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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 30, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines. all adults over 18 in england will be offered a coronavirus boosterjab by the end of january. boris johnson says it's the best defence, against the omicron variant. it's the best defence, it's time for another great british vaccination effort. we've done it before and we're going to do it again. and let's not give this virus a second chance. mps vote to approve new rules which make masks compulsory in shops and on public transport in england, unless you are exempt. and anyone arriving in the uk must take a pcr test within two days, and isolate until they receive a negative result. five days after storm arwen, tens of thousands are
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till without power. and the singerjosephine baker, becomes the first black woman, to officially be declared a national hero, in france. good evening. the prime minister has vowed to offer a coronavirus booster to everyone in england who is eligible within the next two months as he said it was time for another great british vaccination effort. the military will be brought to help the nhs and volunteers with vaccination centres being set up around the country. 22 cases of the omicron variant have now been identified in england and scotland. nicola sturgeon says the nine cases
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in scotland are all linked to one private event ten days ago and don't appear to be related to travel in south africa. in england boosters will be offered to the most vulnerable. first with m million more people eligible right now. once again people will be invited to come forward in age bands. everyone who can have a booster should have been offered one by the end of january. 400 military personnel will support 1,500 community vaccine sites across england to deliver the programme. borisjohnson said the situation in uk is and always will be immeasurably better than it was a year ago. but the government was taking proportionate precautionary measures while scientists crack the 0micron code. here's our health editor, hugh pym. there's new urgency to the boosterjab campaign. this is one of the centres which is having to gear up for the faster roll—out, with all adults becoming eligible
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and the gap between second dose and boosters halved to three months. it's certainly a major logistical challenge. we will need to obviously expand our capacity both here and in the gp vaccination centres, the local vaccination centres. and we will need to get more staff back in. do you think the nhs can handle it? yes, i think we can. i think we have demonstrated over the last two years that we can do an enormous amount in very short timescales. local health officials say take—up of boosters had been disappointing until the middle of last week, but since thursday, when news of the variant emerged, they say more people have been coming in, and forfirst or second doses as well as boosters. beverly was one of them. she already qualified for a booster and booked in after she first heard the news about omicron. it was on the back of my mind because i knew the date was coming up when i would be eligible for my booster. but with the news, it really did push me.
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and what did you think when you heard the news? here we go again. and the prime minister explained how the new booster plan would be delivered in england. there'll be temporary vaccination centres popping up like christmas trees, and we'll deploy at least 400 military personnel to assist the efforts of our nhs alongside, of course, the fantastic jabs army of volunteers. the head of nhs england called on people to enlist in that jabs army. if you are able to help, then please do apply or volunteer. your help can help us protect more people and save more lives. i am confident that with public support, the can—do spirit of the nhs will once again win through. she added that those who are eligible for boosters should wait to be invited. in northern ireland, meanwhile, which has the lowest uptake of the booster shot in the uk, more vaccination clinics have been set up to meet demand.
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ministers said the aim was to give boosters to all eligible age groups as quickly as possible. and the first minister gave an update on cases of the new variant in scotland. health protection teams have established that all nine cases are linked. they all trace back to a single private event on 20th november. indeed, we expect that there will be more cases identified over the coming days that are also linked to this event. in wales, the requirement for face coverings has been extended across all education settings. all staff and learners should wear face coverings while indoors where physical distances can't be maintained. there's still uncertainty about how effective the vaccines will be against the new variant. the boss of moderna cast doubt on how much protection they might offer and warned it could take months for companies to amend their jabs. but the regulator the european medicines agency said existing
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vaccines would provide protection. however much that protection might amount to, officials are urging people to get theirjabs and at this vaccine bus in colchester today, there was no shortage of takers as the vaccination programme starts to accelerate again. hugh pym, bbc news. show almost 40,000 new cases have been recorded over the latest 24 hour period and there have been 159 further deaths. that's those who've died within 28 days of a positive test result. more than 18 million people in the uk have now had a third dose or booster of a coronavirus vaccine. that's nearly a third of the population over the age of 12. that's nearly a third of the population over the age of 12. tighter restrictions came into force in england today. face coverings are now mandatory again in shops and on public transport. there have also been changes
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to the rules around international travel, anyone arriving in the uk must take a pcr test within two days and isolate until they get their result. the prime minister has decribed the rules as "proportionate". 0ur transport correspondent katy austin reports. they are a familiar sight and once again, passengers must wearface coverings on public transport in england or risk a fine unless they�* re exempt. the rule applies in shops too. i think you do it out of respect and dignity to others. an overreaction, basically. doesn't make me or anybody else any safer. this brings england in line with scotland, wales and northern ireland, where masks are already mandatory on public transport and in many indoor areas. also landing today, the requirement for all international travellers to pay for a pcr test within 48 hours of coming into the uk and self—isolate until they get a negative result. for this couple who have just arrived from spain, it's a race against time. well, it means everything to me, because it is my son's wedding. if i'm not there, he's going to be heartbroken.
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he's not going to get married again and he has been planning it for two years. so you've taken a pcr test and you have to wait for the result? yeah, wait for the results by ten o'clock tomorrow night. we should be ok. hopefully, they'll be back in time. previously, a cheaper, quicker lateral flow test was enough. this is one of the drive—in sites where people can come and have their pre—booked covid pcr tests done. over the past couple of days, the company which runs this place has been converting lots of bookings for antigen lateral flow tests into the pcr that people now need. they can't currently offer an option which gives a result in just three hours because with the new variant around, the test standard has been raised. the government have set very exacting standards for day two in terms of specificity and sensitivity, which is wholly appropriate. we are looking to modify our rapid tests so that we are able to do a rapid pcr on day two. this will take a few days to sort out.
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0ne airline says some customers are choosing to postpone imminent holidays. i think that is just because people are taking the opportunity to perhaps rebook next year, but it's too early to tell what this will stabilise at. it's not the same drop—off in the bookings we have seen from previous times when restrictions have been introduced. business travel was ramping up again. the new rules could change that. i myself have travelled a few times recently. people have been coming here, we have seen already, either because people don't want to have to quarantine for a couple of days for shorter trips. and longer trips, it's thrown a degree of uncertainty notjust over travel changes in the uk but travel changes in the home markets as well. much uncertainty still surrounds the omicron variant. for now, whether you're taking the bus, train or plane, caution is the direction of travel. the labour leader sir keir starmer has urged borisjohnson to go further with restrictions to try and contain the spread of the 0micron variant in the uk.
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i think it should go further. we've supported what the prime minister has put in place, wejust supported what the prime minister has put in place, we just voted for that. were not against the measures put in place but i think the urgent question is can we stop the transmission into the country by a preacher far to departure taxes urgent for anybody coming into the country for the having a pcr test after you've arrived with z travel knock on, public transport and waiting and number of days is no substitute for a predeparture test for everyone coming into the country but urgent, safer prime minister, do it and do it today. but urgent, safer prime minister, do it and do it today. let's speak to andrew hayward, professor of infectious disease epidemiology and inclusion health research at university college london, and member of the government's nervtag advisory group. but he's speaking to us in a personal capacity. thank you forjoining us. looking across europe, how is the uk faring
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with this 0micron variant compared with other countries? i with this omicron variant compared with other countries?— with other countries? i think it's difficult to _ with other countries? i think it's difficult to say _ with other countries? i think it's difficult to say because - with other countries? i think it's difficult to say because across . with other countries? i think it's| difficult to say because across all countries in europe we've only had low numbers of detected cases. i think what we need to remember is those detected cases will probably be the tip of the iceberg of the true number of cases out there. because we always under detect full stop and also because identification of the cases relies notjust on testing but sequencing. and we only testing but sequencing. and we only test about, wheelie sequence about 20, 30% of cases. it will be an underestimate. and i think one of the concerning things perhaps is that historically, the united kingdom has had more travellers from south africa than any other european country. so if anywhere it was going to be affected early, it would be the uk. �* , .,
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to be affected early, it would be the uk. ~ _, . ., ., to be affected early, it would be theuk. �* _, ., , ., the uk. beyond omicron or before omicron how— the uk. beyond omicron or before omicron how is _ the uk. beyond omicron or before omicron how is the _ the uk. beyond omicron or before omicron how is the uk _ the uk. beyond omicron or before omicron how is the uk infection i 0micron how is the uk infection rates in comparison with other parts of the continent? i rates in comparison with other parts of the continent?— of the continent? i think what we've seen since about _ of the continent? i think what we've seen since about july, _ of the continent? i think what we've seen since about july, we've - of the continent? i think what we've seen since about july, we've had - seen since aboutjuly, we've had high infection rates with delta that remained relatively steady, they've gone up and down. they look like fortunately it weakens the link between cases and death although we are still seeing substantial regular amounts of death and height levels of hospitalisations. and that was putting a great deal of pressure on the nhs as it tried to deal with this backlog. i've had friends who've worked in the nhs for 30 years and they say they are really, really struggling to cope. so we really struggling to cope. so we really don't need another wave of hospitalisations. haifa really don't need another wave of hospitalisations.— really don't need another wave of hospitalisations. how important then is this vaccine _ hospitalisations. how important then is this vaccine booster _ hospitalisations. how important then is this vaccine booster roll-out - is this vaccine booster roll—out going to be that the prime minister had been talking about today? i think it is important. of course
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there is a degree of uncertainty about how much the vaccines will protect. i think everybody is reasonably confident that they will provide some protection and the booster will mean that that protection will be higher without the booster doses. but we really don't know how protected they will be. and that's going to be really important because that will determine not only the number of cases but the number of hospitalisations and deaths. it's very difficult at the moment to know exactly what a proportionate response is because there are so many uncertainties. but i personally think that the restrictions that we have in place at the moment are unlikely to really stop this strain spreading in the uk and that it's likely to increase over the next few months. and potentially become the dominant strain and have higher levels of infection that we
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otherwise had. how that translates into hospitalisations and deaths is difficult to say. but unless the strain is less severe than previous trains then it's likely to lead to lead to more than we would have had. given the number of cases that we've had where people thankfully has survived, given the high rate of vaccination in this country there should be quite a good level of antibodies in many peoples systems. but you are still saying or implying that you think there need to be more measures brought in, more restrictions or more protections depending on how you want to look at it for that what would you say they need to be?— need to be? well, i do think we need to start to think _ need to be? well, i do think we need to start to think about _ need to be? well, i do think we need to start to think about those - to start to think about those measures that involve more social distancing. i think we need to be thinking about plan b measures. 0bviously thinking about plan b measures. obviously the position at the moment is that we are being proportionate, working to find out more, were going to wait for a few weeks to see what we find out. i guess i'm just a
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little bit concerned that we may look back injanuary and wish that we had activated some of those plans earlier. i do hope i'm wrong on that. . ~ , ., earlier. i do hope i'm wrong on that. . ~' , ., , earlier. i do hope i'm wrong on that. . ~ , . for talking to us. let's look at the global picture now stop picture now professor david heymann is from the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine; he coordinated the world health 0rganisation response to sars, which was caused by a type of coronavirus. and we'll have more on this story what do you know at that moment about the character of 0micron that might give you an indication of how it will behave? the might give you an indication of how it will behave?— it will behave? the information that we have now _ it will behave? the information that we have now is _ it will behave? the information that we have now is coming _ it will behave? the information that we have now is coming mainly- it will behave? the information that we have now is coming mainly from| we have now is coming mainly from south africa, it is freely shared its data for the past week. anyone can go on their website and find out what their latest thinking is. what they believe is that this variant
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doesin they believe is that this variant does in fact spread easier than other parents in the past and therefore they have won province in south africa which has this as the dominant strain. but they've also noticed that the infection may be noticed that the infection may be not more effect or even less verbal and then what is been occurring in the past. meaning there is less a severe early illness. at that early data. they also suspect that the vaccine will protect against this virus. again, it's also very early information.— virus. again, it's also very early information. what else have we learned during _ information. what else have we learned during the _ information. what else have we learned during the course - information. what else have we learned during the course of. information. what else have we | learned during the course of this pandemic that will help us tackle the 0micron variant? i pandemic that will help us tackle the omicron variant?— pandemic that will help us tackle the omicron variant? i think we've learned, the omicron variant? i think we've learned. the _ the omicron variant? i think we've learned, the stars _ the omicron variant? i think we've learned, the stars coronavirus - the omicron variant? i think we've learned, the stars coronavirus to l learned, the stars coronavirus to wizened pandemic and becoming rapidly endemic and countries. those countries that have the highest population immunity which means protection either they've had the infection themselves or because
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they've been vaccinated, those countries with the highest levels of population immunity seem to have less serious illness in re— infections or infections after vaccination. which is good. we want to see that continue but at the same time not have the virus overwhelm countries. so it must come in at a slower rate than their rather than a rapid rate. slower rate than their rather than a raid rate. ~ ~ slower rate than their rather than a raid rate. ~ . , ., slower rate than their rather than a raid rate. ~ . ,., rapid rate. which countries are part ofthe rapid rate. which countries are part of the world — rapid rate. which countries are part of the world are _ rapid rate. which countries are part of the world are most _ rapid rate. which countries are part of the world are most exposed - of the world are most exposed to 0micron? bill of the world are most exposed to omicron? �* _, , ., ,.,, omicron? all countries are exposed to omicron- — omicron? all countries are exposed to omicron. virus _ omicron? all countries are exposed to omicron. virus spread _ omicron? all countries are exposed to omicron. virus spread and - omicron? all countries are exposed | to omicron. virus spread and people to 0micron. virus spread and people around the world and they have already spread. it would be wrong to pick one country and say this is where the focus should be. the focus must be on every countryjust as it is here in the uk. must be on every country 'ust as it is here in the umfi must be on every country 'ust as it is here in the uk. when it comes to vaccine poverty. — is here in the uk. when it comes to vaccine poverty, vaccine _ is here in the uk. when it comes to vaccine poverty, vaccine apartheid l vaccine poverty, vaccine apartheid as it's being described, how much more pressing does e quality and access to vaccine become with more variance emerging? we
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access to vaccine become with more variance emerging?— access to vaccine become with more variance emerging? we certainly need to net variance emerging? we certainly need to get vaccines — variance emerging? we certainly need to get vaccines to _ variance emerging? we certainly need to get vaccines to the _ variance emerging? we certainly need to get vaccines to the people - variance emerging? we certainly need to get vaccines to the people who - to get vaccines to the people who need them, that's clear. in the kovacs facility as you know has been established to do that. what's important now is that all countries work together including those countries that need to vaccine. in those countries need to put it as a priority and make sure that somehow they get the vaccine, the facility is there, who is they are, they need to be requesting vaccines. and then they need to deliver them to the people who need them. and it's very difficult in some countries where they have never been adult vaccination programmes before. in the uk there's been an adult vaccination for influenza for many years. but in some african and asian countries they don't have a habit of giving vaccines to adults. so it means a whole new system has to be set up an order that they can get the vaccines to the people who need them. we
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the vaccines to the people who need them. ~ have more on this story at half past eight. about how the vaccine programme here can be successfully expanded. time for a look at sports news. full round up from the bbc sports news. full round up from the bbc sport data. i didn't know who it was. i had to turn around. i know who it is, tells in. i didn't know it was going to be used please take it was going to be used please take it away, tell us the sports news. i'll do my best. three of the home nations are in action this evening in women's world cup qualifiers with ellen white having already broken the england goal—scoring record in the game against latvia. white has scored a hattrick to move ahead of kelly smith who had the previous record of 46 with beth mead also notching a hat—trick in the first 25 minutes. currently 12— zero after 64 minutes definitely had to six wins.
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in group b scotland take on first placed spain in seville ??? and likewise in group eye with wales in france knowing victory that one is goal is. that when there is goal is as well. to the men's game where it's bottom hosting second bottom in the premier league as newcastle take on norwich. that one is goalless at half—time but newcastle were reduced to ten men afterjust nine minutes when ciaran clark was sent off. just under way at elland road it's leeds united desperately looking forjust a third win of the season up against crystal palace who could move seventh with a win. while in the scottish premiership dundee united could move third with a win away to motherwell. motherwell scoring early to hold a one — zero lead. motherwell scoring early to hold a one — zero lead. the former liverpool, arsenal and england player ray kennedy has passed away aged 70. he won everything there was to win with liverpool in the seventies and eighties,
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including five first division titles and three european cups. kennedy had been living with parkinson's disease since 1984. there's been another shock exit in the uk snooker championship with 2011 championjudd trump being knocked out. the world number two was one of the favourites going into the tournament, but was beaten in the third round by fellow englishman matthew selt, losing six frames to three. he's the latest big name to crash out with last year's winner neil robertson and world champion mark selby both knocked out earlier in the tournament. number 11 seed mark allen is also out after he was beaten by david gilbert. gilbert recovered from 5 frames to 2 down against the northern irishman to win 6—5. tiger woods has said he was lucky not to lose his leg in the horrific car crash he was involved in earlier this year and that he doesn't expect to return to the tour full time. woods has been speaking to the media a day after giving his first interview since the accident. he said he was back playing golf,
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but nowhere near the level he had been used to. however, he also said he was grateful to be playing at all because of the severity of his injuries. to see some of my shots, followed it's got a lot shorter than they used to is it eye—opening. but at least i'm able to do it again, that something for a while there didn't look like it was going to. but i'm able to participate in the sport of golf now to what level, i do not know that. i will keep you abreast as progress continues to go on for that whether or not i'll be out here and at what level and when. that whether or not i'll be out here and at what level and when. 0nto tennis and great britain are into a deciding doubles rubber against germany after cameron norrie lost his singles match to jan lennard struff. earlier dan evans played what he called — some of his best tennis of the year, as he beat peter goy—of—check in straight sets, 6—2, 6—1.
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the german is only ranked 86th in the world and, lost the match in under an hour with his seventh double fault, summing up his performance. just over a week since he broke three ribs and punctured a lung, mark cavendish has been speaking about being involved in a crash at a meet in belgium that he admits will hinder him going into the new season. cavendish went down in the final madison event of the ghent six just over a week ago after the riders hit water on the track. he ended up with nowhere to go after riders in front of him crashed first. i was doing a little break anyway and i was due a week ten days and maybe a week longer then i can start getting on indoors. i should be all right. as long as i get my long check, as long as my long has healed and the pain i can manage to get on with myjob. ijust have to look after my health more than the pain, i guess.
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sorry margaret. england's women are now winning right has broken the england gold scoring record for the women's game. their ego. i completely deserve that. i can't eat for and present poor eyesight tonight. 0f for and present poor eyesight tonight. of that my glasses on. i just haven't seen you in the preview screen. thank you. you're watching bbc news for the breaking news this hour. at least three people were killed and six others have been wounded in a shooting at a high school in michigan. according to the oakland county sheriffs office it happened at a high school in oxford which is about 35 miles north of the city of detroit. these are the latest pictures that we have from the states of michigan. you can see the
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huge number of emergency vehicles that have responded to this. at least three people are said to of died, six have been injured. we will bring you more details of course when we have them put up we may have a little bit more that i can tell you now. that's always there at the moment. the local hospitals have been put on standby and art responding. we will bring you more from detroit, from michigan when we get it. tens of thousands of people in scotland and the north of england still have no electricity five days after storm arwen caused, what's being described as "unprecedented damage" to the power network. strong winds snapped telegraph poles and knocked out supplies on friday. we have two reports tonight from the worst hit areas the north—east of england and aberdeenshire from where lorna gordon sent this first report. a fifth night without mains power, and patrick and debbiejamieson are hunkering down again. it's friday, saturday, sunday, monday and tuesday now. without power?
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without power and temperatures have been between —5 and —10 in the evenings. what have you done for heating? just wrapping up very warm, trying to keep close together. i remember the �*70s and the power cuts very well, but not as bad as this. it's the worst it's ever been. right across this area, people are grappling with the aftermath of the storm. they're checking on neighbours and offering food. how are you doing? surviving? it's a nightmare, isn't it? it is. i've got three layersj on and i'm freezing. all thse houses around here - are granite, so when they get cold, they get really, really cold. in rhynie, there's no power here or water, locals are gathering together for company and warmth. ann is one of many donating supplies and wondering when the power will come back on. it's like a bit of false hope because you were getting a text message saying it's going to come on maybe at 12 o'clock, lunchtime, then it went
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to six o'clock that night, then midnight, then the next day, so you was kind of hoping but it was never happening. it's been difficult for everyone in the village. hundreds of engineers are working to restore supplies, but the impact of this storm was so severe that tonight, thousands in scotland are still cut off and may remain that way for some time. lorna gordon, bbc news, aberdeenshire. here in northumberland and volunteers are cooking for those who can't. 0n the other side of the hall aged local counsellor is updating villagers. aged local counsellor is updating villa . ers. �* aged local counsellor is updating villauers. �* ., , , villagers. i've got resident in this area that i'm _ villagers. i've got resident in this area that i'm a _ villagers. i've got resident in this area that i'm a rare _ villagers. i've got resident in this area that i'm a rare up _ villagers. i've got resident in this area that i'm a rare up to - villagers. i've got resident in this area that i'm a rare up to eight . area that i'm a rare up to eight aware of that are taking water from the river or stream to the other properties to actually wash for that i have to ask the question why the emergency services in local authority haven't declared a major incident by now? authority haven't declared a ma'or incident by nomfi incident by now? that's because hundreds of— incident by now? that's because hundreds of people _ incident by now? that's because hundreds of people like - incident by now? that's because hundreds of people like james l incident by now? that's because i hundreds of people like james and lucy still need support. i was
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hundreds of people like james and lucy still need support.— lucy still need support. i was last sor had lucy still need support. i was last sorry had a _ lucy still need support. i was last sorry had a shower? _ lucy still need support. i was last sorry had a shower? thursday, i sorry had a shower? thursday, the day before — sorry had a shower? thursday, the day before the storm. since then it's been— day before the storm. since then it's been wet wipes, hot flannel washers — it's been wet wipes, hot flannel washers. ., �* , ., ., , washers. now it's time to grab the hot food and _ washers. now it's time to grab the hot food and hit _ washers. now it's time to grab the hot food and hit the _ washers. now it's time to grab the hot food and hit the road. - washers. now it's time to grab the hot food and hit the road. a - hot food and hit the road. a lifeline to the families and vulnerable people who haven't been able to cook for four days. it's villages like this is where volunteers have been delivering too. when you get inside you could see just how bad the damage is. trees like this, the sheer force of storm are wind blowing them down and bringing down cables. it’s are wind blowing them down and bringing down cables. it's getting to the breaking _ bringing down cables. it's getting to the breaking point. _ bringing down cables. it's getting to the breaking point. it's- bringing down cables. it's getting to the breaking point. it's hard. l to the breaking point. it's hard. especially when you've got a little when in the house. and just the not knowing, get a straight answer of what it's actually going to be back on. at on the people actually getting poor you realise how it can affect you. getting poor you realise how it can affect ou. , . .,' affect you. they feel cut off in every wav- — affect you. they feel cut off in every wav- and _ affect you. they feel cut off in every way. and are _ affect you. they feel cut off in every way. and are wondering affect you. they feel cut off in -
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every way. and are wondering what choices they have the longer this continues. let's return momentarily to the breaking news we are bringing you from oxford in michigan. a town about 35 miles north of detroit. three students killed and six other people wounded including a teacher we are told in a shooting at the high school. we are now being told by the oakland county sheriffs office that a 15 —year—old student has been taken into custody and a handgun has been seized after those shootings. three students dead, six others injured including a teacher and a 15 —year—old student in custody. more details when we get them. time for look at the weather. hello there. temperatures well below freezing.
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tonight spell of wet and windy moves through and that will open the floodgates to something called her again from the north of the northwest. here it is, this area of low pressure which will bring the spell of wet and windy weather. as it pushes its way southeastwards, you can see the blue colours beginning to return, digging in behind the system. but it's going to be quite a wet night for a time as this band of heavy rain spreads its way southeastwards. then it'll be followed by blustery showers, these wintry certainly across central and northern scotland. and it will be windy with gales in exposure across some western areas. a chillier night to come, not as mild across the south as what we had the previous night. the mild air eventually clears away from the south east during wednesday morning, then we're all into that colder air flow. there'll be a mixture of sunshine and showers, these wintry across northern areas. some of the showers may form bands across parts of england and wales, so it could be quite wet in places. and it's going to be a chillier day. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... all adults over 18 in england
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will be offered a coronavirus boosterjab by the end of january. boris johnson says it's the best defence, against the 0micron variant. it's time for another great british vaccination effort. we've done it before and we're going to do it again. and let's not give this virus a second chance. mps vote to approve new rules which make masks compulsory in shops and on public transport in england, unless you are exempt. and anyone arriving in the uk must take a pcr test within two days, and isolate until they receive a negative result. five days after storm arwen, tens of thousands of people in scotland and the north of england are still without power. barbados has spent its first day as a republic with a president not the queen as its head of state. and the singerjosephine baker, becomes the first black woman, to officially be declared a national hero, in france.
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let's return now to the vaccine programme expansion. prime minister borisjohnson says the government's target is for all adults to be offered a covid booster by the end of january, with temporary vaccination centres to be opened up, as at other stages of the vaccine roll out. with me now is dr liz breen, she the director of the digital health enterprise zone at the university of bradford and reader in reader in health service operations, specialising in supply chains. doctor, thank you very much for joining us. you have been looking at how the vaccine roll—out has happened up until now. how do you think this next phase is going to compare? think this next phase is going to com are? �* , think this next phase is going to comare? �* , _, ., compare? i'm very confident in what the lans compare? i'm very confident in what the plans are — compare? i'm very confident in what the plans are and _ compare? i'm very confident in what the plans are and our _ compare? i'm very confident in what the plans are and our capacity - compare? i'm very confident in what the plans are and our capacity to - the plans are and our capacity to operationalise them. certainly we have done a greatjob with the previous campaign, and we pulled out all the stops. we got all of those
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vaccinations done incredibly quickly. i think because the existing of the structure is already there and we are getting additional resources this time around, i can see a very enhanced and advanced programme rolling out. haifa see a very enhanced and advanced programme rolling out.— programme rolling out. how well --eole in programme rolling out. how well people in your — programme rolling out. how well people in your view _ programme rolling out. how well people in your view access - programme rolling out. how well people in your view access the i people in your view access the booster? because they are trying to get it done in a hurry. thea;r booster? because they are trying to get it done in a hurry.— get it done in a hurry. they are, and obviously _ get it done in a hurry. they are, and obviously once _ get it done in a hurry. they are, and obviously once people - get it done in a hurry. they are, and obviously once people are l get it done in a hurry. they are, - and obviously once people are called forward with regards to being in their category to receive their booster, then it looks as though we are going to have lots of access points for people to go to, so it was mentioned that we have 1,500 community pharmacies, but when you add in all the other temporary vaccination centres that are opening up, the figure that has been quoted for access points are 3,000. now, if you think about it a lot of patients will have gone to their gp surgery, mass vaccination centre, even churches and nightclubs. so if they reopen the same one, there is a level of familiarity for the patients, and i could help with regards to reducing any hesitancy
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issues. ., . , , , regards to reducing any hesitancy issues. ., . , ,, ., , issues. how much pressure are gp suraeries issues. how much pressure are gp surgeries going — issues. how much pressure are gp surgeries going to _ issues. how much pressure are gp surgeries going to be _ issues. how much pressure are gp surgeries going to be under? - issues. how much pressure are gp surgeries going to be under? we l issues. how much pressure are gp - surgeries going to be under? we know that people are finding it difficult to get appointments for other things and face—to—face appointments even more tricky. i and face-to-face appointments even more tricky-— more tricky. i agree. one of the thins i more tricky. i agree. one of the things i noticed _ more tricky. i agree. one of the things i noticed about _ more tricky. i agree. one of the things i noticed about the - things i noticed about the announcement earlier on was to focus on enabling gps to be able to do this so that actually, you know, some of the elements of what they do may be removed from them so they can prioritise being able to take vaccines, because obviously that is a key priority for the government at the minute, but i do feel that giving gps are still playing catch up giving gps are still playing catch up with regards to the excellent service they provide to patients, and also we have flu vaccines and we've just got so many more bugs and germs around at the minute because we have stopped wearing our masks and stopped preventing some of those common colds from brewing. i think it will be challenging times and it's good to see that this being offered by the government to support but they can do but then the
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practice. but they can do but then the ractice. ., . . but they can do but then the ractice. . .. , ., , practice. vaccine providers obviously get _ practice. vaccine providers obviously get paid - practice. vaccine providers obviously get paid for- practice. vaccine providers - obviously get paid for providing vaccines. how much does that galvanise this process?- vaccines. how much does that galvanise this process? well, you know, galvanise this process? well, you know. most _ galvanise this process? well, you know, most people _ galvanise this process? well, you know, most people are _ galvanise this process? well, you know, most people are spurred i galvanise this process? well, you| know, most people are spurred on galvanise this process? well, you - know, most people are spurred on by incentives, however, idon't know, most people are spurred on by incentives, however, i don't think thatis incentives, however, i don't think that is necessarily the focus here. i think it's a case of gps have and will continue to want to offer these vaccines. it'sjust will continue to want to offer these vaccines. it's just that they are offering so much more as well, so i think the money obviously will pay for their time. think the money obviously will pay fortheirtime. i think the money obviously will pay for their time. i think it's much more than that, it's the right thing to do for their population and for their contribution to the vaccine effort. ~ ., ., , , effort. we are not 'ust seeing the booster come — effort. we are not 'ust seeing the booster come the — effort. we are notjust seeing the booster come the third _ effort. we are notjust seeing the booster come the third vaccine i effort. we are notjust seeing the| booster come the third vaccine for many people, but we are also seeing those who are immunosuppressed being offered a fourth vaccine, children being offered vaccines as well, so a lot going on here and the supply chain has to respond. the other issueis chain has to respond. the other issue is making sure the right vaccine is in the right place for the right people.— vaccine is in the right place for the right people. exactly. from a louistical the right people. exactly. from a logistical point _ the right people. exactly. from a logistical point of _ the right people. exactly. from a logistical point of view, - the right people. exactly. from a logistical point of view, we - the right people. exactly. from a logistical point of view, we are i logistical point of view, we are rolling out something incredibly
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quickly. the deadline is the end of january for everybody to be able to get a booking, you are eligible to get a booking, you are eligible to get the cobit boosters, and as he rightly said, the 12 to 15 have to get theirs as well, but some of those may be in schools as a poster gp practices, so the government have obviously said with confidence that there will be enough supplies, and i suppose we have to trust that that is the case, because they have managed to do it previously. two vaccines that will be used throughout the booster campaign under 12 to 15 —year—olds second dose. so we are highly reliant on those two vaccines being available when they are needed, so the logistics really do need to be considered in advance to make sure that we can deliver this turbo—charged, you know, activity, and all the resources that have been promised, hopefully we will have those realised and that will make it go smoothly. those realised and that will make it go smoothly-— go smoothly. doctor from the university _ go smoothly. doctor from the university of _ go smoothly. doctor from the university of bradford, - go smoothly. doctor from the university of bradford, thank| go smoothly. doctor from the . university of bradford, thank you very much for talking to us. you are welcome.
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a couple who were arrested when they left isolation in the netherlands to board a flight to spain have been released. carolina pimenta tested positive for covid 19 after landing in amsterdam from south africa with her partner on friday. they were arrested by military police two days later as their plane was about to take off for spain. the couple have been told that prosecutors have decided not to pursue the case. greece is to make covid vaccinations mandatory for people aged 60 and over. fines of 100 euros that's 85 pounds will be imposed at monthly intervals from mid january on those who refuse the jab. the money will go towards the greek health system, which is struggling with a surge in hospital admissions. about 63% of greece's 11 million population is fully vaccinated, but data show more than 520,000 people over 60 are yet to get the jab. ghislaine maxwell was "number two" in the hierarchy ofjeffrey epstein's employees that's what his former pilot has testified on day two of her six abuse trial in manhattan. the 59—year—old is accused
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of recruiting and grooming underage girls forjeffrey epstein. she denies the charges. 0ur north america correspondent, nada tawfik, is following the trial. larry all morning laid out in great detail what epstein cosmic properties like like, what his planes looked like and who flew on those planes. he said elaine maxwell is on there frequently as the number two of his staff with her own personal assistance and even flew the helicopter on her own. he also that public figure such as prince andrew, donald trump and bill clinton were all guests on his plane. so to two accusers, when he described as a mature woman with piercing blue eyes who is being referred to in court as jane, and also virginia roberts chef ray, one of epstein's most outspoken accusers. he said he never actually witnessed any sexual activity aboard
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those flights. ghislaine maxwell the entire time was attentive, putting on her glasses to examine exhibits and to watch her defence attorney under cross—examination. she has pleaded not guilty to all of the charges. the labour leader sir keir starmer has defended his decision to reshuffle his top team at the same time as his deputy was making a speech. sir keir said he had held continual discussions with angela rayner. speaking after the new look shadow cabinet met for the first time he described his new team as a "government in waiting". angela and i have discussed things on a very regular basis, leader, deputy leader of the party. i was absolutely clear in my mind that i wanted my top players on the team so that we can be election ready and government ready. and i'm really pleased that every single appointment i wanted to make i was
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able to make yesterday. we have a very strong team, and at a shadow cabinet meeting this morning, there was a real buzz about this new team. it was a bit off to begin to be shuffled when she is in the middle of a keynote speech over a keynote speech overseas, completely over shattered her efforts yesterday. we shattered her efforts yesterday. - speak very, very regularly and i spoke to her yesterday morning. it's very important that we carried out this reshuffle. i think, you know, everybody now looking at that reshuffle is saying that is the right team, that is a strong team, effective communicators, people very goodin effective communicators, people very good in their brief, so we can now face an election and persuade the country that we are a government in waiting. a co founder of the neo nazi terror group national action has been convicted of remaining a member after it was banned. ben raymond from swindon, was convicted of staying in the organisation after it was banned in december 2016. a jury at bristol crown court also found him guilty of two charges of possessing information useful to a terrorist. he is the 17th person convicted of national action membership.
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chief superintendent kenny bell is from west midlands police. we've done an immense investigation, and at the moment now, 16 other people have been brought tojustice as being members of that proscribed group. and then all of the evidence that we've reviewed from those investigations has led us to conclude, and thejury have accepted, that he's been the co—founder, the architect, the leader of that group. and how much of an influence did he have on neo—nazis who became involved in serious terrorism plots? yeah, well, our evidence has shown that he's had a lot of contact with people who've then got on to commit the violent acts, both in terms of either hate crime or violent crime or acts of terrorism. 0ur evidence has shown that he has had significant contact with them and he's been able to influence them.
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a man accused by a newspaper of being a "fixer" linked to the rochdale grooming gang has said his life was crumbling. wajed iqbal sued for defamation against the mail on sunday and won damages of 180,000 pounds. associated newspapers, the publishers of the paper, apologised in court and agreed the allegations were false. his case has been part of a report today looking at how muslims and islam are reported in the british media. it claims almost 60% of online media articles and 47% of television clips associate muslims and/or islam with negative aspects or behaviour." 0ur religious affairs reporter harry farley reports. my life just started crumbling, and you just don't know what to do. tears started rolling out me eyes cos i thought, "what is happening?" in may 2017, wajed iqbal�*s life was turned upside down. they referred to me as "the fixer". i was going to friday prayers, and you do get a lot of people looking at you and just sneering, you know, laughing. you get some external people approaching your friends saying, "0h, your mate's done this." my oldest had to suffer taunts from fellow students at university.
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the ex—wife said, "look, you know, i'm protecting the kids." she was getting taunted by friends. you know, the word soon spread throughout the asian community. for a father to be absent from their child's life, only a father can tell you how difficult it is, especially when you're close with them. we used to go to football together, did a lot of activities together, and then all of a sudden, boom, no contact for two years, not even a phone call. wajed sued for defamation. eventually, in january 2020, the mail on sunday's publishers, associated newspapers, apologised and agreed to pay £180,000 in damages. there's no amount of money, i can't put a figure on that two years i missed with my kids. i've lost that time. that time was precious. and also in terms of my career, it put brakes on my career. we've approached the mail on sunday for comment. in a court statement, associated newspapers accepted the allegations were false.
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a report today from the centre for media monitoring suggests unfairly negative coverage of muslims is widespread in british media. muslims are constantly scapegoated, made to be a threat to the way of life here in britain. but there's lots of tropes that were found, you know, in the corners of the internet amongst far—right figures which have slowly started entering mainstream media, and that's the worrying thing. some of the report's findings are subjective, but for wajed, this was about clearing his name. they didn't expect somebody from a small lancashire town to take them on, and i'm glad i did it. harry farley, bbc news. all adults in england will be offered a cobit boost by the end of january. preston says it's the best defence against the i'm variant. mps bowed
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to make masks compulsory in shops and on public transport in england unless you are exempt. anyone arriving in the uk must take a pcr test within two days and isolate until they receive a negative result. barbados, has become the world's newest republic, after replacing the queen as its head of state, with a new president. in a speech to mark the occasion in the caribbean islands capital prince charles acknowledged that british history had forever been stained by the atrocity of slavery. barbardos will remain in the commonwealth. from bridgetown, here's daniela relph. the shifting sands of constitutional change. this is now the republic of barbados. practically, things look the same. symbolically, it's very different. a show of self—confidence and a clean break from aspects of a colonial past. the order of freedom of barbados. the first major event hosted by this
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island republic, the national honour ceremony in bridgetown. the honours system has been restructured, and references to the british crown removed. national hero of barbados. among those recognised, rihanna, the island's most successful musical export, who came home to witness the birth of this new republic. she was honoured as a national hero. barbadians are proud people, you know? we are probably the proudest people i know, and no matter where i go in the world, i take that pride with me. no matter where we go, the world is going to know that we are bajan to the bone. i'm going to be bajan till the day i die. this is still the only place i've ever called home. last night, the prince of wales watched the ceremony that formally removed his mother, the queen, as head of state. he used his speech to emphasise enduring friendships and directly
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acknowledged the wrongs of our shared history. from the darkest days of our past and the appalling atrocity of slavery which forever stains our history, the people of this island forged their path with extraordinary fortitude. the move to a republic has involved reflecting on the past, but also focusing on the future. the barbadian prime minister has described today as a moment that transforms this island's mental landscape. and there are rumblings of republicanism in other parts of the caribbean. this new republic will be eyed carefully by its neighbours. daniela relph, bbc news, bridgetown, barbados. last night was the "curry 0scars" a celebration of the uk's favourite curry restaurants,
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held at a ceremony in central london. the british curry awards were held after a tough 18 months for the industry, as curry restaurateurs faced the challenges of the pandemic. last year's ceremony was held virtually, due to coronavirus restrictions. we can speak now jaf ali, founder of khai khai restaurant in newcastle. he won the most innovative restaurant concept award. congratulations. quite a feather in your cap. tell us about your concept. your cap. tell us about your concept-— your cap. tell us about your concet, . , ., ., , ., , your cap. tell us about your concet. ~ , ., ., , ., ., concept. we started two years ago, one of the crucial— concept. we started two years ago, one of the crucial things, _ concept. we started two years ago, one of the crucial things, we - concept. we started two years ago, one of the crucial things, we began | one of the crucial things, we began a partnership with a chef named alfred and created a concept which is so unique, it's all based on the concept of play, back when gasoline did not exist, today, that is an innovation, cooking with the qualifier, wood fires and working on simple dishes and making them
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incredibly tasty.— simple dishes and making them incredibly tasty. what difference does it make, _ incredibly tasty. what difference does it make, cooking _ incredibly tasty. what difference does it make, cooking them - incredibly tasty. what difference does it make, cooking them in l incredibly tasty. what difference i does it make, cooking them in that way? we does it make, cooking them in that wa ? ~ ., does it make, cooking them in that wa ? . . . ., does it make, cooking them in that wa ? ~ . ., ., , , way? we have a unique of being, but it is 'ust way? we have a unique of being, but it isjust the — way? we have a unique of being, but it isjust the whole _ way? we have a unique of being, but it is just the whole look and - it is just the whole look and feel of the space, just to make it look very aged, from designers who are the best in the country, so we set to do something unique and brings something that newcastle does not have and change the landscape in the indian restaurant sector, and the pandemic didn't stop us doing that. we rebuilt every part of our business, regardless of how difficult it was because we felt that it was something so unique, we wanted to have recognition from the offset command to be rewarded, which we are ecstatic, because as he said, for us to be able to get there and achieved a business plan and see the fruits of that in terms of awards, but also, it's so incredibly busy, the restaurant, it has been amazing. you certainly bucked the trend. a lot of restaurants that they closed because of the pandemic, and now
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you're opening a new enterprise just when it gets really difficult. how did manage to survive?- when it gets really difficult. how did manage to survive? because we are an independent _ did manage to survive? because we are an independent operator, - did manage to survive? because we are an independent operator, be . did manage to survive? because we i are an independent operator, be open on december the fourth last year right in the middle of the pandemic, and it was that crucial time when the government were about to make an announcement about whether they are going to let us come out and open restaurants, and sadly, they didn't, but what we did was because we are private, we kind of out of the box started to sell wraps on the goal, because we are near a river, we are near the quayside of newcastle and lots of people walking and doing their daily use, and we decided to do some amazing chai and it wraps and having food on the go command that started to build a big name for itself, so that's how we started, and then we were able to do the takeaways, we get them incredibly well. itjust builds such a big following, even before the rush opened. when we managed to open a restaurant in macon that was an
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instant success. bud restaurant in macon that was an instant success.— restaurant in macon that was an instant success. and you have also really thought _ instant success. and you have also really thought very _ instant success. and you have also really thought very hard _ instant success. and you have also really thought very hard about - instant success. and you have also| really thought very hard about your employees and the make—up of your staff. tell us about that. critically, and all restaurants, we were taught many years ago by our forefathers that it was about the food and the service, so we always locked down the food because it's a restaurant, so the food, michelin star chef and his team, and when we managed to get them from london at the time when that restaurants in london closed, we booked them into our operations to work and other restaurants when we were just doing takeaways, so the kitchen team is intact. then you have a huge front of house team that we have managed to conjure up, but because it's a unique restaurant, i had been happening restaurant in the region at this moment in time, and on the country, wejust had at this moment in time, and on the country, we just had lots of people that wanted to kind of be a part of that wanted to kind of be a part of thatjourney, so we treat our staff
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incredibly well, lots of care, we give them so much training, so that has been so critical to achieve the next two point such as to give the gaston incredible experience, and the fourth point is to leave guests with an incredible memory. you have sold it to us- — with an incredible memory. you have sold it to us. you _ with an incredible memory. you have sold it to us. you very _ with an incredible memory. you have sold it to us. you very much. - with an incredible memory. you have sold it to us. you very much. i - sold it to us. you very much. i curry award winner. hope you continue with your success. thank you for talking to us. congratulations. the american born singer and activist, josephine baker, who made her name and her home in france in the 1920s has been honoured at the pantheon mausoleum in paris the resting place for the nation's heroes. she's the first black woman to be memorialised there in recognition of her work on civil rights, and the part she played in the resistance during the second world war. member of her familyjoined president macron at the ceremony, as our paris correspondent, lucy williamson, reports. idealist and idol, singer and spy. josephine baker, adored by paris a century ago, was the star of france again today. translation: you are entering our
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pantheon because you loved france andrew shown the way. born american, at heart, there is no—one more french than you. as the symbolic coffin made its way towards the pantheon, baker's journey from poverty and segregation in america was retold — how she used her celebrity here in paris to campaign against racism and pass messages for the french resistance during the second world war. this is one of the greatest honours france can bestow, a seat in the resting place of its national heroes. josephine baker is the first black woman to be honoured here, a member of france's wartime resistance movement and a lifelong campaigner against racism. that campaign shaped herfamily as well. baker adopted 12 children from around the world, calling it her rainbow tribe. these children represent an example of real brotherhood. they show to people
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that it is possible to live together if we so wish to. speaking to us before the ceremony, one of her children said he never thought his mother was cool until he learned mick jagger was a fan. she was very protective, very close to us when she was there, because sometimes she was away. and she wanted for us a good education. so sometimes, she could be a little bit strict when we were doing bad things. her symbolic coffin contains handfuls of earth from the four corners of her life — paris, missouri, monaco where she is buried, and the village in france where she raised her children. the pantheon today echoed with her trademark song j'ai deux amours, a love song to paris, as the city that revered her
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a century ago claimed herforever as its own. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. let's speak with... speak with. .. she speak with... she also starred in the documentaryjosephine baker, story of an awakening. she joins us from nashville, and a lovely location to which to speak to you, tracy. tell us how a young girl from missouri came to be so beloved by france. i missouri came to be so beloved by france. ., missouri came to be so beloved by france. . ., , france. i mean, her timing was erfect france. i mean, her timing was perfect in _ france. i mean, her timing was perfect in many _ france. i mean, her timing was perfect in many respects, - france. i mean, her timing was perfect in many respects, 1. france. i mean, her timing was i perfect in many respects, i mean france. i mean, her timing was - perfect in many respects, i mean she was ambitious, she was lively, outgoing, and i mean, likejust seemed to follow her way at a certain moment in time. she ends up in new york. she is seen in the review. she starts as a comedian, she still does her comedic shtick
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when she is in france, but at that particular moment, she was just, when she is in france, but at that particular moment, she wasjust, you know, a backup dancer, so she arrives in paris, and opening night, she mesmerises the crowd. she's beautiful, lean, you know, fairly tall, not very tall, but lean, tall, she's different, she's american, but she's different, she's american, but she's excited, so she captivates the french imagination at that particular moment ends with all things exotic. this is happening around the same time that they are in africa examining certain things, you know, art, and it's kind of taking over paris. paris is very cosmopolitan. people are meeting there from all over the world, and she kind of embodies the difference. at the same time, the american nests that was attractive. it at the same time, the american nests that was attractive.— that was attractive. it was attractive _ that was attractive. it was attractive for _ that was attractive. it was attractive for someone . that was attractive. it was attractive for someone as | that was attractive. it was - attractive for someone as creative as her to be, wasn't a? worked both ways, she took france to her heart and did so much in the second world
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war. , ., and did so much in the second world war. , . . ., and did so much in the second world war. , ., _, i. and did so much in the second world war. _, ,., war. yes, and could you blame her? the fact of— war. yes, and could you blame her? the fact of the _ war. yes, and could you blame her? the fact of the matter _ war. yes, and could you blame her? the fact of the matter is, _ war. yes, and could you blame her? the fact of the matter is, when - war. yes, and could you blame her? the fact of the matter is, when she i the fact of the matter is, when she left the united states, she was considered too thin voice, too dark and not particularly talented. she would never go far, that was the predictions. so, for her, france just opened up a whole new world, so what was there not to love about it? so, it's a fabulous story, and certainly she gave so much to france because france gave so much to her. how important figure was she in the civil rights movement? she never forgot where she'd come from, did she? ., ., . . forgot where she'd come from, did she? ., ., ., ., a forgot where she'd come from, did she? ., ., ., ., she? no, not at all. baker came back multile she? no, not at all. baker came back multiple times. _ she? no, not at all. baker came back multiple times. she _ she? no, not at all. baker came back multiple times. she was _ she? no, not at all. baker came back multiple times. she was very - multiple times. she was very important figure in civil rights, andindeed important figure in civil rights, and indeed it was her staging a standoff with walter winchell that leads to her eventually being banned from the united states for over ten years, and it wasn't until the kennedys came into office that she was invited to speak at the march on
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washington, and she was the only woman invited to that central stage to speak at the march on washington, and coretta scott king was so taken with a grantor civil rights activism that she had hoped that after the assassination of king, she would assume the reins, but that was not to be, we are dealing with some sexism of christ at that particular moment as well, but this is simply an example of how dedicated baker was to notjust the cause of france come of the resistance, but also to civil rights in the united states. she never ever forgot home. civil rights in the united states. she never everforgot home. just she never ever forgot home. just briefl , she never ever forgot home. just briefly. she's _ she never ever forgot home. just briefly, she's only the sixth woman tojoin 18 national briefly, she's only the sixth woman to join 18 national heroes, briefly, she's only the sixth woman tojoin 18 national heroes, the first black women. how significant is that for young women these days to see her there? i is that for young women these days to see her there?— to see her there? i think it's extremely — to see her there? i think it's extremely significant. - to see her there? i think it's extremely significant. i - to see her there? i think it's| extremely significant. i think particularly for american women it's very significant, and african—american women as well, we cannot forget that because baker never forgot it. cannot forget that because baker neverforgot it. so, i think cannot forget that because baker never forgot it. so, i think it's extremely significant. i think it's fascinating to hear the french speak
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about her in the way that they do, saying of course she was extremely french, and she was. this is a woman who when she arrived, you know, not particularly x, and she learns the language, she speaks it beautifully and she embraces france, so i think she becomes a model for those women in france, but over here as well. professor, thank you very much for your time. professor, thank you very much for our time. ., ~ professor, thank you very much for our time. ., ,, i.
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this is bbc news i'm christian fraser. the new covid—19 variant was in europe earlier than previously thought. test samples show cases of omicron were present in the netherlands 11 days before the variant was first identified by south africa. the first of four victims gives evidence against ghillaine maxwell in new york. the woman known only as jane says she was groomed at the age of 14. the head of britain's security agency mi6 has warns the chinese are conducting large—scale spying operations against the uk and its allies. and barbados has spent its first day as a republic — with a president — and not the queen as its head of state.

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