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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 25, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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to the syrian region. i am referring to the syrian crisis where we worked with counterparts and we are still working with counterparts injordan and other countries in the region. there is a great deal of work that took place. but the sadness of all of this all i can say is the british government and i are working night and day to recognise that no one country can solve this on their own and that is why we need stronger cooperation across the board to address these issues together. the eo - le address these issues together. the --eole of address these issues together. tue: people of east address these issues together. tte: people of east kent address these issues together. "tte: people of east kent are address these issues together. t'te: people of east kent are qualified and deeply upset by what the chief rabbi this morning called an unspeakable tragedy happening on our shores. we should be ashamed also that amongst the dead was a soldier who served alongside british armed
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forces personnel and reportedly felt unable to wait any longer for help to come, not an illegal migrant, i think the home secretary would agree. rather government please act not simply to repel those human beings desperate to risk this crossing about immediately open of the afghan citizens resettlement scheme and this family unions to prevent more deaths like this. t prevent more deaths like this. i refer her to my comments earlier on both those points. we refer her to my comments earlier on both those points.— both those points. we have seen consistently _ both those points. we have seen consistently with afghanistan - both those points. we have seen | consistently with afghanistan and hong kong that the british people react with incredible generosity of spirit to people who are fleeing persecution and oppression and conflict. dishy agree that the safe and legal roots she has referred to consistently and which are techno to the bill are vital but also have to be the only viable route into the uk
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to preserve life and also retain the support of the british public and integrity of our asylum system which is what we all want to see full she is what we all want to see full she is absolutely right, the changes the government have brought an we are very clear about the issues. for government have brought an we are very clear about the issues.- very clear about the issues. for 20 ears the very clear about the issues. for 20 years the asylum _ very clear about the issues. for 20 years the asylum system - very clear about the issues. for 20 years the asylum system has - very clear about the issues. for 20 - years the asylum system has remained in aspic, it has not been reformed and it needs reformed and with that we have set up resettlement routes, hong kong, the scheme has what phenomenally as it is incredibly moving to see how people have been resettled across the uk as well as afghanistan and other schemes as well, silly and refugees, we need to build upon those successes and do the right thing for people fleeing persecution because it is the bond of trust with the british public who are one ungenerous and we need to
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deliver for them are one ungenerous and we need to deliverfor them but are one ungenerous and we need to deliver for them but we cannot be walked all over by other countries that abbott stepping up and taking their responsibilities which is why we have to continue with this cooperation with our neighbours. t cooperation with our neighbours. i thank the secretary of state for cooperation with our neighbours. t thank the secretary of state for her commitment to finding a solution for this, it is clear she is doing just that. my heart aches at the lost lives that have become a reality on behalf of my party i convey my sincere sympathies to all those who grieve for their loved ones. would she consider utilising private petrol companies offering services with boats ready to help the patrol of the sea such as one that contacted me to highlight the facility. as their erol for private enterprise and helping the fight against these dangerous crossings. —— is a role? the
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against these dangerous crossings. -- is a role?— -- is a role? the answer is yes and the home — -- is a role? the answer is yes and the home office _ -- is a role? the answer is yes and the home office has _ -- is a role? the answer is yes and the home office has been - -- is a role? the answer is yes and| the home office has been tasked to look at private companies and support and with my french counterpart this morning i have once again put that offer on the table to have other contractors and join the collective effort. the have other contractors and 'oin the collective effort.�* have other contractors and 'oin the collective effort. the background of british tr00ps _ collective effort. the background of british troops being _ collective effort. the background of british troops being sent _ collective effort. the background of british troops being sent to - collective effort. the background of british troops being sent to report i british troops being sent to report to help secure the border with belarus, can she confirm and clarify the basis of her broad and generous offer to the french, has she offered border force castles to work close to shore in conjunction with the french and has she offered the deployment of british troops and uk police ethnicity and on french command to operate on french beaches. , . command to operate on french beaches-_ may - command to operate on french beaches._ may i . command to operate on french. beaches._ may i first beaches. yes, i have. may i first commend _ beaches. yes, i have. may i first commend the — beaches. yes, i have. may i first commend the home _ beaches. yes, i have. may i first commend the home secretary i beaches. yes, i have. may i first| commend the home secretary on beaches. yes, i have. may i first- commend the home secretary on her robust response to the snp, the
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london borough as currently buckling under the strain and looking after 10% of the refugees and the whole country and almost none of those people have a route to scotland. may i ask that recognising the importance of safe and legal roots and the comments made by the french foreign minister about some of the factors in the uk, but she consider what steps can be brought forward to the of asylum from those who claim subsequently shown to have been bogus. t subsequently shown to have been bonus. ., , ~' subsequently shown to have been bonus. ., , ~ ., , ., bogus. i would 'ust like to put on the racket — bogus. i would 'ust like to put on the racket my — bogus. i would just like to put on the racket my thanks _ bogus. i would just like to put on the racket my thanks to - bogus. i would just like to put on the racket my thanks to the - bogus. i would just like to put on i the racket my thanks to the london borough of hillingdon and many other local authorities across the uk, prominently and london which is feeling the pressure in terms of accommodation, hotels and housing and he is correct in terms of his own suggestion and moving forward on
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solutions working together and this is exactly why we are looking to reform the system, we have to have the differentiation.— the differentiation. lives are trauicall the differentiation. lives are tragically being _ the differentiation. lives are tragically being lost - the differentiation. lives are tragically being lost in - the differentiation. lives are tragically being lost in the i the differentiation. lives are - tragically being lost in the channel at the british people want these gangs smashed, crossing stopped and people processed and the nearest country. the opposition have voted again and again against our measures on the bill to cut down on human trafficking by small boats and the shadow home secretary has called our proposal is unconscionable, the local labour party and lib dems party none of whom ict up today and campaigning againsta party none of whom ict up today and campaigning against a immigration removal centre, does the hope secretary agree that the labour failure shows that when the chips are down to support legislation the note on the do not understand the views of the british people but are failing to protect those being
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exploited by criminal gangs whose callous and criminal behaviour based people are left to die in the channel. ., ~ , people are left to die in the channel-— people are left to die in the channel. ., ~ , ,., , channel. he makes some very important _ channel. he makes some very important points _ channel. he makes some very important points and - channel. he makes some very important points and in - channel. he makes some very important points and in terms| channel. he makes some very i important points and in terms of removal centre, we have them for good and strong reasons, these are people with no legal rights to remain in our country and there are reasons to why we have to put them in removal centres with the processes we have two move them on by the fundamental point here is the reforms we are trying to bring in which are thwarted by the party opposite and by stopping these changes and reforms we are playing into the hands of the people smugglers and those in the hands of traffickers. de smugglers and those in the hands of traffickers. �* . , smugglers and those in the hands of traffickers._ that'll - traffickers. add finally... that'll teach me traffickers. add finally. .. that'll teach me for— traffickers. add finally... that'll teach me for being _ traffickers. add finally... that'll teach me for being a _ traffickers. add finally... that'll teach me for being a last - traffickers. add finally... that'll teach me for being a last end. | traffickers. add finally... that'll i teach me for being a last end. the situation yesterday was a tragedy but it is clear what the home secretary has said, there is no single sober bullet to fix this
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problem. ritchie agree that broadly there are around huge areas to cover, one the international cooperation has got to be there to work with other countries, the domestic legislation has to be put in place which is what we are doing through the nationality and borders bill to fix our borders and the broken asylum system and lastly we need the toughest possible measures to crackdown on the surveillance and criminality of those gangs who are quite frankly aiding and abetting the situation every day. he is absolutely — the situation every day. he is absolutely right _ the situation every day. he is absolutely right and - the situation every day. he is absolutely right and thank. the situation every day. he is| absolutely right and thank you the situation every day. he is - absolutely right and thank you for the comments, he has summed up the totality of the challenge that confronts us and has existed for a long time and that is exactly why we are attempting to fix the broken system by tackling these issues, gangs at source, using intelligence and fixing the system in the uk and
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our continued work with counterparts around the world. that is the home secretary, you're watching bbc news. we have been watching the statement in the house of commons from the home secretary, a large number of contributions mostly from her own benches, the summary of position was we can only make a success to work without international partners in the uk would do whatever it takes to tackle the crisis and magnets trying to cross the channel. she stressed very much that was good
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cooperation with the frenchman was critical of unnamed countries for not giving sufficient support so it is unclear who she was referring to. we know a pregnant woman and three children were among those who died and the tragedy but a labour mp suggesting one of them may have been a soldier from afghanistan who had given up on the option of getting out through the afghan resettlement scheme because of the difficulty of getting out of the country in order to take advantage of that scheme. despite the deaths and worsening weather conditions in the channel more small boats arrived and double this morning —— arrived in dover this morning —— arrived in dover this morning. given the chance, the traffickers will always find people to exploit and manipulate, some of them do not even know that they are coming to the uk. this does mean tackling issues upstream and not waiting until people have reached eu countries. and i've always been extremely clear
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that i want to cooperate and i'm cooperating with international colleagues. the united kingdom has given its unflinching and generous support to france to end this terrible trade in people smuggling. we are not working just to end these crossings because we don't care and we're heartless. the united kingdom has a clear and a generous, humane approach to asylum seekers and refugees. yes, people should come here legally and the system must be fair. but the main issue is this crossing the channel in small boats is extremely dangerous. and yesterday was the moment that many of us had feared for many years. the criminals that facilitate these journeys are motivated by self—interest and profit, not by compassion. they threaten, intimidate, bully and assault the people who get into these boats and they have a complete, absolute disregard for human right. they use the money they make for other heinous crimes. and we simply have to break their business model and, of course, bring them tojustice.
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the government's new plan for immigration, which will be put into law through the national borders bill, is a longer term solution that will address many of these underlying factors to deterring illegal migration and addressing underlying pull factors into the uk's asylum system. it will bring in a range of measures, including the one stop appeals process, the ability to process claims outside the country, the ability to declare an admissibility to our asylum system and have differentiation. those who arrive in the uk, having passed through safe countries and life sentences for people smugglers, people should madam deputy speaker, claim asylum in the first safe country they reach. and nobody needs to leave. nobody needs to flee france in order to be safe. however, madam deputy speaker, we are not waiting until the national borders bill passes. we are undertaking a wide range of operational and diplomatic work.
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i have already approved maritime tactics, including boat turnarounds of border force to deploy the government. the police, the national crime agency are taking action at every level to take down the people smuggling gangs. and once again, however, we cannot do it alone. we continue to work closely with the french to prevent crossings. more than 20,000 have been stopped this year, which i think all members of this house should recognise the magnitude and the scale of the illegal migration crisis that we are seeing. we have dismantled i7 organised criminal groups and secured over 400 arrests and 65 convictions. but this crisis continues clearly demonstrating we need to do more together. this is a complicated issue and there is no simple fix. it does mean a herculean effort and it will be impossible without close cooperation between all international partners and agencies. i also urge colleagues to reconsider their opposition to the nationals
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borders bill, because it is an essential element in finding a long term solution to what is, madam deputy speaker, a long term problem that successive governments have faced over decades as we mourn have faced over decades. as we mourn those who have died in the most horrendous of circumstances i hope that the whole house can come together to send a clear message that crossing the channel in this lethal way in a small boat is not the way to come to our country. it is, of course, unnecessary, illegal and desperately unsafe. the shadow home secretary nick thomas symonds responded to priti patel and asked her to clarify exactly how much surveilance of the french coast is currently happening i have raised on a number of occasions the arrangements we have in place with french authorities and
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i would ask firstly the home secretary could set out how many days a week the full existing surveillance capacity is currently operating. what will she be doing urgently to increase that surveillance. i pay tribute to the national crime agency and a front line or enforcement officers for the work they do and i heard what the home secretary said in her statement about more enforcement cooperation but can she also tell the house what she will do to deepen the intelligence and law enforcement cooperation with the french authorities and other countries so the focus is not only on coastal patrols important though they are but also about disrupting the roots facilitated, often across hundreds and thousands of miles by via people smuggling gangs with the reckless disregard for human life. can i also place on properly managed safe and legal roots, specifically the dub scheme which has closed down having
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helped only 480 unaccompanied children rather than 3000 and was expected to. well that scheme be urgently reinstated? and our political correspondent, caroline davies, is in westminster. how would you characterise the tone of today? there was a sombre mood and a general recognition that this is a complicated issue that needs to notjust require a solution that will happen on the beaches are in the channel, this is something that will have to be rooted all the way back through the chain of people smugglers and back further to the issues that cause people to lead to migrate in the first place, that is one of the other big concerns. just because the some recognition this is complicated doesn't mean labour and the conservatives were on the same page but we heard from the home secretary saying this was a shock but not a surprise, she highlighted
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various measures she is taking to try to solve the problem, offering france additional officers. we know and the past the french have rejected that, there is a concern about sovereignty, we also know with priti patel that she has made trying to solve and deal with this problem a key part of her position and role and the labour have been critical of that today, we had from keir starmer who said he was sick of grand statements from her however and the chamber be heard some support from her own party, david davis said she had strained every sinew to try to deal with this problem. it is interesting to hear from deal with this problem. it is interesting to hearfrom nick talking about paying respects to those with dyed highlighting the safe and secure roots and the uk resettlement scheme announced in february and he said there had only
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been 770 people helped by the scheme and 1171 until the end of september. he was saying that was far short of the 5000 promised and when the home secretary responded she said it was during the pandemic and there are limited measures taken to try to resettle people. not a vast difference between the parties, a sombre atmosphere but still some clear points of difference. we heard the different interpretations of the phone conversation that emanuel macron and borisjohnson had sing to stop using this for particle advantage and downing street singly agreed to work together. do you get any sense that there is a renewed desire to find common ground and make the interruption of the network
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more effective. i think that will be the key question, we heard repeatedly from the home secretary that she had been in touch with her counterpart in france, that she had made various offers and said she put things forward to the french and clearly that conversation is ongoing. what submissions and where that takes us next we do not know. the other point as the home secretary repeatedly made that she said it was shameful and got to this point at which people start reacting, it has to take for people to die for things to move forward. whether or not this particular incident will move things forward of whether the ba different relationship and whether things will progress on this as a short—term burst of better feelings we will have to wait and see. thank you.
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is there anything that can be done to stop people crossing the busiest sea route in the world. whilst the tragedy was unfolding dozens of people who had successfully crossed the channel were arriving in the dungeness will stop the numbers this year have far outstripped last year. the new route first emerged three years ago, sajid javid rushed back from holiday to try to nip it in the bud by the government has been on the back foot ever since. amongst these proposed solutions are joint patrolling of the coast with british and french police and introducing new laws to
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be nice people who arrive in small boats, moving to create more safe routes for people to claim asylum before they enter the uk and greater efforts to tackle the people smuggling gangs. the uk is ready paying millions of pounds towards french only patrols of the beaches but politicians there do not see british participation as a solution. the only answer coming from this awful drama is for the brits to give us more money from the french authorities to have people patrolling the french sure it will not change anything. nothing will change. we are still going to have dead bodies in the channel. the french say _ dead bodies in the channel. the french say that _ dead bodies in the channel. the french say that what makes splitting attractive as these with which people can disappear into the great economy and that is what needs fixing. in fact the number of asylum seekers arriving at substantially lower than its peak 20 years ago.
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the home secretary priti patel seen here in the channel last year and the french both agree that tackling the french both agree that tackling the people smugglers as the priority. not so sake campaigners. the people smugglers are a symptom but not _ the people smugglers are a symptom but not a _ the people smugglers are a symptom but not a coils of the issue, the issue _ but not a coils of the issue, the issue is— but not a coils of the issue, the issue is the _ but not a coils of the issue, the issue is the people want to claim uk asylum _ issue is the people want to claim uk asylum lry— issue is the people want to claim uk asylum by cannot do it unless they are physically in the uk and that is no way— are physically in the uk and that is no way for— are physically in the uk and that is no way for them to get their other than sticking on a boat. with arrests being _ than sticking on a boat. with arrests being made - than sticking on a boat. t't arrests being made overnight after the tragedy yesterday labour say more could have been done to tackle people smuggling. t tihd more could have been done to tackle people smuggling-— people smuggling. i find it really hard to believe _ people smuggling. i find it really hard to believe that _ people smuggling. i find it really hard to believe that those - hard to believe that those arrests couldn't have been made last week on the beak before, apart from the tragic deaths and don't think the evidence is different so ramp up the more enforcement against those that are making money from this human tragedy. are making money from this human traced . ~ ., , are making money from this human traced .~ ., , , tragedy. when migrants were mostly usin: tragedy. when migrants were mostly using lorries — tragedy. when migrants were mostly using lorries and _ tragedy. when migrants were mostly using lorries and to _ tragedy. when migrants were mostly using lorries and to the _ tragedy. when migrants were mostly using lorries and to the channel - using lorries and to the channel tunnel to enter britain huge efforts were made to close the roots, they were made to close the roots, they were only partially successful and
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have led to the new people smuggling route, crossing the channel and dangerous small boats. our europe editor, katya adler, is following the diplomatic response to last night's tragedy. we had emanuel macron speaking to borisjohnson and the home secretary speaking to her counterpart in france and their once of cooperation and determination not to make people smugglers get away with risking those lives in the channel but at the same time each side has been sniping across the channel, the uk are closing france of not doing enough to stop people taking to those unsafe dinghies and choppy waters and france sang to the uk at is actually too welcoming to people
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who arrive in the uk without legal papers are not creating enough of a deterrent. all of this comes in the background of sour relations between france and the uk, france was seen as the bad cop and brexit degradations, france is annoyed at the uk because it said it is not issuing fishing licences to french fishermen and said when i agreed after brexit and at is upset with the uk because of the recent security agreement with the us and australia with france shut out of that and only finding out at the last minute. none of that mood music is helping the cooperation between the two sides but frankly many watching have no patience with the politics and say this is about human tragedy and loss of life, notjust the ngos, it is people setting up impromptu memorial services but also looking at the french press today, a
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bestselling newspaper saying to france and the uk enough is enough, you have to roll up your sleeves and stop this tragic loss of life. tim muffett, is in doverfor us. what sort of continued activity is being seen today? fml there was a clear indication of the desperation many people have too make this perilous journey it is that after the tragedy yesterday to more boats may be johnny the tragedy yesterday to more boats may bejohnny carrying around 40 people, they made it into british waters and the rnli rescued them and brought them to the uk. many wonder what actually happens then to the people who do arrive and over, they are taken to the tug haven reception centre nearby and it is a collection of marquees, people should theoretically spend a few hours the whilst details are taken before they
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are taken to other short—term reception centres around the country. the number of people making this johnny this month, country. the number of people making thisjohnny this month, more country. the number of people making this johnny this month, more than 6000 is so high that we understand some people are having to spend the night at the system is under enormous strain. many people wondering why so many people are making this journey, we wondering why so many people are making thisjourney, we have had many of the reasons, more than 25,000 to start and the money that can be made by the people smuggles is not to be around 3000 pounds per person brought over so it is really a lucrative but deadly trade. it looks beautiful and dover, the water looks beautiful and dover, the water looks calm but what sort of conditions to people endure particular at this time of year in the middle of that water. it is clear and relatively calm from here but it is really cold. there was a view earlier this year that the
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season during which these crossings tends to happen would have finished by now but that simply has not been the case, 6000 people this month alone have made thisjourney the case, 6000 people this month alone have made this journey and we know as well as 27 people who died yesterday to people are in hospital with hypothermia and fighting for their lives. it really as very deceptive, it can look clear and come by those what is at this time of year are really are exceptionally cold. on the coastline at the port there is a lot of activity there, often these ports are further down the coast when it is more quiet, is that evidence of police activity on a presence, to try and interdict these arrivals assuming they get away safely from flange france. once
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the boats get into uk wattles that the boats get into uk wattles that the list when the only to be rescued at the under international law people have to seek asylum in any country arriving so that is the aim. there are so much criticism about the myths towards these people about what life in the uk will be like and thatis what life in the uk will be like and that is clearly a lot of determination to try to get the reality through but it is very difficult and there as so much money to be made. tim, thank you. some breaking news, relevant stories about what is going on, not directly related to migration but studies
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that have been doing the rounds and this is from the french fishing association threatening to blockade northern french ports and the eurotunnel tomorrow because and the once of the boss of that union we still do not have what we want, the ongoing dispute between british and french overfishing licences post brexit. a lot of the rhetoric which got quite heated between boris johnson and president macron calmed down when the french remove the threat to stop british boats landing and french ports and the sides agreed to talk about the fashion men are becoming rather impatient and have heard nothing and over two weeks and do not have the license they want. that is to come. also the french trade minister is going to ireland this week to talk about the post brexit street and easements which are still causing such stress
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and hassle on the island. now it's time for a look at the weather. today has been the calm before the storm, that will bring rain and clearer skies and cheryl's as they would strengthen. temperatures not far away from freezing, the cloud and damp continuing south, sunshine following but also showers telling wintry and snow and northern parts of scotland as the winds back—up. temperatures 7—9, up on today but winds picking up across northern areas later, a storm approaches with gales quite widely across the uk and may be snow on the house, some
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disruption expected. the arm but when warning runs from 3pm tomorrow and particularly when the only north—east. hello this is bbc news with shaun ley. the headlines... urgent talks today between london and paris over people smuggling, after the deaths of 27 in the english channel. a pregnant woman and three children, were among those who died. the government — and labour call for urgent action, starting with tackling people smugglers they threaten, intimidate, bully these people get into these boats and they have a complete disregard for human rights. they use the money they make for other heinous crimes. france says the whole
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of europe must unite, to end, the deaths at sea. translation: these people are ex - loited translation: these people are exploited and — translation: these people are exploited and promised - translation: these people are exploited and promised el- translation: these people are| exploited and promised el dorado translation: these people are . exploited and promised el dorado in england and this has been happening for over 20 years. the government says it will work at pace, to deliver a new independent regulator, for football. politicians in jersey vote to approve the principle of legalising assisted dying. and a roman mosaic thought to be centuries old has been unearthed in a farmer's field in the east midlands sport now with holly. this we start with a record result for northern ireland's women — they beat north macedonia 11—0
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in their world cup qualifier in skopje. six names on the scoresheet — simone magill with four in total. it was a special day for rachel furness — her hat trick means she is now level with david healy�*s record of 36 goals for her country. rebecca mckenna, lauren wade, kirsty mcguinness and rebecca holloway also on target this afternoon. it means northern ireland go level with austria — who face england on saturday at the stadium of light. now could this man be making a return to arsenal? well according to the current boss, mikel arteta — arteta was asked during this afternoon's press conference if a formal offer had been made to bring arsene wenger back to the emirates where he previously guided the club to three premier league titles. arteta told reporters there had been communication, but it's unclear in what capacity. i would like
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him to it would be a great help and a great help for the club. elsewhere in football, we've had a couple of managerial departures this morning. in the women's super league, leicester have sacked manager jonathan morgan with the club bottom of the table. and sheffield united have parted company with slavisa jokanovic — just six months after his appointment with the club 16th in the championship following their relegation from the premier league last season. the club have moved quickly to replace him though, bringing back paul heckingbottom, who was caretaker manager for the final two months of last season. reigning champion neil robertson begins his defence of the uk championship this afternoon. the australian beat judd trump last year in a final that lasted into the small hours. he'll be up againstjohn astley, a former professional who's now competing as an amateur after losing his place on the tour. i think they see the world in the uk, a couple of other big events
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where they can maybe have a bigger jump where they can maybe have a bigger jump in the rankings and that they will be even more hungry for those kinds of tournaments than some of the others so, yeah, but it's not really something i worry about as a player. i know that if i play well, 99 times out of 100 i will win. ifocus i know that if i play well, 99 times out of 100 i will win. i focus on what i'm doing and let other players worry about me. australia's nathan lyon is the latest player to support former captain tim paine and says he should be included in their ashes team. paine stood down as captain last week after it emerged he'd sent sexually explicit texts sent to a female colleague four years ago. the ashes series against england gets underway in brisbane on the 8th of december. lyon insists the saga won't be a distraction. he made a mistake a few years ago and assured lot of courage and he has got my full support —— showed a lot of courage. i'm guaranteed he has the full support of the
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australian changing room, so i do not see it as a distraction at all. at the end of the day, we are professional athletes, we know what we have got to do and how we have to go about it so, the lead into the test match and throughout the whole series, we are professional sports people and we will go out there and do ourjob. tennis's davis cup finals begin today across three different countries — italy, austria and spain — but the competition is set to move to the uae on a five year deal from 2022. abu dhabi would host across multiple venues and the tournament could stretch to 12 days. it wouldn't finish until early december and there are concerns it would clash with football's world cup in nearby qatar. the decision is to be rubber stamped next week. that's all the sport for now. holly hamilton at the bbc sport centre. we stay with support.
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the government says it will work �*at pace' on proposals to create an independent regulator for english football, to ensure the financial stability and good governance of the game. it's one of a number of recommendations made by a fan—led review, which was carried out by the former sports minister, tracey crouch. our sports correspondent nesta mcgregor has the details. chanting: we want ashley out, we want ashley out. _ well, they do say the best football chants are short, to the point, and easy to remember. and whether it's a protest against ownership, a breakaway league, or the financial state of a club, supporters have been calling for change. now a government—led review into how english football is run has concluded the game needs an independent regulator. we've seen football lurch from crisis to crisis over the last decade or so, and unfortunately we haven't necessarily had the right levels of regulation in place to stop that crisis from happening. i think we've reached a point where people are saying, no more. the regulator would have the power to enforce a more rigorous owner
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and directors' test. a transfer levy would see the premier league give more money to the rest of the game. to the rest of the game, a reform of parachute payments to regulated clubs, and also give fans more of a say in the running of a club. since the end of the 2018—19 season, gigg lane, the home of bury football club, has remained unused. the club went out of business after running into financial trouble. some say had football had an independent regulator, the club might still exist today. the lancashire—based club was sold forjust £1. unpaid wages and mounting debt then led to it being expelled from the league. lots of football clubs and lots of football supporters around the country will be wondering, what's the big fuss about this particular review? my message to them in a way is you don't know what you have until you lose it. it's far more profound than people realise. those in favour of the review�*s recommendations say it would benefit and protect
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the entire footballing pyramid. praise the lord we're finally getting somewhere. football is coming home, you could say. i think it is the solution. we've documented the issues involved in football and obviously the super league pushed the arms of many people and the fans are the ones that pay the money that go into the ground, so i think the report is very, very positive. critics of tracey crouch's plans claim too much red tape could put off potential investors and it doesn't go far enough in helping fans who want to own part of their club. the report is now with the government. it's a very detailed review so we really need to look at all the other recommendations and see how we can make those work as well, but i'm very excited about the prospect of an independent regulator. although no changes are guaranteed, just getting the ball rolling is progress for those who've been waiting for long enough. nesta mcgregor, bbc news. some of the children who survived the aberfan disaster have said they were put through distressing medical tests, which one described as "torture".
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116 children and 28 adults were killed in 1966 when coal waste slid down a hillside, burying a primary school and homes in village of merthyr tydfil. maria david has more. lam standing i am standing once again only a pile of black— i am standing once again only a pile of black sky— i am standing once again only a pile of black sky and _ i am standing once again only a pile of black sky and underneath - i am standing once again only a pile of black sky and underneath as - i am standing once again only a pile of black sky and underneath as is i of black sky and underneath as is the infant — of black sky and underneath as is the infant school. _ of black sky and underneath as is the infant school. on _ of black sky and underneath as is the infant school.— the infant school. on the 21st of october 1960 — the infant school. on the 21st of october 1960 6,000 _ the infant school. on the 21st of october 1960 6,000 of- the infant school. on the 21st of october 1960 6,000 of tonnes| the infant school. on the 21st of. october 1960 6,000 of tonnes of the infant school. on the 21st of- october 1960 6,000 of tonnes of coal waste surged down the hillside of aberfan —— 1966, thousands of tonnes. aberfan "1966, thousands of tonnes. . ., tonnes. the children were due to start their _ tonnes. the children were due to start their half _ tonnes. the children were due to start their half term _ tonnes. the children were due to start their half term holiday. - tonnes. the children were due to j start their half term holiday. this airl was start their half term holiday. this girl was rescued, _ start their half term holiday. girl was rescued, but her start their half term holiday.- girl was rescued, but her brother and sister did not survive. over the years, she has written two books about what happened. any bbc wales podcast, gaynor describes the added trauma of the medical tests she was put through after the disaster. t’tt put through after the disaster. t�*tt never forget it. can into two gates
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with this big, big building, mental hospital. someone came out trying to calm me down, i was still kicking and screaming. they were trying to prise my fingers of any handle full stop to basically drag me in this hospital. they would completely fill your hair with loads of gel. this cap with a baton, you see it in frankenstein. on these plugs and leads coming out, fixing to the caps: your head. and if you had to sit there and be interrogated. it was torture. sit there and be interrogated. it was torture-— was torture. years later, she discovered — was torture. years later, she discovered that _ was torture. years later, she discovered that the - was torture. years later, she discovered that the tests - was torture. years later, she l discovered that the tests were carried out in case that they were asked for proof of psychological damage. asked for proof of psychological dama . e. , , ., , asked for proof of psychological damare. , , ., , ., damage. there tests were only to determine what _ damage. there tests were only to determine what level _ damage. there tests were only to determine what level of _
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damage. there tests were only to - determine what level of compensation from aberfan disaster fund. tt from aberfan disaster fund. it was not to help _ from aberfan disaster fund. it was not to help us- — from aberfan disaster fund. it was not to help us. today, _ from aberfan disaster fund. it was not to help us. today, mental - from aberfan disaster fund. it was i not to help us. today, mental health services are — not to help us. today, mental health services are very _ not to help us. today, mental health services are very different. _ not to help us. today, mental health services are very different. i - services are very different. i think the whole — services are very different. i think the whole approach to dealing with people _ the whole approach to dealing with people following traumatic events has changed immensely in the last few decades and i'm very confident that nowadays individuals would be dealt with in a different way, primarily— dealt with in a different way, primarily talking therapies and particularly for children and young people. _ particularly for children and young people. it — particularly for children and young people, it is still is appropriate to come — people, it is still is appropriate to come forward because there are interventions and treatments that can help — interventions and treatments that can help people, even at many, many years— can help people, even at many, many years after~ _ can help people, even at many, many years after-— years after. like many survivors, ga nor years after. like many survivors, gaynor is — years after. like many survivors, gaynor is still _ years after. like many survivors, gaynor is still traumatised. - years after. like many survivors, gaynor is still traumatised. now| gaynor is still traumatised. now after 55 years, she has finally begun treatment. you can hear more from gaynor and her surviving classmates in the podcast series aberfan: tip number seven, available to download now on bbc sounds. well worth a listen, if very sombre
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reminder of those very terrible events back in the village of aberfan back in 1966. the national trust will no longer issue licenses for trail hunting on its land. last month, a senior huntsman was convicted of telling people to use the sport as a "smokescreen" for illegal fox hunting. a rare roman mosaic has been discovered in a field in the east midlands. the artwork, which dates back to the third or fourth century, shows the epic battle between achilles and the trojan hero, hector, in homer's the iliad. it's the first of its kind to be found in the uk. the site has now been granted protection, to preserve the discovery. it means we will not be talking in detail about where it was. i'm pleased to say i can speak to the man who found it —jim irvine. this is a fantastic story, tell me how it came about.— this is a fantastic story, tell me how it came about. during lockdown in 2020, i how it came about. during lockdown in 2020, | decided _ how it came about. during lockdown in 2020, i decided some _ how it came about. during lockdown in 2020, i decided some exercise i how it came about. during lockdown i in 2020, i decided some exercise was required and went off early wander around some local fields, which are on the family farm. and i stumbled
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across some pottery and some oyster shells and various other bits and pieces, which really got me interested in where these had come from, so a bit of digging, not literally, a bit of investigation i got home and i spotted a really interesting proper mark, which was apparently the field, so it went on from there, really, and when the crop is harvested, i went back with a spade and started to explore there is a bit and this is where i came across the pavement, as it is, and it went on from there, really. heep it went on from there, really. how bi is it? it went on from there, really. how big is it? i — it went on from there, really. how big is it? i should _ it went on from there, really. how big is it? i should probably - it went on from there, really. how big is it? i should probably know. big is it? i should probably know less. it is about _ big is it? i should probably know less. it is about seven _ big is it? i should probably know less. it is about seven metres i less. it is about seven metres across by a bit about ten metres long so it is quite a large individual room in a building complex of many rooms. 50 individual room in a building complex of many rooms. so it would have been something _ complex of many rooms. so it would have been something like _ complex of many rooms. so it would have been something like a - complex of many rooms. so it would have been something like a roman l have been something like a roman villa built on that site do they think? ., , ~ ,., ., think? that is right. at the sort of la out think? that is right. at the sort of layout and — think? that is right. at the sort of layout and location _ think? that is right. at the sort of layout and location probably - layout and location probably indicates it might have been a working farm with a rather nice house attached to it. in the room
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fun at itself, we have this amazing mosaic on the ground which is busily telling a story —— in the room itself. you can imagine people showing their friends it. itself. you can imagine people showing theirfriends it. tt is itself. you can imagine people showing their friends it.- showing their friends it. it is a treat showing their friends it. it is a great story — showing their friends it. it is a great story of _ showing their friends it. it is a great story of hector- showing their friends it. it is a great story of hector and - showing their friends it. it is a - great story of hector and achilles's battle outside the walls of troy and it is a homer myth that lots of people will know almost as a childhood story, but to see it this way, knowing it had been under the soilfor so many way, knowing it had been under the soil for so many centuries, way, knowing it had been under the soilfor so many centuries, what feeling was that? tt soil for so many centuries, what feeling was that?— feeling was that? it was pretty amazinr. feeling was that? it was pretty amazing- i _ feeling was that? it was pretty amazing. i mean, _ feeling was that? it was pretty amazing. i mean, you - feeling was that? it was pretty amazing. i mean, you know, l feeling was that? it was pretty - amazing. i mean, you know, these are things like archaeological discoveries like this, they are made by people building a house are putting a pipe end but seeing something that has been undisturbed for 1700 years or so has been great. what has kept me interested is what is the state of the next thing that
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will come out of the site because it has all been amazing so far? you talked about _ has all been amazing so far? you talked about using the field any normal way after you had found it. is there a bit of nervousness about any work you have been doing? yeah, the feel any work you have been doing? yeah, they feel there _ any work you have been doing? yeah, they feel there is _ any work you have been doing? yeah, they feel there is now _ any work you have been doing? yeah, they feel there is now under - any work you have been doing? yeah, they feel there is now under an - they feel there is now under an agri— environment scheme, reverted to grassland so it won't be part of cereals any more and it basically protects the archaeology. there will be no cultivation of the field, no scrub, the grass mix on there is to protect what is underneath. this has been taken out of use and will no longer be farmed as part of the farm. ., ., , ~' longer be farmed as part of the farm. ., ., , ~ ., ., farm. your family, i think, have had our farm farm. your family, i think, have had your farm for _ farm. your family, i think, have had your farm for a _ farm. your family, i think, have had your farm for a 50 _ farm. your family, i think, have had your farm for a 50 or _ farm. your family, i think, have had your farm for a 50 or 60 _ farm. your family, i think, have had your farm for a 50 or 60 years, - farm. your family, i think, have had| your farm for a 50 or 60 years, what yourfarm for a 50 or 60 years, what was your dad's reaction? was he miffed because it is an extra complication?— miffed because it is an extra comlication? ., , , ,, , complication? running a business is hard enough. _ complication? running a business is hard enough, isn't _ complication? running a business is hard enough, isn't it? _ complication? running a business is hard enough, isn't it? yeah, - complication? running a business is hard enough, isn't it? yeah, that. complication? running a business is hard enough, isn't it? yeah, that is| hard enough, isn't it? yeah, that is an aspect of it. the agri— environment scheme is compensated,
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so in terms of actually keeping it in good order, you're compensated for that sort is taking at farming, but you are paid to maintain it as it is so you do not really lose significantly. and i will be perfectly honest, the field is a tricky one to get to, so i don't think i am that fast. hat tricky one to get to, so i don't think i am that fast.— tricky one to get to, so i don't think i am that fast. not too much to worry about! — think i am that fast. not too much to worry about! i _ think i am that fast. not too much to worry about! i think— think i am that fast. not too much to worry about! i think we - think i am that fast. not too much to worry about! i think we are - to worry about! i think we are allowed to say it is in rutland, aren't we question mark that is opposite all we can say. he aren't we question mark that is opposite all we can say. he went and talked to leicestershire _ opposite all we can say. he went and talked to leicestershire county - talked to leicestershire county council about advice from the archaeological experts about what you should do. are you hoping that the link between this find and at the link between this find and at the site can somehow be kept? yeah, i'm ordering — the site can somehow be kept? yeah, i'm ordering my _ the site can somehow be kept? yeah, i'm ordering my toga _ the site can somehow be kept? yeah, i'm ordering my toga and _ the site can somehow be kept? yeah, i'm ordering my toga and sandals - i'm ordering my toga and sandals now! in all seriousness, the local council and museum will be doing a virtual display. it's very likely. site is not easily accessible and the appetite for the visitor centre
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is not really there because of the risk in the long term to the archaeology, so what happens if visitors start coming, the site goes bust, all of these things, so the correct thing to do is preserve the archaeology when it has. and to learn from it by investigating, which has already been done over the last two seasons. and that is at the farm we have got today. today we have an amazing recordings, some of the video, and all of this contributes to rounding up the whole, give it a good overview of what the site might have been used for and how it was structured and what people might have done there. it really is a fascinating site and there is still more loads —— loads more to learn. it is lovely to hear your enthusiasm. thank you for finding itand your enthusiasm. thank you for finding it and doing the right other people can shading it as well. it has a remarkable thing, the first of its kind to be found anywhere in the uk so it makes you hope there might be more debt there. if you pleasure
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to speak to you, thanks for your time. ., ~' ,, nearly 50 fire stations across south wales have become designated safe havens where people can go if they feel threatened or in danger. the launch coincides with white ribbon day —— the international day for the elimination of violence against women and girls. here's rhiannon wilkins. we're used to hearing about firefighters being called to deal with all kinds of emergencies that today fire stations like this one will now become safe havens, places for people who are being abused, or who feel at risk of being abused to come to. joining me now as jason evans, the head of risk reduction here at south wales fire and rescue. jason, tell me a little more about this initiative.— this initiative. this initiative is a community _ this initiative. this initiative is a community safety _ this initiative. this initiative is a community safety activity i this initiative. this initiative is. a community safety activity and this initiative. this initiative is i a community safety activity and in general has become a big part of the fire fighter�*s role. we work with
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families of victims to build their esteem and are using our firefighters as positive role models. quite an alarming statistic is we also provide reactive service to individuals who have had fire used as a threat against them. so in the last 12 months, we have seen a 25% increase at over 450 instances where we have attended properties at your target those properties against the threat of fire from perpetrators. $5 the threat of fire from perpetrators.- the threat of fire from perpetrators. the threat of fire from --eretrators. �* , ., , perpetrators. as part of this initiative. — perpetrators. as part of this initiative, i— perpetrators. as part of this initiative, i think _ perpetrators. as part of this initiative, i think there - perpetrators. as part of this initiative, i think there are l perpetrators. as part of this | initiative, i think there are 47 stations taking part in total across south wales, not all of them are crude 24 hours a day, but people will be able to come any time of day is that right? yes, most are crude 20 47, is that right? yes, most are crude 20 47. some _ is that right? yes, most are crude 20 47, some have _
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is that right? yes, most are crude 20 47, some have two _ is that right? yes, most are crude 20 47, some have two -- - is that right? yes, most are crude 20 47, some have two -- 24/7. i is that right? yes, most are crude 20 47, some have two -- 24/7. |f| 20 47, some have two —— 24/7. if they are not crude, people can follow the instructions posted and follow the instructions posted and follow 999 and get an officer or person back to a system as quickly as possible in a time of need —— for stations that are not crewed. as possible in a time of need -- for stations that are not crewed.- stations that are not crewed. there is a station — stations that are not crewed. there is a station in _ stations that are not crewed. there is a station in cardiff _ stations that are not crewed. there is a station in cardiff central - stations that are not crewed. there is a station in cardiff central is i is a station in cardiff central is one of 47 that is taking part in this initiative. it is called a safe havens and hopefully that will go some way to helping vulnerable people who feel in danger. what a great idea. you will be familiar with those blokes behind me. and you may recall what peter jackson did with archives and behind the scenes stuff of world war i one footage. he has brought them to
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life. well, he has done something similar with the beatles. for more than half a century, almost 60 hours of unseen footage of the beatles making their final album, gathered dust in a vault, unseen. but for the last four years, the oscar winning director of the the lord of the rings, peterjackson, using the footage, has been crafting a three part, eight hour documentary. it's called get back and is a candid and intimate portrait of the fab four, who often didn't realise, they were being filmed. paul mccartney says jackson's film has actually changed his perception of how the band broke up. peterjackson has given his only british tv interview to our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson. # get back, get back... well, we'll have to do it sitting down or we get too excited. the sounds, the colours, the joy of the beatles making music. unseen for more than half a century. ringo said that he felt we had to just tell it
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like it is. i think we are. the man entrusted to restore almost 60 hours of footage from the let it be sessions injanuary 1969, the lord of the rings director peterjackson. what made you want to dedicate four years of your life to this project? well, i wouldn't have done it if it was the rolling stones or something. sort of controversial, sorry! a musical documentary is not a huge appeal to me, but the beatles, yes. i'm all in, 100%. four years, no problem. i've loved every second of it. # speaking words of wisdom... do you want to do it once more then? yes, yes. i mean, we'll never get a chance to do it again. the project happened almost by mistake. peterjackson was meeting with the beatles company apple to discuss the possibility of a virtual reality exhibition. so, cats and kittens, what are we going to do? but as a beatles obsessive, he took his chance to ask something he'd always wanted to know — what had happened to all
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the outtakes from the 1970 beatles documentary let it be? they said to me, "well, yeah, we've got it all." which was great as a fan. i was sitting there thinking, "yeah, you've got it all!" they were thinking about using it for a documentary, a stand—alone documentary, but they didn't have anybody, a film—maker attached. so the only time in my life i've ever done this, i sort of put up my hands and i said, "well, if you're looking forsomebody, i'lljust... please think of me." just say whatever comes into your head each time and try to be like a cauliflower until you get the word. peterjackson was offered the job the same day. his only concern — he'd always been told that the making of the let it be album was a gloomy time for the beatles. but when he sat down to watch the outtakes, what surprised him was just how much fun everyone was having. if the footage showed a truly miserable band not wanting to be doing what they were doing, i wouldn't have made the movie. that's not the movie i would have wanted to make, but i was amazed and surprised to see the footage showing a very different story to what i'd
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believed for 40 years. all we've got is us. what do you think? in the end, there was so much footage, get back has been divided into three parts. and there is one other trilogy that links peterjackson to the beatles. one real curiosity — in the 1960s, the beatles actually wanted to make a lord of the rings movie directed by stanley kubrick. what do you know about that? i've been scraping together little pieces of information. i've been interrogating paul about it. and ultimately they couldn't get the rights from tolkien because tolkien didn't like the idea of a pop group doing his stories. remarkable stuff, can't wait to see that. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett.
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some snow over the hills and some disruption is expected. ahead of that, we have the clear skies this evening and temperatures will be something quickly. workload and some rain arriving in scotland, pushing into northern ireland and that cloudy, wet weather will sweep its way southwards overnight. to be replaced in normal areas by showers at —— northern areas. even in the south—east of england, it is still quite chilly passing in the morning, temperatures just quite chilly passing in the morning, temperaturesjust above quite chilly passing in the morning, temperatures just above freezing. the cloud and patchy rain continues to drive across england and wales. the brighter skies with sunshine falling, showers may turn wintry fault northern ireland, some is now arriving in northern parts of scotland as at the winsock to back up scotland as at the winsock to back up here. temperatures are seven, eight, 9 degrees, a notch up on today. the winds are picking up all the while. this is where we have this amber wind warning from the met office, heading into saturday morning, gust of 75 miles or more.
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the storm will be tracking out into the north some rain and snow wrapped around it and on the back edge of that storm we have those really strong winds. those will dry their way southwards overnight to many parts of the country, leaving us with a very windy day on saturday. these are the gusts we are expecting, notjust very these are the gusts we are expecting, not just very windy across north—eastern areas, but across north—eastern areas, but across these western coast, through the irish sea some gales, may be severe gales. some cloud and outbreaks of rain, maybe a little bit of sleet and snow over the hills. lingering across parts of eastern england, other areas as a share of the computer. it is windier, these early temperatures we are looking at —— other areas shy woody. when you look at the strength of the wind, it will be significantly colder on saturday. into saturday and sunday, the sun coming down. a week when the front arriving into northern ireland, threatening a little rain here. still quite windy first thing across eastern parts of england. if you wintry showers continuing near
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coastal areas. many places will be dry with some sunshine, still cold, but not as windy.
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this is bbc news, the headlines urgent talks today between london and paris over people smuggling, after the deaths of 27 in the english channel. a pregnant woman and three children, were among those who died. the government — and labour— call for urgent action, starting with tackling people smugglers they threaten, intimidate, bully and assault the people getting to these boats and have a complete disregard for human right. they usually money they make for other heinous crimes. france says the whole of europe must unite, to end, the deaths at sea. iam i am alive and dover were more boats have arrived carrying migrants today
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even as the french authorities have the grim task of identifying those who died yesterday. the government says it will work at pace, to deliver a new independent regulator, for football. politicians in jersey vote to approve the principle of legalising assisted dying and — a roman mosaic thought to be centuries old has been unearthed in a farmer's field in the east midlands the home secretary has said the uk will do �*whatever it takes' to tackle the crisis of migrants trying to cross the channel in small boats. speaking in the commons after the deaths of at least let's go to ben boulos in dover
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the white cliffs of dover and iconic symbol of the white cliffs of dover and iconic symbol of the the white cliffs of dover and iconic symbol of the south the white cliffs of dover and iconic symbol of the south coast the white cliffs of dover and iconic symbol of the south coast of the white cliffs of dover and iconic symbol of the south coast of england but also a symbol of the hope those migrants making that crossing had of a better life, safe and on these shores but tragically for 27 of those were tried to cross yesterday it ended in tragedy. the itis details we have on that, 27 confirmed to have died, they are in the process of being identified by the process of being identified by the french authorities. they have confirmed that there were among them seven women and three children. as to the cause of the accident many questions remain but the french interior minister has said when rescuers found the boat they want and it was almost completely deflated, he described it as being like a paddling pool boat you might have in your garden and that is typical that many of the magnets
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will use to try to cross the channel. in terms of the search and rescue efforts there is at least one person unaccounted for and to who were rescued from the water who are being treated in hospital but remain critical. with the latest details he has jessica parker. critical. with the latest details he hasjessica parker. —— here is jessica parker. —— here isjessica parker. blustery winds blowing across northern france this morning, an empty beach, but it seems there were crossings from france overnight to the u.k. this is a vessel apparently used by people to make the perilous journey. they were picked up by british patrols early this morning, yet another effort to reach english shores despite yesterday's tragedy. there are pregnant women and children who died yesterday in this makeshift boat. and for a few thousand euros, these people are exploited to promise them elderado in england. and unfortunately, this has been repeated every day for over 20 years.
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record numbers have been making the crossing from france to britain. the french say they've worked hard to try and prevent crossings, for example, stepping up patrols, patrols. the uk government has helped fund, but british ministers also under pressure. we're prepared to offer support on the ground. we're prepared to offer resources. we're prepared to offer literally people to go there and help and assist the french authorities. and we're clear we don'tjust see this as an issue that france needs to deal with, but one that we want to work together with france and our wider european partners as we only need to look at the situation, the mediterranean or eastern europe, to see this isn'tjust an issue in the channel to try to break the break, the business model of these gangs, and that includes things like securing returns, agreements, as well as the policing and law enforcement presence that there is in calais. after efforts at a search and rescue operation
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more details are emerging about those who lost their lives. french officials say 17 were men, seven were women, one of whom was pregnant and three were children. two were rescued and have been in a critical condition, one from iraq, another somalia. the reality is and you know, we can't get away from this reality. we have to face up to it is that people have a right under the un convention to seek safety in the uk. emergency meetings, hastily arranged phone calls. authorities on both sides of the channel are scrambling to respond after yesterday's tragic events. but this crisis has been long in the making and long discussed. for all that talk, full, effective solutions have so far proved elusive. people here being escorted to shelters in france as part of efforts to deter crossings and prevent further tragedy. jessica parker, bbc news in calais.
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we understand from official figures that 25,000 people have attempted the crossing. that 25,000 people have attempted the crossing-— the crossing. from france to the uk throu~h the crossing. from france to the uk through the — the crossing. from france to the uk through the channel— the crossing. from france to the uk through the channel on _ the crossing. from france to the uk through the channel on boats - the crossing. from france to the uk through the channel on boats this i through the channel on boats this year, more than triple the figure of the previous year and led to a lot of discussion amongst politicians here in the uk and across the channel about how to deal with the problem of people putting their lives at risk and also the people traffickers who make vast sums, it is thought per person something like 3000 euros or dollars to make that crossing. look at a boat with maybe overcrowded 80 people that is a quarter of a million smuggles could potentially make from one boat of the dozens that attempt the crossing each day. there has been some discussion about what to do and many
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ideas have been put forward, let's hear what priti patel told the house of commons earlier. given the chance, the traffickers will always find people to exploit and manipulate, some of them do not even know that they are coming to the uk. this does mean tackling issues upstream and not waiting until people have reached eu countries. and i've always been extremely clear that i want to cooperate and i'm cooperating with international colleagues. the united kingdom has given its unflinching and generous support to france to end this terrible trade in people smuggling. we are not working just to end these crossings because we don't care and we're heartless. the united kingdom has a clear and a generous, humane approach to asylum seekers and refugees. yes, people should come here legally and the system must be fair. but the main issue is this crossing the channel in small boats is extremely dangerous. and yesterday was the moment that many of us had feared for many years.
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one of the ideas the uk government has suggested it may tighten up the rules on applying for asylum for refugees status and it may make it harder to claim it they have crossed using so—called illegal means. crossing by boat rather than applying for a formal legal process but that has common practices from the labour party. i have raised on a number of occasions the arrangements we have in place with french authorities and i would ask firstly the home secretary could set out how many days a week the full existing surveillance capacity is currently operating. what will she be doing urgently to increase that surveillance. i pay tribute to the national crime
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agency and front line law enforcement officers for the work they do and i heard what the home secretary said in her statement about law enforcement cooperation but can she also tell the house what she will do to deepen the intelligence and law enforcement cooperation with the french authorities and other countries so the focus is not only on coastal patrols important though they are but also about disrupting the routes facilitated, often across hundreds and thousands of miles by people smuggling gangs with the reckless disregard for human life. among the ideas suggested is the idea ofjoint patrols along the northern french coast to try and intercept boats before they leave and deter both the migrants and people smugglers putting people on the boats and are indifferent to whether people cross the channel
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safely or die whilst trying. it is fraught with complexity and difficulty, discussions between the two governments going on. daniel sandford looks at the options being explored. whilst the tragedy was unfolding dozens of people who had successfully crossed the channel were arriving near dungeness. the numbers this year have far outstripped last year. the new route first emerged three years ago, sajid javid rushed back from holiday to try to nip it in the bud but the government has been on the back foot ever since. amongst these proposed solutions are joint patrolling of the coast with british and french police and introducing new laws to penalise
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people who arrive in small boats, moving to create more safe routes for people to claim asylum before they enter the uk and greater efforts to tackle the people smuggling gangs. the uk is already paying millions of pounds towards french only patrols of the beaches but politicians there do not see british participation as a solution. the only answer coming from this awful drama is for the brits to give us more money for the french authorities to have people patrolling the french sure it will not change anything. nothing will change. we are still going to have dead bodies in the channel. the french say that what makes britain attractive is the ease with which people can disappear into the great economy and that is what needs fixing. in fact the number of asylum seekers arriving at substantially lower arriving is substantially lower
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than its peak 20 years ago. the home secretary priti patel seen here in the channel last year and the french both agree that tackling the people smugglers is the priority. not so say campaigners. the people smugglers are a symptom but not a cause of the issue, the issue is the people want to claim uk asylum and cannot do it unless they are physically in the uk and there is no way for them to get their other than sneaking on a boat. with arrests being made overnight after the tragedy yesterday labour say more could have been done to tackle people smuggling. i find it really hard to believe that those arrests couldn't have been made last week or the week before, apart from the tragic deaths i don't think the evidence is different so ramp up the more is different so ramp up the law enforcement against those that are making money from this human tragedy. when migrants were mostly using lorries and the channel tunnel to enter britain huge efforts were made to close the routes, they were only partially successful and have led to the new people smuggling route, crossing the
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channel in dangerous small boats. our political correspondent, caroline davies, is in westminster. we gather this is the single issue ministers have talked about more than anything else except the pandemic in recent months, give us a sense of how that debate is being framed and the tone. in parliament todayit framed and the tone. in parliament today it was very sombre from both sides, there are some level of agreement between labour and the conservatives at least in terms of the backdrop for these issues, and understanding it is complicated and will take a long time to resolve but it goes far beyond just the beaches in france, this is something that needs to be tackled on an international scale with international scale with international collaboration beyond france. in terms of exactly for this to happen next that is not complete
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agreement from both sides, early on heard from the home secretary who was speaking in the chamber, she staked a large amount of reputation over the years that she will be tough on trying to solve the issue of small boats to crossing the channel, there was some support for help today, we had from david davis who said she was straining every sinew to solve the problem, however the labour party had been critical of her. we had from keir starmer who said he was sick of the home secretary playing the sort of headlines with grand statements of what she would do but not achieving anything and we also had from the labour party who work at a sizing and pointing the finger at the conservatives about resettlement and the number of people brought over through safe routes for asylum seekers. the home secretary said some of those numbers were depleted because it was during the pandemic,
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it was harder to transport people across. she pointed out it was important to make sure the resettlement schemes make sure people will end the community are notjust based on hotels. she wanted to support legislation the government pushing through which is the nationalities and bottles bill to make it the case that knowingly arriving in the uk without permission would be a new criminal offence. the labour party said they would not support the bill, that it breached refugee convention and damage their status so despite the fact everybody is united and sombre and paying condolences that it was a horrific event, exactly how to deal with it next is still not something that all sides agree on. our correspondent, hugh schofield, is in paris.
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there will be people watching this think these people are migrants fleeing war and poverty and prosecution and violence from their home country, that is why they are seeking a refugee status but that departure point for the uk as the northern coast of france, a western democracy that respects the rule of law, why is it they do not feel they can claim asylum there. many do of course, do not overlook the fact that many migrants come to france and choose to stay there are try to apply for asylum in france so we are seeing part of the problem at the border crossing to the uk but one must not forget it is only one aspect of it from the french point of view, why do they keep going to the border, the same reason that brought them there 20 years ago when the saga began, it is the draw of
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the saga began, it is the draw of the uk with its free economy and multiplicity of ethnic groups, the language, no id card, general sense that it seems to be held around the world that the uk as a free economy when you can lose yourself and make your life again which applies less and so that as the poor factor, there is no six at about that and people will have therefore friends and relatives and britain which is also part of the draw that is why it is not particularly are being pushed out of france on that france is trying to get rid of them, they are the ones who are going there of their own volition. a number of ideas have been floated by the british government including the idea of turning back the boats at
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sea in the channel, back towards the french coast as well as offering joint patrols with the french authorities to intercept the boats, how have they gone down with the french government? neither of these are new ideas, they have been floating around for quite some time. there is a huge degree of scepticism about turning the boats back, anyone who has been out to see from the french side and british side knows actually putting into practice that injunction will be very complicated. at sea was play and it is very difficult to simply say to turn around and go by catheter as a sense that life will be put at risk and what the french say is that the migrants play on this and make it apparent that their lives would be
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endangered and they mightjump overboard oral do something silly and at that point any one says do not take any risks and the british were not take those risks either because that is the law of the sea so and practice i think the idea of turning people around and sending them back is regarded with great scepticism on the site of the channel and as fulljoint patrols of the beaches are to something the british have been pushing for and it has been resisted by the french on grounds of sovereignty, already be have a certain french presence in britain with the agreement meaning there are customs checks at ports but that is a long way from having uniform british officers walking along french beaches alongside their french counterparts, i do not think
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thatis french counterparts, i do not think that is a runner, settlement the french have rejected it until now. thank you. although it does look calm and clear and bright and dover this afternoon there is a bitterly cold wind and one can only imagine how much worse that as ndc. —— in the sea. a lot of maggots will have seenin the sea. a lot of maggots will have seen in the past week when they can attempt the crossing with the worst weather that is expected and that is partly why we have seen the numbers remain so high, normally the numbers this time of year taper off but on at least one day earlier this month and november more than 1000 people made the crossing in one—day. as we saw so tragically yesterday sometimes that attempt ends in disaster.
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by by the time we join you again bennett problem starting to get dark until pictures will be dropping even further. thank you. some of the children who survived the aberfan disaster have said they were put through distressing medical tests, which one described as "torture". 116 children and 28 adults were killed in 1966 when coal waste slid down a hillside, burying a primary school and homes maria david has more. archive: i'm standing once again on a pile of black- slurry, and underneath us is the infant school. - on october 21st 1966, thousands of tonnes of coal waste surged down the hillside above aberfan, burying the village school and surrounding houses. 116 children and 28 adults were killed. this afternoon, the children were due to start their-
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half—term holiday. gaynor madgwick was rescued, but her brother carl and sister marilyn didn't survive. over the years, she's written two books about what happened. now in a bbc wales podcast, gaynor describes the added trauma of the medical tests she was put through after the disaster. i'll neverforget it, coming to two gates with this big, big building, mental hospital. someone came out trying to calm me down. i was still kicking and screaming. they were trying to prise my fingers off the handle to basically drag me in this hospital. they would completely fill your hair with loads of gel. this cap they put on, now you see it in frankenstein, all these plugs and leads coming out, fixing to the cap skull onto your head. and you had to sit there and be interrogated.
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it was torture. years later, she discovered the tests were carried out in case they were asked for proof of psychological damage. those tests were only to determine what level of compensation from aberfan disaster fund. that's all it was for, it wasn't to help us. today, mental health services are very different. i think the whole approach to dealing with people following traumatic events has changed immensely in the last few decades and i'm very confident that nowadays individuals could be dealt with in a different way, primarily talking therapies, and particularly for children and young people, it still is appropriate to come and treatments that can help people even many, many years after. like many survivors, gaynor is still traumatised. now, after 55 years,
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she's finally begun treatment. you can hear more from gaynor and her surviving classmates in the podcast series aberfan: tip number 7, available to download now on bbc sounds. the government has indicated it will accept the appointment of an independent regulator for english football to ensure the financial stability and good governance of the game. it's one of a number of recommendations made by a fan—led review our sports news editor dan roan has more. it's the most popular sport in the country, but with clubs going bust, and after the threat of a breakaway, scrutiny on football has intensified.
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the woman tasked with the landmark review of the english game told me it was time for a radical reform. we've seen football lurch from crisis to crisis over the last decade or so. and unfortunately, we haven't necessarily had the right levels of regulation in place to stop that crisis from happening. i think we've reached a point where people are saying, no more. crucially, crouch wants a powerful independent football regulator that would have stopped the attempt by the premier league's big six earlier this year tojoin the european super league. overseeing financial regulation, it could even block spending by owners deemed to be irresponsible. the regulator would enforce a beefed up owners�* and directors' test for new buyers. other proposals include a transfer levy to get more money from the premier league to the rest of the game, reform of parachute payments to relegated clubs, and fan empowerment through shadow boards and a so—called golden share. that would mean supporter consent needed over key decisions, such as a change of club name or stadium relocation, unlike in the past when wimbledon was infamously moved to milton keynes.
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and this season, a championship club that twice won the first division title in the 70s also fell into administration. derby county, for many, is sadly emblematic of a broken and unsustainable club system. one that encourages too many to overspend in the pursuit of promotion, and which shows why radical change is now needed to the way that clubs are both financed and run. criticised for allowing the controversial recent saudi takeover of newcastle united, the premier league said the reforms mustn't damage the game. but with the government likely to support crouch, football seems set for momentous change. dan roan, bbc news. joining me now is dr borja garcia, an expert in football policy and finance at loughborough university. what you make of these proposals? t what you make of these proposals? i think they are ground—breaking and comprehensive and well thought out
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and they can certainly put football and they can certainly put football and a sound financial management way. some work has already been done such as financial fair play but now stronger control and transparency is needed and if adopted these measures can be positive. to needed and if adopted these measures can be positive-— can be positive. to what extent do ou think can be positive. to what extent do you think this _ can be positive. to what extent do you think this move _ can be positive. to what extent do you think this move to _ can be positive. to what extent do you think this move to give - can be positive. to what extent do you think this move to give fans i you think this move to give fans greater voice has been given a boost by the aborted decision by some clubs to break away and from the european super league. t clubs to break away and from the european super league.— european super league. i think it is, where european super league. i think it is. where the — european super league. i think it is, where the situation _ european super league. i think it is, where the situation that - european super league. i think it| is, where the situation that finally took it over the line. we have seen an england over the last few elections have that in the manifesto but never acted on that, and other countries the model works and with the super league on the table the
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political momentum has brought the parties and government and independent commentators to push it, the idea was there and nobody wanted to act and certainly the super league is what brought it forward. assuming these proposals went ahead what difference would fans experience in terms of the day—to—day running of the local team? day-to-day running of the local team? ., , , , , . team? hopefully the first difference is that expenditure _ team? hopefully the first difference is that expenditure will _ team? hopefully the first difference is that expenditure will be _ team? hopefully the first difference is that expenditure will be far - team? hopefully the first difference is that expenditure will be far more | is that expenditure will be far more controlled, there will be a cost controlled, there will be a cost control so on the longer run clubs will be healthier, much better community assets and funds will be able to enjoy football clubs without able to enjoy football clubs without a problem then day—to—day running owners and clubs would be accountable for actions so we could see how accounts are published more regularly rather than once a year,
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how clubs have to negotiate ticketing policy so to have a constant dialogue with fans about issues such as ticketing, safety, stewarding and lots of proposals to increase standing in stadiums and make again legal the consuming of alcohol and the stands. t has alcohol and the stands. i was interested — alcohol and the stands. i was interested to _ alcohol and the stands. i was interested to see _ alcohol and the stands. i was interested to see a _ alcohol and the stands. i was interested to see a couple i alcohol and the stands. i was interested to see a couple of| interested to see a couple of reactions to the report, a statement from the english football league chairmen are saying it is pleasing to see the review concluded that additional distribution into the top flight is required, more money at the top of the game needs to be spread to clubs further down, by contrast the premier league said at as important that any reforms do not damage the competitive balance of the game levels of current investment. whoever becomes regulator is mostly to be required the wisdom of solomon.—
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the wisdom of solomon. indeed because the _ the wisdom of solomon. indeed because the regulation - the wisdom of solomon. indeed because the regulation and i the wisdom of solomon. indeed because the regulation and oil. the wisdom of solomon. indeed i because the regulation and oil and transport and banking, they will always have people in their own interest. in terms of investment a well—regulated english game is attractive so just because that is regulation will not assume investment is less attractive but i think the idea of the regulator is good, what we need is decisions the regulator will take especially the code for good governance and management that is also proposed as part of the licensing system which will really tell us how this regulator will be.- will really tell us how this regulator will be. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello there, today has certainly been the calm before the storm and following the sunshine with clear skies this evening, temperatures will fall away sharply. more cloud coming into scotland and northern ireland bringing some rain
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southwards, followed by clearer skies in the north and the showers as they went out to strengthen. temperatures are still not far from phasing in the south—east of england the first thing in the morning. we have that cloudy, damp weather starting tomorrow morning in england and wales. sunshine falling, showers too. those could turn wintry northern ireland and we had a spell is now arriving in northern parts of scotland as the winds really pick up here later on the day. temperature 7-9 , here later on the day. temperature 7—9 , a notch up on today, winds picking up across northern storm arm and approaches, sweeping gales quite widely across the uk —— storm arwen. the amber wind warning from the met office runs from 3pm tomorrow afternoon to 9pm saturday —— nine o'clock saturday and particularly windy in the north—east. hello, this is bbc news with shaun ley. the headlines: urgent talks today between london and paris
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over people smuggling after the deaths of 27 in the english channel. a pregnant woman and three children were among those who died. the government and labour call for urgent action, starting with tackling people smugglers. they threaten, intimidate, bully and assault the people who get into these boats and they have a complete disregard for human rights. france says the whole of europe must unite to end the deaths at sea. and prevent the channel becoming a cemetery at sea. the government says it will work at pace to deliver a new independent regulator for football. politicians in jersey vote to approve the principle of legalising assisted dying. and a roman mosaic thought to be centuries old has been unearthed in a farmer's field in the east midlands. sport, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's holly. good afternoon.
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some breaking news from manchester united. the club has reached an agreement with ralf rangnick to become their interim manager. the 63—year—old is recognised as one of football's revolutionary figures. he is currently working as a sporting director at lokomotiv moscow. he has reportedly agreed a six—month deal until the end of may. he will have a further two years in a consultancy role. this follows the departure of ole gunnar solskjaer as united manager on sunday morning after their 4—1 defeat to watford. united made it clear that they would look to hire an interim manager until the end of the season and they quickly moved for rangnick, who has previously managed hannover, schalke, hoffenheim and rb leipzig. it's unlikely he'll be in place for united's premier league tie agaisnt chelsea on sunday. we will bring you more as we get it.
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we start with a record result for northern ireland's women. they beat north macedonia 11—0 in their world cup qualifier in skopje. kenny shiels' side were relentless. simone magill with four of the goals, including this one to make it 7—0 before half time. it was a special day for rachel furness — her hat trick means she is now level with david healy�*s record of 36 goals for her country. rebecca mckenna, lauren wade, kirsty mcguinness and rebecca holloway also on target this afternoon. it means northern ireland go level on points with austria, who face england on saturday at the stadium of light. now, could this man be making a return to arsenal? well, according to the current boss, mikel arteta, it's on the cards. arteta was asked during this afternoon's press conference if a formal offer had been made to bring arsene wenger back to the emirates where he previously guided the club to three premier league titles. arteta told reporters there had been communication, but it's unclear in what capacity.
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i would like him to be much closer, personally to me because i think it will be a great help, a great help for the club, and things take time and i think he has had to dictate those timings. elsewhere in football, we've had a couple of managerial departures this morning. in the women's super league, leicester have sacked manager jonathan morgan with the club bottom of the table. and sheffield united have parted company with slavisa jokanovic, just six months after his appointment with the club 16th in the championship following their relegation from the premier league last season. the club have moved quickly to replace him though, bringing back paul heckingbottom, who was caretaker manager for the final two months of last season. mark cavendish is back home in essex after being released from ghent hospitalfollowing his crash on sunday. cavendish broke two ribs and suffered a punctured lung
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after crashing in the six days of ghent track event in belgium. reports say he's been discharged from the hospital and his wife, peta, had driven him home. reigning champion neil robertson has started his defence of the uk championship. the australian beatjudd trump last year in a final that lasted into the small hours. he's up againstjohn astley, a former professional who's now competing as an amateur after losing his place on the tour. astley took the first frame in that one. it's one of eight games in the afternoon session. tennis's davis cup finals begin today across three different countries — italy, austria and spain — but the competition is set to move to the uae on a five—year deal from 2022. abu dhabi would host across multiple venues and the tournament could stretch to 12 days. it wouldn't finish until early december and there are concerns it would clash with football's
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world cup in nearby qatar. the decision is to be rubber stamped next week. there's a story on the website with an update on wigan athletic striker charlie wyke. he collapsed in training earlier this week and remains in hospital in a stable condition. head over to bbc.co.uk/sport for more details. for now, bye from me. holly, thank you very much. jersey's independent parliament has voted overwhelmingly in favour of the principle of legalising assisted dying, paving the way for the biggest channel island to become the first place in the british isles to change its law. detailed work will now begin to determine how a system of assisted dying could work and further political votes will then be required in a process expected to take at least eighteen months. i'm joined now by dr nigel minihane, a gp and former head of thejersey primary care.
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thank you so much for talking to us. what has been most striking about the debate injersey, certainly has an outside observer is firstly, this is a process that has involved all islanders, the opportunity for them to take part, a citizen is actually looking at the issue. we have had quite a lot of polling done. do you think that has helped any debate? because this is something that could become very quickly question mark i think it was reflected actually in the debate in our states. tt think it was reflected actually in the debate in our states.- think it was reflected actually in the debate in our states. it was a very dignified _ the debate in our states. it was a very dignified and _ the debate in our states. it was a very dignified and respectful i the debate in our states. it was a very dignified and respectful and | very dignified and respectful and are something of whichjersey can truly be very proud. that said, i think there were concerns raised. although the states lessened to islanders and at the jury they set up, there are concerns about safeguards and it is important —— listened to islanders. it is important we listen to concerns. tt
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important we listen to concerns. it is potentially something that will be in place before anything can be donein be in place before anything can be done in the uk parliament and will hopefully provide some kind of model, if it is something british politicians decide to proceed with. what do you think are the kind of elements that are needed to make something robust, credible, effective, but also sensitive to the needs of people who are, in many cases, at their very lowest ebb? absolutely. i think, cases, at their very lowest ebb? absolutely. ithink, as cases, at their very lowest ebb? absolutely. i think, as you say, regulation, oversightand absolutely. i think, as you say, regulation, oversight and guidance are the most important principles. we would be looking to other jurisdictions for that. we are not the first to do that. something like 200 million people around the world are now living under some form of assisted dying legislation and they have not, to my knowledge, resend it. so i think we can look to them and to our neighbours such as yourselves, scotland and ireland in particular are looking at this legislation, grappling with the same
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sort of issues and i think we will be developing policies at roughly the same time.— be developing policies at roughly the same time. ~ ., ., ., ., , the same time. what about among gps? because to a _ the same time. what about among gps? because to a certain _ the same time. what about among gps? because to a certain extent, _ the same time. what about among gps? because to a certain extent, this - because to a certain extent, this mirrors the debate over abortion and that ultimately some kind of medical input will be required, even if it is simply to say this person is of sound mind and is able to make this judgment freely and is doing it freely. how comfortable are gps with that potential role? t freely. how comfortable are gps with that potential role?— that potential role? i think the conscientious _ that potential role? i think the conscientious objection - that potential role? i think the| conscientious objection clause, witches the potential law, is at —— which is in the potential law is at their gps, as it is with abortion. in terms of moving forwards with the abortion argument, it is important gps and look at exactly what their core functions are this is certainly what i have done in my own practice.
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we are therefore care, for compassion, and above all, probably, to relieve suffering. and if we can't offer there functions, it is extremely important there is an alternative. tdo extremely important there is an alternative.— extremely important there is an alternative. ., ., , , , alternative. do you have any sense ofthe alternative. do you have any sense of the number— alternative. do you have any sense of the number of _ alternative. do you have any sense of the number of people _ alternative. do you have any sense of the number of people who, i alternative. do you have any sense| of the number of people who, from the islands, have travelled to switzerland are taking the option of assisted dying elsewhere because it was not available on the island? without any personal disclosure, have you had any patients? let me repeat the question, i know those earpieces are a nightmare. regulative cases where this has happened with people from the island seeking assisted dying elsewhere? i think dr minihane may have lost as, actually. dr minihane, can you hear
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me? �* actually. dr minihane, can you hear me?_ dont— actually. dr minihane, can you hear me?_ don't worry - actually. dr minihane, can you hear. me?_ don't worry about me? i've lost him. don't worry about it, niel me? i've lost him. don't worry about it, nigel minihane _ me? i've lost him. don't worry about it, nigel minihane in _ me? i've lost him. don't worry about it, nigel minihane in the _ me? i've lost him. don't worry about it, nigel minihane in the channel i it, nigel minihane in the channel islands. i was hoping we could put one more question about the technology sometimes defeats us and we are very grateful to dr minihane for standing out in the cold and he was waiting for quite a while before i was able to get him, but also with assisting with the distraction of one of those earpieces because they go into your earpieces because they go into your ear and unlike the ones that are moulded gradually like ours, they're kind of hanging and your kind of doing this because you're terrified it is going to drop out. have a sympathy if you see anyone in that situation because it is quite hard to concentrate on what you're saying with that kind of distraction and worrying about whether it is going to drop it and you will not know what is going on. let's move on to crew crane. —— ukraine. us and nato say russia is deploying troops near the border with ukraine. the country has been fighting
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russian—backed forces in its east since 2014. senior officials in kyiv fear russia plans to invade ukraine. abdujalil abdurasulov visited the front line and sent this report. the skeleton — that's what ukrainian soldiers call this former factory. this place used to be a bustling industrial zone, and now it is on the front line where ukrainian military fight russian—backed forces. the separatists�* position is less than 100 metres away, and such proximity makes this part of the front line particularly tense. despite the ceasefire agreement, shooting here is a daily reality. gunshot i�*ve just heard a few gunshots and a couple of explosions. we are now taking cover behind this concrete wall and sandbags, and the soldiers are reassessing the situation. and then they will make
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a decision what to do next. we changed our position when it all went quiet. for now, the war here is regarded as a low intensity conflict. there are occasional skirmishes without any serious attempts to advance. but there is a growing concern that the situation will escalate soon. recent satellite images show what washington calls russia�*s unusual military activity near the border with ukraine. moscow claims that it is the west that is fuelling tensions by providing lethal weapons to the government in kyiv and conducting military drills in the region. ukrainian soldiers closely follow such reports. if they have an army on our border, up to 80,000 people, it will be really hard for us to stay here, to stay in our position. but nevertheless, we�*lljust keep calm because we know
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that it�*s our territory, it�*s our country and we know what we have to do. gunfire at night, shooting is more intense. it is too dangerous to get into the trenches and my infrared camera can reveal our positions. but it is not safe even inside this building. explosion we have to leave to find a safer place to stay. but night—time flare—ups show how quickly the situation can escalate at the front line. abdujalil abdurasulov, bbc news, in eastern ukraine. new data has further backed the safety of coronavirus vaccines for pregnant women. figures from the uk health security agency show women who ve had a covid jab are no more likely than those who are
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unvaccinated to have a stillbirth, premature birth or baby with a low birthweight. experts are now urging more mothers to be to get a vaccine, warning that the potential impacts of catching coronavirus whilst pregnant can be serious for both mother and baby. with me now is our health correspondent, katharine da costa. afternoon. give us that the background to this.- afternoon. give us that the background to this. why was this work going _ background to this. why was this work going on? _ background to this. why was this work going on? the _ background to this. why was this work going on? the evidence i background to this. why was this i work going on? the evidence shows women who get cover back in later stages of pregnancy are at increased risk of ending up in hospital nicu —— over edge. there is a higher chance of having a premature baby or needing a c—section. women were being offered moderna and pfizer jabs this year with the recommendation to have their second doseit recommendation to have their second dose it weeks later. there was not a clinical trial data because they were not included any trials. for obvious reasons. because they were untested vaccines on pregnant women. there are substantial real—world
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data have been vaccinated in the us and israel with no safety concerns and israel with no safety concerns and now the uk health security agency has new data for england on vaccine safety. ho agency has new data for england on vaccine safety-— vaccine safety. no fully vaccinated women was _ vaccine safety. no fully vaccinated women was admitted _ vaccine safety. no fully vaccinated women was admitted to _ vaccine safety. no fully vaccinated women was admitted to i - vaccine safety. no fully vaccinated women was admitted to i see i vaccine safety. no fully vaccinated women was admitted to i see you | women was admitted to i see you between february —— icu. and the rates of pregnant women are increasing just over one in five had had a jab before they give birth in august. this new data looks at every eight months betweenjanuary august. this new data looks at every eight months between january and august and there were good outcomes for pregnant women who had been vaccinated, no greater risk compared to their unvaccinated counterparts to their unvaccinated counterparts to sever things like stillbirth, premature birth, or a baby with a low birth weight. there were concerns that some groups are not taking up the vaccines, lower rates
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in younger women, people from deprived areas, and women from black and asian communities. this data backs up the international data and should be reassuring for women and give them the confidence to come forward and get a vaccine. interesting, 98% of women in hospital with covid are unvaccinated so there is more work to do. the uk health regulator has said there is no health concerns and pfizer and moderna can be given at any stage of pregnancy, so now there is less we�*ll call for professionals and pregnant women to get talking because it is really about trust —— there is at this call for professionals and packet women. thank you very much. —— pregnant women. for more than half a century, almost 60 hours of unseen footage of the beatles making their final album, gathered dust in a vault, unseen. but for the last four years, the oscar winning director of the the lord of the rings,
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peterjackson, using the footage, has been crafting a three part, eight hour documentary. it�*s get back and is a candid and intimate portrait of the fab four, who often didn�*t realise, they were being filmed. these are the outtakes of an earlier documentary. paul mccartney says jackson�*s film has actually changed his perception, of how the band broke up. peterjackson has given his only british tv interview, to our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson. # get back, get back... well, we�*ll have to do it sitting down or we get too excited. the sounds, the colours, the joy of the beatles making music. unseen for more than half a century. ringo said that he felt we had to just tell it like it is. i think we are. the man entrusted to restore almost 60 hours of footage from the let it be sessions injanuary1969, the lord of the rings director peterjackson. what made you want to dedicate four years of your life to this project? well, i wouldn�*t have done it if it was the rolling stones or something. sort of controversial, sorry!
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a musical documentary is not a huge appeal to me, but the beatles, yeah. i�*m all in, 100%. four years, no problem. i�*ve loved every second of it. # speaking words of wisdom...# do you want to do it once more then? yes, yes. i mean, we'll never get a chance to do it again. the project happened almost by mistake. peterjackson was meeting with the beatles�* company apple to discuss the possibility of a virtual reality exhibition. so, cats and kittens, what are we going to do? but as a beatles obsessive, he took his chance to ask something he�*d always wanted to know — what had happened to all the outtakes from the 1970 beatles documentary let it be? they said to me, "well, yeah, we�*ve got it all," which was great as a fan. i was sitting there thinking, "yeah, you�*ve got it all!" they were thinking about using it for a documentary, a stand—alone documentary, but they didn�*t have anybody, a film—maker attached. so the only time in my life i�*ve ever done this, i sort of put up my handh and i said, "well, if you�*re looking for somebody, i�*lljust...
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please think of me." just say whatever comes into your head each time and try to be like a cauliflower until you get the word. peterjackson was offered the job the same day. his only concern — he�*d always been told that the making of the let it be album was a gloomy time for the beatles. but when he sat down to watch the outtakes, what surprised him was just how much fun everyone was having. if the footage showed a truly miserable band not wanting to be doing what they were doing, i wouldn�*t have made the movie. that�*s not the movie i would have wanted to make, but i was amazed and surprised to see the footage showing a very different story to what i�*d believed for 40 years. all we've got is us. what do you think? _ in the end, there was so much footage, get back has been divided into three parts. and there is one other trilogy that links peterjackson to the beatles. one real curiosity — in the 1960s, the beatles actually wanted to make a lord of the rings movie directed by stanley kubrick. what did you know about that? i�*ve been scraping together little pieces of information.
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i�*ve been interrogating paul about it. and ultimately they couldn�*t get the rights from tolkien because tolkien didn�*t like the idea of a pop group doing his stories. fascinating stuff, quite an insight. a rare roman mosaic has been discovered in a field in the east midlands. the artwork, which dates back to the third or fourth century, shows the epic battle between achilles and the trojan hero, hector, in homer�*s the iliad. it�*s the first of its kind to be found in the uk. the site has now been granted protection to preserve the discovery. earlier i spoke to the man who found the mosaic —jim irvine. during lockdown in 2020, i decided some exercise was required, and i went for a wander around some local fields at the family farm and i stumbled across some pottery and some oyster shells and various
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other bits and pieces, which really got me interested in where they come from. so bit of digging — well, not literally but bit of investigation. at home i spotted a really interesting mark which was apparently in the field. so it went on from there. and then eventually when the crop was harvested i went back with a spade, started to explore this a bit. and this is where i came across the pavement, as it is, and it went off from there. how big is it? i should probably know this. it is about seven metres across, by a bit more than ten metres long, so it�*s quite a large individual room in a building complex of many rooms. so it would have been something like a roman villa or something built on that site, do they think? i mean, the layout and location probably indicates it might have been a working farm with a rather nice house attached to it and the room format itself, you know, we�*ve got this amazing mosaic
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on the ground, which is obviously telling a story. and you can imagine these guys probably having dinner and lounging about talking about the story and showing that they knew about greek history. i mean, this is the great story of hector and achilles�* battle outside the walls of troy. and it�*s you know, it�*s a homer myth that lots of people will know almost as a childhood story. but to see it this way, knowing it had been under the soil for so many centuries, was sort of feeling was that? ——what sort of feeling? it was pretty amazing, i mean, you know, normally things like archaeological discoveries, like this are discovered sort of building a house or putting a pipe in or something like that. so to see something that�*s been undisturbed for, you know, more or less 1600, 1700 years, is quite amazing. and the thing that�*s been really interesting over the last couple two seasons of digging is what�*s the state of the next thing that�*s
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going to come out of this site? because, you know, it�*s all been amazing so far. you talked about using the field in the normal way after you�*d found it. was there a bit of nervousness about about the work you were doing? yes. i mean, the field is now under an agri—environment scheme, which means it�*s been converted to grassland. it�*s not going to be planted anymore. and this basically protects the archaeology. there�*ll be no cultivation in the field. scrub allowed to grow and the grass mix on there is intended to protect what�*s underneath the soil. so this is a preservation in situ, so this field will now be taken taken out of use and will no longer be farmed as a part of the farm. what an impressive story. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with darren. hello there. it�*s been a cold but sunny day for most of us today. however, the first named storm of the season is on the way, arriving across northern parts of the uk later friday, sweeping gales across many areas into saturday. that�*s storm arwen. there could be some snow, mainly over the hills and some disruption is expected. ahead of that, though, we�*ve got
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the clearer skies this evening. temperatures will be tumbling very quickly, but there�*s more cloud and some rain arriving in scotland, pushing into northern ireland. and that cloudy, wetter weather will sweep its way southwards overnight to be replaced in northern areas by clearer spells and some showers and the winds picking up as well. but ahead of that rain, even in the southeast of england, it�*s still quite chilly first thing in the morning. temperatures just above freezing. the cloud and the patchy rain continues to drive southwards across england and wales tomorrow morning and then we�*ll get some brighter skies with some sunshine following. the showers may turn wintry in northern ireland. we�*re going to find some snow beginning to arrive in northern parts of scotland as the winds will really start to pick up here. and these are the temperatures — seven, eight, nine degrees, so a notch up on today. but remember, the winds are picking up all the while. and this is where we�*ve got this amber wind warning from the met office heading into saturday morning — gusts of 75 miles an hour or more near those coastal areas. now, storm arwen is going to be tracking out into the north sea. it�*s got some rain and some snow wrapped around it and it�*s on the back edge of that storm that we�*ve got those really strong winds.
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those will drive their way southwards overnight to many parts of the country, leaving us with a very windy day on saturday. and these are the gusts we�*re sort of expecting, not just very windy across northeastern areas, but across these western coasts through the irish sea we�*ll have some gales, maybe even severe gales. we�*ve still got some clouds, some outbreaks of rain, maybe a bit of sleet and snow over the hills. that may linger all day across the eastern parts of england. many other areas brightening up as the showers do become fewer. still, it�*s windier. these are the sort of temperatures we�*re looking at, but when you add on the strength of the wind, it is going to feel significantly colder on saturday. now, as we head from saturday into sunday, the weather starts to calm down a bit. storm arwen heading out into continental europe and weakening. a weak weather front arriving into northern ireland, threatening a little bit of rain here. still quite windy first thing across eastern parts of england. a few wintry showers continuing near coastal areas and in northern scotland, but many places will be dry with some sunshine. still cold, but not as windy.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: urgent talks today between london and paris over people smuggling, after the deaths of 27 in the english channel. a pregnant woman and three children, were among those who died. the government — and labour opposition call for urgent action, starting with tackling people smugglers. they threaten, intimidate, bully and assault the people getting to these boats and have a complete disregard for human rights. france says the whole of europe must unite, to end the deaths at sea. these people are exploited to promise them the golden land in england, and unfortunately, this has been repeated every day for over 20 years. the government says it will work at pace,
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to deliver a new independent regulator for football. politicians in jersey politicians injersey become the first to vote in the principal to assist in legalising assisted dying —— assisted dying. and a roman mosaic thought to be centuries old has been unearthed in a farmer�*s field in the east midlands. good afternoon, welcome to bbc news. the home secretary has said the uk will do �*whatever it takes�* to tackle the crisis of migrants trying to cross the channel in small boats. speaking in the commons this afternoon after of at least 27 people yesterday. priti patel warned mps there were no quick fixes , and said the uk would have to rely let�*s go to ben boulos in dover.
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as dusk. here in dover, as does the temperature. it is as nothing to the conditions out to sea here in the english channel, whether 27 migrants died yesterday. many questions still remain about the incident, and how their boat sank, but today, a lot of their boat sank, but today, a lot of the focus has been on the political discussions about how to tackle the problem of human trafficking and migrants making that perilous journey. the uk home equity, the interior minister priti patel has said that the uk will do everything it takes to tackle the problem of human trafficking. she spoke to her french counterpart as well. despite those deaths yesterday, the biggest single loss of life in the english channel since records started being kept, and the worsening weather, more boats carrying migrants arrived here in dover this morning. we get the latest in this report from jessica parker in calais. blustery winds blowing across northern france
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this morning. an empty beach, but it seems there were crossings from france overnight to the uk. this is a vessel apparently used by people to make the perilous journey. a vessel apparently used by people to make the perilousjourney. they were picked up by british patrols early this morning. yet another effort to reach english shores despite yesterday was my tragedy. translation:— translation: there are pregnant women and — translation: there are pregnant women and children _ translation: there are pregnant women and children who _ translation: there are pregnant women and children who died i women and children who died yesterday and this makes it —— makeshift boat and 40,000 euros. these people are exploited to promise them el dorado in england and unfortunately, this has been repeated every day for over 20 years. repeated every day for over 20 ears. . ., , , ., , years. record numbers have been makin: years. record numbers have been making the _ years. record numbers have been making the crossing _ years. record numbers have been making the crossing from - years. record numbers have been making the crossing from france i years. record numbers have been. making the crossing from france to britain, and the french say they have worked hard to try and prevent crossing, for example, stepping up patrols but patrols the uk government has helped a fun, but british ministers are also under pressure. british ministers are also under ressure. ~ . british ministers are also under ressure. . ., ., ,, , , pressure. what happened yesterday was a dreadful— pressure. what happened yesterday was a dreadful shock _ pressure. what happened yesterday was a dreadful shock and _ pressure. what happened yesterday was a dreadful shock and it - pressure. what happened yesterday was a dreadful shock and it was i pressure. what happened yesterday was a dreadful shock and it was not| was a dreadful shock and it was not a surprise, but is also a reminder
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of how vulnerable people are put at peril when in the hands of criminal gangs. there is also, madam deputy speaker, no quick fix. this is about addressing long—term factors, especially the criminal gangs that treat criminal beings are human beings as cargo and tackling supply chains. this requires a coordinated international effort and i have been international effort and i have been in constant contact with my counterparts from france, poland, austria, belgium, italy and greece to name just a few.— austria, belgium, italy and greece to name just a few. to name 'ust a few. after efforts as a search to name just a few. after efforts as a search and _ to name just a few. after efforts as a search and rescue _ to name just a few. after efforts as a search and rescue operation - to name just a few. after efforts as a search and rescue operation are i a search and rescue operation are more details are emerging about those who lost their lives. french officials say 17 women, seven were women, one of whom was pregnant, and three were children. two were rescued and have been in a critical condition to stop one from iraq, anotherfrom somalia. condition to stop one from iraq, another from somalia. the reality is, and another from somalia. the reality is. and we — another from somalia. the reality is, and we cannot _ another from somalia. the reality is, and we cannot get _ another from somalia. the reality is, and we cannot get away - another from somalia. the reality is, and we cannot get away from i is, and we cannot get away from this, really, we have to face up to it, is that people have a right under the un convention to seek
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safety in the uk.— under the un convention to seek safe in the uk. , , safety in the uk. emergency meetings hastily arranged _ safety in the uk. emergency meetings hastily arranged phone _ safety in the uk. emergency meetings hastily arranged phone calls, - safety in the uk. emergency meetings hastily arranged phone calls, and i hastily arranged phone calls, and authorities on both sides of the channel are scrambling to respond out against the�*s tragic events. this crisis has been long in the making and long discussed for all that store, full effective solutions so far have proved elusive. people here are being escorted to shelters in france. as part of efforts to deter crossings and also prevent further tragedy. well, our europe editor is also in cali and following the diplomatic response to yesterday was my tragedy. the french say that that�*s just not going to be possible, the idea ofjoint patrols with the uk, they say it is a sovereign treat issue, particularly after brexit. —— sovereignty issue. although they have rejected this idea before, instead, france has asked for an additional effort, a
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european one, having caught at the eu and said, look, after brexit, our coastlines, say the french, has become a border of the eu, it is an external border and we need more border patrol, help from france, the eu's border patrol, help from france, the eu�*s border force, basically, and it has also appealed to know the definite neighbouring netherlands and belgium as well, for help in this effort. there has been promise of stepped—up cooperation between the two sides, as you say, between president macron and borisjohnson, but in between us, there has been an awful lot of cross channel sniping. the uk has accused france of not doing enough to stop people stepping into those perilously flimsy thingies on arrestees, and when he sees in the middle of the night, with that famous footage of course of a french police can�*t literally on the beach watching one of those thingies take to the water. on the other hand, the french accused the uk of sounding tough, are taking
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back control over their borders after brexit, but not doing enough on the ground to implement that. they accuse the uk have being far too welcoming with the poorest labour market, easy to enter for people who arrive in the uk, without legal papers. of course, each side denies the accusations and in the meantime, ngos, human rights lawyers, and actually, the french press by now also saying, enough of this politics, this is about a human tragedy, a waste of life, and the uk and france need to roll up their sleeves and do something about it. just a moment, we will be getting the latest in our political correspondent at westminster. but this issue of asylum seekers and migrants making risky crossings to try to get to the uk has become something of a political blame game between london and paris. the question is, though, what could be done to deter people from making those risky crossings? our home
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affairs correspondent daniel sanford has this analysis. while the tragedy was unfolding off the coast of france yesterday, dozens of people whose had successfully crossed the channel were arriving nearby. the numbers of rises of migrant this year has far outstripped the numbers last year. the new route first emerged three years ago when sajid javid was home secretary. he rushed back from holiday to try to nip it in the bud. but the government has been on the back foot ever since. among the proposed solutions are dealt patrolling of the french coast with british and french police and trying to reduce the pull factor of the uk. introducing new laws to penalised people who arrive in small boats, moving to create more safe routes for people to claim asylum before they enter the uk and greater efforts to tackle the people smuggling gangs. the uk�*s is already paying millions of pounds towards french only patrols of the beaches,
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but politicians there don�*t see british participation as a solution. if the only answer coming from this awful tragedy is for the british to give us more money and for the french authorities to have more people patrolling the french shores, it will not change. nothing. nothing will change. and we still are going to have dead bodies in the channel. the french say that what makes it an attractive is the ease with which people can disappear into the grey economy and that is what needs fixing. in fact, the number of asylum seekers arriving is substantially lower than its peak 20 years ago. the home secretary pitted mattel, seen here on a patrol boat in the channel last year and the french, both agree that tackling the people smugglers as a priority, not so, to the campaign is, however. the --eole so, to the campaign is, however. tt;e: people smugglers are a symptom and not the cause of the issue. the issueis not the cause of the issue. the issue is that these people want to
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claim a uk asylum, and they can�*t do it unless they are physically present in the uk. and there is no way for them to get their other than sneaking in on a boat. but way for them to get their other than sneaking in on a boat.— sneaking in on a boat. but with the rest bein: sneaking in on a boat. but with the rest being made _ sneaking in on a boat. but with the rest being made overnight, - sneaking in on a boat. but with the rest being made overnight, as i sneaking in on a boat. but with the rest being made overnight, as yetl sneaking in on a boat. but with the | rest being made overnight, as yet it was my tragedy, labour�*s said more could be done to tackle people smuggling. t could be done to tackle people smuggling-— could be done to tackle people smu~linr. ., , ., ., smuggling. i find it really hard to believe that _ smuggling. i find it really hard to believe that those _ smuggling. i find it really hard to believe that those arrests - smuggling. i find it really hard to believe that those arrests could i smuggling. i find it really hard to i believe that those arrests could not have been— believe that those arrests could not have been made last week of the don't _ have been made last week of the don't see, — have been made last week of the don't see, part of the tragic deaths. _ don't see, part of the tragic deaths, that the evidence is different, so ramp up the law enforcement against those that are making _ enforcement against those that are making money from this human tragedy — making money from this human traced . ~ ., , making money from this human traced .~ ., , , tragedy. when migrants were mostly usin: a tragedy. when migrants were mostly using a lorries _ tragedy. when migrants were mostly using a lorries and _ tragedy. when migrants were mostly using a lorries and the _ tragedy. when migrants were mostly using a lorries and the channel- using a lorries and the channel tunnel to enter britain, future efforts remained to close those rates down. those efforts were only partially successful, and have anyway led to the new people smuggling route. crossing the channel in a dangerous small boats. daniel sandford, bbc news. we now speak to the political correspondent at westminster, caroline davies. i
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gather that this issue is the one that ministers have spoken about more in recent months than anything, except the pandemic. i suppose it feels now that there is an added urgency to it. give us a sense of the turnaround the conversation. the turn at the the turnaround the conversation. tt;e: turn at the moment at least in parliament was still very sombre at this stage, and it was interesting to hear from the this stage, and it was interesting to hearfrom the home this stage, and it was interesting to hear from the home secretary earlier, talking about lots of collaboration of her conversations internationally and also particularly talking to her french counterpart and the various offers she has made, a real sense that this problem needs to be sold internationally, rather than just within the uk. the labour party has a sense of agreement that yes, this is an international problem, then it needs to be fixed with collaboration, and this is also vocal copycat issue, but in terms of the common ground there, it doesn�*t necessarily mean that they have got in all senses as we have heard from labour leader keir starmer he was criticising the home secretary earlier. we also heard criticism in the chamber about the resettlement schemes that the conservative
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government have implemented, labour was suggesting that they are not to the same level of numbers that they would like to see and that the conservative home secretary was saying back in response that during the course of the pandemic, that is difficult to reach the same numbers because his people are not able to transport —— sport as it is possible. this is a very sticky issue, lots of different ways to deal with it and there is no one consensus at the moment about what exactly to focus on and also how to solve it. ., ., ., solve it. ok, caroline, for the moment. _ solve it. ok, caroline, for the moment, thank— solve it. ok, caroline, for the moment, thank you. - solve it. ok, caroline, for the moment, thank you. caroline| solve it. ok, caroline, for the - moment, thank you. caroline davies for us in westminster there. we speak now to a doctor who is a former refugee from afghanistan who went on to become an nhs a&e doctor. he is also a humanitarian activist. it is very good to have you with us. how did you feel when you had about what happened to those 27 people yesterday? th what happened to those 27 people esterda ? ., . .,, , ., yesterday? in the tragic loss of human beings. _ yesterday? in the tragic loss of human beings. we _ yesterday? in the tragic loss of human beings. we hearing i yesterday? in the tragic loss of human beings. we hearing the| yesterday? in the tragic loss of - human beings. we hearing the news is
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all of this political scapegoating of asylum seekers, the blame game but we have to mourn 31 or 27 human losses, people who wanted to come to the uk for safety, they wanted to come here with their dreams, determination, to be able to find safely here —— safety here, to also be to give to a society, a community, as well as to the world at large. the same way that i did when i came from afghanistan as a child refugee. there was no legal route, there is no legal route and actually, for people coming and fleeing from conflict zones, we have to understand why they flee. they flee because their life is in danger, they flee persecution. they�*re not coming here for the whole of the hotels, they are not coming herejust whole of the hotels, they are not coming here just because they can find betterjobs. the alternative is it death for them. and for many people, the people who then try to embark on thatjourney, they cannot just embark to embassy and find all
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of this online, they had to find any route to be able to see themselves as well as their children and that is the same way as my parents when i was coming from afghanistan at age 15, they sold their house, all their belongings to gather the money to put it in the hands of the smugglers to send me away aged 15 at the net in 1999. i had no clue where i was landing, simply because i want to find safety. and because there was no other alternative. t find safety. and because there was no other alternative.— no other alternative. i appreciate ou were no other alternative. i appreciate you were a _ no other alternative. i appreciate you were a child _ no other alternative. i appreciate you were a child when _ no other alternative. i appreciate you were a child when you - no other alternative. i appreciate you were a child when you made | no other alternative. i appreciate i you were a child when you made the journey to the uk, but what do you remember of that experience? what can you tell us about how you made that escape from afghanistan and arrived in the uk? t that escape from afghanistan and arrived in the uk?— arrived in the uk? i would like to emphasise _ arrived in the uk? i would like to emphasise again _ arrived in the uk? i would like to emphasise again that _ arrived in the uk? i would like to emphasise again that i _ arrived in the uk? i would like to emphasise again that i was - arrived in the uk? i would like to emphasise again that i was born | arrived in the uk? i would like to i emphasise again that i was born into war and i spent 15 years of my childhood, my entire childhood in conflict, so many other refugees do, they go into horrendous conditions where they are hiding, the same way as i did, where most of my education happened in a row, i didn�*t have any hope for a future, i want to become
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a doctor, was inspired to become one, suffering from speculators and seeing so much misery in conflict zones, but there was no way for me to realise my dream, the same way that all the other refugees have their own dreams as well, so at age 15, was coming, and also under a taliban rule, my life was in danger, make my parents wanted me to be safe, so that genital we have no clue, we could not divide it, it had to be planned by the people smugglers. the alternative was to to stay in afghanistan and maybe i would be dead by now. let alone coming here to the uk, and then going on to become a doctor that i�*m very proud serving on the front line nhs and computing to the people. indeed. but the stark choice that faces many people who are in the position that you were once in is if they stay, and the place where they are persecuted or there is a complex, they risk dying, but equally, if they make that hazardous journey, they also risk dying. it is
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such a dreadful situation, such a terrible position for people to find themselves in. are you aware of the people who are now in that position and choosing to take the risk of making the journey because it staying where they are simply not an option? mr; staying where they are simply not an 0 tion? ~ , ., staying where they are simply not an otion? g ., ., , , ,., option? my own family members are still in afghanistan. _ option? my own family members are still in afghanistan. they _ option? my own family members are still in afghanistan. they are - still in afghanistan. they are caught up in conflict. the risk of them dying in there, like the simian people who are in afghanistan. they are suffering from poverty, the harsh winter conditions are looming again. many people are dying because of lack of medicine, shortage of food, and they are displaced, there are many millions of internally displaced, and next year, probably around 90% of people will be living in poverty, so when people are saying, one is an immediate risk to their lives, and also other risks to their lives, and also other risks to their lives, and also other risks to their lives, as well as the ones i have just highlighted to you, so the alternative for them is to die or have some sort of a hope and that is
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what i did. when i left afghanistan. all i had with me was just hope. i had hardly any form of education, no family support, but i did have that hope that i would land somewhere where people would be kind and compassionate to me. they were when i arrived here in the uk. then it would be able to pursue my dream of doing something with my life and contributing once i�*m safe. ok. contributing once i'm safe. ok, thank you _ contributing once i'm safe. ok, thank you very _ contributing once i'm safe. ok, thank you very much _ contributing once i'm safe. ok, thank you very much for speaking to us here on bbc news. well, that doctor spoke of the hope of a better life, a safer life, and here in dover, the white cliffs, and iconic symbol of britain and also a sign of the hope of a better life, a safer life, that many people making it dangerous crossing have in mind and literally in their sites, but as we learned yesterday, for some people, thatjourney learned yesterday, for some people, that journey ends learned yesterday, for some people, thatjourney ends in disaster. i will have more for you throughout the day came from dover but the moment, backing you in london ——
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back to you in london. then, was corresponded in dover. let�*s take a look at the latest covid figures — 47, 240 people have tested positive for covid 19 in the past 24 hours to thursday. there have been 147 deaths recorded within 28 days of a positive test, 88.4 % of those aged over 12 have received a first dose of the vaccine, 80.4 % have received both doses and 16 million 383,575 have now had a boosterjab. the sports minister nigel hudson says the government will work at pace to meet proposals from an independent enquiry that they should be a regulatorfor independent enquiry that they should be a regulator for irish football to ensure financial stability and good governance of the game.
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it�*s one of a number of recommendations made by a fan—led review, which was carried out by the former sports minister, tracey crouch. but it�*s not yet clear when this could be introduced. our sports correspondent nesta mcgregor has the details. chanting: we want ashley out, we want ashley out. _ well, they do say the best football chants are short, to the point, and easy to remember. and whether it�*s a protest against ownership, a breakaway league, or the financial state of a club, supporters have been calling for change. now a government—led review into how english football is run has concluded the game needs an independent regulator. we�*ve seen football lurch from crisis to crisis over the last decade or so, and unfortunately we haven�*t necessarily had the right levels of regulation in place to stop that crisis from happening. i think we�*ve reached a point where people are saying, no more. the regulator would have the power to enforce a more rigorous owner and directors�* test. a transfer levy would see the premier league give more money to the rest of the game. a reform of parachute
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payments to regulated clubs, and also give fans more of a say in the running of a club. since the end of the 2018—19 season, gigg lane, the home of bury football club, has remained unused. the club went out of business after running into financial trouble. some say had football had an independent regulator the club might still exist today. the lancashire—based club was sold forjust £1. unpaid wages and mounting debt then led to it being expelled from the league. lots of football clubs and lots of football supporters around the country will be wondering, what�*s the big fuss about this particular review? my message to them in a way is you don�*t know what you have until you lose it. it�*s far more profound than people realise. those in favour of the review�*s recommendations say it would benefit and protect the entire footballing pyramid. praise the lord we�*re finally getting somewhere. football is coming home, you could say. i think it is the solution.
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we�*ve documented the issues involved in football and obviously the super league pushed the arms of many people and the fans are the ones that pay the money that go into the ground, so i think the report is very, very positive. critics of tracey crouch�*s plans claim too much red tape could put off potential investors and it doesn�*t go far enough in helping fans who want to own part of their club. the report is now with the government. it�*s a very detailed review so we really need to look at all the other recommendations and see how we can make those work as well, but i�*m very excited about the prospect of an independent regulator. although no changes are guaranteed, just getting the ball rolling is progress for those who�*ve been waiting for long enough. nesta mcgregor, bbc news. it little earlier, was speaking to one of our other interviewees, i quoted rick parry. the first year of the premier league, and he is now ceo of the english premier league.
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hejoins me now. do you open recognise the independent regulator? taste do you open recognise the independent regulator? we have to look at the whole _ independent regulator? we have to look at the whole report _ independent regulator? we have to look at the whole report and - independent regulator? we have to look at the whole report and our. look at the whole report and our passion, our purpose is making club are sustainable throughout the pyramid and that needs two things, firstly, it needs redistribution, registry makes club solvent, then it needs better regulation, proper cost control to make sure they are sustainable in the longer term, and you can�*t have one without the other, so the package of redistribution and better regulation must come together. we welcome the report, it is really thorough, i think she has done a very professionaljob and our position is that we want to engage constructively, in terms of the scope of the regulator and all the things that she says in terms of licensing, real—time monitoring,
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agility, we endorse those. we are absolutely in favour of those. i think we need to have discussions is what we continue to regulate, what the regulator does. we don�*t have an overlap, i think there is plenty of scope for discussion. fir overlap, i think there is plenty of scope for discussion.— overlap, i think there is plenty of scope for discussion. or indeed you kind of cease _ scope for discussion. or indeed you kind of cease to _ scope for discussion. or indeed you kind of cease to be _ scope for discussion. or indeed you kind of cease to be necessary - kind of cease to be necessary altogether, which i can quite understand from where you sit would not feel like an improvement on the current situation! take on what you said about redistribution. you said in a statement, that is pleasing to see the review concludes the additional dissolutions from the top flight are required, by contrast in the premier league�*s statement, they said it is important to everyone that any reforms do not damage elbow game�*s competitive balance all the levels of current investment. if there is a regulator doing this, it is going to require the wisdom of solomon, isn�*t it? t is going to require the wisdom of solomon, isn't it?— solomon, isn't it? i think it is really simple. _ solomon, isn't it? i think it is really simple. we _ solomon, isn't it? i think it is really simple. we have - solomon, isn't it? i think it is really simple. we have been | really simple. we have been consistent in our messaging over the last 18 months. if you go back to
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the fundamental premise, the pyramid matters as a whole, you have to bear in mind that brent became the 50th club tojoin the in mind that brent became the 50th club to join the premier league, last season, 16 of the championship has premier league experience, and we actually need that flow of clubs but down the —— up and down the premier league, which is healthy for both sides this is not about gifts or hand—outs committed about common sense investment. on the basis that the premier league is paying out twice as much in wages as the other major european leagues, their�*s actually plenty of money to go around without dumbing the game down and also the more competitive the championship is, the healthier the game will be. so it is a really straightforward argument. mt game will be. so it is a really straightforward argument. all of that sounds _ straightforward argument. all of that sounds fine, _ straightforward argument. all of that sounds fine, but _ straightforward argument. all of that sounds fine, but if - straightforward argument. all of that sounds fine, but if you - straightforward argument. all of that sounds fine, but if you are i straightforward argument. all of| that sounds fine, but if you are a major financial investor in one of the big names, if you like, it looks
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very different from that perspective. you see this, firstly, as a brand, your club is a brand, you promote that brand, you buy the best players, you get the best management team. the last thing you want is some woman or man in a suit somewhere telling you how to run things. that is going to be a recipe for trouble, things. that is going to be a recipe fortrouble, isn�*t things. that is going to be a recipe for trouble, isn�*t it? things. that is going to be a recipe fortrouble, isn�*t it? ho things. that is going to be a recipe for trouble, isn't it?— for trouble, isn't it? no because nobody is _ for trouble, isn't it? no because nobody is being _ for trouble, isn't it? no because nobody is being told _ for trouble, isn't it? no because nobody is being told how - for trouble, isn't it? no because nobody is being told how to i nobody is being told how to run things. i think everybody agrees logically that some form of cost control, some form of regulation makes eminent sense —— eminent sense. if you look at the championship and we had a profit as its inability rules that we inherit from the premier league and yet manifestly, championship clubs are neither profitable nor sustainable. they spend collectively in the order of i20% they spend collectively in the order of 120% of their turnover on wages, they are losing in excess of 300 million and they are relying —— reliant on 400 million of owner funding every year. by any analysis,
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thatis funding every year. by any analysis, that is simply not sustainable. the model that we have at the moment, frankly, itjust does not work. investors, i would have thought, would be more than happy at the thought that we were going to impose some restrictions, which at least make clubs break even, so we have long—term sustainable futures. tt is long-term sustainable futures. it is interestin: long—term sustainable futures. it is interesting talking about sustainability. those clubs are sustainable, the ones at the top flight, they appear to be sustainable, the ones that died the death, the controversial of women and moving, that has been further down, but that is nothing to do with premier league, that is to do with how the rest of football has been administered.— administered. yes, but the fundamental _ administered. yes, but the fundamental premise - administered. yes, but the fundamental premise is i administered. yes, but the i fundamental premise is that we administered. yes, but the - fundamental premise is that we have the strongest pyramid in the world. you can�*t chop it off half way down. half of the pyramid matters to us, —— either the pyramid matters to us or it doesn�*t. i think it does. we have sent to clubs that sit at the heart of their communities, the vast majority of them have really committed to dedicated owners who
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have done magnificently to get them through the pandemic. as i said, in terms of changing the make—up of the premier league, with promoted clubs and healthy clubs going upwards, thatis and healthy clubs going upwards, that is good business sense from the premier league�*s point of view, but you don�*t want the static at the top, what you actually want is a pyramid that is viable from top to bottom without cliff edges at every step. tdo bottom without cliff edges at every ste -. ,., , ., bottom without cliff edges at every ste. ., ., step. do you find that the attitude and perhaps _ step. do you find that the attitude and perhaps some _ step. do you find that the attitude and perhaps some of _ step. do you find that the attitude and perhaps some of the - step. do you find that the attitude i and perhaps some of the boardroom is at the top in premier league has perhaps modified a bit after what was frankly the disastrous mistake of the european super league proposals, the ones that collapse within days of being launched? that was not a great _ within days of being launched? tngt was not a great initiative, that is for sure, although ironically, when it did show is english governance works quite well, it was not an unviable threat, as it turns out, and in part, though, ithink unviable threat, as it turns out,
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and in part, though, i think you have to look at what lies behind it, and i think there is a desire for change. if everybody thought the status quo is fine, why would we have a super league proposal in the first place? i think there is a recognition that things have to change, english football is a great success story, i don�*t really get the premise that lurches from crisis to crisis, i don�*t accept that. but i do think we need a fundamental financial research because as i said, our purpose is about making clubs sustainable from the club to the very bottom. rick clubs sustainable from the club to the very bottom.— the very bottom. rick parry, chairman — the very bottom. rick parry, chairman of _ the very bottom. rick parry, chairman of the _ the very bottom. rick parry, chairman of the england i the very bottom. rick parry, i chairman of the england football league, the afl, thank you very much for being with us and joining us from chester this afternoon. —— efl. we bring you some breaking news now. this was the french fishermen are planned to block the ports of set manner, and blocking the traffic into the channel tunnel tomorrow and
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this has meant —— led to the promised to issue a statement from downing street in which he said he was disappointed by threats of protest activity by a french fishing association body, and that the body is monitoring the situation closely. what is very interesting about that is that they went away and has taught, the french backs out from their pledge, but we have heard nothing about these talks, no change in fishing licenses, and it looks like the french fishermen is association has finally run out of patience. another bit of breaking news. this won�*t be any surprise to anybody. mansfield—based entice energy had been trading since 2015 and has 5,400 customers. shoreditch—based orbit is owned by us firm gentle energy and has 65,000 customers. they appear to have an outcome i could not see the top of that story, actually, they appear to have announced that they are no longer going to be able to continue trading and supply and any credit was
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secure, they are just reassuring customers, entice one of seven names by off gem as owing renewable obligation fees, which helped to fund —— fund green energy projects. others named included ampower, ma energy and neon reef, who have all since ceased trading in the last fortnight. a total of 24 companies have now departed from the uk s energy supply market due to rising gas prices. more on that in the next half—hour, but now for look at the weather stop sorry! a lot of energy in the atmosphere in the next few days, being pretty calm today, and it is getting cold where we had the clear skies, especially across england and wales, but there is a bit more cloud coming in from the north, this is bringing with it some rain and drizzle, and strengthening ones as well, and that will sweep southwards overnight, followed by some showers. even by the end of the night, temperature is won�*t be far away from freezing in the south—east of england. we have cloud and rain and drizzle moving across england and wales early on
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friday morning, with sunshine following, some of them have ring those showers, and some snow over the high ground in northern scotland, blizzard as well. winds are really starting to pick up by this stage. temperature is a shade higher than today, but the winds are going to be stronger. when there are strong winds to come later on on friday and into saturday, so they will sweep their weight southwards, with a snow mainly over northern hills, but some disruption can be expected. the strongest winds are going to be across eastern scotland and the north—east of england, we have the amber wind warning from the met office. the winds could be gusting at 75 miles an hour. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines... urgent talks today between london and paris over people smuggling, after the deaths of 27 in the english channel. a pregnant woman and three children, were among those who died. the government — and labour— call for urgent action, starting with tackling
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people smugglers. they people smugglers. threaten, intimidate, bully and assault they threaten, intimidate, bully and assault the people who get into these boats, and they have a complete absolute disregard for human life. france says the whole of europe must unite, to end the deaths at sea. these people are exploited to promise — these people are exploited to promise them el dorado and england, and unfortunately this has been repeated — and unfortunately this has been repeated every day for over 20 years — the government says it will work at pace, to deliver a new independent regulator, for football. politicians in jersey vote to approve the principle of legalising assisted dying. and a roman mosaic thought to be centuries old has been unearthed in a farmer�*s field in the east midlands. sport, and for a full round—up
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from the bbc sport centre, here�*s... holly hamilton. the latest from the news breaking _ holly hamilton. the latest from the news breaking at _ holly hamilton. the latest from the news breaking at old _ holly hamilton. the latest from the news breaking at old trafford. - manchester united are set to appoint ralf rangnick as interim manager on a six—month contract. it follows the departure of former boss ole gunnar soljkaer on sunday, and plenty of speculation around his replacement has followed this week. ourfootballer reporter simon stonejoins us now. what do we know about rangnick — what makes him the man for thejob? well, he has an excellent reputation, initially as a coach in germany, winning the german cup, and taking shelter to the semifinals of the champions league and doing really well at rb leipzig as well —— schalke. more recently he has been more of a sporting director, both for the red bull organisation and
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now with locomotive moscow who, ironically, have a europa league game against lazio this evening. he is a fantastic, thoughtful person about the game, and i think manchester united feel as though he can bring some stability to the club at a time of turmoil, after the dismissal of ole gunnar solskjaer. and also he can think about the way the club should be run in the future. so, yes, ithink after speaking to a number of different people over the course of this week, united have settled on rangnick. we are waiting for an official announcement.- are waiting for an official announcement. , ., , , ., announcement. this of course is an interim position, _ announcement. this of course is an interim position, but— announcement. this of course is an interim position, but united, - announcement. this of course is an interim position, but united, you i interim position, but united, you know, he has impressed the bosses
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there, they don�*t want to let him go too easily after the six months. they have already had discussions apparently around what happens after that. ., �* , , ., ., ~' that. that's right, they are talking about structural _ that. that's right, they are talking about structural and _ that. that's right, they are talking about structural and technical i about structural and technical expertise that rangnick can offer, and i think a lot of people on the outside of manchester united, maybe not inside, but on the outside would argue this is the exact kind of appointment the club should have made whenjose mourinho was sacked in 2018, when ole gunnar solskjaer came in on an interim basis, and then that should have allowed a technical director to come in. instead, they gave solskjaer the job on a full—time basis and it has not quite worked out. i think the feeling is that rangnick can get hold of the first team, give it a bit of direction may be with the current coaches, including michael carrick, who will take charge again for sunday�*s game at chelsea, he can give them a bit of guidance, a bit
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of expertise while at the same time getting a bit of an overview of the club and then helping whoever comes in as the full—time manager, which is still expected to be an appointment that united make next summer. tt appointment that united make next summer. , , ., summer. it will be interesting to see the reaction _ summer. it will be interesting to see the reaction to _ summer. it will be interesting to see the reaction to this. - summer. it will be interesting to see the reaction to this. we i summer. it will be interesting to i see the reaction to this. we won't see the reaction to this. we won�*t get to see anything anytime soon of course, work permits need to be sorted out before the on sunday. what do you think the reaction will be to this appointment, or what has it been so far? t be to this appointment, or what has it been so far?— it been so far? i think most people connected with _ it been so far? i think most people connected with united _ it been so far? i think most people connected with united will- it been so far? i think most people connected with united will think i it been so far? i think most people connected with united will think it| connected with united will think it is a good appointment, obviously, otherwise they wouldn�*t be doing it. i do think there is a feeling in football that manchester united need to sort the structure of their club out, really, and without that, any manager will fail, out, really, and without that, any managerwill fail, because out, really, and without that, any manager will fail, because the construction of the team, and the squad is not the way that they do things say at liverpool or manchester city or even chelsea,
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although they�*ve got a slightly different model. so it will be interesting. this is quite an intriguing appointment i think, and most people, i think, given the reputation of rangnick, the experience he has got in the technical director role, i think most people will think that this is a forward step for manchester united. whether it sorts them out this season is another matter. they have obviously this week qualified for the last 16 of the champions league, so they�*ve got a chance of winning that tournament. they are still obviously in the fa cup, like everybody else you would imagine that winning the premier league might be a bit of a stretch this season, but may maybe, finally manchester united are on the road to getting themselves sorted out, and may be moving forward in a way that would allow them to challenge the teams that have won the major trophies over the last few years. and that is what the fans want to hear. thank you for your insight. let�*s move on to a record result for northern ireland�*s women earlier —
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they beat north macedonia 11—0 in their world cup qualifier in skopje. kenny shiels�* side were relentless. simone magill with four of the goals, including this one, to make it 7—0 before half time. it was a special day for rachel furness — her hat—trick means she is now level with david healy�*s record of 36 goals for her country. rebecca mckenna, lauren wade, kirsty mcguinness and rebecca holloway also on target this afternoon. it means northern ireland go level on points with austria, who face england on saturday at the stadium of light. that�*s all the sport for now. scientists in cambridge are hoping they may discover how to improve the treatment of brain diseases, by growing mini human brains in a lab. called �*organoids�*, the researchers hope the innovation could revolutionise medicine. richard westcott has more.
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ina in a busy ina busy lab in a busy lab in cambridge... scientists are growing something that could help find treatments for two devastating and related brain disorders — motor neurone disease and frontotemporal dementia. these are human mini brains. these mini brains, they�*re not conscious, they�*re not thinking, but they�*ve been grown from the cells of people with motor neurone disease, so the dna has the same errors and they�*re actually mimicking how their brains would have grown in the womb. that allows them to study how the disease may start, long before symptoms develop. by feeding the mini brains with vitamins and proteins every day, and slicing them up so the nutrients go in better, they�*ve managed to keep them growing longer than ever. so, i�*ve got this image of you coming in every day during lockdown feeding these mini brains with nutrients, and the big breakthrough for you guys was keeping them growing for nearly
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a year, wasn�*t it? why was that so significant? yeah, growing them for so long lets the cells mature for longer and we are able to look at the start of the development of diseases for a longer time. mini organs, or organoids, can also be used to try different drugs out, reducing the need to test on animals or humans, and because they use your personal cells it could one day tell scientists which drugs work best for you. we are all different, so our responses to medications as well. for instance, we can take cells from an individual patient and grow organoids from them which would mimic their own brain and their own disease essentially, so we can test drugs on them and see what combination of the drugs or single drugs are more suitable for their own disease. and presumably it�*s a lot safer testing drugs on an organoid than the actual person? that's right, it's not only safer but you can test drugs in combination,
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you can test multiple drugs at the same time, and it's a much more rapid process. many human organs, including the liver, gut and heart can now be grown as organoids. they�*re becoming an important tool for understanding and treating disease. richard westcott, bbc news, cambridge. new data has further backed the safety of coronavirus vaccines for pregnant women. figures from the uk health security agency show women who ve had a covid jab are no more likely than those who are unvaccinated to have a stillbirth, premature birth or baby with a low birth weight. experts are now urging more mothers to be to get a vaccine, warning that the potential impacts of catching coronavirus whilst pregnant can be serious for both mother and baby. our health correspondent, katharine da costa, has more details... the evidence shows that women who
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get covid in later stages of pregnancy are at increased risk of ending up in hospital and i see you. there is a two to three time chance of needing a c—section or having a premature baby. so pregnant women where being offered my donor and pfizerjabs where being offered my donor and pfizer jabs since where being offered my donor and pfizerjabs since april this year with a recommendation to have their second dose at eight weeks later. but there has been this hesitancy in this group because there wasn�*t the clinical trial data, because they weren�*t included in the clinical trial data. weren't included in the clinical trial data. ., weren't included in the clinical trial data-— weren't included in the clinical trial data. for obvious reasons presumably- — trial data. for obvious reasons presumably. because - trial data. for obvious reasons presumably. because they i trial data. for obvious reasons i presumably. because they won't test vaccines on pregnant _ presumably. because they won't test vaccines on pregnant women. - presumably. because they won't test vaccines on pregnant women. but i vaccines on pregnant women. but there is substantial real—world data from thousands of pregnant women who have been vaccinated in the us and israel with no safety concerns. now the uk health security agency has got new data for england on vaccine safety, and i think the really striking thing is that no full vaccinated women was admitted to acu with covid between february and the end of september this year. and the rates of pregnant women getting
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vaccinated are increasing but they are still lower, so just over one in five had had a jab before they gave back —— gave birth in august. this new data looks at the eight months tween january and august, new data looks at the eight months tweenjanuary and august, and there were good outcomes for pregnant women who had been vaccinated. they were at no greater risk and pet their unvaccinated counterparts to suffer things like stillbirth, premature birth or having a baby with a low birth weight. there were some concerns that some groups won�*t taking up the vaccine. so there were lower rates in younger women, people from deprived areas, and among women from deprived areas, and among women from black and asian communities. but health officials say that this data really backs up the international data and it should be reassuring for women, that it should give them the confidence to come forward and get a vaccine. interestingly, 98% of women in hospital with covid are unvaccinated so there is more work to do. the uk health regulator again has said there is no safety concerns, and
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that pfizer and modernity can be given at any stage of pregnancy. so now there is this real call for professionals and pregnant women to get talking because it is really about trust, to try and build up that confidence and get them to try and take up the vaccine. three people have appeared in court charged with the murder of caroline glachan. the 14 year old was found dead along the banks of the river leven in west dunbartonshire 25 years ago. donna brand, andrew kelly and robert o�*brien were remanded in custody for further examination. caroline�*s death went on to feature on the bbc�*s crimewatch programme and became one of scotland�*s most high—profile unsolved cases. a man has appeared in court, charged with the murders of a couple who were attacked at their home in somerset, while their children slept unharmed upstairs. 34 year old former soldier collin reeves appeared at taunton magistrates court this morning, charged with the murders ofjennifer and stephen chapple, who were found with stab wounds in the village of norton fitzwarren on sunday. devon and cornwall police have given
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an update on their investigation into the disappearance of 18—year—old bobbi—anne mcleod. bobbi—anne was reported missing on saturday, after she left home to catch a bus into plymouth town centre to meet friends, but never arrived. police found a woman�*s body on tuesday, in nearby bovisand, but formal identification is yet to take place. a 24—year—old man remains in custody under a warrant of further detention — and police say he was not known to her. a significant number of enquiries and searches have been carried out in relation to the ongoing murder investigation in plymouth. earlier today, a 26—year—old man, who was arrested on suspicion of murder, was released from police custody, having been eliminated from the enquiry. a24—year—old man remains in police custody at this time, on suspicion of murder, under a warrant of further detention. this warrant was granted by plymouth magistrates court and allows officers to detain
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the man for an additional 24 hours. i can confirm that at this time, there is no known link between the suspect and bobbi—anne, and i would like to reassure the public that at this time we are not seeking anyone else in relation to this matter. the family of bobbi—anne continue to be supported by specialist officers. this remains a live and active case, and, as such, we would remind everyone the importance of not speculating in relation this matter. it is crucial that we uphold the integrity of this investigation at all times. once again, i give my utmost thanks to the communities and the public in plymouth. we have their continued support in our enquiries. specialist resources are supporting officers on the ground as we carry out enquiries at a number of locations. tt
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we carry out enquiries at a number of locations-— of locations. it is now approaching 13 minutes — of locations. it is now approaching 13 minutes to _ of locations. it is now approaching 13 minutes to five. _ the headlines on bbc news... urgent talks today between london and paris over people smuggling, after the deaths of 27 in the english channel. a pregnant woman and three children, were among those who died. the government — and labour— call for urgent action, starting with tackling people smugglers. the government says it will work at pace, to deliver a new independent regulator for football. politicians in jersey vote to approve the principle of legalising assisted dying. they have become the first anywhere in the british isles to do so. some of the children who survived the aberfan disaster have said they were put through distressing medical tests, which one described as "torture". 116 children and 28 adults were killed in 1966 when coal waste slid down a hillside, burying a primary school and homes in village of merthyr tydfil. maria david has more.
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archive: i'm standing once again on a pile of black- slurry, and underneath us is the infant school. i on october 21st 1966, thousands of tonnes of coal waste surged down the hillside above aberfan, burying the village school and surrounding houses. 116 children and 28 adults were killed. this afternoon, the children were due to start their- half—term holiday. gaynor madgwick was rescued, but her brother carl and sister marilyn didn�*t survive. over the years, she�*s written two books about what happened. now in a bbc wales podcast, gaynor describes the added trauma of the medical tests she was put through after the disaster. i�*ll neverforget it, coming to two gates with this big, big building, mental hospital. someone came out trying
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to calm me down. i was still kicking and screaming. they were trying to prise my fingers off the handle to basically drag me in this hospital. they would completely fill your hair with loads of gel. this cap they put on, now you see it in frankenstein, all these plugs and leads coming out, fixing to the cap skull onto your head. and you had to sit there and be interrogated. it was torture. years later, she discovered the tests were carried out in case they were asked for proof of psychological damage. those tests were only to determine what level of compensation from aberfan disaster fund. that�*s all it was for, it wasn�*t to help us. today, mental health services are very different. i think the whole approach to dealing with people following traumatic events has changed immensely in the last few
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decades and i'm very confident that nowadays individuals could be dealt with in a different way, primarily talking therapies, and particularly for children and young people, it still is appropriate to come forward because there are interventions and treatments that can help people even many, many years after. like many survivors, gaynor is still traumatised. now, after 55 years, she�*s finally begun treatment. you can hear more from gaynor and her surviving classmates in the podcast series, aberfan: tip number seven, available to download now on bbc sounds. a rare roman mosaic has been discovered in a field in the east midlands.
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the artwork, which dates back to the third or fourth century, shows the epic battle between achilles and the trojan hero, hector, in homer�*s the iliad. it�*s the first of its kind to be found in the uk. the site has now been granted protection, to preserve the discovery. now for more than 700 episodes, fans have been hooked on the simpsons, with its cast of hundreds becoming a part of many of our lives. the show has experienced some historic firsts, the first same sex kiss on tv being a notable example, and now it crosses a new frontier years in the making. simpsons stalwart waylon smithers, long known as the mr burns right hand man, found love on sunday, in a landmark episode for the series, for the first time the show centred its storyline around a gay love story. it�*s an amazing moment for fans of the show, and for lgbtq+ visibility, johnny lazebnik wrote johnny lazebnik wrote the episode.
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the fact that the simpsons, particularly the executive producer trusted me and my dad to write this episode, that really takes the simpsons family out of the forefront and puts this gay love story is the main story of the episode, it�*s huge. i also think it�*s really special. i wrote a lot ofjokes that are kind of niche gayjokes, things that i don�*t think straight people could have even written and those got to really take centre stage in a way that i�*m not sure the show has really done before. and it was so special to be able to do that. i feel so lucky for the opportunity, but i think it is special. i think for so long gay people haven�*t always been able to tell our own stories, and to be able to take this character that i grew up with, that i knew and loved so well and to be able to rate for him was amazing. it was amazing. able to rate for him was amazing. it was amazing-— able to rate for him was amazing. it was amazing. whether we get to see it in the uk is— was amazing. whether we get to see it in the uk is another— was amazing. whether we get to see it in the uk is another matter. i for more than half a century, almost 60 hours of unseen footage of the beatles making their final album, gathered dust in a vault, unseen.
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but for the last four years, the oscar—winning director of the the lord of the rings, peterjackson, using the footage, has been crafting a three—part, eight—hour documentary. it�*s "get back", and is a candid and intimate portrait of the fab four, who often didn�*t realise they were being filmed. paul mccartney says jackson�*s film has actually changed his perception of how the band broke up. peterjackson has given his only british tv interview to our entertainment correspondent, colin paterson. # get back, get back... well, we�*ll have to do it sitting down or we get too excited. the sounds, the colours, thejoy of the beatles making music. unseen for more than half a century.
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ringo said that he felt we had to just tell it like it is. i think we are. the man entrusted to restore almost 60 hours of footage from the let it be sessions injanuary1969, the lord of the rings director peterjackson. what made you want to dedicate four years of your life to this project? well, i wouldn�*t have done it if it was the rolling stones or something. sort of controversial, sorry! a musical documentary is not a huge appeal to me, but the beatles, yes. i�*m all in, 100%. four years, no problem. i�*ve loved every second of it. # speaking words of wisdom... do you want to do it once more then? yes, yes. i mean, we'll never get a chance to do it again. the project happened almost by mistake. peterjackson was meeting with the beatles company apple to discuss the possibility of a virtual reality exhibition. so, cats and kittens, what are we going to do? but as a beatles obsessive, he took his chance to ask something he�*d always wanted to know —
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what had happened to all the outtakes from the 1970 beatles documentary let it be? they said to me, "well, yeah, we�*ve got it all." which was great as a fan. i was sitting there thinking, "yeah, you�*ve got it all!" they were thinking about using it for a documentary, a stand—alone documentary, but they didn�*t have anybody, a film—maker attached. so the only time in my life i�*ve ever done this, i sort of put up my hands and i said, "well, if you�*re looking forsomebody, i�*lljust... please think of me." just say whatever comes into your head each time and try to be like a cauliflower until you get the word. peterjackson was offered the job the same day. his only concern — he�*d always been told that the making of the let it be album was a gloomy time for the beatles. but when he sat down to watch the outtakes, what surprised him was just how much fun everyone was having. if the footage showed a truly miserable band not wanting to be doing what they were doing, i wouldn�*t have made the movie. that�*s not the movie i would have wanted to make, but i was amazed and surprised to see the footage showing a very
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different story to what i�*d believed for 40 years. all we've got is us. what do you think? in the end, there was so much footage, get back has been divided into three parts. and there is one other trilogy that links peterjackson to the beatles. one real curiosity — in the 1960s, the beatles actually wanted to make a lord of the rings movie directed by stanley kubrick. what do you know about that? i�*ve been scraping together little pieces of information. i�*ve been interrogating paul about it. and ultimately they couldn�*t get the rights from tolkien because tolkien didn�*t like the idea of a pop group doing his stories. amazing —looking pictures. i have to say, it is probably fair to say that neither myself nor darren bett are in any position to comment about the hairstyles chosen by the beatles back then, but, darren... what
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hairstyles chosen by the beatles back then, but, darren... what do ou back then, but, darren... what do you mean? _ back then, but, darren. .. what do you mean? it— back then, but, darren. .. what do you mean? it is— back then, but, darren. .. what do you mean? it is fair— back then, but, darren... what do you mean? it is fair to _ back then, but, darren... what do you mean? it is fair to say, - back then, but, darren... what do you mean? it is fair to say, is i back then, but, darren... what do you mean? it is fair to say, is it i you mean? it is fair to say, is it not, it is— you mean? it is fair to say, is it not. it is going _ you mean? it is fair to say, is it not, it is going to _ you mean? it is fair to say, is it not, it is going to be _ you mean? it is fair to say, is it not, it is going to be a - you mean? it is fair to say, is it not, it is going to be a hard i you mean? it is fair to say, is it i not, it is going to be a hard day's not, it is going to be a hard day�*s night tomorrow? not, it is going to be a hard day's night tomorrow?— not, it is going to be a hard day's night tomorrow? not, it is going to be a hard day's nirht tomorrow? ~ ., , night tomorrow? well, there goes the sun, i hoe night tomorrow? well, there goes the sun. i hope to — night tomorrow? well, there goes the sun. i hope to give — night tomorrow? well, there goes the sun, i hope to give you _ night tomorrow? well, there goes the sun, i hope to give you a _ night tomorrow? well, there goes the sun, i hope to give you a few - night tomorrow? well, there goes the sun, i hope to give you a few words i sun, i hope to give you a few words of wisdom, because we have a storm in the way actually, that will ruffle some people�*s heirs, not ours, this is storm arwen, it will bring some gales widely across the uk from the north and will contain some snow over northern hills, some disruption can be expected. it is yet to really develop but we got this shield of cloud moving down from the north. for england and wales the cloud is quite thin, so it is cold out there and temperatures will continue to fall for a while. then we see the thickening cloud coming down from the north together with some strong winds and that will bring with it some rain too, it will sweep southwards followed by showers but even by the end of the night in south—east england, those temperatures are still close to freezing. but we have cloud, rain and drizzle to sweep down across england and wales fairly early in
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the morning. following that, some sunshine and some will turn wintry in northern ireland. there will be some snow over the higher ground in northern scotland. some blizzards as well, because the winds are really starting to pack a punch by the stage. temperatures may be a shade higher than today but the wind is stronger. the strongest are in this area of eastern scotland and the north—east of england, where we have this amber wind warning from the met office, winds could be gusting 75 mph. now you wouldn�*t think so particularly, if you look at storm arwen, nothing impressive, we got rain and snow wrapped around it but it�*s on the back end of that storm as it pushes a way that we see those strong winds sweeping down across many parts of the country overnight and into saturday. so saturday is going to be a windy day, notjust across the north—east of the uk, but some very strong winds are likely across more western areas, through the irish sea and on to the west coast. we do have some cloud, some rain, may be some sleet and snow over the hills, that wet weather continues across eastern england through the day. elsewhere it will brighten up, there will be some sunshine, the showers will become
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fewer through the day but still a windy day and a cold day, temperatures struggling to four or five degrees, but when you add on the strength of the wind, it will feel significantly colder. for the second half of the weekend, we see storm arwen weakening and moving away. into continental europe. a weak weather front approach is from the atlantic, threatening to bring cloud and a little rain into northern ireland. still windy in the morning fees and parts of and, if you wintry showers here, some wintry showers in scotland as well but many other areas will have a dry day. still cold really on sunday but it is not going to be as windy for the second half of the weekend. the winds into next week churn into the atlantic, that will bring some milder weather.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. the uk and france call for a coordinated international response to human trafficking, following the deaths of 27 people whose dinghy capsized in the english channel they threaten, intimidate, bully and assault the people getting to these boats and have a complete disregard for human rights. france says the whole of europe must unite, to end, the deaths at sea. i�*m live in dover where more boats arise despite yesterday�*s tragedy and the weather. onboard, desperate people, risking everything, their lives. the government says it will work
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at pace to deliver a new independent regulator for football.

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