get involved _ someone who has done that? i'm not going to get involved in _ someone who has done that? i'm not going to get involved in a _ going to get involved in a hypothetical and historical speculation on somebody who is applying for a job. you speculation on somebody who is applying for a job-— applying for a 'ob. you won't be seekin: applying for a 'ob. you won't be seeking in — applying for a job. you won't be seeking in any _ applying for a job. you won't be seeking in any way _ applying for a job. you won't be seeking in any way to _ applying for a job. you won't be seeking in any way to influence | seeking in any way to influence future — seeking in any way to influence future appointments _
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seeking in any way to influence future appointments by - seeking in any way to influence future appointments by the i seeking in any way to influence i future appointments by the bbc or for ofcorn — future appointments by the bbc or for ofcorn or— future appointments by the bbc or for ofcom or the _ future appointments by the bbc or for ofcom or the charity— future appointments by the bbc or. for ofcom or the charity commission in any— for ofcom or the charity commission in any way— for ofcom or the charity commission in any way to— for ofcom or the charity commission in any way to check— for ofcom or the charity commission in any way to check the _ for ofcom or the charity commission in any way to check the political- in any way to check the political credentials _ in any way to check the political credentials of— in any way to check the political credentials of any _ in any way to check the political credentials of any candidate? i in any way to check the political. credentials of any candidate? i’m“ credentials of any candidate? i'm not art credentials of any candidate? i'm not part of _ credentials of any candidate? not part of recruitment process. credentials of any candidate?“ not part of recruitment process. my role as a secretary of state and i haven't gone through a process yet, by the way, in the eight weeks i've been there, i'm about to go through the process, but my responsibility, finally, is to sign off after the process and due diligence has been done and interviews have taken place by a panel which includes an independent member which is in accordance with the government's code for public appointments which is overseen by the public appointments commissioner. my role is to sign off on a final candidate but i don't get any involvement in that process along the way in terms of the due diligence you are talking about. in
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of the due diligence you are talking about. , ., , , ., of the due diligence you are talking about. , ., , i. _ about. in terms of timings, you say no preferred _ about. in terms of timings, you say no preferred candidate _ about. in terms of timings, you say no preferred candidate in _ about. in terms of timings, you say no preferred candidate in terms i about. in terms of timings, you say no preferred candidate in terms ofl no preferred candidate in terms of the charity— no preferred candidate in terms of the charity commission _ no preferred candidate in terms ofj the charity commission candidate, but we _ the charity commission candidate, but we have — the charity commission candidate, but we have been _ the charity commission candidate, but we have been holding - the charity commission candidate, but we have been holding a - the charity commission candidate, but we have been holding a date l the charity commission candidate, | but we have been holding a date of the 9th _ but we have been holding a date of the 9th of— but we have been holding a date of the 9th of december— but we have been holding a date of the 9th of december for— but we have been holding a date of the 9th of december for that- the 9th of december for that appointment— the 9th of december for that appointment and _ the 9th of december for that appointment and we - the 9th of december for that appointment and we needed| the 9th of december for that. appointment and we needed to the 9th of december for that- appointment and we needed to have those _ appointment and we needed to have those documents _ appointment and we needed to have those documents by— appointment and we needed to have those documents by the _ appointment and we needed to have those documents by the 2nd - appointment and we needed to have those documents by the 2nd of- those documents by the 2nd of decemher— those documents by the 2nd of december which— those documents by the 2nd of december which is— those documents by the 2nd of december which is six- those documents by the 2nd of december which is six working | those documents by the 2nd of- december which is six working days and she _ december which is six working days and she has— december which is six working days and she has said _ december which is six working days and she has said that— december which is six working days and she has said that she _ december which is six working days and she has said that she has - december which is six working days and she has said that she has not . and she has said that she has not gone _ and she has said that she has not gone through _ and she has said that she has not gone through the _ and she has said that she has not gone through the process - and she has said that she has not gone through the process yet, i and she has said that she has not gone through the process yet, soj and she has said that she has not i gone through the process yet, so why are your— gone through the process yet, so why are your officials _ gone through the process yet, so why are your officials effectively _ are your officials effectively giving — are your officials effectively giving us, _ are your officials effectively giving us, getting _ are your officials effectively giving us, getting us- are your officials effectively giving us, getting us to i are your officials effectively| giving us, getting us to hold are your officials effectively i giving us, getting us to hold a are your officials effectively - giving us, getting us to hold a date when _ giving us, getting us to hold a date when you _ giving us, getting us to hold a date when you are — giving us, getting us to hold a date when you are not _ giving us, getting us to hold a date when you are not need _ giving us, getting us to hold a date when you are not need the - when you are not need the appointment? _ when you are not need the appointment?— when you are not need the a- ointment? �* , , ., appointment? because interviews have taken lace appointment? because interviews have taken place in — appointment? because interviews have taken place in the _ appointment? because interviews have taken place in the process _ appointment? because interviews have taken place in the process is _ taken place in the process is ongoing and we have given a date which we anticipate we will be able to meet _ which we anticipate we will be able to meet. ~ . . which we anticipate we will be able to meet. ~ ., ., ., ., , ., to meet. what i have not done is go to meet. what i have not done is go to the process _ to meet. what i have not done is go to the process of _ to meet. what i have not done is go to the process of signing _ to meet. what i have not done is go to the process of signing of- to meet. what i have not done is go to the process of signing of a - to the process of signing of a successful candidate. you to the process of signing of a successful candidate. you have got a candidate and _ successful candidate. you have got a candidate and you _ successful candidate. you have got a candidate and you won't _ successful candidate. you have got a candidate and you won't discuss i candidate and you won't discuss that, _ candidate and you won't discuss that, that — candidate and you won't discuss that, that is _ candidate and you won't discuss that, that is absolutely - candidate and you won't discuss that, that is absolutely fine. i candidate and you won't discuss that, that is absolutely fine. [i that, that is absolutely fine. i have that, that is absolutely fine. have not gone through the that, that is absolutely finel- have not gone through the process that, that is absolutely finel— have not gone through the process of signing of a candidate. irate have not gone through the process of signing of a candidate.— signing of a candidate. we can anticipate _ signing of a candidate. we can anticipate that _ signing of a candidate. we can anticipate that date? - signing of a candidate. we can anticipate that date? there i signing of a candidate. we can anticipate that date? there is| signing of a candidate. we can l anticipate that date? there is no
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reason to not — anticipate that date? there is no reason to not think _ anticipate that date? there is no reason to not think that - anticipate that date? there is no reason to not think that you i anticipate that date? there is no | reason to not think that you won't be using that date.— be using that date. thank you for “oininr be using that date. thank you for joining us- _ be using that date. thank you for joining us. serious _ be using that date. thank you for joining us. serious concerns i be using that date. thank you for joining us. serious concerns have been _ joining us. serious concerns have been raised — joining us. serious concerns have been raised about— joining us. serious concerns have been raised about the _ joining us. serious concerns have been raised about the impact- joining us. serious concerns have been raised about the impact of. joining us. serious concerns have i been raised about the impact of any changes— been raised about the impact of any changes to — been raised about the impact of any changes to the _ been raised about the impact of any changes to the licence _ been raised about the impact of any changes to the licence fee - changes to the licence fee settlement, _ changes to the licence fee settlement, and - changes to the licence fee i settlement, and specifically on regional— settlement, and specifically on regional broadcasting, - settlement, and specifically on regional broadcasting, and i'm| regional broadcasting, and i'm obviously— regional broadcasting, and i'm obviously specifically - regional broadcasting, and i'm obviously specifically worried i regional broadcasting, and i'm i obviously specifically worried about wales _ obviously specifically worried about wales and — obviously specifically worried about wales and the _ obviously specifically worried about wales and the impact _ obviously specifically worried about wales and the impact it _ obviously specifically worried about wales and the impact it will- obviously specifically worried about wales and the impact it will have, i wales and the impact it will have, especially— wales and the impact it will have, especially as— wales and the impact it will have, especially as they _ wales and the impact it will have, especially as they are _ wales and the impact it will have, especially as they are being - especially as they are being included _ especially as they are being included in _ especially as they are being included in the _ especially as they are being included in the steps - especially as they are being included in the steps this i especially as they are being i included in the steps this time, especially as they are being - included in the steps this time, so what _ included in the steps this time, so what steps — included in the steps this time, so what steps will _ included in the steps this time, so what steps will you _ included in the steps this time, so what steps will you take _ included in the steps this time, so what steps will you take to - included in the steps this time, so what steps will you take to make i what steps will you take to make sure regional— what steps will you take to make sure regional content _ what steps will you take to make sure regional content is - what steps will you take to make i sure regional content is protected? i do appreciate _ sure regional content is protected? i do appreciate how _ sure regional content is protected? i do appreciate how important i sure regional content is protected? i do appreciate how important that| i do appreciate how important that is in wales and i know how much the welsh mp5 love it and i don't want you to think that i don't, it is a small station, and it is very important in terms of its welsh speaking aspect and i'm aware of that. in terms of the licence fee settlement with the bbc, ijust that. in terms of the licence fee settlement with the bbc, i just want to let you know, i fully understand
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your concerns and i'm aware of them and i can't discuss the ongoing discussions with the bbc but i'm very aware of your concerns and where you are coming from. thank ou. where you are coming from. thank you- hopefully _ where you are coming from. thank you- hopefully you _ where you are coming from. thank you. hopefully you can _ where you are coming from. thank you. hopefully you can come i where you are coming from. thank you. hopefully you can come back| where you are coming from. thank you. hopefully you can come back and we can— you. hopefully you can come back and we can guestion — you. hopefully you can come back and we can question you _ you. hopefully you can come back and we can question you on— you. hopefully you can come back and we can question you on the _ we can question you on the settlement— we can question you on the settlement further. - we can question you on the settlement further. now. we can question you on the settlement further. now to we can question you on the - settlement further. now to channel 4, they— settlement further. now to channel 4, they contribute _ settlement further. now to channel 4, they contribute £20 _ settlement further. now to channel 4, they contribute £20 million- settlement further. now to channel 4, they contribute £20 million in. 4, they contribute £20 million in wales— 4, they contribute £20 million in wales and — 4, they contribute £20 million in wales and they _ 4, they contribute £20 million in wales and they have _ 4, they contribute £20 million in wales and they have supported i 4, they contribute £20 million in- wales and they have supported many 'obs, wales and they have supported many jobs. the _ wales and they have supported many jobs. the £77 — wales and they have supported many jobs, the £77 million _ wales and they have supported many jobs, the £77 million investment- jobs, the £77 million investment they have — jobs, the £77 million investment they have made _ jobs, the £77 million investment they have made in _ jobs, the £77 million investment they have made in wales, - jobs, the £77 million investment they have made in wales, with i they have made in wales, with production— they have made in wales, with production companies- they have made in wales, withi production companies providing they have made in wales, with - production companies providing local 'obs, production companies providing local jobs. whatever— production companies providing local jobs, whatever you _ production companies providing local jobs, whatever you decide _ production companies providing local jobs, whatever you decide in- production companies providing local jobs, whatever you decide in the i jobs, whatever you decide in the consultation, _ jobs, whatever you decide in the consultation, will— jobs, whatever you decide in the consultation, will you _ jobs, whatever you decide in the consultation, will you require i jobs, whatever you decide in the consultation, will you require a i consultation, will you require a private — consultation, will you require a private owner _ consultation, will you require a private owner to _ consultation, will you require a private owner to maintain- consultation, will you require a private owner to maintain the i consultation, will you require a i private owner to maintain the same level of— private owner to maintain the same level of investment _ private owner to maintain the same level of investment in _ private owner to maintain the same level of investment in wales? i- level of investment in wales? i can't level of investment in wales? can't actually speculate on level of investment in wales?“ can't actually speculate on that because i haven't even made a decision about whether we are going to go to that position. as you said, the consultation is ongoing and we had 60,000 responses to the consultation and there are a huge number responses and detailed
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responses, as well, so the department is working hard and fast to get through that consultation process and once it does so we will then, i will take that and that will be a big body of work, into consideration, but there are a number of issues i to consider before i make the decision over the future of channel 4. and perhaps, and again i hear your concerns, and it is very important... and again i hear your concerns, and it is very important. . ._ it is very important... studio: nadine dorries _ it is very important... studio: nadine dorries talking - it is very important... studio: nadine dorries talking there. l it is very important... studio: l nadine dorries talking there. we will watch the rest of that and renew highlights later. while watching bbc news. ? bring you highlights later. reduce the risk of transmission by over 50%.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... amid rising fears of europe's fourth covid wave, governments across the uk are deciding how to respond. scotland's first minister says covid passports won't be expanded to venues. i cannot emphasise strongly enough that opposition are still precarious, the next few weeks to pose risks, cases are rising in countries around us and the festive period will bring more travel and more socialising. in northern ireland ministers reiterate their advice to urge people to work from home where possible to stop the spread of the virus. 46 people are dead after a coach crashed and burst into flames in bulgaria — 12 of those killed were children. two men are arrested on suspicion of murder after a couple in their thirties were killed in somerset, local
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people have spoken of their shock. it's the children i cannot forget. for what they have seen. it's scary. a requiem mass at westminster cathedral for the mp sir david amess — who was stabbed to death last month. good afternoon. amid rising coronavirus cases and tightening restrictions in europe, leaders in the uk have been considering whether changes are required. in the last hour, nicola sturgeon has — for the time being — ruled out an expansion of scotland's coronavirus passport scheme, describing it as a �*finely balanced decision'. the cabinet had been discussing a potential expansion of the scheme to include a wider range of premises like cinemas and hospitality venues. the current scheme will see people in scotland showing proof of vaccination to enter nightclubs and large events like gigs and football matches.
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though, from the 6th of december, the first minister said it will be possible to access those venues and events by showing evidence of recent infection or a negative lateral flow test. across in northern ireland, ministers are encouraging companies to help employees to work from home. meanwhile in england, updated guidance advises people to take lateral flow tests before mixing in crowded indoor spaces. first minister nicola sturgeon made this plea, ahead of the christmas season. the duty and responsibility though of all of us as it is to get vaccinated as soon as we are able. if you have not yet had a dose of vaccine that you're eligible for, please make arrangements to get it now. this is even more vital if you
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are planning to socialise at all over the festive period. if you're meeting up with loved ones and you're not as fully vaccinated as you're not as fully vaccinated as you could, you're putting them at unnecessary risk. to be blunt, you could be putting our lives in danger. the most precious gift we can give anyone this christmas is to be vaccinated and also tested which i will say more about shortly before we meet, hug or spend any time with them so have not have a 1st or 2nd dose yet, it is not too late to now and please also get your booster as soon as you're able. a boosterjag reduces the risk of symptomatic infection by more than 80%. but dr sandesh gulhane, of the scottish conservatives, said the decision not to extend the scheme, caused unnecessary worry among businesses. that is also welcome that the vaccine — that is also welcome that the vaccine passport scheme is not being extended _ vaccine passport scheme is not being extended the uncertainty that this government has left hanging over businesses for the past 2 weeks has been unnecessary and unacceptable.
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the scottish government released their so—called evidence paper on friday— their so—called evidence paper on friday yet— their so—called evidence paper on friday yet in almost 70 pages, they were unable to offer clear proof of the scheme's effectiveness. it seems more _ the scheme's effectiveness. it seems more and _ the scheme's effectiveness. it seems more and more likely that they are making _ more and more likely that they are making it _ more and more likely that they are making it up as they go along. the view from making it up as they go along. tie: view from scottish parliament. people in northern ireland are being urged by stormont ministers to work from home "where possible" in a bid to curb the spread of covid—19. current advice already states that people should work from home where they can but ministers said they were "strengthening" that message but not making a formal change to rules. ministers are also advising the public to limit their social contacts and wear face coverings in indoor settings. our ireland correspondent, chris page, says it follows an executive meeting about how to tackle rising infections. yes, the second straight day of ministerial meetings, a measure of the rising concern about covid cases and hospitalisations here in northern ireland. no change to the legal measures, but there certainly is a change to the public messaging. and that is being strengthened, prior to today people were being told to prepare for a return
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to the office, and they could work from home when they can. now they are being told they should work from home unless they cannot. ministers say this is one of the key measures they hope will make a difference to bring down case numbers. they recognise, they say, it could be difficult for people depending on their circumstances. they are asking employers to try to do their best to facilitate more people working from home. also, there is going to be an increased focus on getting more people vaccinated, particularly getting more people to take up their third dose, there booster dose. and there will be advice on how people can limit their social contacts. no decision on mask wearing in terms of how it should be enforced.
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mask wearing is still compulsory in a number of indoor public spaces. there has been some political disagreement about exactly how and how tightly that should be enforced. officials are going to look at that and come back with some recommendations. but overall it is a shift in the public message and it is reflecting the feeling among ministers that things have to change for the better in order for people to have a decent christmas. in part that will depend on the size of facilities available in hospitals, if there are enough intensive—care beds, it is possible that significant infection could be coped with in london is a good idea of that but well you have only a small amount of hospitals to work with, a large number infections quickly overwhelm them. that is the problem that they are trying to deal with in northern ireland at the moment. let's return to scotland and in glasgow. you watch the exchanges in glasgow. you watch the exchanges in the scottish parliament in the
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last hour or so. in the scottish parliament in the last hour or 50. what has been the reaction to the statement? i did last hour or so. what has been the reaction to the statement? i did not have a chance _ reaction to the statement? i did not have a chance to _ reaction to the statement? i did not have a chance to see _ reaction to the statement? i did not have a chance to see the _ reaction to the statement? i did not have a chance to see the exchangesj have a chance to see the exchanges with the opposition parties but certainly in the past, the conservatives have been quite sceptical about the vaccination scheme because they have felt there has not been the need for a vaccine certification scheme and theyjust have not had enough testing done to see whether it is appropriate or not, and they had wondered and quick 7 not, and they had wondered and quick ? might wondered and questioned whether there should be a lateral flow test, a negative lateral flow test, to an hour access to venues like nightclubs and other live events in the way that they have in other parts of the united kingdom and 1 of the things nicola sturgeon announced this afternoon was that it was going to happen so in a sense, not exactly a loosening of the controls but it does mean another
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option for people who have not been fully vaccinated that they will be able to go to nightclubs and live event venues if they can get a negative lateral flow test shortly before trying to do that. brute negative lateral flow test shortly before trying to do that.- before trying to do that. we 'ust -la ed an before trying to do that. we 'ust played an extract i before trying to do that. we 'ust played an extract from i before trying to do that. we 'ust played an extract from the i played an extract from the conservative saying we are relieved. but grumbling about the uncertainty. that is the difficulty with this because it is tracked from the figures we week decisions be made relatively with a short amount of time and giving people predictability, she is not saying there will be no further restrictions before christmas but she is saying she is hopeful they can avoid that scenario. it interesting that they feel they are interesting that they feel they are in that position really don't have to do it as yet. she has described as precarious but perhaps better than they might have expected so i think you're right where there is that sense that you make decisions not on a day by day basis, trying to look ahead as much as possible both
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always with that unpredictability as we saw this time last year when lockdown came into effect before christmas, did not seem to improve the situation enough and then came into effect immediately after christmas. clearly there is quite a start contrast in the situation and we are looking at now in 2021 compared to 2020, does not look as if we are in that kind of situation but as nicola sturgeon herself reflected during her speech, the situation in europe now certainly does give chords to concern and that things are panning out for us in the rest of the uk. european ministers are meeting
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in brussels to discuss how to tackle the increasing number of covid cases on the continent. several governments have brought back restrictions and urged more people to get vaccinated, but the measures have sparked violent protests in some towns and cities. but how is the uk faring in comparison with europe? let's talk to our helath correspondent katherine da costa cases have been bouncing around since july, but they are starting high level but we are not seeing the high levels that austria, belgium and the loans are seeing. we reach the status quo. the vaccination and previous infection and that is because the uk start the vaccination programme a lot earlier than some of the other countries. there has been somewhat fake among all the groups and vulnerable people. and now they are pushing out boosterjabs which offer really high levels of protection, more than 90%. that will protection, more than 90%. that will
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protect the vulnerable groups going into the winter. they are coming into the winter. they are coming into a good position. there was a big wave, be opened up and released restrictions over the summer and that was a strategy actually to have an early exit wave during the summer 1. because people are outside in school is not there.— 1. because people are outside in school is not there. yeah, and to avoid having _ school is not there. yeah, and to avoid having that _ school is not there. yeah, and to avoid having that in _ school is not there. yeah, and to avoid having that in the - school is not there. yeah, and to avoid having that in the autumn, | avoid having that in the autumn, winter when people are intermixing. much more pressure, much more respiratory virus like flows for example ? might like the flu for example. so we were going in in a better position in some european countries with the politics what you will have a big bonfire at the restrictions, evidence the government was freeing people and all the rest of it but what you're saying is there is a much more carefully thought out scientific strategy than might have implied. that was the support. that was the
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thinking going ahead into winter. there is still a lot of uncertainty. also about people's behaviour. adults have not returned quite to the level of contact that they would have in normal times. but we know they are coming up to christmas and people have parties and more indoor mixing, busy shopping centres, and... , ., mixing, busy shopping centres, and... ., ., ., and... maybe not ventilation as well because it will _ and... maybe not ventilation as well because it will be _ and... maybe not ventilation as well because it will be a _ and... maybe not ventilation as well because it will be a bit _ and... maybe not ventilation as well because it will be a bit nippy. i and... maybe not ventilation as well because it will be a bit nippy. yes, | because it will be a bit nippy. yes, and advice — because it will be a bit nippy. yes, and advice on _ because it will be a bit nippy. yes, and advice on taking _ because it will be a bit nippy. 1913 and advice on taking lateral flow you are asked to take twice a week and now going up into this busy christmas period when you're mixing more, they asked to take them whenever you will be meeting crowded indoor areas, seeing vulnerable people, for example. to be more cautious, to kind of think about who your meeting and it's about thinking
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about those precautions because the precautions we take could see... the virus. it precautions we take could see... the virus. ., ., ~' precautions we take could see... the virus. ., ., ~ ., , precautions we take could see... the virus. ., ., ~ .,, ., virus. it looked as though the government _ virus. it looked as though the government present - virus. it looked as though the government present that i virus. it looked as though the l government present that might threaten debt and said they would not do it because they would not get the take up of 2nd doses and boosters. it was almost as if it felt like a black male thing. if you do not do this, we will bring in that. in scotland, they stuck with it but are now saying they will not extend it any further. it does not mean you need people to prove it any more. still being kept under review in scotland and england. what nicola sturgeon said is that cases have sort of stabilised and so while you still need them to get into a nightclub. . giving a recent lateral
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flow test will be enough. you might guess, and in england, it is part of plan b if they are good to go down that road. the thinking is that either a vaccination status or having a negative test would help reduce the spread of the virus. and ringing them in might encourage vaccine uptake 50 it is a strategy, kind of like a carrot and stick approach that governments are using it here in england, they reserve the encasing it. would you say ministers or officials you talk to are a sort of quietly, perhaps only quietly reasonably content with where they find themselves in the month before christmas. it find themselves in the month before christmas. , , ., ,. , christmas. it depends what scientist ou seak christmas. it depends what scientist you speakto- _ christmas. it depends what scientist you speak to. clearly _ christmas. it depends what scientist you speak to. clearly there - christmas. it depends what scientist you speak to. clearly there are i you speak to. clearly there are concerns that there are still a
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large number of patients in hospital, the numbers have coming down in recent days but it is still putting pressure on the nhs none the less, so there is that real concern that there is the busy winter months but there are... quietly optimistic and the prior immunity from infection that we are better placed going into winter. as i say, there are unknowns about people's behaviour, how much mixing, do people remember to take their test, ventilate rooms. all of these things have cases and infection falling seriously ill
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full extensive process in northern ireland full extensive process in northern lreland though — full extensive process in northern ireland though non-violent. i full extensive process in northern ireland though non-violent. we i full extensive process in northern i ireland though non-violent. we are ireland though non—violent. we are talking now to rob butler. the director of the world health organisation and he joins us director of the world health organisation and hejoins us now from kipp again. thank you very much for being with us. from where you sit at the who. at what stage does it reach continental europe? you like we are very concerned. we've gone past 1.5 million deaf mark last week. if we continue on this course, week. if we continue on this course, we will see another half a million deaths over this winter period. there is, as your previous speaker said, quiet optimism in the uk and we cannot say the same across the european region where we see stress on the hospitals and intensive—care units, so whilst we are not at the levels of health service stress that
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we were last year, we are still in a very worrisome and concerning situation. whilst 54% of the population of the european... the region are... and 54% vaccinated. still have a long way to go in terms of the vaccination as well. just to clarify, does that include the uk as well? or is that kind of a drawing of mainland europe if i can put it like that? it of mainland europe ifi can put it like that? ., , , , of mainland europe if i can put it i like that?_ that like that? it does indeed, yes. that is uuite like that? it does indeed, yes. that is quite worrying. — like that? it does indeed, yes. that is quite worrying, in _ like that? it does indeed, yes. that is quite worrying, in a _ like that? it does indeed, yes. that is quite worrying, in a sense - is quite worrying, in a sense because that is just over half and we know the rates in some countries including the uk are very high so that must mean some countries are really quite as millie lowe. indeed, some are low and i think more worrisome than that is where we... in all countries, we have pockets of
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unvaccinated and unvaccinated. the risk is that those pockets are found out and that is what we're seeing with highly transmissible data that there can often be a very small pocket. that is why in hospitals all over europe, the birds, the hospital beds, the ic you unit are filling up with unvaccinated vulnerable population. ? max icu units. i was struck talking to a leading intensive—care doctor and he said he reckons 85% of his patients in icu and unvaccinated. where is the problem, do you think, in terms of communicating that? i've heard scepticism from people about whether vaccines make any difference in
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people saying, look, all these people saying, look, all these people are being vaccinated and ending up in hospital. can you clarify for people who have not got that message through to them yet about why vaccination matters notwithstanding the fact that some people even if vaccinated will end “p people even if vaccinated will end up in hospital never mind all the people who certainly end up in hospital because they have not been vaccinated. the hospital because they have not been vaccinated. . . . , ., vaccinated. the vaccines... heard severe disease — vaccinated. the vaccines... heard severe disease and _ vaccinated. the vaccines... heard severe disease and death. - vaccinated. the vaccines... heard severe disease and death. so - vaccinated. the vaccines... heard severe disease and death. so we| severe disease and death. so we found the vaccines have had a terrific impact in reducing the number of severe disease cases and deaths, but they do not store karajan transmission and they never... that's not what they are designed to do. whilst the vaccination rates go up across the board, we are also seeing cases and rates of cases go across the board in your and that is difficult to
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understand and i see the point in raised here but it is so important that we make the case for vaccine still, hundreds of thousands of lives have been saved. if we can continue on this course, we do not have to necessarily see the over 2,000,000 deaths mark being... of course marked, as i say by march next year, so it is... that is how vaccines work in this case. the majority of hospitalisation, hospitalised cases across europe are in the unvaccinated. we hospitalised cases across europe are in the unvaccinated.— in the unvaccinated. we had a big debate about _ in the unvaccinated. we had a big debate about globally, _ in the unvaccinated. we had a big debate about globally, what - in the unvaccinated. we had a big| debate about globally, what about within your mic is that the case that anyone who wants to be vaccinated can get vaccinated? lilo. vaccinated can get vaccinated? no, it is not. i refer— vaccinated can get vaccinated? no, it is not. i refer to _ vaccinated can get vaccinated? mfr, it is not. i refer to the 3 seas. confidence, complacency and convenience. —— the three cs. there
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is lack of trust or confidence in the vaccines and the authority providing them, some are complacent around covid 19 and do not feel as if they do not perceive risk and there are a pocket and numbers of there are a pocket and numbers of the population in every country that struggle to access vaccination. i've returned from romania recently where the elderly population for example were not facilitated as easily as they could be to access the vaccine services so we cannot always point to the end user as a reason for low vaccination rate. sometimes it is an issue of supply and more importantly service delivery and how easy it is to access a vaccine when people need them. ~ ., , to access a vaccine when people need them. ~ . , i. to access a vaccine when people need them. ~ . , ., ., them. what is your overall message? i think there — them. what is your overall message? i think there is _ them. what is your overall message? i think there is 5 _ them. what is your overall message? i think there is 5 stabilisers _ them. what is your overall message? i think there is 5 stabilisers at - i think there is 5 stabilisers at this point. we need to boost mask use. 48% of people in our region
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report mask use. we need to increase this. dramatic reductions in transmission were receiving mask use, so masks need to be still part of the armoury, vaccines, we need to boost vaccines to save those with hundreds of thousands of lives being saved overjust this winter and of course boosters, ventilation and i think more focus on treatment and therapeutics would be healthy as well but the basic public health and social measures are still so important to everybody everywhere in the european region, mask use, physical distancing, ventilation and of course vaccination as and when possible. of course vaccination as and when ossible. ., ~ , ., borisjohnson has narrowly succeeded in getting mps to back his controversial plans for a new cap on the cost of social care in england,
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but there was a substantial tory rebellion. the plans change the way the cap of £86,000 is calculated, and critics say say poorer people are disproportionately affected. the prime minister claims the plans are �*incredibly generous�*. the proposals went through but mrjohnson�*s commons majority was cut from 80 to 26. our political correspondent lone wells reports. does the prime minister have enough support? l has he made a pig's ear of it? it's a question getting louder in westminster after borisjohnson faced some dissent from his own side over the government's less generous than expected social care plans. the plans are are more generous than the current system because anyone with assets under £100,000 will get some state support that is means tested, and everyone will pay a maximum of £86,000 for their care.
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but any council support won't count towards that cap. this means someone with a family home worth £100,000 or less and somebody with a £1 million home would both need to spend £86,000 on care, even if one is eligible for help. often people with dementia, which is incredibly unfair in the way it affects people, and can face catastrophically high care costs, so we do have concerns with the suggestions that people perhaps in different parts of the country who have worked all their lives, but by virtue of the fact of the assets they may or may not have may be treated differently. we think that is a problem. the plans narrowly passed last night, but this disparity is what is troubling some conservative mps, who fear, as one put it, about ending up on the wrong side of the argument. the significant conservative rebellion last night came after a speech to the cbi conference of business leaders where the prime minister lost his place in his notes and got sidetracked about his visit to peppa pig.
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forgive me. some this morning, even the former health secretaryjeremy hunt, who abstained from backing borisjohnson�*s plans last night, have been forgiving to him. the speech didn't go particularly well, but i think the bigger picture is the things that matter to ordinary people, for example, the booster programme, which is by far the biggest anywhere in europe, means that we have a better chance of having a normal christmas this year than many countries in europe. i think in the end that is the kind of thing that will matter more to most people. but some of those who represent ordinary people, mps, feel their patience is wearing thin. after a rocky few weeks of difficult headlines about sleaze, less generous plans for railways and now social care, some of those who didn't back the government last night feels it's not good enough for ministers to just say, "trust us, we have done the sums." they want more assurances the plans they're being asked to vote on have been properly thought through.
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the government insists on this issue of social care that everyone will be better off by having this £86,000 cap. no one will lose from these reforms compared to the system we have now, and the overwhelming majority will win. downing street say there is an impact assessment of how these social care plans will affect people, but it hasn't yet been published. but this isn't the end of the road for the plans, which could still be challenged as they go through the house of lords. the house of lords will do what it does well, we may amend and suggest constructive amendments to the government and we may say to them think again if we are not comfortable with the detail that is there.
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any changes suggested by the lords could be bounced back to mps, meaning borisjohnson and ministers have work to do if they are to cool concerns on their own side. presidentjoe biden has ordered the release of fifty million barrels of oil from the united states�* strategic reserve in a bid to bring down energy prices. let�*s get more on this with our business and economics correspondent, michelle fleury. is there an energy crisis all of a sudden? i is there an energy crisis all of a sudden? ~ , , ~ sudden? i think the president -like american consumers _ sudden? i think the president -like american consumers in _ sudden? i think the president -like american consumers in the - sudden? i think the president -like american consumers in the same l sudden? i think the president -like| american consumers in the same in the united kingdom has been watching prices at the pump go up and this is a response to that. you have to remember this is a president whose poll ratings at the moment have in fairly low, he has been hit by inflation which has been damaging, his reputation and achievement and so he is taking this very seriously. what is interesting in all of this is you have some of the big oil consumers around the world teaming
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up consumers around the world teaming up together to try and have an impact on the price of oil so the us and china turns out leaders of those 2 countries discuss this when they held a meeting back in november and now we are seeing the results of that in coordination with other south asian countries as well as the united kingdom. you south asian countries as well as the united kingdom.— south asian countries as well as the united kingdom. you must be aware that some more _ united kingdom. you must be aware that some more americans - united kingdom. you must be aware that some more americans than - united kingdom. you must be aware l that some more americans than usual might be noticing the price of fuel for their vehicles. might be noticing the price of fuel fortheirvehicles. it sometimes feels like the entire country is on the move. feels like the entire country is on the move-— feels like the entire country is on the move. �* . . , _ ., the move. and certainly this year. after the pandemic _ the move. and certainly this year. after the pandemic when - the move. and certainly this year. after the pandemic when travel i the move. and certainly this year. i after the pandemic when travel was virtually shut down, this year, they are expecting huge numbers of people, either on the roads or flying to visit family and relatives so i think the timing of this perhaps may be linked to that and how much influence, just the talk of this has helped lower prices so the
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fact that when they officially release this news, it was higher than some analysts expected so it is “p than some analysts expected so it is up slightly but it is down from it was a month ago and that is what they are trying to do, sending a message to the oil producing countries to say, if you will not work with us on this 1, we will use our reserves to try to make a difference. our reserves to try to make a difference-— our reserves to try to make a difference. some sceptics and critics might _ difference. some sceptics and critics might say _ difference. some sceptics and critics might say that - difference. some sceptics and critics might say that is - difference. some sceptics and critics might say that is like i difference. some sceptics and . critics might say that is like using taxpayer money to buy goodwill from taxpayers but it is thanksgiving so we should be charitable. are you spending thanksgiving? i willi we should be charitable. are you spending thanksgiving?- spending thanksgiving? i will be with friends _ spending thanksgiving? i will be with friends and _ spending thanksgiving? i will be with friends and family, - spending thanksgiving? i will be with friends and family, eating l spending thanksgiving? i will be l with friends and family, eating the whole turkey dinner, all of the trimmings so if i look a bit bleary eyed on friday, you know why. deserved it. happy thanksgiving to you, have a lovely week. now, the man convicted of murdering the british student meredith kercher
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in perugia in italy in 2007 has been released from prison. rudy guede, from ivory coast, was due to end his sentence in early january but it has been brought forward under a procedural italian legal step. the murder escalated into an international courtroom drama. miss kercher�*s american roommate amanda knox and knox s italian boyfriend were also convicted, only for the decision to be overturned almost four years later, reconvicted and then finally acquitted on appeal. 34—year—old guede, however, was found definitively guilty of ms kercher�*s sexual assault and murder after his bloodstained fingerprints were identified. hundreds of politicians have joined the family of the conservative mp, sir david amess, for a requiem mass in his memory at westminster cathedral. the pope sent a message, praising sir david�*s years of "devoted public service". he was stabbed to death while holding a surgery in his southend west constituency last month. damian grammaticas reports.
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in the heart of westminster, they gathered today. prime ministers past, along with cabinet members, friends and colleagues, all mourning their loss. yesterday in southend it was sir david�*s private family service, here the political world turns out to say goodbye to a man liked by those on all sides. a silence fell. sir david amess�*s coffin arrived and on the steps of westminster cathedral was an honour guard of house of commons staff. their respect, a mark of the man sir david amess was, genuine and kind to all, no matter their station.
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united in loss today, they marked the death of sir david. there was even a personal message from the pope. it is both my honour and sad duty to convey this message from the holy father, francis. sir david was a committed catholic, his faith a central part of his life. he had met the pope, who said sir david�*s was an example to follow. commending sir david�*s soul to the loving mercy ofjesus christ our saviour, the holy father prays that all who honour his memory will be confirmed in the resolve to reject the ways of violence, to combat evil with good and to help build a society of ever greater justice, fraternity and solidarity. sir david amess�*s death, stabbed in his constituency, was shocking, but today it�*s the fond memories those closest
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to him wanted to dwell on. we're all feeling very, very sad but on the other hand today we are also celebrating, celebrating a life. i feel very strongly that we must remember david not for how he died but for how he lived and for the causes he fought for. an mp for almost a0 years, sir david never became a minister or a party grandee — he was a politician driven not by ambition but a desire to make a difference, his passions often local and personal. just a very sad day — he was my best friend in parliament. i have known him for a0 years. when i was first elected in 2001 he was there to greet me and take me in. i will miss him, but i�*ll neverforget him. sir david amess, remembered and missed. above all, this was a day about honouring a politician for how he lived and the many lives he touched. damian grammaticas, bbc news, westminster.
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in the introduction i said there were two former prime ministers but in fact there were three former and the current serving prime minister. sport and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. how are you? i�*m very well indeed, but it is going to be a busy night. manchester united kick off in the champions league in the next couple of hours against villareal in spain. their first game since sacking ole gunnar solskjaer. michael carrick takes the reins in caretaker capacity. a win would see united through to the knockout stage but if they slip up then qualification will go down to the final group game. carrick, who won the champions league as a player with united in 2008, has been promoted from first team coach to look after the team until a full—time appointemnt is made.
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it is a big game, obviously for us in terms of any group stages and trying to get through on that. i willjust go about myjob exactly as i normally would and trust the people i�*ve got behind me and the staff and the players and be positive and look forward to the game. it�*s a fantastic game to be playing and a fantastic game of football. these are the nights that you�*re tested and that you remember when you are pushed to the limit and, you know, the ones when you find out really what you�*ve got. manchester united kick off at 5.45, it�*s an 8 o�*clock kick—off at stamford bridge. chelsea need just a point againstjuventus to make it through to the last 16. the italians have already qualified but there�*s still a bit at stake because finishing top of the group could be all important. romelu lukaku is expected to be available for the first time since injuring his ankle earlier this month, but chelsea have done pretty well without him. we always had the options.
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it�*s on the players when they�*re needed. and then they have the chance to show their potential. they need to show it and they need to be ready. that�*s life at chelsea and this is what they do in a very impressive away. we always have options, and when we play with romelu, we play with romelu. when they are not available, we try to find a solution. that is why we are here and that is why we have a big squad. the tottenham chairman daniel levy says the club has to improve its business in the transfer window, but that might not be a sign that new manager antonio conte will be gifted a war—chest for new players. the club has published its financial results for the year ending injune and they have made pre—tax losses of £80 million as a result of the pandemic. since opening the new stadium over two years ago they have spent almost £400 million on players and in a statement alongside the results levy says... "player spending is no guarantee of success, and our focus must be "on improved recruitment, coaching,
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fitness and a competitive mindset," england�*s netballers will host australia, new zealand and south africa in the quad series injanuary at the copper box arena in london. it�*ll be really good preparation for england ahead of the defence of their commonwealth games title in birmingham next summer. they�*re ranked third in the world, behind the australians and the kiwis. each side will play four games. the 1st ashes test starts two weeks tomorrow but australian preparations for the series are farfrom ideal. cricket tasmania say that the treatment of their player tim paine by cricket australia has been "appalling". paine stepped down as captain last week over an investigation into sexually explicit texts he sent to a female colleague in 2017. paine said he was "exonerated" following an integrity review but stood down after learning that the messages were to be made public. the current cricket australia chair says paine should never have been allowed to become captain in the first place. it�*s still to be decided
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by selectors if paine, who keeps wicket, will feature in the ashes. finally, anotherformer essex cricketer has claimed that he experienced racism during his four years at the club. jahid ahmed says he was made to feel like an outsider. he�*s the third player from the county to come forward in recent weeks. essex say they are investigating the latest claims. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. i will be back with an update in the next hour. studio: thanks for joining studio: thanks forjoining us. 46 people have been killed in bulgaria after a coach crashed and burst into flames in the middle of the night. the passengers were all from north macedonia, returning from a weekend in turkey. 12 of the victims were children. it�*s the worst coach crash in europe in a decade. nick thorpe reports.
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soon after two in the morning local time, the tourist coach registered in north macedonia veered off the motorway and hit the crash barrier. it tore away a 50—metre section, then burst into flames. no other vehicles were involved. the bus was the last of four travelling in a convoy across bulgaria, from turkey to north macedonia. tourists, including many children, on their way home from a weekend in istanbul. top officials, including the prime ministers of both countries, visited the scene of the accident, then went to meet survivors who were being treated in a sofia hospital. | translation: it's a tragedy that | shook us and which has demanded from the bulgarian state to react as quickly as possible, to investigate this road accident. what are the reasons for it? what led to the death of 46 people? and what care can be offered
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to those that survived? translation: i will leave it to the bulgarian experts - and professionals to analyse the causes of the incident. our fellow citizens who are alive, thank god, have their memories and reflections about how this happened. the causes of the accident are not yet known. the mayor of one nearby village told local media that this particular section of the motorway has many potholes and is a blackspot for accidents. visibility was also bad with recent rain. the bulgarian authorities have promised a full inquiry. nick thorpe, bbc news. thousands of people have taken part in a candlelit vigil in the american state of wisconsin — where a man drove his car through a christmas parade on sunday. five people were killed and 48 others injured, including six children
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who are in a critical condition. local police said the suspect, darrell brooks, a resident of nearby milwaukee, will be charged with five counts of first degree homicide. two men have been arrested on suspicion of murder, after a couple in their thirties were killed in a village in somerset. stephen and jennifer chapple were found with serious injuries in norton fitzwarren, near taunton, on sunday evening and died of their wounds. two young children were also inside the property but were unharmed. our correspondentjon kay has the latest from norton fitzwarren. it was 9:1i5pm on sunday evening that police were called to this quiet cul—de—sac, dragon rise, in norton fitzwarren, to a house on the left—hand side where the police van is. it was there they found this couple, who have been named locally as stephen and jennifer chapple, badly injured. there were attempts to save them but they were pronounced dead at the scene. police are now searching this whole area. jennifer chapple, i understand, worked in a nearby garden centre in a coffee shop.
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colleagues told us she was a much loved friend. that they are devastated by her loss. they are now thinking of the two young children who were then found unhurt inside the property. police say those youngsters are understandably distressed. they are receiving specialist help. specially trained officers are working with grieving relatives. i spoke to one neighbour a few moments ago. her name was teresa. it's the children i can't forget, for what they have seen. it's scary. absolutely scary for them. so young as well. two men, aged 3a and 67, have been arrested on suspicion of murder. now the police aren�*t giving any more information about what might have prompted what happened here, but they have told us that
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because there had been prior contact between officers and some of those involved, that there has been a mandatory referral of this case to the independent office for police conduct. police searching this lunchtime. they have been looking in bushes and drains and drones trying to capture photographic evidence, as well. and police have confirmed that the 67 year old man who�*s been arrested has been released under investigation — a second younger man remains in custody. a bbc investigation has found evidence of a black market in highly polluting greenhouse gases, smuggled into the uk from eastern europe. the gases are called hfcs and they�*re used in cooling systems — such as air conditioning and industrialfridges. the eu and uk are phasing them out and bringing in cleaner alternatives. but older machinery still runs with the most polluting hfcs. the result is a thriving underground trade, as angus crawford reports. it�*s an illegal trade you�*ve
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probably never heard of, in gases that harm the environment. that should not be on the market in the uk? absolutely not. that one there is about 4,000 times worse than carbon dioxide. they are called hfcs, hydrofluorocarbons, used in air—conditioning systems, shop fridges and the aircon in older cars. only approved and licensed companies like this one can import, sell and use them. there are meant to be strict quotas. here�*s the thing. these old hfcs are powerful greenhouse gases. the government is phasing them out and wants us to use cleaner, greener alternatives. but that means upgrading with more modern kit, which is expensive. the result, a thriving black market in old gases worth millions. we�*re heading to the centre of that black market in northern romania. i�*ve arranged to meet a smuggler. he�*s nervous, so we find
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a quiet back road. he thinks we�*re buyers from the uk. 0k. that looks good. this is just a sample, he�*s selling in bulk. i ask about shipment to the uk. despite checks by customs officers, the border is porous and huge amounts of hfcs are brought in illegally. these gases are smuggled from ukraine, just up the road there, into romania and then shipped across europe and on into the uk — where we found them advertised on facebook marketplace. this one�*s in north london. what have you got for me?
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unlicensed and selling illegally to small firms and aircon engineers who don�*t care about the rules. can you get more in? so why does this matter? so, there we go, we�*ve picked these up, bought this morning. yikes. there�*s no way that should have come into the uk. there�*s a huge profit to be made, and if you are caught, which in itself is rare, often the penalties are very low, so we really need to see customs and enforcement agencies recognise that climate crime is a serious crime and this might be an invisible gas, but it has a huge impact on global warming. another illegal trader. remember, anyone selling or buying hfcs has to be properly licensed but here, again, no questions asked. great stuff, thank you. legal suppliers say it is something we should all think about when we turn on the aircon. if a car gets cold then maybe they are not so worried.
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the air—conditioning is working and that is fine. but whilst products are brought in illegally, then they are going to weaken the effect of that regulation, which ultimately means more global warming can take place. we made sure the bottles we bought illegally were emptied and recycled, but our investigation shows laws passed to protect the planet can be exploited by criminals who just want to make money. angus crawford, bbc news. armageddon? do you remember that film, about 25 years ago, with bruce willis. well, reality is catching up with fiction, to a certain extent. it�*s the stuff of hollywood blockbusters — a mission into space to try to stop an asteroid hitting the earth. but that�*s what nasa are testing this week, with the launch of their dart mission. they�*re firing a spacecraft
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at a huge lump of rock in space called dimorphos, to see if they can tip it in another direction. the aim is to develop technology that could stop any dangerous asteroid in the future smashing into earth. here�*s sean dilley. asteroids are just one of the long—term threats to the survival of our planet. millions of the rocky masses have been floating around space since the formation of our solar system more than 4.5 billion years ago. but now nasa is preparing to launch a spacecraft from california that will be guided remotely to crash into a pair of asteroids called didymos and dimorphous. neither present any risk to earth, but scientists want to test whether it is possible to change the course of the large asteroids, even by a tiny fraction. this is a big dealfor nasa, the first time the agency will intentionally crash a spacecraft into an asteroid for a planetary defence mission. the impact won�*t happen until september next year. but when it does, it
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will deliberately strike at around 15,000 mph. essentially, this spacecraft is going to act like a cue ball in a game of pool orsnooker, right? it�*s going to smash into this asteroid and give it a little bit of a boost in energy. if you can change the speed of the asteroid so that it just misses the earth, that�*s all you need to do. no known asteroid wider than 140 metres is expected to hit the earth in the next 100 years, but if nasa�*s experiment is successful, future generations could be protected. sean dilley, bbc news. i�*m joined now by dr megan argo who�*s a senior lecturer in astronomy at the university of central lancashire. this sounds like science fiction but not in the hollywood version? it is a bit different _ not in the hollywood version? it is a bit different to _ not in the hollywood version? it 3 a bit different to the film, armageddon, and often in the movies they send nuclear bombs to explode
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and basically blow up the asteroid but the problem with that technique, if you have an asteroid heading for earth, if you blow it up, instead of one object coming to the earth, you have several objects coming towards the earth, but this technique is much less exciting in a sense because you don�*t have those explosions but it does potentially give the option to move the trajectory of an asteroid early enough so it won�*t actually hit the earth and we don�*t have to blow it up. we can give it a slight nudge and it will move off its trajectory and it will move off its trajectory and miss the planet. the and it will move off its tra'ectory and miss the planeth and it will move off its tra'ectory and miss the planet. the idea even sounds slightly _ and miss the planet. the idea even sounds slightly far-fetched - and miss the planet. the idea even sounds slightly far-fetched but - and miss the planet. the idea even sounds slightly far-fetched but the | sounds slightly far—fetched but the reality is, asteroids are not unusual cosmic events and presumably the law of averages says that at some point something quite big could hit us. ~ , ., some point something quite big could hit us. ~ , , ., ., , hit us. absolutely. there are many tens if not — hit us. absolutely. there are many tens if not hundreds _ hit us. absolutely. there are many tens if not hundreds of _ hit us. absolutely. there are many tens if not hundreds of thousands| hit us. absolutely. there are many. tens if not hundreds of thousands of asteroids in the inner solar system and so far we have probably only discovered a small percentage of those with our telescopes and the big ones are easy to spot because
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they reflect a lot of sunlight comparatively, so we know where they are, but spotting the smaller ones which are about 140 metres and smaller, they are more difficult because they are darker and much harder to see. if we are going to spot one, if it is potentially coming to open up we might not have that much time to do something. ? if it is coming to earth, we might not have much time to do something. so if we can test the technology, in a controlled environment around something we can monitorfrom controlled environment around something we can monitor from the earth, then if it happens for real, we understand what happens and we know what to do about it. this we understand what happens and we know what to do about it.— know what to do about it. this is almost research _ know what to do about it. this is almost research in _ know what to do about it. this is almost research in real-time, i know what to do about it. this is l almost research in real-time, isn't almost research in real—time, isn�*t it question how will this work? ? isn�*t it? it question how will this work? ? isn't it? ., ., ., ., isn't it? tomorrow morning, the spacecraft _ isn't it? tomorrow morning, the spacecraft will _ isn't it? tomorrow morning, the spacecraft will launch _ isn't it? tomorrow morning, the spacecraft will launch from - isn't it? tomorrow morning, the spacecraft will launch from the l isn't it? tomorrow morning, the i spacecraft will launch from the air force base and it will take about a year to get to the asteroid, quite a long trajectory, it goes around the
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sun in a slightly longer orbit than the earth, and it will impact on the surface of the smaller of this pair of asteroids, and when that happens, because we won�*t see anything spectacular because it is a small impact looking from the earth, a five kilograms object hitting a asteroid, but what we will see in the months and years is by watching what happens to how the small asteroid moves its parent body, we can see a change and the orbit happening as a result of this impact, so it is not as exciting as what happens in armageddon but it is a very proactive investigation and they will be a lot of things which happen in the future as a result of this ? there will be.— happen in the future as a result of this ? there will be. there are lots of asteroids. _ this ? there will be. there are lots of asteroids, as _ this ? there will be. there are lots of asteroids, as you _ this ? there will be. there are lots of asteroids, as you said, - this ? there will be. there are lots of asteroids, as you said, does - this ? there will be. there are lots of asteroids, as you said, does it i of asteroids, as you said, does it matter if some of them hit us? the small ones — matter if some of them hit us? the small ones hit _ matter if some of them hit us? the small ones hit us _
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matter if some of them hit us? the: small ones hit us all the matter if some of them hit us? tu9 small ones hit us all the time matter if some of them hit us? tu9: small ones hit us all the time and if you have ever seen a meteor shower, those are small bits of rock floating around, that happens all the time, but bigger ones like this much less often about when they do we will know about it because they can be quite catastrophic and there was a relatively large one in russia a few years ago which was quite famous because everyone caught it on their dash cams and that is much smaller than this particular one, so smaller than this particular one, so smaller ones happens all the time, and bigger ones happens less often, thankfully. indie and bigger ones happens less often, thankfull . ~ , :, : thankfully. we will be watching tomorrow with _ thankfully. we will be watching tomorrow with interest - thankfully. we will be watching tomorrow with interest and - thankfully. we will be watching tomorrow with interest and i'mj thankfully. we will be watching - tomorrow with interest and i'm sure tomorrow with interest and i�*m sure you will be watching with more than interest. thanks forjoining us. we have some breaking news. some breaking news concerning the murder of a couple in their 30s who were killed in a village in somerset. avon and somerset police have named
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the victims, they are confident to name them as 36—year—old stephen chapple and his wifejennifer chapple and his wifejennifer chapple who was 33. the children are five and six, they are not being identified beyond that, but they were found asleep upstairs, thankfully, and hopefully unaware of what was happening downstairs. specially trained police officers are providing support to them and theirfamilies. are providing support to them and their families. jennifer died from multiple stab wounds and they have yet to determine the cause of her husband�*s death. two men aged 34 and 67 were originally arrested on sunday on suspicion of murder and the 67—year—old man has been released under investigation and the other man remains in police custody. there is a bit more, this is a police statement, in fact, just coming in now... this is what the police are saying, a senior
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investigating officer said what happened is heartbreaking and we can�*t begin to imagine the impact this will have on their children, he says, and he asks people not to speculate as this is a tragic incident which has shocked the community and they have police officers patrolling the area to offer reassurance. reaction now from west somerset college, the head teacher there, west somerset college, the head teacherthere, it west somerset college, the head teacher there, it turns out stephen chapple was a teacher at the college and he described him as a great colleague and a great teacher and he led innovations, using technology across the school, and he will be sadly missed by all staff and students and our thoughts and prayers go to his children and wider family at this time. that is the naming of stephen chapple and jennifer chapple as victims of the killings at the weekend in somerset. their children aged five and six were not harmed.
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now it�*s time for a look at the weather with ben rich. good afternoon. today is one of the calmer, milder days of the week — certainly compared to some of what is to come. because it is going to turn colder with, yes, some rain, but also possibly some sleet and snow at times. and then the potential for a really stormy end to the week. but for the time being, things are relatively quiet. quite windy across the north of the uk. a lot of cloud around, especially in north—western parts. the best of the sunshine across eastern and southern areas. and then, as we head through this evening and tonight, there will be big areas of cloud floating around. the potential of some fog patches down towards the south—east, and then this band of rain working in across parts of scotland and northern ireland by the end of the night. temperatures for most of us hovering just above freezing. tomorrow, we will have this band of rain — a cold front which will be pushing its way southwards and eastwards. and as the name suggests, the air behind this front will be
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turning colder as we start to develop a northerly wind. so our frontal system, marked out by this band of cloud and rain, sinking southwards. ahead of it, quite a lot of cloud, some early mist and fog in places, some sunny spells, too. behind our weather front, especially for scotland and northern ireland, things will turn much brighter with lots of sunshine, but some showers, which will be wintry over high ground in scotland. it will turn increasingly blustery and increasingly cold. and all of us will be in the cold air for thursday. quite a brisk northerly wind. only slowly easing through the day. sunny spells for many. some showers for coastal parts, and wintry showers over high ground in northern scotland. and temperatures in single digits for just about all of us. and then we get to friday, and this is friday�*s weather maker — a deep area of low pressure diving down from the north, heavy rain and strong winds. but with some cold air wrapping
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into this weather system, there is the potentialfor some of the rain to turn to sleet and snow. and it really depends upon just how cold the air gets. so, yes, we will see areas of showery rain sinking southwards. perhaps sleet and snow, especially over high ground but possibly to low levels, especially in northern scotland. it�*s going to be a very cold day and a very windy day. in fact, we could see damaging winds developing in places during friday night. gales possible, especially towards the north and east. the threat of windy and wintry weather — it�*s worth staying tuned to the forecast.
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fingerprints were identified.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... amid rising fears of europe�*s fourth covid wave — governments across the uk are deciding how to respond. but scotland�*s first minister says covid passports won�*t be expanded to venues. i cannot emphasise strongly enough that our position is still precarious. the next few weeks to pose risks, news that you are new cases are rising around us and we will be seeing more travel and social... in northern ireland ministers reiterate their advice urging people to work from home where possible to stop the spread of the coronavirus. a murder investigation is launched after a couple in their thirties were killed in somerset. their children aged five and six, were found by officers asleep upstairs. two men have been arrested
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on suspicion of murder. it�*s the children i cannot forget. for what they have seen. it�*s scary. 46 people are dead after a coach crashed and burst into flames in bulgaria — 12 of those killed were children a requiem mass at westminster cathedral for the mp sir david amess — who was stabbed to death last month. good afternoon. amid rising coronavirus cases and tightening restrictions in europe, leaders in the uk have been considering whether changes are required. this afternoon , nicola sturgeon has — for the time being — ruled out an expansion of scotland�*s coronavirus passport scheme, describing it as a �*finely balanced decision�*.
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the scottish cabinet had been discussing a potential expansion of the scheme to include a wider range of premises like cinemas and hospitality venues. the current scheme requires people in scotland to show proof of vaccination to enter nightclubs and large events like gigs and football matches. though, from the 6th of december, the first minister said it will be possible to access those venues and events by showing evidence of recent infection or a negative lateral flow test. ministers in northern ireland are slowing down their process for relaxing coronavirus measures, in response to rising case numbers. businesses are being encouraged to allow people to continuing working from home where possible — rather than prepare for them to return to the office. meanwhile in england, updated guidance advises people to take lateral flow tests before mixing in crowded indoor spaces.
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first minister nicola sturgeon made this plea, ahead of the christmas season. the duty and responsibility though of all of us as it is to get vaccinated as soon as we are able. if you have not yet had a dose of vaccine that you�*re eligible for, please make arrangements to get it now. this is even more vital if you are planning to socialise at all over the festive period. if you�*re meeting up with loved ones and you�*re not as fully vaccinated as you could, you�*re putting them at unnecessary risk. to be blunt, you could be putting our lives in danger. the most precious gift we can give anyone this christmas is to be vaccinated and also tested which i will say more about shortly before we meet, hug or spend any time with them so have not have a 1st or 2nd dose yet, it is not too late to now and please also get your booster as soon as you�*re able.
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a boosterjag reduces the risk of symptomatic infection by more than 80%. but dr sandesh gulhane, of the scottish conservatives, said the decision not to extend the vaccine passport scheme, caused unnecessary woi’i’)i among businesses. it is also welcome that the vaccine passport scheme is not being extended the uncertainty that this — government has left hanging over businesses for the past 2 weeks has been unnecessary and unacceptable. the scottish government released their so—called evidence paper on friday yet in almost 70 pages, they were unable to offer clear proof of _ the scheme's effectiveness. it seems more and more likely that they are making it up as they go along. people in northern ireland are being urged by stormont ministers to work from home "where possible" in a bid to curb the spread of covid—19. "where possible" in a bid to curb current advice already states that
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people should work from home where they can but ministers said they were "strengthening" that message but not making a formal change to rules. our ireland correspondent, chris page, says it follows an executive meeting about how to tackle rising infections. yes, the second straight day of ministerial meetings, a measure of the rising concern about covid cases and hospitalisations here in northern ireland. no change to the legal measures, but there certainly is a change to the public messaging. and that is being strengthened, prior to today people were being told to prepare for a return to the office, and they could work from home when they can. now they are being told they should work from home unless they cannot. ministers say this is one of the key measures they hope will make a difference to bring down case numbers.
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they recognise, they say, it could be difficult for people depending on their circumstances. they are asking employers to try to do their best to facilitate more people working from home. also, there is going to be an increased focus on getting more people vaccinated, particularly getting more people to take up their third dose, there booster dose. and there will be advice on how people can limit their social contacts. no decision on mask wearing in terms of how it should be enforced. mask wearing is still compulsory in a number of indoor public spaces. there has been some political disagreement about exactly how and how tightly that should be enforced. officials are going to look at that and come back with some recommendations. but overall it is a shift in the public message and it is reflecting the feeling among ministers that things have to change for the better in order for people to have a decent christmas.
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european ministers are meeting in brussels to discuss how to tackle the increasing number of covid cases on the continent. several governments have brought back restrictions and urged more people to get vaccinated, but the measures have sparked violent protests in some towns and cities. but how is the uk faring in comparison with europe? let�*s talk to our helath correspondent katherine da costa ata at a sort of interesting to see the divergences now, isn�*t it? this year as opposed to last year. why is that? is it possible to map reasons that? is it possible to map reasons that could have contributed? cases are still high _ that could have contributed? cases are still high across _ that could have contributed? cases are still high across the _ that could have contributed? cases are still high across the uk - that could have contributed? cases are still high across the uk and - are still high across the uk and they have been bouncing around since around july when we lifted restrictions in england and it is likely that we�*ve reached a sort of equilibrium where you have got immunity from vaccination and past infection, so if you look at vaccination, the uk started vaccinating much earlier than some other countries, there has been good
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uptake among older, vulnerable groups and now the uk is among other countries with the booster programme which is more than 15.5 million have now had the dose and that provides more than 19% protection against infection so that has been concerned about waning immunity and the data from the ons that came out today said actually there are high antibody levels across all age groups and the increase in the over 70s, those who operate our prioritised for boosters, chose the impact their having already and in terms of infection, obviously delta variant appeared early on in the uk, england opening up injuly early on, very few protections in place and large numbers among the young have been exposed to the virus and built up been exposed to the virus and built up protection for that and it was a deliberate strategy to have an earlier exit rave during the summer rather than waiting in the also winter when there are other viruses in circulation like the nhs is under
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under greater pressure so it is different picture now because of the vaccination and that is a key strategy for the government to get through winter testing and vaccination.— through winter testing and vaccination. , vaccination. referred the figures, the have vaccination. referred the figures, they have come _ vaccination. referred the figures, they have come out _ vaccination. referred the figures, they have come out with - vaccination. referred the figures, they have come out with 42,484' they have come out with 42,484 infections, up 8.7% over a week ago, deaths, 165. just on those infection figures, we will keep them up on screen so people at home can follow what they are seeing and the infection figures are on the left in the 1st column there, up 8 or 9% over 7 days, i guess this time of year, that is not a particularly shocking rise, is it? respiratory infections are more common this time of year, presumably you�*ll spend more time indoors and it is a question how much file they go. as i said at the beginning, it is like turbulence, we are kind of pumping around so people are sometimes up, you see cases go down and they start
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to go up again and that is because we have sort of reached the status quo where small changes like testing and isolation can have big impact on kind of reducing those numbers down and that is 1 of the big unknown is, really, going into this christmas period where there is going to be more parties, very busy shopping centres you might be visiting elderly relatives, and so it is the unknown as people�*s behaviour because at the moment the contacts have not quite gone back to where they were pre— pandemic and so you when you�*re mixing more, socialising more, there is a greater risk of transmission, so the government has encouraged people to take more lateral flow test so rather than just 2 per week, they say if you are going to go into a crowded, busy area, if you will see vulnerable people, take a rapid test before you go to help reduce the risk because some people are asymptomatic, they do not know they have the virus at
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the time so it is taking precautions to try to limit the risk. how would you characterise the mood on those you characterise the mood on those you speak to a health profession and indeed among the government about the period between now and christmas?— the period between now and christmas? :, ' christmas? there are different cam s. christmas? there are different camps- there _ christmas? there are different camps. there are _ christmas? there are different camps. there are clearly - christmas? there are differentj camps. there are clearly those christmas? there are different - camps. there are clearly those who are more cautious and would like to see more educations in place, there have been calls for mandatory mask wearing, et cetera, working from home, and there are concerns that there are still about 8000 patients in hospital across the uk, while thatis in hospital across the uk, while that is way down on what they saw last year, it is adding to pressure on the nhs with a huge backlog of operations and we have yet to have the flu season, so there are those who are worried and concerned about what this will mean going into winter. others are slightly more optimistic that because we have got higher immunity within the
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population that things should stay sort of service they will going into the winter period but there are these unknowns, so there could be a new variant, for example, although delta is the dominant1 in this country and spreads much more easy than previous versions, there could be a new variant that gets around immunity from the vaccine, so that is still clearly aching concern. as we talk about behaviour, how much mixing is going on, people remembering to ventilate, seeing their relatives and in terms of the vaccination, will people get vaccinated, boosted, take the jab, the flu jab, for example, there has been this criticism, it has not been rolled out fast enough and it is picking up pace. still 30% of people with a weakened immune system who have not had their 3rd primaryjab. this is different to the booster campaign which is aimed at the over 40s. :, , , :, , campaign which is aimed at the over 40s. :, , , :,, :, campaign which is aimed at the over 40s. :, , , :, , :, :, 40s. vulnerable people are treated not my you — 40s. vulnerable people are treated not my you might _ 40s. vulnerable people are treated not my you might guess, _ 40s. vulnerable people are treated not my you might guess, if- 40s. vulnerable people are treated not my you might guess, if you - 40s. vulnerable people are treated not my you might guess, if you arej not my you might guess, if you are immunosuppressed, you have 3
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vaccines. and there is low vaccination for flu. and vaccines. and there is low vaccination forflu. and pregnant women are more vulnerable at catching the vaccine. and there are still nearly 5,000,000 people who have not even had the 1st vaccine, so there are still pockets of vulnerable groups within the community that will be vulnerable going into the winter so there is that concern but the government has said there is nothing in the data currently to suggest they will need stronger restrictions. can i ask you 1 final stronger restrictions. can i ask you 1final point? you mention people who have not been vaccinated at all, i was talking to doctor rob butler from the health association and he was saying the big issue is most of the people in intensive care were unvaccinated. is that true as far as
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you are aware in the uk as well that the most severely ill leaving aside those that might already have conditions and underlying complications, is the fact they have not received any vaccine? it is complications, is the fact they have not received any vaccine?— not received any vaccine? it is fair to sa in not received any vaccine? it is fair to say in intensive _ not received any vaccine? it is fair to say in intensive care _ not received any vaccine? it is fair to say in intensive care the - to say in intensive care the majority are likely to be people who not had any vaccine at all. where you do see vaccinated people in hospital, we have large numbers of the population being double vaccinated so you would expect to see large numbers. it is relative so thatis see large numbers. it is relative so that is why you would see them vaccinated. it is the question i have been asked by people and the vaccine, what difference it makes. actually the doctors keep telling you it has made a big difference. people may be elderly, older, they might be up there for different reasons. and other people in for different reasons are tested and
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then see the have the virus. let return to a story that we were speaking about before. police have police say a couple were stabbed to death in their someset home as their two children were asleep upstairs. they are mister and missus chapple, stephen and jennifer, they had a 5 and 6 —year—olds. in the last 2 minutes, 2 men have been arrested on suspicion of murder. 1 has been released pending further enquiries. let us hear now this update from avon and somerset police. iltrui’hiile avon and somerset police. while formal identification _ avon and somerset police. while formal identification has - avon and somerset police. while formal identification has not - avon and somerset police. �*gg�*u i9 formal identification has not been placed, the victims are believed to be a 36 —year—old stephen chapple
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and jennifer chapple. the children age 5 and 6 were found by officers asleep upstairs and are now being looked after by family members. specially trained officers are providing support to the families of both stephen and jennifer and our thoughts continue to be with them at this awful time. post—mortem examinations are ongoing and i confirm thatjennifer died of multiple stab wounds. a magistrates have granted an extension to custody time limit in relation to a 34 year old man while the 67 —year—old man has been released under investigation to allow further enquiries to take place. cordons remain at 2 properties on dragon rises officers continue to examine them. the senior officer investigating, inspector neil mead, has said what happened to stephen jennifer is utterly heartbreaking and i cannot begin to imagine the impact these deaths will have on 2 children. family liaison officers are supporting their families and
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keeping them updated on the progress of our investigation. i appreciate there are significant interest in what happened and i ask people not to speculate and to think about the impact it may have on families. he added this as a tragic incident which i shall community and officers are providing reassurance. should anyone have any concerns about what happened, i encourage them to talk to them. they should call 101 or give the call handler the reference 52212 744 97. give the call handler the reference 52212 744 91— give the call handler the reference 52212 744 97. :, :, , :, , ., 52212 744 97. that has a statement. from norton — 52212 744 97. that has a statement. from norton fits _ 52212 744 97. that has a statement. from norton fits warren _ 52212 744 97. that has a statement. from norton fits warren on - 52212 744 97. that has a statement. from norton fits warren on the - 52212 744 97. that has a statement. | from norton fits warren on the edge of taunton in somerset. boris johnson has narrowly succeeded in... borisjohnson has narrowly succeeded in getting mps to back his controversial plans for a new cap on the cost of social care in england, but there was a substantial tory rebellion.
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the plans change the way the cap of £86,000 is calculated, and critics say say poorer people are disproportionately affected. the prime minister claims the plans are �*incredibly generous�*. the proposals went through but mrjohnson�*s commons majority was cut from 80 to 26. our political correspondent lone wells reports. does the prime minister have enough support? i has he made a pig's ear of it? it�*s a question getting louder in westminster after borisjohnson faced some dissent from his own side over the government�*s less generous than expected social care plans. the plans are are more generous than the current system because anyone with assets under £100,000 will get some state support that is means tested, and everyone will pay a maximum of £86,000 for their care. but any council support won�*t count towards that cap. this means someone with a family home worth £100,000 or less and somebody with a £1 million home would both need to spend £86,000 on care, even if one is eligible for help. often people with dementia, which is incredibly unfair in the way it affects people, and can face catastrophically high care costs, so we do have concerns with the suggestions that people
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perhaps in different parts of the country who have worked all their lives, but by virtue of the fact of the assets they may or may not have may be treated differently. we think that is a problem. the plans narrowly passed last night, but this disparity is what is troubling some conservative mps, who fear, as one put it, about ending up on the wrong side of the argument. the significant conservative rebellion last night came after a speech to the cbi conference of business leaders where the prime minister lost his place in his notes and got sidetracked about his visit to peppa pig. forgive me. some this morning, even the former health secretaryjeremy hunt, who abstained from backing borisjohnson�*s plans last night,
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have been forgiving to him. the speech didn�*t go particularly well, but i think the bigger picture is the things that matter to ordinary people, for example, the booster programme, which is by far the biggest anywhere in europe, means that we have a better chance of having a normal christmas this year than many countries in europe. i think in the end that is the kind of thing that will matter more to most people. but some of those who represent ordinary people, mps, feel their patience is wearing thin. after a rocky few weeks of difficult headlines about sleaze, less generous plans for railways and now social care, some of those who didn�*t back the government last night feels it�*s not good enough for ministers to just say, "trust us, we have done the sums." they want more assurances the plans they�*re being asked to vote on have been properly thought through. the government insists on this issue of social care that everyone will be better off by having this £86,000 cap. no one will lose from these reforms compared to the system we have now,
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and the overwhelming majority will win. downing street say there is an impact assessment of how these social care plans will affect people, but it hasn�*t yet been published. but this isn�*t the end of the road for the plans, which could still be challenged as they go through the house of lords. the house of lords will do what it does well, we may amend and suggest constructive amendments to the government and we may say to them think again if we are not comfortable with the detail that is there. any changes suggested by the lords could be bounced back to mps, meaning borisjohnson and ministers have work to do if they are to cool concerns on their own side.
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what did you joining me now is, mike padgham who is the chair at the independent care group — which represents independent care providers in york and north yorkshire. what did you make of it? alike i was disappointed that it was noted for but i was heartened that the majority are smaller than expected so i�*m hopeful that when it does go to the house of lords. i do not think the system is right yet, particularly those who have a rethink. you picked up that sense among people you�*ve been talking to in yorkshire about this and about concerns that may be through no fault of their own, they could end “p fault of their own, they could end up effectively paying a sort of bigger proportion of what they�*ve built up over their life than, say, people living in wealthier parts of the country down south. that is particularly right because we only learned a few days ago of the cost thatis learned a few days ago of the cost that is made is not the cap so it is
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the only money the to put in, so having a total authority support, it will take longer before we reach the cap so it is tough and i don�*t think the detail had been thought through which is why i am concerned but there is still time the government can change its mind. they said it was generous. presumably the kind of money, whatever you think of that, the money that people are going to put in and what instead will be put in by the state is only1 aspect of the problem with social care but what are the more pressing things you have to deal with? i what are the more pressing things you have to deal with?— what are the more pressing things you have to deal with? i admit it is a very difficult _ you have to deal with? i admit it is a very difficult issue _ you have to deal with? i admit it is a very difficult issue and _ you have to deal with? i admit it is a very difficult issue and i - you have to deal with? i admit it is a very difficult issue and i want - you have to deal with? i admit it is a very difficult issue and i want to l a very difficult issue and i want to give the government some credit for trying to tackle social care because this has been through the labour and conservative coalition as well, and i would say it has not been tackled but money is coming in to be raised to a national insurance, the vast majority of that is going to the nhs 1st and not social care so when you take the money out of the cap that we were speaking about, there�*s very little left for local authorities to
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fund an ever increasing population that needs care. we should remember that needs care. we should remember that there are 1 of the half—million people who are not getting care at all who need it, so it very early the surface and to say you will fix it and have it done, it is a bit rich because there has not even been a starter and it made, to be honest. you do not know by the time the nhs has taken its need, how much will be left. the other question since it is 1 that has come up today withjeremy hunt putting down an amendment to the bill saying the government should plan on health, should plan twice a year how many staff it needs, starting black staff and social care are currently not part of the health service and their recruitment is a different question. are you getting enough staff? are you getting the kind of skills base of staff you need?— you getting the kind of skills base of staff you need? definitely not on there in lies — of staff you need? definitely not on there in lies another _ of staff you need? definitely not on there in lies another problem - of staff you need? definitely not on there in lies another problem with i there in lies another problem with there in lies another problem with the code of rent government is we are saying that social care before the pandemic so that there was
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already 100,000 vacancies and now with the pandemic and the fact we have got nojob with the pandemic and the fact we have got no job no jabs policy means we will lose another 60,000 which is around 10% of the workforce. the population needing care is going up and the government does not seem to understand that if we are going to help the health service, we need to be strong because if we are not, the health service cannot. but we need to pay staff and have better terms and conditions for what is very skilled work and i would like staff and social care to be on the same paras and social care to be on the same par as the nhs and we are not, we have to keep fighting until the government listens to us. thank you so much for — government listens to us. thank you so much forjoining _ government listens to us. thank you so much forjoining us _ government listens to us. thank you so much forjoining us this _ so much forjoining us this afternoon, good to speak to you again. now to afghanistan. it is 100 day since the taliban seized power and many are scrambling to avert 1 power and many are scrambling to avert1 of power and many are scrambling to avert 1 of the world�*s worst humanitarian crises. a senior red cross official has warned policies
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designed to withhold international funds are depriving ordinary afghan people of the means of survival. —— a hundred days after the taliban seized power in afghanistan, millions of people are facing the threat of starvation. aid agencies are scrambling to avert what has been called one of the �*world�*s worst humanitarian crises�*. a senior red cross official has warned policies designed to withhold international funds from the taliban are depriving ordinary afghan people of the means of survival. yalda hakim is in kabul. hello to you. hello. as you say, cominu hello to you. hello. as you say, coming to _ hello to you. hello. as you say, coming to your _ hello to you. hello. as you say, coming to your life _ hello to you. hello. as you say, coming to your life from - hello to you. hello. as you say, coming to your life from the - hello to you. hello. as you say, - coming to your life from the afghan capital cab all where i�*ve been in the last... for the last few weeks. —— the afghan capital kabul. it is hard not to see the starvation and famine on the faces of the people who are really desperate in these desperate times in the un warned a few weeks ago that it is a marketable catastrophe and no matter when you go, whether you�*re in the capital or travelling down to kandahar or hell manned, you see the desperation everywhere you go. —— or helmand. and this is what i seen in campbell. —— in kabul.
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-- in kabul. this is a nation on the brink of starvation _ -- in kabul. this is a nation on the brink of starvation and _ -- in kabul. this is a nation on the brink of starvation and for - -- in kabul. this is a nation on the brink of starvation and for aid - brink of starvation and for aid agencies, it is a race against time. emotions begin to run high. this lady has arrived with her disabled son pleading for help. the world food programme says they are doing everything they can. but it is not enough. this lady tells me she is desperate.
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the taliban says the world needs to act. the international community has a hand in that, because they have imposed sanctions and other steps, which has led to a humanitarian crisis in afghanistan. i think there are many in the international community and other countries who are speaking about human rights and educating of human rights, they have such claims. they should reconsider, not take steps which lead to a humanitarian crisis in afghanistan. and these are the faces of the crisis. we�*ve just come to the indira gandhi children�*s hospital, where there are many cases of children suffering
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from acute malnutrition. gulnara is three, so weak she can barely open her eyes. marwa is nearly one. it�*s notjust patients suffering. health care staff haven�*t been paid for months. every single person i�*m speaking to has the same story. they can�*t pay for their ticket to come here, they can�*t pay for theirfood here. and she was just saying that someday they may have to admit her here as a malnutrition patient herself, because she doesn�*t know where she�*s going
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to get her next meal from. even before the taliban came to power, there was a humanitarian crisis in this country. drought, aid cuts and the economic collapse have turned crisis into catastrophe. yalda hakim, bbc news, kabul. i have spoken to taleban leadership who say age should not be —— aid should not be condition —based. —— spoken to the taliban. they will not engage until certain conditions are met which includes an inclusive government which includes people other than members of the taliban regime or the base and that should include women for example, the rights of women and girls who are still being denied the right to go to school, girls over the age of 12
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in many parts of this country, have not been going to school for at least 67 days now and now the winter break has begun, so these are the concerns of the international community and these are the sorts of things and demands they want the taliban to meet. on the other hand, the taliban say they will not be pressured and they would rather go into some kind of dialogue with the international community so that the humanitarian situation can be resolved in this country. the british government has admitted that it failed to warn british airways that the iraqi invasion of kuwait was about to happen in 1990. it�*s the first time officials have acknowledged that they could have prevented the hostage situation that unfolded when a ba jet landed there as part of a stopover and hundreds of passengers were captured by sadam hussein. some were used as human shields by his forces and some experienced sexual violence. now it�*s time for a
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look at the weather. a look at the weather. very good afternoon. it has be calm a very good afternoon. it has been a calm sort of day in london, how is it looking across the uk?— calm sort of day in london, how is it looking across the uk? don't get too used to — it looking across the uk? don't get too used to it _ it looking across the uk? don't get too used to it because _ it looking across the uk? don't get too used to it because things - it looking across the uk? don't get too used to it because things are i too used to it because things are set to change over the next couple of days, but today will go down across the uk is one of the calmest and mildest days of the week. sunshine to the south—east and many more areas have had a lot of cloud, quite misty and murky through parts of the midlands into the west country, fog patches forming as we go through tonight across southern areas, a lot of cloud in the mix and then this band of rain working in across parts of scotland, northern ireland. temperatures will hover just above freezing, falling below if you see clear spells for any length of time and then tomorrow, a band of rain sinking southwards, ahead of it lots of cloud, and the
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skies will brighten for scotland and northern ireland but shower is turning wintry over the high ground in scotland because the air will be turning colder and getting windy, as well, that sets us up for the end the week. say goodbye to calm conditions, it will be turning colder with rain, sleet and snow in the forecast and potentially some stormy weather for the end of the week. welcome back. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: amid rising fears of europe�*s fourth covid wave — governments across the uk are deciding how to respond. but scotland�*s first minister says covid passports won�*t be expanded to other venues. i cannot emphasise strongly enough that our position is still precarious, the next few weeks do pose risks, cases are rising in countries around us and the festive period will bring
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more travel and more socialising. in northern ireland, ministers reiterate their advice urging people to work from home where possible to stop the spread of the coronavirus. a murder investigation is launched after a couple in their 30s were killed in somerset. their children, aged five and six, were found by officers asleep upstairs. two men have been arrested on suspicion of murder. it�*s the children i cannot forget. for what they have seen. it�*s scary. 46 people are dead after a coach crashed and burst into flames in bulgaria — 12 of those killed were children. a requiem mass at westminster cathedral for the mp sir david amess — who was stabbed to death last month. sport and a full round up
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from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. manchester united kick off in the champions league in a little over an hour against villareal in spain. their first game since sacking ole gunnar solskjaer. michael carrick takes the reins in a caretaker capacity. a win would see united through to the knockout stage but if they slip up then qualification will go down to the final group game. carrick, who won the champions league as a player with united in 2008, has been promoted from first team coach to look after the team until a full—time appointment is made. it�*s a big game, obviously for us in terms of the group stages and trying to get through. i willjust go about my job exactly as i know and trust the people i�*ve got behind me and the staff and the players and be positive and look forward to the game.
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it�*s a fantastic game to be playing and a fantastic game of football. these are the nights that you�*re tested and that you remember when you are pushed to the limit and, you know, the ones when you find out really what you�*ve got. the team news is not yet in for that but you will find out on the bbc website. it�*s an 8 o�*clock kick—off at stamford bridge. chelsea need just a point againstjuventus to make it through to the last 16. the italians have already qualified but will want to stay top of the group with the potential of an easier knockout tie. romelu lukaku is expected to be available for the first time since injuring his ankle earlier this month, but chelsea have done pretty well without him. we always had the options. it�*s on the players when they�*re needed. and then they have the chance to show their potential. they need to show it and they need to be ready. that�*s life at chelsea and this is what they do in a very impressive away. we always have options,
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and when we play with romelu, we play with romelu. when we play with timo, we play with timo. when they are not available, we try to find a solution. that is why we are here and that is why we have a big squad. the tottenham chairman daniel levy says the club has to improve its business in the transfer window, but that might not be a sign that new manager antonio conte will be gifted a war—chest for new players. the club has published its financial results for the year ending injune and they have made pre—tax losses of £80 million as a result of the pandemic. since opening the new stadium over two years ago they have spent almost £400 million on players and in a statement alongside the results, levy says... "player spending is no guarantee of success, and ourfocus must be on improved recruitment, coaching, fitness and a competitive mindset," the body set up to examine discrimination in cricket says that more than 2,000 people have come forward in the past two weeks to share their experiences.
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the independent comission for equity in cricket launched its call for evidence from anyone connected to the sport earlier this month. the county game has seen a number of former players come forward, following azeem rafiq�*s testimony of the racist abuse he suffered at yorkshire. jahid ahmed has become the third former essex player to claim that he was the victim of racism at the club. he said he was bullied by a senior coach and his accent was mocked during his four years at the county. essex said they are disheartened to hear of his allegations and are investigating. england�*s netballers will host australia, new zealand and south africa in the quad series injanuary at the copper box arena in london. it�*ll be really good preparation for england ahead of the defence of their commonwealth games title in birmingham next summer. they�*re ranked third in the world, behind the australians and the kiwis. each side will play four games. that�*s all the sport for now.
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studio: thanks for joining studio: thanks forjoining us. 46 people have been killed in bulgaria after a coach crashed and burst into flames in the middle of the night. the passengers were all from north macedonia, returning from a weekend in turkey. 12 of the victims were children. it�*s the worst coach crash in europe in a decade. nick thorpe reports. soon after two in the morning local time, the tourist coach registered in north macedonia veered off the motorway and hit the crash barrier. it tore away a 50—metre section, then burst into flames. no other vehicles were involved. the bus was the last of four travelling in a convoy across bulgaria, from turkey to north macedonia. tourists, including many children, on their way home from a weekend in istanbul.
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top officials, including the prime ministers of both countries, visited the scene of the accident, then went to meet survivors who were being treated in a sofia hospital. | translation: it's a tragedy that | shocked us and which has demanded from the bulgarian state to react as quickly as possible, to investigate this road accident. what are the reasons for it? what led to the death of 46 people? and what can be offered to those that survived? translation: i will leave it to the bulgarian experts - and professionals to analyse the causes of the incident. our fellow citizens who are alive, thank god, have their memories and reflections about how this happened. the causes of the accident are not yet known. the mayor of one nearby village told local media that this particular section of the motorway has many potholes and is a blackspot for accidents. visibility was also bad with recent rain. the bulgarian authorities have promised a full inquiry.
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nick thorpe, bbc news. hundreds of politicians have joined the family of the conservative mp, sir david amess, for a requiem mass in his memory at westminster cathedral. the pope sent a message, praising sir david�*s years of "devoted public service". he was stabbed to death while holding a surgery in his southend west constituency last month. damian grammaticas reports. in the heart of westminster, they gathered today. prime ministers past, along with cabinet members, friends and colleagues, all mourning their loss. yesterday in southend it was sir david�*s private family service, here the political world turns out to say goodbye to a man liked by those on all sides. a silence fell. sir david amess�*s coffin
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arrived and on the steps of westminster cathedral was an honour guard of house of commons staff. their respect, a mark of the man sir david amess was, genuine and kind to all, no matter their station. united in loss today, they marked the death of sir david. there was even a personal message from the pope. it is both my honour and sad duty to convey this message from the holy father, francis. sir david was a committed catholic, his faith a central part of his life. he had met the pope, who said sir david�*s was an example to follow. commending sir david�*s soul to the loving mercy ofjesus christ our saviour, the holy father prays that all who honour his memory will be
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confirmed in the resolve to reject the ways of violence, to combat evil with good and to help build a society of ever greater justice, fraternity and solidarity. sir david amess�*s death, stabbed in his constituency, was shocking, but today it was fond memories those closest to him wanted to dwell on. we're all feeling very, very sad but on the other hand today we're also celebrating, celebrating a life. i feel very strongly that we must remember david not for how he died but for how he lived and for the causes he fought for. an mp for almost 40 years, sir david never became a minister or a party grandee — he was a politician driven not by ambition but a desire to make a difference, his passions often local and personal. just a very sad day — he was my best friend in parliament. i have known him for 40 years.
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when i was first elected in 2001 he was there to greet me and take me in. i will miss him, but i�*ll neverforget him. sir david amess, remembered and missed. above all, this was a day about honouring a politician for how he lived and the many lives he touched. damian grammaticas, bbc news, westminster. thousands of people have taken part in a candlelit vigil in the american state of wisconsin — where a man drove his car through a christmas parade on sunday. five people were killed and 48 others injured, including six children who are in a critical condition. local police said the suspect, darrell brooks, a resident of nearby milwaukee, will be charged with five counts of first degree homicide. medical advice on treating new mothers with sepsis will be changed following the deaths of two women in kent shortly after they gave birth. the guidance is being revised
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in the wake of a bbc investigation which found they probably died after being infected with herpes while having caesarean sections. doctors had assumed that samantha mulcahy and kim sampson were suffering from a bacterial infection and didn�*t give them the anti—viral drugs that may have saved their lives. east kent hospitals trust said it couldn�*t identify the source of the infection. presidentjoe biden has ordered the release of 50 million barrels of oil from the united states�* strategic reserve in a bid to bring down energy prices. our business correspondent michelle fleury says this is a response to watching prices at the pump go up you have to remember that this is a president whose ratings at the moment have been fairly low and he has been hit by inflation which has been damaging his reputation and achievements so he has taken this seriously. what is interesting, you have some of the big oil consumers
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around the world teaming up together to try and have an impact on the price of oil, so the us and china, the leaders of those countries, they discussed this when they held a meeting in november, and now we are seeing the results of that in coordination with other south asian countries as well as the uk. more americans — countries as well as the uk. more americans than _ countries as well as the uk. more americans than usual _ countries as well as the uk. more americans than usual might - countries as well as the uk. more americans than usual might be i americans than usual might be noticing the price of fuel for their vehicles this week because it is thanksgiving on thursday and sometimes it feels like the entire country is on the move. stand sometimes it feels like the entire country is on the move.— country is on the move. and this ear, country is on the move. and this year. after _ country is on the move. and this year. after the — country is on the move. and this year, after the pandemic, - country is on the move. and this year, after the pandemic, when| year, after the pandemic, when travel was virtually shut down, this year they are expecting huge numbers of people, either on the roads or flying to visit family and relatives, and so i think the timing of this might be linked to that. how much influence, just the talk of this has helped lower prices, so the
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fact that when they actually officially released the news it was slightly less than some analysts expected so if you look at the price of oil it is up slightly but it is down from where it was a month ago and i think that is what they are trying to do, sending a message to the oil producing countries to say, if you won�*t work with us, we will use our reserves to try and make a difference. the new culture secretary nadine dorries has been facing questions in parliament. she�*s been asked about a wide range of subjects — including the new chair of the regulator ofcom and free licence fees for the over 75s. our media and arts correspondent david sillito is here. this was a much awaited appearance, not least by the parliamentary sketch writers who thought that the prospects of nadine dorries, who once said david cameron and george
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osborne did not know the price of milk, posh boys who did not know the price of milk, she might be good for a sound bite or two. this price of milk, she might be good for a sound bite or two.— a sound bite or two. this was one of the most anticipated _ a sound bite or two. this was one of the most anticipated encounters, i a sound bite or two. this was one of. the most anticipated encounters, and she has got a busy injury and just started. the boss of ofcom ? a busy in tray. paul dacre, the former editor of the daily mail, he was in the running to be the boss of ofcom, but he is now not running for it, so thatis but he is now not running for it, so that is to a vacancy. she was questioned about it but she said it is to a vacancy. charity commission boss, still a vacancy. questions about bbc impartiality and she said the bbc is taking it seriously with its new ten point plan and she was asked specifically about a quote she is supposed to have said after an
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interview by nick robinson on the today programme with borisjohnson, in which he had interrupted the prime minister, and she is reported to have said, that has cost the bbc a lot of money. she said she did not say that, it was misreported, so that was brought to a halt. and then there was the wider question because a lot of this is about looking at the online harm is built which is all about online abuse and finding a way to protect people when they are online from all sorts of online abuse. she was questioned about her own behaviour on twitter that she has not been afraid to express her own views and the mpjohn nicholson asked a question about something she said on twitter about the lbc presenterjames o�*brien. said on twitter about the lbc presenterjames o'brien. along with a number of — presenterjames o'brien. along with a number of female _ presenterjames o'brien. along with a number of female politicians, - presenterjames o'brien. along with a number of female politicians, i - presenterjames o'brien. along with a number of female politicians, i am a number of female politicians, lam subjected _ a number of female politicians, lam subjected to — a number of female politicians, lam subjected to a — a number of female politicians, lam
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subjected to a small— a number of female politicians, lam subjected to a small number- a number of female politicians, lam subjected to a small number of- a number of female politicians, lam subjected to a small number of men| subjected to a small number of men who do— subjected to a small number of men who do tweet — subjected to a small number of men who do tweet about _ subjected to a small number of men who do tweet about me _ subjected to a small number of men| who do tweet about me obsessively, aggressively. — who do tweet about me obsessively, aggressively. and _ who do tweet about me obsessively, aggressively, and unpleasantly. - aggressively, and unpleasantly. james _ aggressively, and unpleasantly. james 0briefl— aggressively, and unpleasantly. james o'brien is _ aggressively, and unpleasantly. james o'brien is one _ aggressively, and unpleasantly. james o'brien is one of- aggressively, and unpleasantly. james o'brien is one of them. i aggressively, and unpleasantly. james o'brien is one of them. those tweets that — james o'brien is one of them. those tweets that you _ james o'brien is one of them. those tweets that you mentioned, - james o'brien is one of them. those tweets that you mentioned, he - james o'brien is one of them. those tweets that you mentioned, he is i tweets that you mentioned, he is something that you did retweet, i believe _ something that you did retweet, i believe james o'brien of lbc is a hate _ believe james o'brien of lbc is a hate preacher, a liar and a misogynist, a uk hater and an apologist _ misogynist, a uk hater and an apologist for islamic atrocities. you are — apologist for islamic atrocities. you are in— apologist for islamic atrocities. you are in no position to talk about james _ you are in no position to talk about james o'brien saying offensive things— james o'brien saying offensive things about you, you tweeted that. apart _ things about you, you tweeted that. apart from — things about you, you tweeted that. apart from being actionable and defamatory, it is grotesque. i'm glad _ defamatory, it is grotesque. i'm glad you — defamatory, it is grotesque. i'm glad you agree. | defamatory, it is grotesque. i'm glad you agree-— defamatory, it is grotesque. i'm glad you agree. i don't agree with ou. you glad you agree. i don't agree with you- you think— glad you agree. i don't agree with you. you think that _ glad you agree. i don't agree with you. you think that is _ glad you agree. i don't agree with. you. you think that is appropriate? i haven't come _ you. you think that is appropriate? i haven't come here _ you. you think that is appropriate? i haven't come here to _ you. you think that is appropriate? i haven't come here to answer- you. you think that is appropriate? i haven't come here to answer to i i haven't come here to answer to tweets _ i haven't come here to answer to tweets that — i haven't come here to answer to tweets that i_ i haven't come here to answer to tweets that i sent _ i haven't come here to answer to tweets that i sent years - i haven't come here to answer to tweets that i sent years ago, - i haven't come here to answer to tweets that i sent years ago, butj i haven't come here to answer tol tweets that i sent years ago, but i do understand _ tweets that i sent years ago, but i do understand the _ tweets that i sent years ago, but i do understand the context - tweets that i sent years ago, but i do understand the context in - tweets that i sent years ago, but i do understand the context in my. tweets that i sent years ago, but i. do understand the context in my role
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as the _ do understand the context in my role as the secretary— do understand the context in my role as the secretary of— do understand the context in my role as the secretary of state _ do understand the context in my role as the secretary of state but - do understand the context in my role as the secretary of state but as - do understand the context in my role as the secretary of state but as i - as the secretary of state but as i said. _ as the secretary of state but as i said. as — as the secretary of state but as i said. as a — as the secretary of state but as i said, as a female _ as the secretary of state but as i said, as a female politician... itl said, as a female politician... it is said, as a female politician... is nothing to do with being a said, as a female politician...- is nothing to do with being a female politician. _ is nothing to do with being a female politician. fits is nothing to do with being a female olitician. : . :. , is nothing to do with being a female olitician. : , :, , :, , :, politician. as many females do i have to respond _ politician. as many females do i have to respond assertively - politician. as many females do i have to respond assertively to l politician. as many females do i l have to respond assertively to the numerous — have to respond assertively to the numerous aggressive, _ have to respond assertively to the i numerous aggressive, unpleasant, tweets. _ numerous aggressive, unpleasant, tweets. and — numerous aggressive, unpleasant, tweets, and looking _ numerous aggressive, unpleasant, tweets, and looking at _ numerous aggressive, unpleasant, tweets, and looking at your - numerous aggressive, unpleasant, tweets, and looking at your own i tweets, and looking at your own history. — tweets, and looking at your own history. i— tweets, and looking at your own history, i would _ tweets, and looking at your own history, i would not— tweets, and looking at your own history, i would not say- tweets, and looking at your own history, i would not say that i tweets, and looking at your own| history, i would not say that was something — history, i would not say that was something to _ history, i would not say that was something to be _ history, i would not say that was something to be proud - history, i would not say that was something to be proud of- history, i would not say that wasj something to be proud of either. interesting — something to be proud of either. interesting response _ something to be proud of either. interesting response from - something to be proud of either. interesting response from james o�*brien. he interesting response from james o'brien. ,:, . o'brien. he said he will be delighted _ o'brien. he said he will be delighted to _ o'brien. he said he will be delighted to provide i o'brien. he said he will be delighted to provide her i o'brien. he said he will be| delighted to provide her for o'brien. he said he will be i delighted to provide her for a delighted to provide herfor a public platform to repeat any allegations she would like to make. i suspect she won�*t take it up but this is the difficulty, as cricketers are finding with things they have put up on twitter in the past, in your newjob you are vulnerable to be reminded of the past. vulnerable to be reminded of the ast. ,, , :, :, :, past. she said she did not want to be questioned _ past. she said she did not want to be questioned about _ past. she said she did not want to be questioned about things i past. she said she did not want to be questioned about things she i past. she said she did not want to i be questioned about things she said 12 years ago and the committee said, we might give teenagers a clean bill
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of health from what they said in the past but we might not be quite so willing to do that with a secretary of state for culture, media and sport. it still carries on, there is another hour, so i will go back and have a listen to more of what is going on. have a listen to more of what is auoin on. :, , , have a listen to more of what is going on-_ have a listen to more of what is uuoinon. , , going on. hopefully you will be back to talk to my — going on. hopefully you will be back to talk to my colleagues _ going on. hopefully you will be back to talk to my colleagues during i going on. hopefully you will be back to talk to my colleagues during the l to talk to my colleagues during the course of the rest of the day if there are any more memorable exchanges. thanks forjoining us. it�*s the stuff of hollywood blockbusters — a mission into space to try to stop an asteroid hitting the earth. but that�*s what nasa are testing this week, with the launch of their dart mission. the aim is to develop technology that could stop any dangerous asteroid in the future smashing into earth. here�*s sean dilley. asteroids are just one of the long—term threats to the survival of our planet. millions of the rocky masses have been floating around space since the formation of our solar
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system more than 4.5 billion years ago. but now nasa is preparing to launch a spacecraft from california that will be guided remotely to crash into a pair of asteroids called didymos and dimorphous. neither present any risk to earth, but scientists want to test whether it is possible to change the course of the large asteroids, even by a tiny fraction. this is a big dealfor nasa, the first time the agency will intentionally crash a spacecraft into an asteroid for a planetary defence mission. the impact won�*t happen until september next year. but when it does, it will deliberately strike at around 15,000 mph. essentially, this spacecraft is going to act like a cue ball in a game of pool orsnooker, right? it�*s going to smash into this asteroid and give it a little bit of a boost in energy. if you can change the speed of the asteroid so that it just misses the earth, that�*s all you need to do.
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no known asteroid wider than 140 metres is expected to hit the earth in the next 100 years, but if nasa�*s experiment is successful, future generations could be protected. sean dilley, bbc news. the former rugby league player, kevin sinfield, has completed a challenge to run 101 miles injust 24 hours, to raise money for charity. he did it in honour of his former team mate, rob burrow, who was diagnosed with motor neurone disease two years ago. the run — which began in leicester and ended at headingley stadium in leeds — has raised over £1 million. sally nugent was there to meet kevin as he crossed the finish line. applause kevin sinfield, finishing an epic challenge. he has run 101 miles in 24 hours. at the finish line, his former team—mate and best friend, rugby league legend rob burrow. rob was diagnosed with motor neurone disease back in 2019. don�*t make me cry. no, i�*m not going to make you cry.
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you�*ve done it. you�*ve done it, that�*s all you need to know. i know. yeah, he knows how much we love and care about him. that was certainly a battle. we wanted a battle and we got one. three, two, one, go! cheering the challenge started in leicester. all along the route, members of the public encouraged their hero on. really, really buoyed by the support, it�*s been incredible. i can�*t thank people enough. he's done a wonderful thing. really, really wonderful. i've not come across anybody so inspiring in a very, - very long time, and i wish him all the very best. i kev is raising money for the motor neurone disease association and leeds hospital charity. mnd is a degenerative brain disorder. there is no effective treatment and no cure. rob�*s got the same strain of motor neurone as my sister had,
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who passed away last year, and it�*s just so... just so damn horrible. as day turned into night and the temperature dropped, this gruelling run, mile after mile, started to take its toll. obviously, he's running on fumes, he is very emotional, very tired, but we are just all so proud of him. kevin sinfield entered the leeds rhinos stadium to a standing ovation, and this message from his best friend... recorded voice: thanks so much to all involved i with this amazing event. the money raised will help people to get a great facility for a new care centre and to help the mndf find a cure. today is an amazing day for the whole community, and it will benefit every sufferer. lastly, to my amazing friend kev, you don�*t realise the impact you have had on me and the whole mnd community. a remarkable feat of endurance which will help fund treatments and research into a cure for mnd.
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sally nugent, bbc news. apologies, i disconnected my microphone before that story. now it�*s time for a look at the weather. i heard you loud and clear, but i have got to say the weather is expected to change over the next couple of days and today is one of the calmest days of the week because the rest of the week will see things turn much colder. sleet and snow in the forecast and the potential for some stormy weather to end the week. we will get to that in a moment. in the short term, a lot of cloud through this evening and overnight and areas of mist and fog likely down towards the south and later in the night we have rain down into scotland and northern ireland. most staying above freezing through the night but the few places might drop below where we have clear skies. into tomorrow,
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this is the main weather here, the frontal system pushing eastwards, it is a cold front, and behind it the air will be turning colder. the northerly winds will develop. a fair amount of cloud ahead of that frontal system and mist anime which could linger. the frontal system brings rain southwards and behind it for scotland and northern ireland, these skies will turn sunny but there will be showers which could turn wintry over high ground in scotland and the winds will strengthen and it will turn increasingly cold from the north. by thursday we will all be in the grip of that cold air but it is looking like a bright day after a potentially frosty start. a couple of showers especially for coastal areas and even wintry showers down to lower land and temperatures in single digits for everyone and there we get to friday. this deep area of low pressure is expected to dive in from the north, lots of white lines and isobars and some strong wind and
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also heavy rain but crucially, cold air tucking into the weather system, and depending just how much of that is brought into the mix, we might notjust have rain but also sleet and snow mixing in, especially over high ground in the west but potentially wintry weather to quite low levels in northern areas late in the day on friday. it will be cold and windy and as we go through friday night it is going to turn very windy indeed and in fact there is the potential for damaging winds to develop over at some northern and eastern areas in particular, further wintry weather, a mixture of rain, sleet and snow, a messy mixture for us to get the detail right at the moment so it is worth staying in touch with the forecast over the next couple of days with the wintry and still weather on the way and there are already weather warnings from the met office. find out more on the bbc website.
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this is bbc news, i�*m ben brown. our headlines at five: people in northern ireland are being asked to work from home "where possible" to help curb the spread of coronavirus. we are all very much united and asking the public to pay its part along with us as politicians that we can take every effort to try and minimize their transmission rates of the coronavirus. scotland�*s first minister, nicola sturgeon, has confirmed that the vaccine passport scheme will not be expanded to other venues despite urging caution. i cannot emphasise strongly enough that our position is still precarious. the next few weeks do pose risks, cases are rising in countries around us, and the festive period will bring more travel and more socialising. the couple killed in a somerset village while their two young children slept upstairs have been named as stephen
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and jennifer chapple.

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