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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  December 1, 2021 5:00am-5:31am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. compulsory vaccinations a possibility for germany, as the new coronavirus strain spreads across the globe. mike pence calls on the us supreme court to overturn the landmark abortion legislation roe v wade. �*lovely bones�* author, alice sebold, apologises for her part in the conviction of a man found innocent after 16 years injail. the human cost of the war in yemen — our middle east editor jeremy bowen sends a special report. the way this war ends is not
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in the hands of yemenis because big regional powers have intervened. the people here are suffering because of the fault lines that run right through the middle east. hello and welcome. around the world, governments are bracing themselves for the possible effects of the omicron strain of coronavirus. in the united states, the biden administration is drawing up new travel guidelines. already under strain from a new wave caused by the delta variant, governments across europe have reinstated measures to try to stop the spread of the virus. and there are concerns the new variant could evade the current vaccines. the new variant could evade courtney bembridge reports. the new variant could evade
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the the new variant could evade word's attention may i shifted the words attention may have shifted to the omicron variant but europe is still struggling with a wave of infections linked to the previous delta variant. austria has extended its lockdown and it is moving ahead with plans to make vaccinations mandatory. grace says that citizens will have to get the jab of face monthly finds and the man set to become germany's leader said he is in favour of compulsory vaccinations. translation: ~ ., ., translation: we have not mana . ed translation: we have not managed to _ translation: we have not managed to vaccinate - translation: we have not managed to vaccinate a - managed to vaccinate a sufficient number of citizens. that is why we are in the situation that we are in today and that is why it is right that under these circumstances such a decision can and must be made. in such a decision can and must be made. ., , made. in the netherlands tight restrictions _ made. in the netherlands tight restrictions are _ made. in the netherlands tight restrictions are already - made. in the netherlands tight restrictions are already in - restrictions are already in place and authorities are now examining cases to look for the new variant after it was revealed the omicron strain was present in the country well
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before the dutch authorities panicked over two flights from south africa carrying infected passengers. labs in several countries are now combing through samples collected not just in recent days but over the past month. scientists say it will take weeks to get a clearer picture of the variant�*s prevalence and how much protection the current vaccines will offer against it. because in the beginning you have small numbers and biases and who is actually been found out as someone who carries overground so it will be very difficult to answer these questions in the short run, i am afraid. questions in the short run, i am afraid-— questions in the short run, i am afraid. ~ . ., am afraid. was so much of the world not _ am afraid. was so much of the world not yet _ am afraid. was so much of the world not yet vaccinated - world not yet vaccinated scientists have this warning about more mutations to come. every person is not immune to this virus— every person is not immune to this virus is_ every person is not immune to this virus is essentially a viral_ this virus is essentially a viral factory and a viral factory— viral factory and a viral factory as a variant factory so we just— factory as a variant factory so we just have to get the word immunised.— we just have to get the word immunised. ., ., , ., . , we just have to get the word immunised. ., ., , ., . immunised. madonna produces one ofthe
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immunised. madonna produces one of the most — immunised. madonna produces one of the most widely _ immunised. madonna produces one of the most widely used _ immunised. madonna produces one of the most widely used jabs - of the most widely used jabs and says it is unlikely to be as effective against the new strain that the company says a reformulated vaccine could be ready by early 2022 and pfizer says any changes to its vaccine could be rolled out within 100 days. we will be looking at the impact of this new variant having on certain industries which have been under huge pressure. also the prospect of business travellers as well as that was just starting to recover from the pandemic. that was just starting to recoverfrom the pandemic. all that to come later in this programme. all that to come later in this programme. the former us vice president mike pence has called on the supreme court to overturn the landmark 19—73 legislation that enshrined abortion as a constitutional right. he says the case of roe versus wade could soon be consigned to "the ash heap of history". mr pence was speaking in washington on the eve of a crucial hearing on a mississippi law banning
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abortion after fifteen weeks. a ruling is not expected until nextjuly, but if the conservative—leaning supreme court rules in mississippi's favour, it would undermine american women's constitutional right to an abortion, allowing each state to enact their own laws on terminations. iurge my i urge my fellow americans who cherish life to pray tomorrow and every day between now and next spring but the in our supreme court to seize this moment for life. supreme court to seize this moment for life. poland's parliament is scheduled to debate a proposalfor a near—total ban on abortion in the country. the controversial court ruling last year led to months of protests. abortion is now permitted only in cases of rape or incest or when pregnancy threatens a mother's health or life. the devoutly catholic country already had some of europe's most restrictive abortion laws.
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let's get some of the day's other news. the 15 year old thought to have shot dead 3 other teenagers and injured eight more has refused to help police following his arrest at a high school in michigan.the arrested teenager is thought to be a pupil at the school. the shooting is the 139th at a school this year the trial of the british socialite ghislaine maxwell, in new york, has heard from a woman who says she was groomed for abuse from the age of fourteen. the woman, who's now in herforties, says she was first approached by maxwell and the millioniare financier, jeffrey epstein, ata summer camp. she says epstein, who killed himself while awaiting trial, abused her on multiple occasions. maxwell denies sex trafficking
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and other charges. honduras's governing national party has acknowledged defeat in sunday's presidential election. early results had put nasry asfura well behind his opponent. now the national party have said they will work with the incoming government of xiomara castro to build a better country. her apparent victory has put the left back in power for the first time since they were ousted in a coup 12 years ago police in new mexico are investigating whether a reloaded bullet may have killed the cinematographer, halyna hutchins, on the set of the movie, rust. an ammunition supplier told police that recycled rounds could have ended up on the set. no criminal charges have yet been filed. the american author,
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alice sebold, has apologised for her part in the conviction of man exonerated last week of raping her in 1981. in a statement, she said she was struggling with the role she played within what she called �*a system that sent an innocent man to jail�*. the events formed the basis of her memoir in which she described being raped and later telling police she had seen a black man in the street whom she believed was her attacker. anthony broadwater was arrested and convicted on flawed evidence. he spent sixteen years in prison. our north america correspondent, david willis, explained the details. in actual fact, alice c bold's memoir lucky may have indirectly led to anthony broadwater�*s exoneration because lucky was being turned into a film when the executive director of that film started to question, is the process went on, certain details not relating to the assault itself but to do with the investigation and subsequent trial. you put in a private investigator. the investigator discovered
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that things simply did not add up and recommended that the evidence be referred to a lawyer and that led last week to anthony broadwater�*s exoneration. his conviction in the first place was based on his being identified in court and flawed forensic evidence. today, alice sebold explained why it has taken her more than a week to actually respond to anthony broadwater�*s exoneration. she said it has taken me these past eight days to comprehend how this could have happened. i will continue to struggle with the role that i unwittingly played within a system that sent an innocent man to jail. and she added, tellingly, perhaps, as a traumatised 18—year—old rape victim i chose to put my faith in the american legal system.
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that is a very good question and this undoubtedly furthers the case of those who argue that people of colour very often do not get a fair trial in the united states and do not get favourable outcome as far as the law is concerned in general. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: record breakers — england's women create history as they maintain their unbeaten run in world cup qualifying. it's quite clear that the worst victims of this disaster are the poor people living in the slums which have sprung up around the factory. we feel so helpless. the children are dying in front of me and i can't do anything.
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charles manson is the mystical leader of the hippie cult suspected of killing sharon tate and at least six other people in los angeles. at 11 o'clock this morning, just half a metre of- rock separated britain i from continental europe. it took the drills just i a few moments to cut through the final obstacle, - then philippe cossette, a miner from calais, was shaking hands and exchanging flags _ with his opposite . number from dover. this is bbc news, the latest headlines. compulsory vaccinations become a possibility for germany, as the continent struggles with rising infections
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and fears of the impact of a new variant. former us vice president, mike pence, says there's a chance the country's landmark roe versus wade abortion ruling could be consigned to what he called "the ash heap of history". houthi rebels in yemen are pressing hard to capture the key city of mareb. it's the last stronghold of the internationally recognised government and at the heart of yemen's oilfields. the fall of mareb would be a major turning point in the conflict that's been going on for years. saudi arabia backed by the us and uk intervened in yemen in 2015 after the houthis ousted the government from the capital, sanaa. since then yemen has suffered the world's worst humanitarian crisis. all sides of the conflict have been accused of killing civilians and other abuses. at least 800,000 people displaced by the war have fled to mareb and more are on their way.
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our middle east editor jeremy bowen made his way to the city and a warning his report contains some distressing images. the plains outside marib are not much of a refuge, but it's all there is for more than 115,000 people who have fled the houthi offensive in the last three months. at this camp, the newest arrivals are in flimsy tents with little food and salty water. children don't have schools. in the desert, the nights are cold. they've lost almost everything, except enough trauma for a lifetime. between them, these two women have fled the fighting with their families 11 times in four years. this woman said her six children freeze in the ripped tent.
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translation: e witnessed everything. fear and panic every time. the kids are terrified when they hear missiles or shooting. so, she was wounded? her daughter was badly hurt in a houthi attack. her two—month—old son was killed. these are pictures of dead people. she gets them to draw theirfrightening memories. he's lost his leg. translation: my kids saw bodies blown to pieces. - in the evening, my seven—year—old says he sees ghosts. they are haunted by the people they saw killed. they blame the houthis. mostly women and children are in the camps. the men, the un says, are dead orfighting. what lies beneath all of this is the war. war kills people, war makes people move, war creates the crisis, and the way this war ends is not in the hands of
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yemenis, because big regional powers have intervened. the people are suffering because of the fault lines that run right through the middle east. they sing. government soldiers took us to the front line. marib has become the key battlefield of the war, but it's about more than yemenis fighting for strategic, oil—rich territory. the houthis, the other side, started to push at the beginning of the year around here. it's really intensified since about september. gunfire. these were government forces later that evening. they're backed by saudi arabia, who hoped for a quick victory when they intervened in 2015... machine gun fire.
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..and now can't find a way out. they're shooting at houthi fighters who believe they're winning, despite losing almost 15,000 dead sincejune. their big ally is iran. the strategic divide between the saudis and iranians and their allies that runs through this valley continues across the middle east. these government soldiers have been pushed back by the houthis. their commander says that doesn't mean they're losing. translation: it's true j that there are advances by the enemy, but war is like this. it's a normal thing in war. however, our men are resisting because they are protecting their country.
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but in marib hospital, the pain inflicted by the houthi offensive is clear in the operating theatres and the wards. most of the patients i saw were wounded government soldiers. this is important part of the whole procedure. a team of british surgeons from manchester is here, bringing expertise and equipment the hospital just doesn't have. there's a lack of- doctors and the local doctors are exhausted. they are doing long shifts, and the injuries they are l getting are quite complex, so they are providing - the minimum treatment with l the basic equipment they have. as soon as they're fit again, these men will be rushed back to fight the houthi advance. the grinding battle for marib is being watched closely by influential yemeni tribes. they will make a deal with the winners. and among the wounded, some defiance. you will fight again afterwards? yes. well, you've got one arm. the war pushes into every life. marib, a city of more than 2 million, has two
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malnutrition centres, each with 11 beds. two others were in areas captured by the houthis. of every 100 children, ten have malnutrition, and of those ten, two are severely malnourished. this baby, six months old, weighs 2.5 kilos — less than many newborns. in ten days of treatment, she's gained 100g. this is what war does. it destroys lives. notjust babies. for everyone. jeremy bowen, bbc news, marib. the human cost of the war in yemen. our middle east editor
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jeremy bowen, cameraman dave bull, and producer cara swift, with that report. british mps have warned the home secretary that her plans to turn back people from attempting to cross the english channel are dangerous and probably unlawful. priti patel saiid last week the tactic would help deter smuggling gangs like the ones thought to be behind the deaths of 29 people last week, meanwhile in an interview with the bbc one of the survivors from that capsizing has told us he's still haunted by what he saw that night. bbc persian�*s soran qurbani reports from the french port city of calais. this is a man who says he stared death in the face and survived. he is one of the two survivors from wednesday's migrant boat disaster in the english channel. we set out
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around 10p on the night before and we were already sailing for three hours and a half when water began to get into the boat and in about 30 minutes it started to sink. mohammed and the only other survivor swam for ten hours until they were rescued by french fishermen. we were so cold, the water was so cold. i saw people die in front of my eyes. family and children as young as five years old and pregnant women. according to his account they were in british waters when the inflatable boat capsized, a claim denied by the uk home office. we were in the british waters foot driver of our boat confirmed that to me. he died but he had a map that showed
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our location and said that we were in the british side. that is why we called the british authorities. mohammed still suffers from hypothermia that left him with injuries on both his legs. but he tells me it is the emotional trauma from that fateful night that will haunt him for the rest of his life. let's get an update on all the sport now. this is your sports news and we start with a record—breaking knight frank and's women. ellen white became the highest goal—scorer in the history of the national team while there are 20 nil venice over latvia. it was the second goal of the game saw her surpass the previous mark of 46 for her country and got even better when, despite the half—time interval, the 32—year—old completed her hat—trick and when the fourth of the night
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was scored and surpassed the previous best of 13— nil over hungary in 2005. previous best of13- nil over hungary in 2005.— previous best of 13- nil over hungary in 2005. football and scorina hungary in 2005. football and scoring goals _ hungary in 2005. football and scoring goals and _ hungary in 2005. football and scoring goals and winning - hungary in 2005. football and scoring goals and winning on | scoring goals and winning on whoover— scoring goals and winning on whoever is in front of you you want — whoever is in front of you you want to — whoever is in front of you you want to score goals and if we can score _ want to score goals and if we can score 20 we're going to score — can score 20 we're going to score 20 — can score 20 we're going to score 20 if we can score 25 we will score _ score 20 if we can score 25 we will score 25. it is not good for the _ will score 25. it is not good for the development of the game but that— for the development of the game but that is for the game is about _ but that is for the game is about. ., , ., but that is for the game is about. ., . . ., about. there was a crucial match at _ about. there was a crucial match at the _ about. there was a crucial match at the bottom - about. there was a crucial match at the bottom of i about. there was a cruciall match at the bottom of the english premier league on tuesday as newcastle and norwich played out a one nil draw. newcastle surging for the first win of the season. the magpies had the lead but the game was equalised. taste magpies had the lead but the game was equalised. we need to net the game was equalised. we need to get the wins _ game was equalised. we need to get the wins will _ game was equalised. we need to get the wins will need. _ game was equalised. we need to get the wins will need. we - game was equalised. we need to get the wins will need. we need | get the wins will need. we need to win matches. first and
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foremost you need to have the spirit within the group to deliver what you need and i feel since we've been here that the spirit and togetherness has grown and that is going to be key for us. grown and that is going to be key for oa— grown and that is going to be ke for us. . , ,, ., , key for us. reads united states debate when — key for us. reads united states debate when thanks _ key for us. reads united states debate when thanks to - key for us. reads united states debate when thanks to an - key for us. reads united states| debate when thanks to an injury time penalty. they are fourth in the premier league. everton a re everton are hosting liverpool later. they are winless in their last seven games where liverpool have not lost a match here for seven years which is not good news. a, here for seven years which is not good news.— here for seven years which is not good news. a massive game for us. not good news. a massive game for us- we _ not good news. a massive game for us. we need _ not good news. a massive game for us. we need to _ not good news. a massive game for us. we need to start - for us. we need to start winning _ for us. we need to start winning and a derby is always an opportunity to put things right— an opportunity to put things right so_ an opportunity to put things right so a massive game for us and we — right so a massive game for us and we are _ right so a massive game for us and we are thinking about getting _ and we are thinking about getting three points. everton's
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former manager _ getting three points. everton's former manager can _ getting three points. everton's former manager can see - getting three points. everton's former manager can see his i getting three points. everton's l former manager can see his side extend their league to seven points if they beat their polling data. the belgian could feature. there was another shark in the uk snooker championship with a 2011 championship with a 2011 champion knocked out. the world number two was one of the favourites going in was beaten in the third round by fellow englishman. his latest big name to crash out when last year's winner and mark selby both left early in the tournament. ronnie o'sullivan features in the fourth round. serbia that by novak djokovic player later with the winner set to face croatia in the semifinal. on tuesday germany came from behind to beat great britain.
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the germans prevailed, taking the doubles. they will face either russia or sweden who play on thursday. you can get the latest sports news on our website. but for me and the rest of the team, that is your sports news for now. and all your business news is coming up in a moment. now, some nice pictures to leave you with. a zoo in western france welcomed a newborn pygmy hippo this month. the calf is the mother's third offspring and zookeepers say she's been very protective, and not let it out of her sights. the pygmy hippo is an endangered species — under threat from deforestation. unlike the larger common hippos, pygmy hippos usually live alone,
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except when they are mating or with a calf. they are mainly nocturnal, spending the day in water and moving to land at night to feed on leaves, roots, fruits, ferns, and grasses. hello there. after a spell of cold weather, the final day of november brought a return to something milder, something much milder, in fact — westerly winds which fed a lot of cloud across the uk but brought temperatures of 12, 13 or 1a degrees in many places. away from the far north, cold air clung on across shetland and that cold air has been staging a return over recent houi’s. this area of low pressure has worked its way through. and that plunge of cold air will continue to take effect as we head through wednesday, the first day of december, the first day of the meteorological winter. and it will feel like it for many of us. there will be some spells of sunshine, but we'll see showers or longer spells of rain drifting southwards, some wintry weather mixing in over high ground, especially across the northern half of the uk. and if we do see any showers into northern scotland
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through the afternoon, they are likely to fall as snow to very low levels indeed. it will remain windy, particularly gusty winds around the coasts, gusts of a0 to 50 miles per hour and temperatures, if anything, coming down as the day goes on. so afternoon values between two and nine degrees. with that brisk wind, it will feel cold out there. now, through wednesday night, we will see some clear spells, some wintry showers too. could see some snow to relatively low levels across parts of eastern england. certainly snow to low levels in the northern part of scotland and temperatures, well, they will drop very close to freezing, below freezing in places. a widespread frost and perhaps some icy stretches to contend with on thursday morning. still quite breezy to start thursday. still some wintry showers, particularly in the east. but this area of high pressure is going to be trying
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to build its weight in, so that means we will see more in the way of dry weather. as we go through the day, the showers will become fewer and further between. there will be more dry weather, some spells of sunshine, although our next frontal system will be introducing cloud and some rain into northern ireland and the far west of scotland. a very chilly feeling day indeed, highs between three and nine degrees. and then another change in the weather as we move out of thursday into friday. this frontal system pushes eastwards. some snow on its leading edge, but this will be introducing milder air once again from the atlantic, so a bit of rain around in places on friday. there will be some good spells of dry weather as well, but it will feel milder to end the week.
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this is bbc news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. on a knife edge... the hospitality industry fears for any stricter measures due to the omicron variant pandemic uncertainty and inflation — wall street sees a sell off after a warning from the fed chief that higher prices may be persistent. and even christmas trees could be in short supply this year — we talk to the boss of europe's largest tree wholesaler.
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the hospitality sector has been waiting

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