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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 1, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. our headlines today. the nhs gears up for a major expansion of the vaccine booster programme, with all adults in england to be offered the jab by the end of january. are you saying "don't" to the christmas do? some businesses are reporting increased cancellations since the weekend over omicron fears. we look at how they're coping. disruption for hundreds of thousands of university students across the uk, as lecturers and other staff begin three days of strike action. more than £20 million is pledged to a new hiv action plan on world aids day. we're live in liverpool remembering some of those who lost their lives to the disease.
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records tumble for england's women. they score 20 goals against latvia, their biggest ever win. and striker ellen white becomes their all time leading goal scorer. good morning. after such a mild day yesterday for the time of year, today and tomorrow are going to turn much colder. did a pretty windy and we had sunshine and showers, some of which will be wintry especially in the north. all of the details later in the programme. it's wednesday 1st december. our main story. the nhs is gearing up for a major expansion of the vaccine booster programme, with hospitals and thousands of community sites set to offer the jab. the prime minister has said he wants all adults in england to be offered a booster dose by the end ofjanuary, as part of the government response to the omicron variant. aru na iyengar reports. we are back to vaccinating on an industrial scale.
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over the summer, vaccination centres opened in cathedrals, shops and football stadiums. now borisjohnson says they will be popping up like christmas trees. it's in response to the new omicron variant which could be more infectious than delta. it's this constant balancing act that the government has had to get right throughout the pandemic. the government has to get across the strong and clear message to encourage people to do the right thing. the prime minister has said the government will be throwing everything at the campaign. he has pledged every adult in england will be offered a booster by the end of january. more hospitals will offerjabs, while over 1000 pharmacies will deliver vaccines. but minutes from a meeting from sage, the group of experts who advise the government, warns of a potentially significant wave of infections and says the government should be preparing to ramp up restrictions. i personally think that the restrictions that we have in place at the moment are unlikely to really stop this strain spreading in the uk. it is likely to increase over
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the next few months and potentially become the dominant strain and have higher levels of infection than we would have otherwise had. ministers have said their response is proportionate and further analysis of the new variant needs to take place in the weeks ahead. the governments in scotland, wales and northern ireland have confirmed they will also step up their booster programmes. saving lives, protecting the nhs, saving christmas. time will tell if the right choices have been made. aruna iyengar, bbc news. let's get more now from our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. good morning, adam. really interesting press conference from the prime minister yesterday afternoon and the government really facing a difficultjuggling act in the weeks ahead, aren't they? yes. the weeks ahead, aren't they? yes, when it comes _ the weeks ahead, aren't they? yes, when it comes to _ the weeks ahead, aren't they? yes, when it comes to the _ the weeks ahead, aren't they? yes when it comes to the vaccine roll—out, that is just a big practical challenge that will be up to the nhs to manage and i'm sure there might be a few bumps along the way or a few glitches in the system
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which will come along in the next few weeks but it will just which will come along in the next few weeks but it willjust be a case of pharmacies and vaccination centres working very hard and the public responding to the text messages so let's keep an eye on that. in terms of the balancing act, the politics is quite tricky because on the one hand, you have a labour saying that the government should go further when it comes to the travel rules, that people should have to test before you come back to the uk if you have been abroad. this would be in addition to the day two test, the pcr test, you have to have and the pcr test, you have to have and the self isolation you have to do until you get that result. but on the other side you have more than 30 conservative mps who have voted against the new rules on self oscillation rice night, the rule that if you come into contact —— self isolation last night, the rule that if you come into contact with someone who has the omicron variant, you have to isolate for ten days evenif you have to isolate for ten days even if you are vaccinated. then you have the fact that if you listen to
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some scientists, for examplejenny some scientists, for example jenny harries, some scientists, for examplejenny harries, one of the government's chief advises, she was suggesting we should cut back on socialising over christmas and the prime minister saying, go ahead on all of your socialising. you can understand why both people said both of those things but it is up to us to make a decision about what to do. where it could get very tricky is in two or three weeks' time, when there is more data about omicron, but what if it isn't absolutely conclusive and you still have an argument about going further are pulling back on what you are doing? that could get very tricky, especially if the data is not super clear.— is not super clear. absolutely ri . ht, is not super clear. absolutely right. adam. _ is not super clear. absolutely right, adam, thank _ is not super clear. absolutely right, adam, thank you. - is not super clear. absolutely right, adam, thank you. we l is not super clear. absolutely i right, adam, thank you. we are is not super clear. absolutely - right, adam, thank you. we are going to try and be really clear with you this morning and give you all of the answers you will need over the next few years weeks. we'll be joined by the health secretary, sajid javid, at 7.30. we will ask him all of the relevant questions we can, and so many of
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them are about travel. from this morning, anyone travelling from the uk to spain, who is over the age of 12, will need to show proof they have been double—vaccinated. previously, a negative pcr test would have been acceptable for entry into the country but the rules have been tightened because of concern about the new omicron variant. three students have been killed in a shooting at a school in michigan. eight other people, including one teacher, were also injured in the attack in the town of oxford, near detroit. a 15—year—old boy has been arrested on suspicion of murder. president biden says his heart goes out to those affected by the incident. workers from dozens of universities across the uk are starting three days of industrial strike action from today. the main disputes are over pensions, pay, and working conditions, and there are worries more strikes could take place if a deal cannot be reached. our education correspondent, elaine dunkley reports. preparing for a picket line. these strikes are about pensions,
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pay and working conditions. every year, we are seeing more colleagues on fixed term contracts and really insecure contracts. you know, it's got to a point where i don't feel like i can recommend this line of work to anybody any more and that's really heartbreaking for me. the average member stands to lose around 35% of their pension, which in their retirement, that obviously is going to make a really significant difference to their quality—of—life. but before they get to retirement, we have also seen in the last 12 years, in realterms, a 20% pay cut. there is support for university staff amongst these students, but with fees of £9,000 per year and some lectures cancelled, they are also worried about their futures. we are also paying for our staff to get paid a decent pay, and have decent working conditions, which they're not getting. so, i mean, we should be in solidarity with them because their fight is our fight. a lot of people are very angry because theyjust don't think it's fair that after a year of strikes
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followed by a year and online learning, they have just got back to normal, things are just about starting to get back into the swing and then we are being, we are facing possibly months of strikes. universities uk, which represents vice chancellors, said it's frustrating to be facing industrial action over pensions but is working to reduce the impact on students. there are many things that we can do in universities to make sure that the students don't suffer. we can change deadlines, we can change teaching methods, we can change assessments, we can change personnel, there's all sorts of things that we can do. it's the start of three days of action but this dispute has lasted over a decade. and with no resolution in sight, staff and students are preparing for more disruption. elaine dunkley, bbc news. around 16,000 people have spent a fifth night without power in england and scotland, following the effects of storm arwen.
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suppliers say 90% of people who lost power have now been reconnected with engineers working around the clock. in cumbria, one of the worst affected regions, the council says urgent help is needed. really, whatever is appropriate to get the help out there to people, to get them some form of heating, to get them some form of power, and where necessary to extract people and put them in accommodation, and one of the issues is because of all of the phones going down, we don't actually know where everyone is and we can't apart from going and knocking on doors. clearly that takes a lot of people and a lot of resource. a british football coach who was jailed for 25 years in the united arab emirates for possessing cbd vape oil has had his sentenced reduced to 10 years on appeal. billy hood was arrested earlier this year after four bottles of the liquid, which contains cannabis oil, were found in his car in dubai.
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he claims he was forced to sign a confession in arabic, despite not speaking the language. the uae has denied the accusation. ending hiv infections and deaths in england by 2030 is "a goal that is entirely within reach", that's according to sir elton john's aids foundation. the government has pledged more than £23 million to reach that target. the new "action plan" will see testing scaled up in high—risk populations, where uptake is low. my personal reaction to hearing about the action plan was one of real optimism and hopefulness. as somebody living with hiv for 25 years, i know the impact of this virus. and it's not a walk in the park. that being said, i would love to be in a position where no one has to have an hiv diagnosis and i think this action plan will move us towards that.
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have you had snow over the last few days? at have you had snow over the last few da s? �* , , ., have you had snow over the last few da 5? �* , , ., ., have you had snow over the last few da s? �* , , ., ., ., have you had snow over the last few das? ,, ., ., ., ., days? a tiny bit, not enough to have fun but enough _ days? a tiny bit, not enough to have fun but enough to _ days? a tiny bit, not enough to have fun but enough to look _ days? a tiny bit, not enough to have fun but enough to look pretty. - days? a tiny bit, not enough to have fun but enough to look pretty. it - fun but enough to look pretty. it hasn't been a fan of —— it hasn't been fun for some people, with the power cuts. if you've been suffering from "snow envy" over the past few days seeing pictures of friends and family having fun in proper, deep snow, then here's a lesson about working with whatever mother nature provides. this is albuquerque in new mexico where snowfall is extremely rare. so every year since 1995 the city authorities have built a "snowman" out of tumbleweed instead. ican i can see here that that is along the interstate highway 40, so you would have a cute thing to wave at if you drive along that every day. unless there is a sudden gust of wind and it would get blown across the road. i wind and it would get blown across the road. ., , ., , the road. i wonder if there is any snow or some — the road. i wonder if there is any snow or some tumbleweed - the road. i wonder if there is any snow or some tumbleweed in - the road. i wonder if there is any| snow or some tumbleweed in the the road. i wonder if there is any - snow or some tumbleweed in the focus this morning!
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there is a mild start, yes, but there is some snow! it will turn colder during the course of the day. it will be windy with sunshine and showers and some snow for some of us. this weatherfront showers and some snow for some of us. this weather front clears the south—east in the next few hours, showers or patchy rain behind it, pushing south, cold air feeding showers or patchy rain behind it, pushing south, cold airfeeding in, wintry showers across the far north of scotland and wherever you are it will be windy. the wind especially strong along the west and east coast. coming from a northerly direction so you will notice it. these are the maximum temperatures, three in aberdeen to maybe ten incident earlier before the cold air sets in. —— may ten in the isles of scilly. there will be wintry showers in all parts of scotland, and showers down the east coast and
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northern ireland through wales, with the west midlands and the west country. some of those will be wintry but most of them will be on the hills. it will be a cold and frosty night, the widespread risk of ice on untreated surfaces, and tomorrow, wintry showers on higher ground across eastern areas, wintry showers at all levels across parts of scotland. but a lot of dry weather, not as windy, more sunshine until later until the next weather front introduces some rain and cloud. look at those temperatures, anyone would think that today was the start of the meteorological winter! ., , ., , , winter! for the rest of us it is advent calendars _ winter! for the rest of us it is advent calendars and - winter! for the rest of us it is advent calendars and for - winter! for the rest of us it is| advent calendars and for you, winter! for the rest of us it is - advent calendars and for you, the start of the meteorological winter. yes, but i would not say no to a chocolate advent calendar! injune, the premier league announced it would donate more than 2,000 defibrillators across grassroots football clubs
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in england and wales, following christian eriksen�*s cardiac arrest on the pitch at euro 2020. around 12 young people between the ages of 12 and 35 die suddenly through unexplained cardiac events every year in the uk. our reporter graham satchell has been to a school that is already benefitting from the device. an after—school training session at seven sisters primary school in north london. they are playing on the ugo ehiogu pitch. the money for this facility donated by ugo ehiogu's family. there wasn't a better father in the world. he was your best friend. he was brilliant. and, as a husband, we were together 22 years. yes, kind, thoughtful, caring, generous. one in a million. very, very special man. commentator: gareth southgate to take the free kick. _ looking for ehiogu! ugo ehiogu was a brilliant, towering defender. he played for middlesbrough, rangers, aston villa and england.
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he was a coach at spurs when he suffered a cardiac arrest. he was just 44. i mean, our world changed sort of in a second, as you can imagine. but, he had been monitored, he had been checked out. there were no signs at all. so it was completely out of the blue. the children are getting a lesson in how to save a life of someone collapses. chest compressions and a defibrillator. leading the class, the spurs club doctor, ravi gill. good, good technique. i like that. modern day defibrillators are very easy—to—use, very safe, very effective. so the earlier it can be recognised and chest compressions given, use of the defibrillator given, can really make a significant impact saving someone's life. watching the lesson, former referee chris foy and ugo ehiogu's team—mate at aston villa, dion dublin. he probably had the best body that i have ever seen in my life.
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abs and pecs. i'm still working on trying to find the abs and the pecs and i never will look like him, unfortunately. but taking over the white line and he became a bit of an animal. you know, somebody who took no prisoners, who was a leader, who was a good friend. and, yes, i miss him. if it can hit someone of ugo's stature and fitness levels, then, you know, we have to do this. we have to get these defibs everywhere, so everybody knows where they are, everybody knows how to use them. it has been almost six months since danish player christian eriksen collapsed on the pitch at the euros. as his team—mates formed a protective ring around him, doctors shocked his heart back into life. terrifying scenes eerily similar almost a decade earlier. the crowd horrified as medics treated bolton midfielder fabrice muamba. his heart stopped for 78 minutes.
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there was fear. people were scared, people were realising something wasn't right. the guy was lying on the ground and there was panic amongst people. chris foy was the fourth official that day. i remember vividly as he was being carried from the field, the doctor was still doing cpr, was still working on him. he survived. it's the knowledge, and these defibrillators are just so important. i just can't stress it enough. we really have got to get the message out there because theyjust save a life. the premier league is now installing 2000 defibrillators at grassroots facilities like this across england and wales. if it can help one person and make others more aware of this happening and educate people, then it is for a greater cause. it could happen to someone you know i and love and if you don't know how i to cope with it and help, then what use are -
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they there, really? obi ehiogu desperately hoping that what happened to his dad can be prevented from happening again. graham satchell, bbc news. we'll be speaking more about this at 8.10am when we'll be joined by the doctor who helped save former footballer fabrice muamba's life. it's 20 parsecs. —— it is 20 past six. it's fair to say there are high hopes for christmas this year, after last year's celebrations were somewhat muted. but there have been some reports of businesses already receiving cancellations after news of the new covid variant. nina has more. nobody likes a party paper, everyone likes the christmas do! and there has been so much excitement because of the last two christmases. we're back in the breakfast arms. all festively set up in anticipation
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of punters hoping to pop in for christmas parties. there might now be more restrictions in england with masks in shops and on public transport but there aren't the same measures for the hospitality sector. lots of pubs, restaurants and bars have been doing their best with extra ventilation, enhanced hygiene and sanitation. last week, before many of us had even heard of the word omicron, booking platform designmynight told breakfast they'd taken just over 35,000 bookings for christmas events in december, not far off the same period in 2019. they've since told us that after the weekend's announcement on restrictions, they saw a 14% increase in cancellations on saturday and a similarjump in cancellations on sunday. it's important to remember these are limited numbers but other hospitality businesses have told us that it has been cancellations, not bookings, that have been flooding their phonelines.
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damian runs a restaurant business and says he had 20 cancellation calls in just the one weekend. ok, so, quite shockingly, over 20 reservations have been cancelled, 20 reservations for groups over the weekend. so the groups between six to 46, 48 guests, so you can imagine the number. and the main explanation was they are concerned because of the new variant of the virus, they don't know what's going to happen and they don't know if we're going to go into lockdown. well, it's a massive, massive financial impact. and obviously we were waiting for this period, this christmas period, since summer. it's the best time for hospitality, december. and obviously, once the announcement was made in the last week, the phone just didn't stop ringing. let's speak to kate nicholls who is the chief executive of uk
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hospitality and joins me now. we heard it there from damien, not necessarily about this specifically it is the fear of what comes next for hospitality.— for hospitality. yes, that's absolutely _ for hospitality. yes, that's absolutely right. - for hospitality. yes, that's absolutely right. it - for hospitality. yes, that's absolutely right. it is - for hospitality. yes, that's absolutely right. it is the l absolutely right. it is the uncertainty introduced into the minds of consumers, that thought process that we might be back in to stop start restrictions, and that their plans might be disrupted and unfortunately over the last 18 to 20 months, many of us as individual consumers will have a sad situation where we are not able to go ahead with plans. that's why we were so pleased yesterday to hear from the prime minister and the health secretary that the restrictions that were introduced yesterday in england, they believe, are sufficient, together with the booster jabs, sufficient, together with the boosterjabs, to be able to be reassuring for customers that they can have christmas parties and we hope that will stem the flow of cancellations we are starting to see. y ., cancellations we are starting to see. , ., cancellations we are starting to see. , , see. do you understand people being reserved about _
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see. do you understand people being reserved about going _ see. do you understand people being reserved about going out? _ see. do you understand people being reserved about going out? they - see. do you understand people being| reserved about going out? they could think, i can sit on an empty train on my own but i have to wear masks, but i sit in a packed pub with various households without any face coverings. i various households without any face coverinus. , ., , , ., , coverings. i understand why people miaht be coverings. i understand why people might be feeling — coverings. i understand why people might be feeling uncertain - coverings. i understand why people might be feeling uncertain about i coverings. i understand why peoplel might be feeling uncertain about the ability to plan, but we can reassure them that hospitality is a safe space. the government's own scientific advisory group sage said that with the investment in hygiene, sanitation and —— ventilation in particular, hospitality is safer to socialise than in your own home. even though there is no mask mandate in hospitality, many people wear them voluntarily and those additional measures are the ones most effective in keeping them safe and allowing them to continue to have those bookings. that was reiterated yesterday by the prime minister and the health secretary, and so we hope that people will feel that reassurance. it is such an important trading period for our businesses which have struggled through the past 18 months of the
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pandemic. many small witnesses, neighbourhood pubs, and community patients will need to have christmas bookings in order to survive into the new year. do bookings in order to survive into the new year-— bookings in order to survive into the new year. do we have to think about the christmas _ the new year. do we have to think about the christmas do _ the new year. do we have to think about the christmas do changing i the new year. do we have to think. about the christmas do changing for good? anecdotally we had heard even before this variant, parties had gone down from 52 smaller groups, more people staying at home, is that set to stay? i’m more people staying at home, is that set to sta ? �* ., , more people staying at home, is that setto sta ? �* ., , , more people staying at home, is that set to stay?— set to stay? i'm not sure it is set to stay because _ set to stay? i'm not sure it is set to stay because hopefully - set to stay? i'm not sure it is set to stay because hopefully when l set to stay? i'm not sure it is set i to stay because hopefully when we learn to live to the virus and it becomes endemicjust like seasonal flu, we will go back to some of those different ways of working. this christmas was already going to be different, people were not back to booking big corporate events and christmas parties, and they were having a smaller sale bookings. normally at this time of year hospitality would be 95% booked out, it was only 75% booked out, and those groups were smaller. so
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undoubtedly christmas this year was going to be different. but i think next year we will see people get back into the normal swing of coming together, socialising. it is such a key part of team building and morale building within workforces. find building within workforces. and hos - itali building within workforces. and hospitality is — building within workforces. and hospitality is such a big part of making the festive period special. many thanks, good to see you. we would love to hear from you. has your business received a load of cancellations since the weekend? or have things stayed the same? we'd love to hear from you. get in contact in the usual ways. group bookings are getting smaller, there is a hope of bounce back next year but there is a real sense of deja vu in hospitality, and you heard that from damien, the fear that this could be something more restrictive coming. the prime minister and the government saying they don't think so and they hope this is enough to curb the omicron variant. and we will try to find out more when we have sajid javid on at
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7:30am. when we have said javid on at 7:30am. ., , when we have said javid on at 7:30am. .,, ., ., ., ., ., 7:30am. people are going to have to make decisions _ 7:30am. people are going to have to make decisions about _ 7:30am. people are going to have to make decisions about parties - 7:30am. people are going to have to make decisions about parties even . make decisions about parties even before we get all of the information we need, really. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. the mayor has warned an entire tube line could close if transport for london does not get more funding from central government. talks have begun on another bailout to try to keep tube and bus services running past the end of next week. the government's previously said it's shown its commitment to positive discussions around tfl's future. without government support, injanuary, we are going to have to make tough decisions which could be cutting our bus services by almost 20%, cutting our tube services by almost 10%. and the experience people have using the bakerloo line, of 50—year—old trains, which are already ten years
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past their life expectancy, having to be endured for the next 20 years. detectives investigating the murder of a 16—year—old boy in southall in southall have arrested a man on suspicion of murder. rishmeet singh was stabbed last wednesday on raleigh road and died at the scene. a 19—year—old man was arrested yesterday and is in custody. an exhibition celebrating the history of black women's hair is being held in essex in the new year. it's a project byjosephine melville, who's been collecting the stories and experiences of women for her project in southend. know your roots the project is important to me because their conversation around the way that black women style their hair, how they feel comfortable about their hair, has been an ongoing thing but never really addressed. here's how the tube looks. the piccadilly line has
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problems with leaves on the line. there's no service between rayners lane and uxbridge. minor delays on some of the other stretch. and for all the latest travel news where you are tune into your bbc local radio station for regular updates throughout the morning. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzin. hello, good morning. it felt mild for this time of year yesterday, but that mild air was with us for one day only and now it is set to turn colder once more. we saw a cold front go through last night. that gave us wet and windy weather for a time but the weather front has now largely cleared through. so it is a mostly dry start to the morning. plenty of cloud. we will see sunshine emerge and there is still a brisk north—westerly wind blowing, so a blustery day of weather. we are coming into chillier feeling air, too, so the highest temperatures will be this morning, unusually, and then they will tend to drop off as we head towards the end of the day. so gradually feeling colder. there will be showers through the afternoon. perhaps the odd sharper one at times, but still some limited sunny spells.
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as we head through this evening and overnight, the skies will clear, the showers will fade away. the wind will lighten and there will be a frost developing into thursday morning. so it is a cold, frosty start to the day tomorrow. it is a calmer looking day of weather. the winds are lighter, now northerly, and there temperatures will not get much past mid—single figures. so it will be feeling colder. on friday, turning wet, windy and a bit milder. i'm back in half an hour. now it's back tojon and sally. hello, this is breakfast with sally nugent and jon kay. still to come this morning. after years in storage, the uk's only tribute to those who died an aids—related death will go on display in liverpool. we'll have a glimpse of the aids memorial quilt before 8. since news of the covid omicron
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variant broke last week, you've been getting in touch with lots of questions, so we've enlisted the help of breakfast regulars dr chris smith and professor linda bauld to get some answers. welcome. and from paris to the west end. we'll be behind the scenes at the most famous cabaret club in the world — the moulin rouge. vaccination centres offering booster jabs will be popping up "like christmas trees" according to the prime minister. more than 14 million people in england alone are now eligible for a booster jab, after the government announced all adults would be offered an additional dose. boosters will be available at 1,500 community pharmacy sites in england, as well as in hospital hubs. the military will also be brought in to help the nhs, alongside volunteers.
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the prime minister has said all eligible people will have been offered a booster by the end of january 2022. breakfast�*s john maguire is at one of the pharmacies offering the boosterjab this morning. good morning. it will be a busy time for pharmacies up and down the country? for pharmacies up and down the count ? , for pharmacies up and down the count? , , for pharmacies up and down the count? , ., country? yes. absolutely one of the main weapons _ country? yes. absolutely one of the main weapons in _ country? yes. absolutely one of the main weapons in the _ country? yes. absolutely one of the main weapons in the armoury - country? yes. absolutely one of the main weapons in the armoury if- country? yes. absolutely one of the main weapons in the armoury if you | main weapons in the armoury if you like, community pharmacies. they will come into their own as they always do when you think about the seasonal flu jab at this time of year. here in west sussex i was looking for a christmas tree. cannot see anything but lots of lights. it is important to say people should stick to appointments and not ring up stick to appointments and not ring up the local pharmacy or turn up expecting a boost today. wait until invited. diane, good morning. phil
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will open the door. how are we? good to see you. come through. people have booked an appointment and will register here with vicky. a former ba cabin crew doing this and then going back to that. haifa ba cabin crew doing this and then going back to that.— ba cabin crew doing this and then going back to that. how has it been? i have going back to that. how has it been? i have been — going back to that. how has it been? i have been glad _ going back to that. how has it been? i have been glad to _ going back to that. how has it been? i have been glad to be _ going back to that. how has it been? i have been glad to be part— going back to that. how has it been? i have been glad to be part of- going back to that. how has it been? i have been glad to be part of the - i have been glad to be part of the team _ i have been glad to be part of the team i_ i have been glad to be part of the team. i have had purpose so it has been _ team. i have had purpose so it has been brilliant and good for the community. busy day expected? 280-300 — community. busy day expected? 280—300 people. well done. we will come through here. and we will meet the wonderful bruce. semi retired pharmacist, is that fair? yes. you are back on the front line. hausa pharmacist, is that fair? yes. you are back on the front line. how has it been? good _ are back on the front line. how has it been? good to _ are back on the front line. how has it been? good to help _ are back on the front line. how has it been? good to help people. - are back on the front line. how has i it been? good to help people. andrew has his arm ready _ it been? good to help people. andrew has his arm ready and _ it been? good to help people. andrew has his arm ready and a _ it been? good to help people. andrew has his arm ready and a booster- it been? good to help people. andrew has his arm ready and a boosterjab i has his arm ready and a boosterjab ready for you today. how are your first two? absolutely fine. keen to get it done today?— first two? absolutely fine. keen to get it done today? definitely keen, so keen i
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get it done today? definitely keen, so keen i am _ get it done today? definitely keen, so keen i am but— get it done today? definitely keen, so keen i am but this _ get it done today? definitely keen, so keen i am but this time - get it done today? definitely keen, so keen i am but this time of - get it done today? definitely keen, so keen i am but this time of the i so keen i am but this time of the morning — so keen i am but this time of the morning to — so keen i am but this time of the morning to get _ so keen i am but this time of the morning to get it. _ so keen i am but this time of the morning to get it. this— so keen i am but this time of the morning to get it.— morning to get it. this is being done especially _ morning to get it. this is being done especially early _ morning to get it. this is being done especially early for - morning to get it. this is being done especially early for us - morning to get it. this is being | done especially early for us this morning. bruce, are you happy to administer the dose? are we ready to go? and there it is, as simple as that. ., , go? and there it is, as simple as that. . , ., go? and there it is, as simple as that. ., , ., . go? and there it is, as simple as that. . , ., ., ., go? and there it is, as simple as that. ., , ., ., ., of that. feel anything? not at all. of course, andrew— that. feel anything? not at all. of course, andrew comes _ that. feel anything? not at all. of course, andrew comes through i that. feel anything? not at all. 0f| course, andrew comes through and sits down for 15 minutes to ensure there are no ill effects before he is allowed home. you are the pharmacist here. we are told the government are making promises, all adults in england by the end of january to be offered a vaccine. your cells, gp surgeries, vaccination centres ramping up. what are your thoughts? share vaccination centres ramping up. what are your thoughts?— are your thoughts? are they achievable _ are your thoughts? are they achievable targets? - are your thoughts? are they achievable targets? i - are your thoughts? are they achievable targets? i think i are your thoughts? are they i achievable targets? i think we are your thoughts? are they - achievable targets? i think we can achieve _ achievable targets? i think we can achieve them. we have always risen to the _ achieve them. we have always risen to the challenge. we need people to
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be aware _ to the challenge. we need people to be aware they can only book an appointment and they book it through the national booking service, not with individual pharmacies, not phoning — with individual pharmacies, not phoning us. because we still provide pharmaceutical services and we need phone _ pharmaceutical services and we need phone lines— pharmaceutical services and we need phone lines to be available for patients _ phone lines to be available for patients. they can phone and book the appointment that way. they need to wait— the appointment that way. they need to wait to _ the appointment that way. they need to wait to be invited. not everybody is ready— to wait to be invited. not everybody is readyjust yet so wait for an invitation _ is ready just yet so wait for an invitation-— is ready just yet so wait for an invitation. , , , , ., invitation. there is pressure on the s stem. invitation. there is pressure on the system- the _ invitation. there is pressure on the system- the gp — invitation. there is pressure on the system. the gp last _ invitation. there is pressure on the system. the gp last night - invitation. there is pressure on the system. the gp last night said - invitation. there is pressure on the system. the gp last night said he i system. the gp last night said he was worried certain other elements need to take a back—seat possibly. is that the same for you? need to take a back-seat possibly. is that the same for you?— need to take a back-seat possibly. is that the same for you? when we sinned u- is that the same for you? when we signed up we _ is that the same for you? when we signed up we ensured _ is that the same for you? when we signed up we ensured all _ signed up we ensured all pharmaceutical services will be provided — pharmaceutical services will be provided all the way through. we do not even _ provided all the way through. we do not even lock our doors when we do this _ not even lock our doors when we do this all_ not even lock our doors when we do this. all services remain as normal. all the _ this. all services remain as normal. all the best — this. all services remain as normal. all the best eu. this. all services remain as normal. allthe best eu. a this. all services remain as normal. all the best eu. a well oiled machine as you can see and it will be put to the test in the
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foreseeable future. brute be put to the test in the foreseeable future. ~ , ,., . ,, foreseeable future. we will be back with ou foreseeable future. we will be back with vou later— foreseeable future. we will be back with you later this _ foreseeable future. we will be back with you later this morning - foreseeable future. we will be back with you later this morning to - foreseeable future. we will be back with you later this morning to see i with you later this morning to see how it continues to work. let's speak now to one of our regular gps, dr rachel ward. as we can see, pharmacists gearing up. in terms of borisjohnson's announcement, what does it mean for gps? ,., ., announcement, what does it mean for gps? ., , announcement, what does it mean for gps? ,., ., ., , ., announcement, what does it mean for gps? ., , ., ., gps? good morning. it is great to see the community _ gps? good morning. it is great to see the community pharmacists l see the community pharmacists stepping up for such an important job. the big announcement yesterday. aiming to give everybody eligible their booster by the end of january. but as amanda prichard rightly pointed out, out of the 115 million vaccine doses delivered so far, the lion's share as she said have been delivered by gb teams and community pharmacists. of course, in recent weeks, everybody is aware of the
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immense pressure in general practice, the increased demand. our practice, the increased demand. our practice, like many others across the country, has very much scaled back the covid vaccine programme because we have had to concentrate on core gp work. we have felt like many that people can go elsewhere to get their vaccine in mass centres but they cannot generally go somewhere else to get gp services. that is what we have focused on. the announcement last night, there are still questions, of course. we will, i am sure, like we have several times, step up to deliver this very importantjob. what we do not really understand is what else in our system will give in order to allow us to do that.— us to do that. you talk about ste -|n~ us to do that. you talk about stepping up- _ us to do that. you talk about stepping up- i— us to do that. you talk about stepping up. i know- us to do that. you talk about stepping up. i know there i us to do that. you talk about stepping up. i know there is | us to do that. you talk about l stepping up. i know there is an enormous amount of work to do. what
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do you need to get back up and running again to the situation we were at maybe eight months ago? cour were at maybe eight months ago? our main were at maybe eight months ago?
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are you hearing from _ per week is very challenging. what are you hearing from patients? how concerned are they when they call you about the new variant? people are concerned. _ you about the new variant? people are concerned. i _ you about the new variant? people are concerned. i would _ you about the new variant? people are concerned. i would say - you about the new variant? people are concerned. i would say the - you about the new variant? people are concerned. i would say the one think i am hearing, people understandably have been holding out may be to see family members who are abroad, at christmas, people who are due to travel and feeling anxious about whether that will happen. people have started asking questions as to whether their plan should continue or whether they should start being very careful again. all of these reasonable things people are worried about. it is difficult at the moment because we do not have answers to give people. i think the government are behaving responsibly by stepping up the booster programme, increasing restrictions such as mask wearing. and it is while scientists work hard in the background to learn more about this variant. hopefully in the next few
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weeks we will have more answers for patients. weeks we will have more answers for atients. ., ., weeks we will have more answers for atients. ., ,, , ., weeks we will have more answers for atients. ., ~' , ., , weeks we will have more answers for atients. ., ,, , ., , . ., patients. thank you very much. have a treat patients. thank you very much. have a great day- — if you want goals, sarah has them. how many? 20. in one match. 20. ten different goal—scorers. it is interesting because it is six wins from six for england, they have scored 53 unanswered goals. a difficult night for latvia. it was the biggest ever competitive win for england. a 20—0 victory. there were four goals for lauren hemp and hat—tricks for several others including ellen white, who became england's record goalscorer. for scotland and wales, as jo currie reports.
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england have cruised through qualifying so far. a chilly night in doncaster against latvia, a team ranked 102nd in the world not expected to trip them up. and so it proved. just over two minutes gone and beth mead with an early opener. a sign of things to come. the real story of the night — ellen white. the striker who came into this game one goal behind kelly smith's england all—time goal—scoring record of 46. a record that was about to tumble. first ellen white equalled it with a wonder strike from the edge of the area before she went one better. this time a simple finish but a goal that will live long in her memory. the joy and perhaps relief that the record relief that the record was finally broken clear to see. england's ruthlessness continued throughout the first half. the lionesses heading in at the break 8—0 up, including a hat—trick from mead. and that score was set to soar. after the restart, who else but white again. a shot from distance. the hat—trick complete. the record well and truly hers.
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a special moment for the 32—year—old. and hat—tricks kept on coming. alessia russo had never scored for england before this match but that all changed. this is the third of the night. and that was followed by lauren hemp. her hat—trick already in the bag, she notched up her fourth goal and england's 20th — yes, 20th — to sign off their biggest ever win in a competitive match. the lionesses finish unbeaten in their world cup qualifying campaign with 53 goals scored and none conceded. elsewhere, battling wales gave a good account of themselves away to france, but succumbed to a 2—0 defeat with kayleigh green sent off in the second half. while scotland were completely outclassed by a brilliant spain side. 8—0 the final score. a painful end to their year. jo currie, bbc news. newcastle are still without a win in the premier league after they drew 1—1 with norwich in a relegation clash. newcastle had ciaran clarke sent off, but went ahead with a callum wilson penalty, before teemu pukki equalised for norwich. they move up to third bottom,
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with newcastle staying at the foot of the table. leeds got a crucial win — raphinha scoring an injury time penalty to beat crystal palace 1—0 at elland road to pull clear of the bottom three. one game in the scottish premiership — motherwell beat dundee united 1—nil at a rain—soaked fir park. a stunning strike from tony watt after 10 minutes gave motherwell the win. they're nowjust a point behind fourth—placed united. tributes have been paid to the former arsenal and liverpool player ray kennedy, who's died at the age of 70. kennedy played for england as well as winning league titles with the gunners and at anfield. he was diagnosed with parkinson's disease in 1984. kennedy's former captain phil thompson called him a great player and wonderful teammate. great britain have been knocked out of the davis cup by germany. dan evans was the only british winner in the quarterfinal tie
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as cameron norrie was beaten in his singles match, before joe salisbury and neal skupski lost the deciding doubles match in straight sets in austria. and that is the sport for now. interesting on the women's football. there is debate over the competitiveness of it. sarina wiegman said it is not a competitive game for them and there is more to do next year. it is definitely something federations will look at. that scoreline is great. i wonder what odds you could have. a 20—0 victory. i do not think anyone predicted that could be possible. thank you. here's carol with a look at the weather. good morning. good morning, compared to yesterday, when most of the
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country —— in most of the country a colder start with the exception of the far south with mild air. but you can see fors, fives, quite widely across the uk. we have been pulling in colder air across the uk. we have been pulling in colderairand across the uk. we have been pulling in colder air and today and tomorrow it will be colder than yesterday. today will be windy and we are looking at sunshine and showers. some of those will be wintry on the tops of the hills and at lower levels at times across the far north of scotland. you can see the weather front moving south. showers followed behind. some of those will be wintry, even at times at modest levels in the far north of scotland. windy particularly down the west coast, north of the east coast, and then we run into showers. the weather front continues to push away in and across the straits of dover. a cold start wherever you are and the cold air getting down to the far
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south of england later in the day. colder air filters south of england later in the day. colder airfilters in south of england later in the day. colder air filters in and wintry showers as i mentioned but also sunshine and in the wind, a northerly, it will feel cold, colder than yesterday. temperatures are lower. two degrees in lerwick. cold air will get behind the weather front into southern areas. overnight, we are in a straight northerly and we will see wintry showers across the far north of scotland and some of those down to lower levels. a widespread frost and the risk of ice on untreated surfaces. showers down the east coast, in through northern ireland, wales, the west country. likely to be wintry on the hills. at lower levels, a bit of sleet but mostly rain. but a lot of dry weather. starting with wintry showers down the east coast and mostly on the
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hills. any showers in the north of scotland will be at all levels and you will see a fair bit of sunshine. not quite as windy. by the end of the afternoon, the cloud will thicken to the west, heralding the arrival of another weather front that will bring rain. note the temperatures, the maximum on thursday, because they will change. on friday, the weatherfront thursday, because they will change. on friday, the weather front pushes eastwards in south—eastwards. behind it sunshine, but cloud bills out towards the west. then we see more rain. on its leading edge we may see snow. the temperatures back up again. we are topsy—turvy with temperatures as we go through the week. today and tomorrow below average and on friday they climb once again. topsy—turvy. well said. let's return to our main story now —
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the race to offer all eligible adults a booster coronavirus jab by the end of january. we can speak now to labour's new shadow health secretary, wes streeting, who joins us from westminster. a nice quiet week for you to start your newjob! a lot of viewers saying they have big decisions to make about how they will live their lives in the run—up to christmas. a lot are asking about parties. i believe you were invited to a party last night. did believe you were invited to a party last niuht. , ,, believe you were invited to a party last niuht. , i. �* last night. did you go? i didn't. not because — last night. did you go? i didn't. not because i _ last night. did you go? i didn't. not because i was _ last night. did you go? i didn't. not because i was ducking - last night. did you go? i didn't. not because i was ducking the l not because i was ducking the christmas party but because you asked me to come on the programme first thing so i did not think it wise. i do not want people to have to change plans for christmas and they should not need to if the government does everything within its power to ensure we are tackling the virus in the way we can. the booster campaign have announced this
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week we welcome. we think the government can achieve half a million boosterjabs a day especially if they use facilities such as community pharmacists and p°p�*up such as community pharmacists and pop—up clinics. having announced that campaign, we will get behind it, we want it to be successful. there are other things the government can do. it is not right people arriving into the uk from overseas are not tested before they leave the country of origin. it is possible for people to travel to the airport, get on the plane, arrive in busy departure halls, get on the train, tube back home without having had a test for a couple of days. that does not make sense. we have more effective treatments available for covid—19 so let's speed up the process for evaluating and improving treatments. we are armed with the tools and i will make the point again, the boosterjab, let's not forget there are plenty of people
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who have not had their second covid vaccination and in some cases there first. having made that progress on the success of the vaccine roll—out, let's not take our foot off the pedal. if the government does those things they will have our support. we urge them to act quickly so nobody has to be the grinch that stole christmas. i do not want ministers turning up in the commons just before christmas turning people's plans upside down. let's do everything to avoid that happening. i am interested in what you say about getting travellers compulsorily tested before flying home to the uk, or foreign visitors before they arrive in britain. you say you do not want to make things complicated but that is a big undertaking and disruptive for a lot of people. it is undertaking and disruptive for a lot of --eole. ,., undertaking and disruptive for a lot of --eole. ,. ., undertaking and disruptive for a lot of --eole. _, ., , , of people. it is a lot disruptive than the consequences - of people. it is a lot disruptive than the consequences in - of people. it is a lot disruptive i than the consequences in terms of people. it is a lot disruptive - than the consequences in terms of lives, livelihoodss and our liberties of failing to get a grip
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of this virus, particularly the risk arising from new variants. we are talking about a lateral flow test. we are used to this and it is not unreasonable before people travel to a busy airport, arrive into a busy arrivals hall, and travel back home on busy public transport that they would have a test before they fly. that would be the responsible thing. that would be the responsible thing. that is why myself and yvette cooper have called on this to happen. it was something yvette cooper was looking at as chair as the commons home affairs select committee. i hope we can achieve cross—party consensus. we have written to the health secretary and home secretary urging them to take action on this and i hope they will be amenable to that as we try to work constructively with the government throughout the pandemic to avoid disruption and devastating consequences we have seen for
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people's lives. brute consequences we have seen for people's lives-— consequences we have seen for people's lives. consequences we have seen for --eole's lives. ~ , , ., ,, ., people's lives. we will speak to the health secretary _ people's lives. we will speak to the health secretary later— people's lives. we will speak to the health secretary later and - people's lives. we will speak to the | health secretary later and hopefully get reaction to that. he would pay for the test? would it be the individual travelling, the tour operator, orthe individual travelling, the tour operator, or the government footing the bill again?— the bill again? there are steps we can take to _ the bill again? there are steps we can take to stop _ the bill again? there are steps we can take to stop people... - the bill again? there are steps we can take to stop people... the - can take to stop people... the racketeering that has been going on with the cost of tests, certainly. i do not think in the grand scheme of things asking for people to pay for a test before they get on a flight is too much to ask and with lateral flow test, there are plenty available and people could take them before they fly. in the grand scheme of the challenges we have at the moment, that is not a particularly significant challenge. the bigger challenge will be failure to act, get a grip on this and failure to do everything we possibly can to avoid the seeding of this new variant in communities. but there will be... we do not want to see this rising
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because that will put us in a difficult position.— because that will put us in a difficult position. there will be families who _ difficult position. there will be families who are _ difficult position. there will be families who are planning - difficult position. there will be families who are planning to i difficult position. there will be | families who are planning to go difficult position. there will be - families who are planning to go away for a cheap weekend away before christmas. they will think i have three, four kids, and if we all have to have lateral flow tests, it might be another hundred pounds. that is not inconsiderable for people. it is a big amount of money.— a big amount of money. there are still lots of _ a big amount of money. there are still lots of lateral _ a big amount of money. there are still lots of lateral flow _ a big amount of money. there are still lots of lateral flow tests - still lots of lateral flow tests ava ila ble still lots of lateral flow tests available and free tests available. i do not think in the grand scheme of things it is a big challenge. the bigger challenges failing to act and the cost of that. we have seen that over the past couple of years in terms of cost to people in terms of their lives, livelihoods, liberties, freedom to do things as normal. in the grand scheme of things this is a small price to pay. in terms of the cost of living pressure on family there is more the government can and
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should be doing to help particularly in the run—up to christmas and in the grand scheme of things a lateral flow test before you board a flight is the least of our worries when it comes to family finances and the pressure facing them. brute comes to family finances and the pressure facing them. we appreciate ou missin: pressure facing them. we appreciate you missing your _ pressure facing them. we appreciate you missing your christmas - pressure facing them. we appreciate you missing your christmas party. i you missing your christmas party. thank you. we are taking a moment to move away from the serious news we are talking about. i'm going to say something i have not said before. fishnets, fabulous frocks and incredible dance numbers. it is not strictly. no, we're not talking about strictly but the world's most famous cabaret club — the moulin rouge. twenty yea rs ago, it was the inspiration for the iconic film starring nicole kidman and ewan mcgregor. now, a stage version of the movie has opened on the west end. here's our music correspondent mark savage. # no matter your sin, you're welcome here #. moulin rouge arrives in london after a hugely successful launch on broadway. like the movie it's based on, the stage show is an assault
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on the senses, with one of the most lavish sets on the west end. we've treated this theatre in a 360 way, right? so when you come to this theatre, when you step off denman street, you are in the moulin rouge — whether you're in the back row or the front row, the show is happening all around you. and let's take a walk out. just show us what's happening in the auditorium. absolutely. so, over here, we've got this amazing windmill that, as you see right now, is rotating. we've got this incredible elephant. there's 800 square metres of red velvet. we've got go—go cages that are used for performers. here's can—can seating, so some people actually sit here this close to the action. so it has that kind of nightclub vibe. and have you ever been to the real moulin rouge? i've been outside the doors, i've knocked on the doors, but i haven't been let in, yes.
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why wouldn't they let you in? because i went in on sunday at 11am. i think they're probably recuperating at that point. or at church. yeah, that's right. but it's notjust the stage. the costumes are equally over the top. there is just about 300 in total for our principal performers and there's 8600 rhinestones that are on satine's diamond costume alone. and do you have to keep a spare bucket of rhinestones in case one falls off? yes, they always fall off. yes, there's a huge bucket — buckets of rhinestones in the back. # i was made for loving you, baby, you were made for loving me. - # the only way of loving me, baby, is to pay a lovely fee.# baz luhrmann's original film starred ewan mcgregor and nicole kidman as christian and satine — two star—crossed lovers in 19th century paris who serenaded each other with medleys of pop songs.
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for the musical, even more songs have been crammed in. this sequence now includes 20 hits in just five minutes. it was really exciting to be able to kind of mine for anti—love songs. so as he's presenting these love songs to her, she's able to refute them with her own songs that she brings into the mix. # need you by my side, girl, you'll be my bride. # never be denied everlasting love. # what's love got to do, got to do with it? # come what may.# for the london production, satine is played by liisi lafontaine, who makes a spectacular entrance every night. yes, i enter by trapeze swing. something i never thought i would say.
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doing it every night is so surreal and you just hear like a slight gasp and then it's applause, and it's just this crazy way to start the show. satine, as fans of the film will know, has quite a tragic story in the final act. how do you prepare yourself for that emotionally every night? it's difficult. i mean, especially with covid and with how much collective grief we've all experienced in the last few years. i think that dying every day is deeper than it would have been two years ago. i think what we're all willing to sacrifice and the people we've lost along the way is kind of all represented within that moment. but i feel like it's such a poetic ending and it makes everything make more sense. and so it's almost like a sacrifice. liisi says audiences have been in tears at every night of previews for moulin rouge the musical. so if you do plan to go, remember to pack a box of tissues.
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we have just given away the ending. no spoilers. moulin rouge is on at the piccadilly theatre now. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. the mayor has warned an entire tube line could close if transport for london does not get more funding from central government. talks have begun on another bailout to try to keep tube and bus services running past the end of next week. the government's previously said it's shown its commitment to positive discussions around tfl's future. without government support, injanuary, we are going to have to make tough decisions which could be cutting our bus services by almost 20%, cutting our tube services by almost 10%. and the experience people have using the bakerloo line, of 50—year—old trains,
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which are already ten years past their life expectancy, having to be endured for the next 20 years. the charity centrepoint says this christmas more than 4000 young people could be homeless in london — the highest number since 2016. it says calls to its national helpline are up by more than 30% — driven largely by the effects of the pandemic. an exhibition celebrating the history of black women's hair is being held in essex in the new year. it's a project byjosephine melville, who's been collecting the stories and experiences of women for her project in southend called know your roots. know your roots the project is important to me because their conversation around the way that black women style their hair, how they feel comfortable about their hair, has been an ongoing thing but never really addressed. here's how the tube looks.
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the overground isn't running between clapham junction and willesden junction. the piccadilly line has problems with leaves on the line. tfl rail has minor delays between paddington and heathrow airport and reading. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it felt mild for this time of year yesterday, but that mild air was with us for one day only and now it is set to turn colder once more. we saw a cold front go through last night. that gave us wet and windy weather for a time but the weather front has now largely cleared through. so it is a mostly dry start to the morning. plenty of cloud. we will see sunshine emerge and there is still a brisk north—westerly wind blowing, so a blustery day of weather. we are coming into chillier feeling air, too, so the highest temperatures will be this morning, unusually, and then they will tend to drop off as we head towards the end of the day. so gradually feeling colder. there will be showers through the afternoon.
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perhaps the odd sharper one at times, but still some limited sunny spells. as we head through this evening and overnight, the skies will clear, the showers will fade away. the wind will lighten and there will be a frost developing into thursday morning. so it is a cold, frosty start to the day tomorrow. it is a calmer looking day of weather. the winds are lighter, now northerly, and there will be sunshine on and off throughout the day. temperatures will not get much past mid—single figures. so it will be feeling colder. on friday, turning wet, windy and a bit milder. i'm back in half an hour. there's plenty more on our website over at the usual address. good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. our headlines today. the nhs gears up for a major expansion of the vaccine booster programme, with all adults
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in england to be offered the jab by the end of january. and those booster jabs and those boosterjabs will be administered at mass vaccination centres, gp surgeries and thousands of community pharmacies. disruption for hundreds of thousands of university students across the uk, as lecturers and other staff begin three days of strike action. more than £20 million is pledged to a new hiv action plan on world aids day. we're live in liverpool remembering some of those who lost their lives to the disease. good morning. after such an unseasonably mild day yesterday, today and tomorrow are going to be much colder. today is pretty windy with sunshine and showers and some of those will be wintry in the north. all of the details later in the programme. it's wednesday 1st december. our main story. the nhs is gearing up for a major expansion of the vaccine booster programme, with hospitals and thousands of community sites set to offer the jab. the prime minister has said he wants
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all adults in england to be offered a booster dose by the end ofjanuary, as part of the government response to the omicron variant. aru na iyengar reports. we are back to vaccinating on an industrial scale. over the summer, vaccination centres opened in cathedrals, shops and football stadiums. now borisjohnson says they will be popping up like christmas trees. it's in response to the new omicron variant which could be more infectious than delta. it's this constant balancing act that the government has had to get right throughout the pandemic. the government has to get across the strong and clear message to encourage people to do the right thing. the prime minister has said the government will be throwing everything at the campaign. he has pledged every adult in england will be offered a booster by the end of january. more hospitals will offerjabs, while over 1000 pharmacies will deliver vaccines. but minutes from a meeting from sage, the group of experts who advise the government, warns of a potentially significant
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wave of infections and says the government should be preparing to ramp up restrictions. i personally think that the restrictions that we have in place at the moment are unlikely to really stop this strain spreading in the uk. it is likely to increase over the next few months and potentially become the dominant strain and have higher levels of infection than we would have otherwise had. ministers have said their response is proportionate and further analysis of the new variant needs to take place in the weeks ahead. the governments in scotland, wales and northern ireland have confirmed they will also step up their booster programmes. saving lives, protecting the nhs, saving christmas. time will tell if the right choices have been made. aruna iyengar, bbc news. let's get more from our chief political correspondent, adam fleming.
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adam, a big commitment from the government, but delivering it, making it happen, is something different. everyone coming forward in one go in the system will collapse, so they need to make sure that people are ready to go for the jab and they are ready to be called for it and the logistics are to be put in place-— put in place. there will be a big ramin: put in place. there will be a big ramping up _ put in place. there will be a big ramping up of _ put in place. there will be a big ramping up of provisions - put in place. there will be a big ramping up of provisions in - put in place. there will be a big ramping up of provisions in the | put in place. there will be a big - ramping up of provisions in the next few days and people are urged to wait until they get a message or hear very clearly it is their turn. it's a big balancing act in terms of how we are all living our lives with the potential risk from the omicron variant. on the one hand, we have conservative backbenchers, more than 30 of them, rebelling last night, voting against the government on the new self isolation rules, if you come into contact with someone who has the omicron variant, you have also got businesses warning that people are may be overreacting to
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the risk and cancelling christmas parties and drinks which could have a big economic impact. on the other hand, you have people likejenny harries, who runs the new uk health security agency who advises the government saying, maybe you should think about cutting back on social contact. you have also got the labour party saying, may be the rules on international travel should be toughened up and we should bring back the idea of, you have to get a negative test before you get on the plane to get back to the uk from abroad which is the proposal put forward by the new shadow health secretary wes streeting this morning. it secretary wes streeting this morninu. , �* ., .,, secretary wes streeting this morninu. , �* ., ., , ., morning. it isn't unreasonable that before people _ morning. it isn't unreasonable that before people travel _ morning. it isn't unreasonable that before people travel to _ morning. it isn't unreasonable that before people travel to a _ morning. it isn't unreasonable that before people travel to a busy - before people travel to a busy airport — before people travel to a busy airport or— before people travel to a busy airport or bought a busy flight, arrived — airport or bought a busy flight, arrived into a busy arrivals hall and travel _ arrived into a busy arrivals hall and travel back home on busy transport, _ and travel back home on busy transport, that they would have a test before they fly. that would be the responsible thing to do. that is why myself— the responsible thing to do. that is why myself and the new shadow home secretary— why myself and the new shadow home secretary yvette cooper have called on this _ secretary yvette cooper have called on this to _ secretary yvette cooper have called on this to happen. that secretary yvette cooper have called on this to happen.— on this to happen. that is the balance of— on this to happen. that is the balance of the _
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on this to happen. that is the balance of the prime - on this to happen. that is the balance of the prime minister on this to happen. that is the i balance of the prime minister is having to strike, the tightrope he has to walk between people saying, do less, and saying, do more. we don't know at the moment because there is going to be a couple of weeks before the scientists can say conclusively what the risks posed by the omicron variant actually are so it will be a bit of a nervous and frustrating couple of weeks. thank ou ve frustrating couple of weeks. thank you very much. — frustrating couple of weeks. thank you very much. we _ frustrating couple of weeks. thank you very much, we will _ frustrating couple of weeks. thank you very much, we will try - frustrating couple of weeks. thank you very much, we will try to - frustrating couple of weeks. thank you very much, we will try to find l you very much, we will try to find out a little bit more and get more clarity from the health secretary sajid javid, at half past seven. from today, anyone over the age of 12 travelling to spain, from the uk, must be fully vaccinated. up until now, travellers could either show a vaccination certificate or a negative pcr test. let's get the details from guy hedgcoe, who is in madrid. guy, what new rules will arrivals face? what are the new rules that arrivals will face? ., ., will face? you mentioned there, until now. _ will face? you mentioned there, until now, people _ will face? you mentioned there, until now, people travelling - will face? you mentioned there, | until now, people travelling from the uk to spain, for nonessential
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travel, could get into the country by providing a negative pcr test. now however that is no longer the case as of today. they will have to provide a vaccination certificate, proof that they are fully vaccinated. the spanish government says that that is driven by the emergence of the new strain, there have only been two confirmed cases of the new strain in spain so far. there are a number of other suspected cases being analysed at the moment. and in fact spain is better off than many other countries in europe in terms of its overall situation regarding covid. however the numbers are rising. and one of the numbers are rising. and one of the big concerns regarding all of this is for the tourism industry which is so important for the spanish economy. the british tourism market is the single biggest tourism market is the single biggest tourism market for the country and earlier this year because they were so few visitors, the early part of the year
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was so poor for the tourism industry here. howeverthings was so poor for the tourism industry here. however things have started to pick up. in october, there were over 1 million british visitors to spain, so there was a certain amount of optimism because of that. however because of the emergence of the new strain, that optimism is now being tempered. strain, that optimism is now being tem ered. ., ., strain, that optimism is now being temered. . ~ i. , strain, that optimism is now being temered. ., ,, , . strain, that optimism is now being temered. ., , . ,, three students have been killed in a shooting at a school in the us state of michigan. eight other people, including one teacher, were also injured in the attack in the town of oxford, near detroit. a 15—year—old boy has been arrested on suspicion of murder. president biden says his heart goes out to those affected by the incident. around 45,000 people have spent a fifth night without power in england and scotland, following the effects of storm arwen. suppliers say 90 % of people who lost power have now been reconnected with engineers working around the clock. in cumbria, one of the worst affected regions, the council says urgent help is needed.
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ending hiv infections and deaths in england by 2030 is "a goal that is entirely within reach", that's according to sir elton john's aids foundation. the government has pledged more than £23 million to reach that target. the new "action plan" will see testing scaled up in high—risk populations, where uptake is low. my personal reaction to hearing about the action plan was one of real optimism and hopefulness. as somebody living with hiv for 25 years, i know the impact of this virus. and it's not a walk in the park. that being said, i would love to be in a position where no one has to have an hiv diagnosis and i think this action plan will move us towards that. we've got something extrordinary to show you now. are you ready for this? yeah. a former military pilot has become
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the first person to fly in and out of an active volcano using a wingsuit. goodness me! this is sebastian alvarez. he's from chile, and this is him flying towards, and then through the pucon volcano at home in chile. and he is mad! look at that. he'd spent a year preparing for the stunt, and he flew nearly 10 metres inside the volcano before swooping back out of the crater at a speed of more than 100 miles per hour. goodness me. and he came down to earth. ~ ., , , so goodness me. and he came down to earth-_ so what - goodness me. and he came down to earth._ so what are - goodness me. and he came down to| earth._ so what are you earth. with a bump. so what are you doin: earth. with a bump. so what are you doing today? — earth. with a bump. so what are you doing today? how — earth. with a bump. so what are you doing today? how was _ earth. with a bump. so what are you doing today? how was your - earth. with a bump. so what are you doing today? how was your day? - earth. with a bump. so what are you i doing today? how was your day? carol is fairly adventurous _ doing today? how was your day? carol is fairly adventurous but i'm not sure she will be doing that! not ina not in a million years! good morning. the weather is cold today, colder than it was yesterday, with the exception of the shetland islands where it was cold yesterday as well. a beautiful start to the
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day. some clear —— some rain will clear the south—east and then a band of patchy rain moving southwards during the day. behind it, colder air, any showers in scotland are likely to be wintry and we have gusty winds particularly down the west coast and the east coast. temperatures are lower than yesterday, two in the north to nine as we come further south. as you add on the strength of the wind coming from the north, it will feel a bit colder. temperatures going down eventually in the far south of england as the weather front clears away, any showers across the north of scotland will be snow to lower levels. we could see some snow showers across the hills of eastern part of england, northern ireland, wales, the west midlands and the west country. in between, clear skies, widespread frost and the risk of ice on untreated surfaces. a cold start tomorrow but a lot of sunshine, still some showers in the
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south—west and wales, as well as eastern england, some wintry on the hills first thing. a lot of dry weather, a fair bit of sunshine, wintry showers in the highlands before this next system comes in from the wet introducing thick cloud and rain. that is windy tomorrow but still cold, maximum of three in aberdeen to eight in st helier. thank you, see you again soon. for the past ten months, british football coach billy hood has been behind bars in the united arab emirates, after police found vape fluid containing cannabis oil in his car. he's always maintained that the oil was left by a friend who had visited from england two weeks earlier. however, the authorities sentenced him to 25 years in prison which was reduced to ten on appeal yesterday. we can speak now to billy's mother breda, and brother alex. they'rejoined by radha stirling, the founder of detained in dubai, an organisation that has been
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advocating on billy's behalf. thank you to all of you. mum, breda, can i start with you? the news that the sentence has been reduced to ten years, welcome, i guess, but what is your reaction? hot years, welcome, i guess, but what is your reaction?— your reaction? not really welcomed, because willie _ your reaction? not really welcomed, because willie has _ your reaction? not really welcomed, because willie has done _ your reaction? not really welcomed, because willie has done nothing - because willie has done nothing wrong. so we thought yesterday that we were going to find out that billy was going to be able to come home. he had done nothing wrong, and he has been told that the charges have been dropped against him. and yet he is still there for another ten years. it's heartbreaking, absolutely heartbreaking. alexe, 'ust absolutely heartbreaking. alexe, just explain _ absolutely heartbreaking. alexe, just explain for— absolutely heartbreaking. alexe, just explain for people _ absolutely heartbreaking. alexe, just explain for people watching l absolutely heartbreaking. alexe, i just explain for people watching at home, the circumstances, what happened?— happened? billy's framed accidentally _ happened? billy's framed accidentally -- _ happened? billy's framed accidentally -- friend - happened? billy's framed - accidentally -- friend accidentally accidentally —— friend accidentally left some — accidentally —— friend accidentally left some cbd oil in his car. the police _ left some cbd oil in his car. the police then— left some cbd oil in his car. the police then stopped billy and found these _ police then stopped billy and found these oils in his possession. he was
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then arrested and charged for drug trafficking, promotion and possession of these vapes and he received — possession of these vapes and he received a — possession of these vapes and he received a 25 year sentence. we have obviously _ received a 25 year sentence. we have obviously appealed it, the appeal came _ obviously appealed it, the appeal came out— obviously appealed it, the appeal came out yesterday, they have removed — came out yesterday, they have removed the drug trafficking charge and the _ removed the drug trafficking charge and the selling but they have kept accidental possession. so they reduced — accidental possession. so they reduced it to ten years. how you can -et reduced it to ten years. how you can get ten _ reduced it to ten years. how you can get ten years for accidental possession is crazy.- get ten years for accidental possession is crazy. breda in the meantime. _ possession is crazy. breda in the meantime. he — possession is crazy. breda in the meantime, he remains - possession is crazy. breda in the meantime, he remains behind i possession is crazy. breda in the - meantime, he remains behind bars, what have you been able to learn about his situation? what kind of contact have you had with him? bill?r contact have you had with him? billy has been able _ contact have you had with him? billy has been able to _ contact have you had with him? e: lly has been able to phone a couple of times during the week but we can never say what time he is going to call. he says he is ok but you can hearin call. he says he is ok but you can hear in his voice that he is not. can't really say too much about the conditions all things because every phone call is monitored over there. so he says, i'm ok, but we tell him we will never give up the fight
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until we get him home. i’m untilwe get him home. i'm interested _ untilwe get him home. i'm interested in _ untilwe get him home. i'm interested in your - untilwe get him home. i'm interested in your take on his experience, radha stirling, breda saying that the family is devastated that the sentence was reduced for ten years, oath —— hoping for a better result, what is your take on this? , ., , , , ., .,. this? the problem stems for the fact that dubai police _ this? the problem stems for the fact that dubai police were _ this? the problem stems for the fact that dubai police were quite - that dubai police were quite negligent— that dubai police were quite negligent in my— that dubai police were quite negligent in my opinion - that dubai police were quite negligent in my opinion wasj that dubai police were quite - negligent in my opinion was charging him with— negligent in my opinion was charging him with the — negligent in my opinion was charging him with the federal— negligent in my opinion was charging him with the federal crimes - negligent in my opinion was charging him with the federal crimes of - him with the federal crimes of trafficking _ him with the federal crimes of trafficking and _ him with the federal crimes of trafficking and selling - him with the federal crimes of trafficking and selling the - him with the federal crimes of. trafficking and selling the drugs were _ trafficking and selling the drugs were there _ trafficking and selling the drugs were there was _ trafficking and selling the drugs were there was no evidence - trafficking and selling the drugs i were there was no evidence apart from _ were there was no evidence apart from the — were there was no evidence apart from the forced _ were there was no evidence apart from the forced confession. - were there was no evidence apart from the forced confession. it - from the forced confession. it escalated _ from the forced confession. it escalated to _ from the forced confession. it escalated to a _ from the forced confession. it escalated to a federal- from the forced confession. it escalated to a federal came i from the forced confession. itl escalated to a federal came —— from the forced confession. it - escalated to a federal came —— case which _ escalated to a federal came —— case which ends — escalated to a federal came —— case which ends up — escalated to a federal came —— case which ends up in _ escalated to a federal came —— case which ends up in abu _ escalated to a federal came —— case which ends up in abu dhabi - escalated to a federal came —— case which ends up in abu dhabi which. escalated to a federal came —— case i which ends up in abu dhabi which has more _ which ends up in abu dhabi which has more severe — which ends up in abu dhabi which has more severe consequences— which ends up in abu dhabi which has more severe consequences for- which ends up in abu dhabi which has more severe consequences for thesel more severe consequences for these allegations _ more severe consequences for these allegations if— more severe consequences for these allegations if he — more severe consequences for these allegations. if he was _ more severe consequences for these allegations. if he was charged - more severe consequences for these allegations. if he was charged in - allegations. if he was charged in dubai _ allegations. if he was charged in dubai with— allegations. if he was charged in dubai with possessing _ allegations. if he was charged in dubai with possessing the - allegations. if he was charged in dubai with possessing the cbd i allegations. if he was charged in i dubai with possessing the cbd oil, it would _ dubai with possessing the cbd oil, it would have _ dubai with possessing the cbd oil, it would have been _ dubai with possessing the cbd oil, it would have been much - dubai with possessing the cbd oil, it would have been much easier. it would have been much easier process — it would have been much easier process now— it would have been much easier process now it _ it would have been much easier process. now it been _ it would have been much easierl process. now it been escalated, it would have been much easier- process. now it been escalated, ten years, _ process. now it been escalated, ten years. it _ process. now it been escalated, ten years. it is _ process. now it been escalated, ten years, it is unacceptable, _ process. now it been escalated, ten years, it is unacceptable, it- process. now it been escalated, ten years, it is unacceptable, it needs i years, it is unacceptable, it needs to be _ years, it is unacceptable, it needs to be appealed _ years, it is unacceptable, it needs to be appealed. the _ years, it is unacceptable, it needs to be appealed. the whole - years, it is unacceptable, it needs to be appealed. the whole appealj to be appealed. the whole appeal process _ to be appealed. the whole appeal process in— to be appealed. the whole appeal process in abu _ to be appealed. the whole appeal process in abu dhabi _ to be appealed. the whole appeal process in abu dhabi is _
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to be appealed. the whole appeal process in abu dhabi is strenuous| process in abu dhabi is strenuous and lengthy. _ process in abu dhabi is strenuous and lengthy, there _ process in abu dhabi is strenuous and lengthy, there are _ process in abu dhabi is strenuous and lengthy, there are delays. i process in abu dhabi is strenuous. and lengthy, there are delays. and it's problematic. _ and lengthy, there are delays. and it's problematic. this _ and lengthy, there are delays. and it's problematic. this is _ and lengthy, there are delays. and it's problematic. this is a - and lengthy, there are delays. and it's problematic. this is a case - and lengthy, there are delays. and it's problematic. this is a case wel it's problematic. this is a case we have _ it's problematic. this is a case we have seen— it's problematic. this is a case we have seen over— it's problematic. this is a case we have seen over and _ it's problematic. this is a case we have seen over and over- it's problematic. this is a case we have seen over and over again - it's problematic. this is a case we i have seen over and over again where someone _ have seen over and over again where someone has — have seen over and over again where someone has been _ have seen over and over again where someone has been in _ have seen over and over again where someone has been in a _ have seen over and over again where someone has been in a car— have seen over and over again where someone has been in a car with- have seen over and over again where someone has been in a car with a - someone has been in a car with a friend _ someone has been in a car with a friend or— someone has been in a car with a friend or didn't— someone has been in a car with a friend or didn't even— someone has been in a car with a friend or didn't even know- someone has been in a car with a friend or didn't even know that i friend or didn't even know that someone — friend or didn't even know that someone else _ friend or didn't even know that someone else was _ friend or didn't even know that someone else was in- friend or didn't even know that i someone else was in possession friend or didn't even know that - someone else was in possession of marijuana — someone else was in possession of marijuana but _ someone else was in possession of marijuana but they— someone else was in possession of marijuana but they all— someone else was in possession of marijuana but they all get - someone else was in possession of marijuana but they all get charged i marijuana but they all get charged with a _ marijuana but they all get charged with a really— marijuana but they all get charged with a really wide _ marijuana but they all get charged with a really wide cast _ marijuana but they all get charged with a really wide cast the - marijuana but they all get charged with a really wide cast the net - marijuana but they all get charged with a really wide cast the net byi with a really wide cast the net by the dubai — with a really wide cast the net by the dubai police. _ with a really wide cast the net by the dubai police. the _ with a really wide cast the net by the dubai police. the fact - with a really wide cast the net by the dubai police. the fact that. with a really wide cast the net byl the dubai police. the fact that the ruling _ the dubai police. the fact that the ruling came — the dubai police. the fact that the ruling came in— the dubai police. the fact that the ruling came in and _ the dubai police. the fact that the ruling came in and said _ the dubai police. the fact that the ruling came in and said that- the dubai police. the fact that the ruling came in and said that he . ruling came in and said that he unintentionally— ruling came in and said that he unintentionally possessed - ruling came in and said that he unintentionally possessed the| ruling came in and said that he - unintentionally possessed the cbd oil, i unintentionally possessed the cbd oil. ithink— unintentionally possessed the cbd oil. i think it — unintentionally possessed the cbd oil, i think it is — unintentionally possessed the cbd oil, i think it is a _ unintentionally possessed the cbd oil, i think it is a time _ unintentionally possessed the cbd oil, i think it is a time for- unintentionally possessed the cbd oil, i think it is a time for a - oil, i think it is a time for a ruler— oil, i think it is a time for a ruler intervention. - oil, i think it is a time for a ruler intervention. there i oil, i think it is a time for a i ruler intervention. there have oil, i think it is a time for a - ruler intervention. there have been applications— ruler intervention. there have been applications made _ ruler intervention. there have been applications made for— ruler intervention. there have been applications made for that - ruler intervention. there have been applications made for that and - ruler intervention. there have been applications made for that and we i applications made for that and we are pushing — applications made for that and we are pushing for— applications made for that and we are pushing for it— applications made for that and we are pushing for it because - applications made for that and we are pushing for it because clearlyl are pushing for it because clearly this is— are pushing for it because clearly this is unjust _ are pushing for it because clearly this is unjust.— are pushing for it because clearly this is unjust. this is un'ust. and would have the like this is unjust. and would have the like rison this is unjust. and would have the like prison over _ this is unjust. and would have the like prison over there, _ this is unjust. and would have the like prison over there, what - this is unjust. and would have the like prison over there, what can i this is unjust. and would have the i like prison over there, what can you tell us about that? —— what are the conditions like in prison over there? _, ., , conditions like in prison over there? ., , ~ , conditions like in prison over there? ., , a , there? the conditions in abu dhabi have been reported _ there? the conditions in abu dhabi have been reported by _ there? the conditions in abu dhabi have been reported by many - there? the conditions in abu dhabi i have been reported by many people, we have _ have been reported by many people, we have had — have been reported by many people, we have had people _ have been reported by many people, we have had people like _ have been reported by many people, we have had people like andrew-
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we have had people like andrew hedges in — we have had people like andrew hedges in prison, _ we have had people like andrew hedges in prison, who _ we have had people like andrew. hedges in prison, who have come out and said they have _ and said they have been beaten, beaten, tortured, subject to... i and said they have been beaten, beaten, tortured, subject to... .j and said they have been beaten, i beaten, tortured, subject to... . if beaten, tortured, subject to... . ll” you beaten, tortured, subject to... . you could talk to him now and beaten, tortured, subject to... m you could talk to him now and have an honest conversation which was not monitored, would you say to him, where you are a bit naive, to get yourself into this situation, what would you say to him as his mum? i would you say to him as his mum? i would say, billy, you have maybe been a little bit silly. he has done absolutely nothing wrong. and he has got stuck out there. and boris johnson, you need to take this up in parliament. you need to put billy's name out there. 160,000 people have signed a petition online but yet no one seems to want to know about it. i will tell billy as well one other thing, we will never give up the fight. thing, we will never give up the fiuht. ., ., ., ., . fight. you are fighting hard now. we hear about this _ fight. you are fighting hard now. we hear about this possible _ fight. you are fighting hard now. we hear about this possible rule - fight. you are fighting hard now. we hear about this possible rule is - hear about this possible rule is intervention but i understand that
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could be months off? —— the intervention of the ruler? could be months off? -- the intervention of the ruler? there is a ardon intervention of the ruler? there is a pardon happening _ intervention of the ruler? there is a pardon happening on _ intervention of the ruler? there is i a pardon happening on independence day on _ a pardon happening on independence day on the _ a pardon happening on independence day on the uae, and they are going to be _ day on the uae, and they are going to be pardoning quite a few people, i to be pardoning quite a few people, i believe _ to be pardoning quite a few people, i believe. and we are just hoping that billy's name will be on that list. that billy's name will be on that list it— that billy's name will be on that list it is— that billy's name will be on that list. it is randomly selected, all we can— list. it is randomly selected, all we can do— list. it is randomly selected, all we can do is pray and hope that his name _ we can do is pray and hope that his name gets— we can do is pray and hope that his name gets called.— name gets called. have you been liven an name gets called. have you been given any indication _ name gets called. have you been given any indication he _ name gets called. have you been given any indication he might- name gets called. have you been given any indication he might be| name gets called. have you been i given any indication he might be on the list? it’s given any indication he might be on the list? �*, _, : , given any indication he might be on the list? �*, , , ., ., the list? it's completely random. there's thousands _ the list? it's completely random. there's thousands of _ the list? it's completely random. there's thousands of people - the list? it's completely random. there's thousands of people in i there's thousands of people in prison— there's thousands of people in prison out— there's thousands of people in prison out there. for whatever charges — prison out there. for whatever charges and stuff. and all we're doing _ charges and stuff. and all we're doing is— charges and stuff. and all we're doing is escaping and alex, i believe — doing is escaping and alex, i believe you have had a conversation with billy _ believe you have had a conversation with billy since the result of the appeal— with billy since the result of the appeal was announced, how was he with you? _ appeal was announced, how was he with you? i— appeal was announced, how was he with you? i spoke to him yesterday for about— with you? i spoke to him yesterday for about five minutes. he was disappointed, because he has been in there for— disappointed, because he has been in there for nearly 11 months now. he has spent — there for nearly 11 months now. he has spent enough time in the. to get
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a ten— has spent enough time in the. to get a ten year— has spent enough time in the. to get a ten year sentence for accidental possession, unknowingly having it, they basically admitted that he never— they basically admitted that he never knew it was in his car. it's crazy _ never knew it was in his car. it's crazy it's — never knew it was in his car. it's crazy it's a _ never knew it was in his car. it's crazy. it's a ten year sentence. for such _ crazy. it's a ten year sentence. for such a — crazy. it's a ten year sentence. for such a ridiculous crime. it's not even _ such a ridiculous crime. it's not even a — such a ridiculous crime. it's not even a crime. it's crazy. breda, you know him — even a crime. it's crazy. breda, you know him better _ even a crime. it's crazy. breda, you know him better than _ even a crime. it's crazy. breda, you know him better than anyone, - even a crime. it's crazy. breda, you know him better than anyone, how| know him better than anyone, how will he be dealing with this and this situation?— this situation? billy is quite stron: this situation? billy is quite strong hearted, _ this situation? billy is quite strong hearted, and - this situation? billy is quite strong hearted, and always| this situation? billy is quite - strong hearted, and always upbeat. he is the life and sell of everything, you would know if you met billy. at the last time i spoke to him, you can feel the fight is going in him. we need someone else to help us so much, just bring him home. to help us so much, 'ust bring him home. ., , to help us so much, 'ust bring him home. . , ., i. ., ., to help us so much, 'ust bring him home. . , ., ., ., , home. finally, for you, radha, is there anything — home. finally, for you, radha, is there anything else, _ home. finally, for you, radha, is there anything else, any - home. finally, for you, radha, is there anything else, any other. there anything else, any other options for him? it —— yes, there is the apollo possibility to possibility to appeal to the supreme court. brute possibility to appeal to the supreme
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court. ~ ., ., ., , , ., court. we are going to be putting a lot of diplomatic _ court. we are going to be putting a lot of diplomatic question - court. we are going to be putting a lot of diplomatic question on - court. we are going to be putting a lot of diplomatic question on the i lot of diplomatic question on the uae, _ lot of diplomatic question on the uae. we — lot of diplomatic question on the uae. we are _ lot of diplomatic question on the uae, we are raising _ lot of diplomatic question on the uae, we are raising it— lot of diplomatic question on the uae, we are raising it in- lot of diplomatic question on the uae, we are raising it in mps- lot of diplomatic question on the| uae, we are raising it in mps and hoping— uae, we are raising it in mps and hoping to— uae, we are raising it in mps and hoping to get _ uae, we are raising it in mps and hoping to get a _ uae, we are raising it in mps and hoping to get a question - uae, we are raising it in mps and hoping to get a question in - hoping to get a question in parliament. _ hoping to get a question in parliament. and _ hoping to get a question in parliament. and we - hoping to get a question in parliament. and we want i hoping to get a question in. parliament. and we want to hoping to get a question in - parliament. and we want to get the part of— parliament. and we want to get the part of to _ parliament. and we want to get the part of to explain _ parliament. and we want to get the part of to explain the _ parliament. and we want to get the part of to explain the relationship i part of to explain the relationship they have — part of to explain the relationship they have built _ part of to explain the relationship they have built with _ part of to explain the relationship they have built with the _ part of to explain the relationship they have built with the uae - part of to explain the relationship they have built with the uae for i they have built with the uae for trade _ they have built with the uae for trade and — they have built with the uae for trade and business, _ they have built with the uae for trade and business, and - they have built with the uae for trade and business, and they. they have built with the uae for i trade and business, and they need they have built with the uae for - trade and business, and they need to apply— trade and business, and they need to apply it _ trade and business, and they need to apply it in _ trade and business, and they need to apply it in an— trade and business, and they need to apply it in an area _ trade and business, and they need to apply it in an area like _ trade and business, and they need to apply it in an area like human- apply it in an area like human rights— apply it in an area like human rightsfor— apply it in an area like human rightsfora— apply it in an area like human rights for a travesty - apply it in an area like human rights for a travesty like - apply it in an area like human rights for a travesty like this. rights for a travesty like this happens _ rights for a travesty like this happens. there _ rights for a travesty like this happens. there nothing - rights for a travesty like this| happens. there nothing billy rights for a travesty like this - happens. there nothing billy could have done — happens. there nothing billy could have done to — happens. there nothing billy could have done to prevent _ happens. there nothing billy could have done to prevent this, - happens. there nothing billy could have done to prevent this, he - happens. there nothing billy could. have done to prevent this, he didn't know— have done to prevent this, he didn't know he _ have done to prevent this, he didn't know he had — have done to prevent this, he didn't know he had the _ have done to prevent this, he didn't know he had the cbd _ have done to prevent this, he didn't know he had the cbd oil. _ have done to prevent this, he didn't know he had the cbd oil. hundredsl have done to prevent this, he didn't. know he had the cbd oil. hundreds of people _ know he had the cbd oil. hundreds of people over— know he had the cbd oil. hundreds of people over the — know he had the cbd oil. hundreds of people over the years _ know he had the cbd oil. hundreds of people over the years have _ know he had the cbd oil. hundreds of people over the years have been - know he had the cbd oil. hundreds of people over the years have been in i people over the years have been in this exact — people over the years have been in this exact situation. _ people over the years have been in this exact situation. it _ people over the years have been in this exact situation. it comes - people over the years have been in this exact situation. it comes down to the _ this exact situation. it comes down to the uae — this exact situation. it comes down to the uae improving _ this exact situation. it comes down to the uae improving their- this exact situation. it comes down to the uae improving theirjet- to the uae improving theirjet system — to the uae improving theirjet system and _ to the uae improving theirjet system and ensuring - to the uae improving theirjet system and ensuring that - to the uae improving theirjeti system and ensuring that there to the uae improving theirjet- system and ensuring that there are no forced _ system and ensuring that there are no forced confessions, _ system and ensuring that there are no forced confessions, that - system and ensuring that there are no forced confessions, that they i no forced confessions, that they have _ no forced confessions, that they have evidence _ no forced confessions, that they have evidence to _ no forced confessions, that they have evidence to secure - no forced confessions, that they have evidence to secure a - have evidence to secure a prosecution _ have evidence to secure a prosecution or— have evidence to secure a prosecution or a - have evidence to secure a i prosecution or a conviction, have evidence to secure a - prosecution or a conviction, before arresting _ prosecution or a conviction, before arresting and — prosecution or a conviction, before arresting and charging _ prosecution or a conviction, before arresting and charging that - prosecution or a conviction, before| arresting and charging that person. thank— arresting and charging that person. thank you. — arresting and charging that person. thank you. all. _ arresting and charging that person. thank you, all, very _ arresting and charging that person. thank you, all, very much - arresting and charging that person. thank you, all, very much indeed i arresting and charging that person. i thank you, all, very much indeed for your time this morning. we will keep across this story in the days and weeks to come. students at more than 58 universities across the uk, could experience potential disruption from today, as staff begin three days of strike action. the dispute is about better pensions, pay and working conditions. there are fears further action
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could take place in the new year if the issues remain unsolved. our education correspondent, elaine dunkley reports. preparing for a picket line. these strikes are about pensions, pay and working conditions, and could have an impact on the financial future of thousands of university staff and the education of millions of students. every year, we are seeing more colleagues on fixed term contracts and really insecure contracts. you know, it's got to a point where i don't feel like i can recommend this line of work to anybody any more and that's really heartbreaking for me. i think that many vice chancellors across the country have taken quite big pay rises at times when they're expecting their staff, as i say, to accept a real terms pay decrease, and i just don't think that's fair. the average member stands to lose around 35% of their pension, which in their retirement, that obviously is going to make a really significant difference
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to their quality of life. but before they get to retirement, we have also seen in the last 12 years, in realterms, a 20% pay cut. this was the strike in leeds in 2018. there were also strikes the following year, and of course, for students, the pandemic caused huge disruption. there is support for university staff amongst these students, but with fees of £9,000 per year and some lectures cancelled, they are also worried about their futures. we are also paying for our staff to get paid a decent pay, and have decent working conditions, which they're not getting. so, i mean, we should be in solidarity with them because their fight is our fight. a lot of people are very angry because theyjust don't think it's fair that after a year of strikes followed by a year and a half of online learning, they have just got back to normal, things are just about starting to get back into the swing and then we are being, we are facing possibly
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months of strikes. it's always difficult, it's hard. i won't be seeing any- students, i would be seeing any of my colleagues. unless they are on the picket line as well. - in leeds, around 2000 members of staff will walk off campus. here, the student union doesn't support the strike. and says it has to focus on the student experience and can't support a national campaign at the expense of members. thank you so much, thank you. if alex gibbon is the editor of the student newspaper, the gryphon. if alex gibbon is the editor of the student newspaper, the gryphon. copy of the paper, anyone? thank you so much. there is a massive pay gap as well, a gender pay gap, and a racial pay gap too. the strikes have been a divisive issue on campus. i think the most controversial thing is the fact that the student union, for the first time, has actually come out and said that they will not be supporting the strikes. usually they stay neutral. and there's a lot of very much split opinion, i would say. a lot of international students feel kind of quite hard done by, especially because they have higher fees. it's very contentious at the minute.
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i know strikes are going to be disruptive, and it feels spikier than ever this year. universities uk, which represents vice chancellors, said it's frustrating to be facing industrial action over pensions but it's working to reduce the impact on students. i really don't think it will be an issue because not many people are striking. and there are many things that we can do in universities to make sure that the students don't suffer. we can change deadlines, we can change teaching methods, we can change assessments, we can change personnel, there's all sorts of things that we can do to mitigate against the negative affects of striking. one of the big questions on campuses is, how long will university strikes last? the longer it goes on, solidarity will remain, i'm confident of that, yeah. i disagree. i fully support the strikes but i think the longer it goes on, the less students will support the strikes. this is the start of three days of action but this dispute has lasted over a decade. and with no resolution in sight,
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staff and students are preparing for more disruption. elaine dunkley, bbc news. thousands of people in scotland and northern england have spent a fifth night without light or heat as engineers continue to repair the damage caused by storm arwen. the affected areas are mainly remote villages like blanchland, in northumberland where there's no electricity, but community spirit is in full flow, as our reporter alison freeman found out. there are the actions we're seeing again and again in the wake of storm arwen. communities helping each other to survive. the lord crewe arms is the only place in blanchland that has power thanks to its back—up generators, so they are keeping an eye on the vulnerable and providing hot food and drinks. i've basically come in just to charge my wife's cochlear implant. and without the grateful help of the lord crew here,
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we would be absolutely snookered. and they're actually doing free soup for the village as we speak. we are surviving, only, cold showers are a bit chilly! but there's been such a community spirit, i don't think we would have survived without the lord crew. i think half of the community were in there last night. nearby communities, they have had, northern power grid have gone round to give them a bit of community support and things. and as yet, we've had nobody into the village or in contact from northern power grid. so i would say to them, really, they do need to make at least one call to the village to tell us that they know we're here. and this northumberland village's post office is being kept stocked up and running as well. there is no internet, there is no tv. the masks have come back in and they didn't know about it. so i'm quite literally the bringer of news to a lot of people in the village. lovely to have some help from the government, maybe draft the army in, maybe just some welfare units or things like that. the lord crewe arms can manage to keep its restaurant and half its 20 or so rooms running on the generator. but they can take cash
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only, and cannot check bookings on their system. but the lack of information is what's causing the most frustration here. it's not very good, we haven't had any updates from the power grid is what's going to happen. the updates we have been getting haven't been following through. so we're just a bit worried about how long it's going to be off for. so did you expect it to last this long? i'm very surprised, i thought there would have been at least maybe some generators they could have brought up and plugged into the village and just kept everyone a bit warmer, really. it's going to freeze again in a couple of days, so my worry is, if we are not sorted by then, we will have burst pipes and stuff like that to contend with as well. alison freeman, blanchland. thank goodness for the generator at the pub. i thank goodness for the generator at the ub. ., : thank goodness for the generator at the ub. .: ., ., thank goodness for the generator at the ub. ., ., , the pub. i was going to say, they are usin: the pub. i was going to say, they are using the _ the pub. i was going to say, they are using the generator, - the pub. i was going to say, they are using the generator, hence i the pub. i was going to say, they i are using the generator, hence the lights. are using the generator, hence the lirhts. �* : are using the generator, hence the lirhts. ~ , ., , lights. and using it and using it, i was auoin lights. and using it and using it, i was going to _ lights. and using it and using it, i was going to say _ lights. and using it and using it, i was going to say well _ lights. and using it and using it, i was going to say well done - lights. and using it and using it, i was going to say well done to - lights. and using it and using it, ii was going to say well done to them but they are probably not able to
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watch us! lots of questions about the vaccine booster programme this morning — we'll get some answers from the health secretary sajid javid in just a few minutes. pharmacies are going to play a big part in the roll out, and breakfast'sjohn maguire is at one for us this morning. they are going to be recruiting an army of volunteers. john, i can see you? army of volunteers. john, i can see ou? ., army of volunteers. john, i can see ou? . , ., , army of volunteers. john, i can see ou? . , , you? can you see me? yes! right in the front line. _ you? can you see me? yes! right in the front line, community _ the front line, community pharmacies, your local pharmacy will sell all sorts, pharmacies, your local pharmacy will sellall sorts, hot pharmacies, your local pharmacy will sell all sorts, hot water bottles, baby shampoo, stuff that smells nice, the pharmacist is able to dispense invaluable medical advice, prescription medicines, over—the—counter tablets, things like that. the flu jab, crucially at this time of year, they have also been doing and we'll be doing covid boosterjabs. that programme really starting to ramp up now. the crew here in west sussex getting ready for a very busy day ahead.
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approaching something like 300 patients will come here for their vital booster today. we will tell you more after the news, travel and weather where you are watching breakfast. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. the mayor has warned an entire tube line could close if transport for london does not get more funding from central government. talks have begun on another bailout to try to keep tube and bus services running past the end of next week. the government's previously said it's shown its commitment to positive discussions around tfl's future. without government support, injanuary, we are going to have to make tough decisions which could be cutting our bus services by almost 20%, cutting our tube services by almost 10%. and the experience people have using the bakerloo line, of 50—year—old trains, which are already ten years past their life expectancy, having to be endured for the next 20 years.
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detectives investigating the murder of a 16—year—old boy in southall have arrested a man on suspicion of murder. rishmeet singh was stabbed last wednesday on raleigh road and died at the scene. a 19—year—old man was arrested yesterday and remains in custody. an exhibition celebrating the history of black women's hair is being held in essex in the new year. it's a project byjosephine melville, who's been collecting the stories and experiences of women for her project in southend called know your roots. know your roots the project is important to me because their conversation around the way that black women style their hair, how they feel comfortable about their hair, has been an ongoing thing but never really addressed. travel now... the overground isn't running between clapham junction and willesden junction. the piccadilly line has problems
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with leaves on the line. tfl rail has severe delays between paddington and heathrow airport and reading. and for all the latest travel news where you are tune into your bbc local radio station. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it felt mild for this time of year yesterday, but that mild air was with us for one day only and now it is set to turn colder once more. we saw a cold front go through last night. that gave us wet and windy weather for a time but the weather front has now largely cleared through. so it is a mostly dry start to the morning. plenty of cloud. we will see sunshine emerge and there is still a brisk north—westerly wind blowing, so a blustery day of weather. we are coming into chillier feeling air, too, so the highest temperatures will be this morning, unusually, and then they will tend to drop off as we head towards the end of the day. so gradually feeling colder. there will be showers through the afternoon. perhaps the odd sharper one at times, but still some limited sunny spells. as we head through this evening and overnight,
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the skies will clear, the showers will fade away. the winds will lighten and there will be a frost developing into thursday morning. so it is a cold, frosty start to the day tomorrow. it is a calmer looking day of weather. the winds are lighter, now northerly, and there will be sunshine on and off throughout the day. temperatures will not get much past mid—single figures. so it will be feeling colder. on friday, turning wet, windy and a bit milder. i'm back in an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. let's return to our main story. borisjohnson has promised to throw everything at the vaccination effort, as he announced a significant ramping up of the booster programme. the plan will see all eligible adults in england offered a boosterjab by the end of january in response to the new omicron variant. let's get the details from
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the health secretary, sajid javid. good morning. when the prime minister says you are going to throw everything at this, what does that mean? ~ : everything at this, what does that mean? ~ , ., ., mean? when we first learned about the omicron — mean? when we first learned about the omicron variant _ mean? when we first learned about the omicron variant our— mean? when we first learned about the omicron variant our strategy - mean? when we first learned about| the omicron variant our strategy was to buy time for scientists to assess it but also to build defences. vaccines still remain our wall of defence and yes it is possible with this new variant they might be less effective but it is also likely they will be effective against serious disease and that is what this new strategy, this national mission on boosters is about. i asked thejcvi, the independent advisers, whether we should expand the programme in light of this new variant. they agreed and said not only should we extend it to adults but we should cut the dosing
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interval to three months which means millions more are eligible. nhs has already done an amazing job in terms of rolling out vaccines. we are asking a lot of them, but they are up asking a lot of them, but they are up to the task. when you get your call, this is part of the national mission where you can play a part, please step up and roll up your sleeves and get protected. when you aet our sleeves and get protected. when you get your call. — sleeves and get protected. when you get your call. we _ sleeves and get protected. when you get your call, we had _ sleeves and get protected. when you get your call, we had a _ sleeves and get protected. when you get your call, we had a lot _ sleeves and get protected. when you get your call, we had a lot of - get your call, we had a lot of people get in touch this morning about the messaging. what they are hearing from the government about how they get their booster. do they get in touch with their gp or pharmacy or do they sit tight and wait? : ., pharmacy or do they sit tight and wait? , ., ., , ., , .,, wait? there is a group of people already eligible _ wait? there is a group of people already eligible and _ wait? there is a group of people already eligible and they - wait? there is a group of people already eligible and they will. wait? there is a group of people. already eligible and they will have been contacted by the nhs, or if they are eligible and want to go to a walk—in centre they can, which is anyone over the age of 40 who has had at least six months since the
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last dose but that six months now is about to fall to three months. that means a lot more people over the age of 14 will be more eligible. the nhs will contact you. if you know you are in that group, you can go to a walk—in centre. over the next weeks, what we will see the nhs do is possibly week by week reduce the ages. they do it in five year intervals. the next day will invite 35-39 intervals. the next day will invite 35—39 year olds and gradually, between now and the end of january, every adult should receive an offer and will be able to get a lot more vaccinated. when you are offered, please step up. it vaccinated. when you are offered, please step up— please step up. it will take until the end of— please step up. it will take until the end of february _ please step up. it will take until the end of february you - please step up. it will take until the end of february you are - the end of february you are committing to at present. how will you get through them by the end of
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january? brute you get through them by the end of janua ? ~ ., : you get through them by the end of janua ?~ . , ., , .,, january? we are being ambitious about this- _ january? we are being ambitious about this. that _ january? we are being ambitious about this. that is _ january? we are being ambitious about this. that is exactly - january? we are being ambitious about this. that is exactly what i january? we are being ambitious i about this. that is exactly what we need to do. i do not deny it is a huge national mission that will be tough. the nhs and others are up to this. as we move into this new delivery effort we will move from... in the last week i think we had 2.4 million vaccines across the uk. we need to do at least1 million more to achieve our targets. i think it can be done. our target is to give everyone an offer so everyone who receives the offer, come forward and get vaccinated. we have to be realistic, as we have seen with the vaccination programme, that not everyone who receives an offer comes forward. i everyone who receives an offer comes forward. ., everyone who receives an offer comes forward. . . ., , ., ~ ., forward. i am curious to know where ou will forward. i am curious to know where you will find — forward. i am curious to know where you will find volunteers _ forward. i am curious to know where you will find volunteers to _ forward. i am curious to know where you will find volunteers to do - forward. i am curious to know where you will find volunteers to do these. you will find volunteers to do these vaccinations. looking back eight months ago, when we were first in
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the situation with a mass vaccination effort, people were on furlough, working from home. maybe volunteers were easier to find. how will you find the army of volunteers? it will you find the army of volunteers?— will you find the army of volunteers? , ., ., ., volunteers? it is another great question- _ volunteers? it is another great question- in — question. in terms of increasing capacity there are things we have started to do. existing national vaccination centres and hospital hubs, many of them will open longer, some of the people there have committed to doing extra hours or they know where they can find volunteers, perhaps volunteers they used in the past. we will have more pharmacies than ever before, around 1500 pharmacies across the country, people who can deliver the vaccines in your community, and we are working with pharmacists and representatives to do that. and more gps will be involved. we are making changes around how gps are working
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to help more come forward, especially with those who might be homebound or others who might find it difficult to get to a vaccination centre. in terms of volunteers, we need more. part of what we started from yesterday when amanda was with me, head of nhs, in the press conference, is to call for more volunteers. if you go to the nhs website it will tell you how to volunteer. and last, we have been fortunate to have 400 more military personneljoin us. these are qualified medical people who can help with this roll—out. you help with this roll-out. you mentioned _ help with this roll-out. you mentioned gps. _ help with this roll-out. you mentioned gps. we - help with this roll-out. you mentioned gps. we had i help with this roll—out. you mentioned gps. we had a gp on an hour ago and she has a question which is, what will gps do with the rest of their work load? everyone is waiting for the protocol, but what will happen to the rest of the gps' workload? the will happen to the rest of the gps' workload? . will happen to the rest of the gps' workload? ,, , will happen to the rest of the gps' workload? . : ., ~' will happen to the rest of the gps' workload? ,, , ., ~ .. will happen to the rest of the gps'
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workload? ,, , ., ~ ., ., workload? the nhs is working on that with gp representatives. _ workload? the nhs is working on that with gp representatives. they - workload? the nhs is working on that with gp representatives. they have i with gp representatives. they have been doing that since setting out this new mission on boosters. i am confident they will work out a way where some of the workload of gps can be temporarily suspended or gps can be temporarily suspended or gps can be temporarily suspended or gps can be helped in other ways so they can be helped in other ways so they can focus on vaccine delivery. [30 can focus on vaccine delivery. do ou can focus on vaccine delivery. do you know when they will be told that? i think imminently. viewers have said they are struggling to book a booster. karen said she had been offered her booster 120 miles away. some say the waiting time is “p away. some say the waiting time is up to four weeks. what happens to those people? if somebody is offered a booster in four weeks, and they are vulnerable, clinically, should they be shielding?— are vulnerable, clinically, should they be shielding? because of the massive expansion _ they be shielding? because of the massive expansion we _ they be shielding? because of the massive expansion we have - they be shielding? because of the | massive expansion we have talked about with the hospital hubs, pharmacies, gps, military help, iam certain that will make it easier for more to get access to boosters. i am
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sorry to hear about the individual you talked about. no one should have to go that far to get their booster. i would think the gp in local areas would be able to provide boosters in those circumstances. we want to make sure it is as available as easily as possible to regardless everyone of where they live. that possible to regardless everyone of where they live.— possible to regardless everyone of where they live. that message i 'ust read out is fl where they live. that message i 'ust read out is one of�* where they live. that message i 'ust read out is one of many. * where they live. that message ijust read out is one of many. another. read out is one of many. another said i cannot get a boosterfor my 83—year—old housebound husband. listening to the health minister makes me see red because no one is coming to give my husband his booster. ~ ., coming to give my husband his booster. ~ . ., , booster. what will i do? i am sorry to hearthat- _ booster. what will i do? i am sorry to hear that. anyone, _ booster. what will i do? i am sorry to hear that. anyone, especially i booster. what will i do? i am sorry to hear that. anyone, especially if| to hear that. anyone, especially if someone is over the age of 18, then they should have been, if they are homebound, contacted by their gp. i do not know the details of that situation but it worries me to hear that because that should not be happening. i hope after this programme we might be able to share
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details with me. if there are others like that, then that should not be happening. if i can i would say to anyone in that situation, if they contact their gp and they are not getting anywhere the best thing they can do is contact their member of parliament directly and that will come to me and we will do everything to help. we are getting a record number of boosters out already. we have the most successful booster programme in the world, we have done 18 million in a few weeks and that has covered more than a third of the aduu has covered more than a third of the adult population. no other country in europe has come close to that, but now we need to do more to build defences. it but now we need to do more to build defences. : ., but now we need to do more to build defences. , ., ., , ., defences. it is a sociable time of ear and defences. it is a sociable time of year and families _ defences. it is a sociable time of year and families want _ defences. it is a sociable time of year and families want to - defences. it is a sociable time of year and families want to get. year and families want to get together and perhaps people who have not socialised much of the christmas party. what are your thoughts on
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christmas gatherings? should we celebrate christmas together in big groups? i celebrate christmas together in big arou s? ., celebrate christmas together in big i rou . s? ., .. “ celebrate christmas together in big u-rous? ., ., groups? i do not think people need to chance groups? i do not think people need to change plans- — groups? i do not think people need to change plans. the _ groups? i do not think people need to change plans. the guidance - to change plans. the guidance already out there, which we published a a few weeks back, the plan that carries guidance around days that get darker. the virus likes colder weather. we should all be cautious. it might be sensible, depending on the type of party and the setting, to take her lateral flow tester before you go. this is guidance already out there. throughout the pandemic, the majority of people have been really sensible. they know when they might have to take a test earlier, should they wear a face mask. they are sensible precautions we can all take. the measures we have announced because of this variant, the announcements in the last few days around whether it is to do with
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international travel, self—isolation rules, coming into contact with someone with a suspected case of the new variant, they are the right measures and there is no need to put more in place at this time. you measures and there is no need to put more in place at this time.— more in place at this time. you are in the prime _ more in place at this time. you are in the prime minister's _ more in place at this time. you are in the prime minister's camp - more in place at this time. you are in the prime minister's camp as . more in place at this time. you are in the prime minister's camp as far as christmas parties are concerned, with the right precautions, they can go ahead. but doctorjenny harries said yesterday it might be a good idea to limit christmas socialising and gathering at christmas. what is your take on what she said? i and gathering at christmas. what is your take on what she said?- your take on what she said? i work with jenn your take on what she said? i work with jenny on _ your take on what she said? i work with jenny on an — your take on what she said? i work with jenny on an almost _ your take on what she said? i work with jenny on an almost daily - your take on what she said? i work with jenny on an almost daily basis withjenny on an almost daily basis and she is fantastic and she runs the uk health security agency and, like many other experts we have, they will have their views and opinions. it is for government to listen to these and take a proportionate approach and that is what we have done. i think the guidance we have got out there is right. it already says when you get darker and colder days, you remind
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people the virus likes that and so does the flu. we want to protect ourselves against that also. it is about taking account of the current guidance. about taking account of the current ruidance. ., ., ., ,., about taking account of the current ruidance. ., ., ., ., ., . ., guidance. you are also announcing an action lan guidance. you are also announcing an action plan on — guidance. you are also announcing an action plan on hiv. _ guidance. you are also announcing an action plan on hiv. why _ guidance. you are also announcing an action plan on hiv. why is _ guidance. you are also announcing an action plan on hiv. why is that - guidance. you are also announcing an action plan on hiv. why is that so - action plan on hiv. why is that so important?— action plan on hiv. why is that so imortant? ., _., �* important? today is world aids day. the action plan _ important? today is world aids day. the action plan is _ important? today is world aids day. the action plan is to _ important? today is world aids day. the action plan is to make _ important? today is world aids day. the action plan is to make sure - important? today is world aids day. the action plan is to make sure we i the action plan is to make sure we are doing everything we can to deal with this disease. i remember when i was growing up and sadly, when i was a child, if somebody got hiv and it developed into aids it was thought of as a death sentence. today with treatments we have got you can go on to live long lives. but still there are too many cases of hiv in this country and what we are setting out is an ambitious target which i believe can be met. we are saying by 2030 we want to have no new hiv
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cases. it 2030 we want to have no new hiv cases. : :: 2030 we want to have no new hiv cases. , ii , . , 2030 we want to have no new hiv cases. , i: , ., , ., 2030 we want to have no new hiv cases. ,::y ., . cases. it is 40 years today since the first death _ cases. it is 40 years today since the first death from _ cases. it is 40 years today since the first death from a _ cases. it is 40 years today since the first death from a aids - cases. it is 40 years today since i the first death from a aids related illness. why has it taken so long to come up with an action plan like this? ., , come up with an action plan like this? . , ., , ., , this? there have been action plans in lace this? there have been action plans in place for — this? there have been action plans in place for many _ this? there have been action plans in place for many years _ this? there have been action plans in place for many years and - this? there have been action plans in place for many years and huge i in place for many years and huge progress has been made. the treatments we have today have been totally transformative. many totally tra nsformative. many governments totally transformative. many governments have been working on this. the nhs has done an incredible job to work with people, either preventing people getting hiv or if they do, helping them to live good lives. a lot has been done. what we are setting out today is an ambitious mission. however much we have done in the past, i always think we can do more. this is a horrid disease and we must do more and that is why i want to make sure we have no new cases of hiv by 2030. thank you. we will put you in touch
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with the lady struggling to get the booster for her 83—year—old housebound husband. thank you. just one of many messages coming through. a lot of people with questions and issues they want raising. at 8:30am we will have a mid week check—in with professor linda bauld and doctor chris smith. our saturday experts but we will have a wednesday surgery this morning. i think we need clarity. yes on the spread of the virus and what we know about the new variant and also the boosters and rules and different nations of the uk. should we go to the christmas party? who knows? i was not even invited, it is not an issue for me! good morning. is there a party? i don't know, i was not invited either!
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good morning, it is a cold start compared to yesterday. for most but not everywhere. the south is still mild but that will change. it will be cold and windy and we are looking at sunshine and showers and some of those will be wintry. we have this weather front moving south. behind that we are bringing in colder air and progressively today it will turn colder. the weather front is moving south taking rain with it. the rain is light in nature so some starting with sunshine but behind it sunshine and showers and increasingly, the showers will be wintry to low levels across the highlands. the black circles represent the strength of wind gusts. it will be windy wherever you are but certainly so in the west, east and north. that will exacerbate the cold feeling. one degree in lerwick, 8—9 in the south
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of england. the channel islands in milder air at this stage but as the weather front milder air at this stage but as the weatherfront move milder air at this stage but as the weather front move south, cold air will follow. tonight dear skies. showers at all levels where they fall across scotland as snow. showers across eastern parts of england, northern ireland, wales, west midlands, west country. mostly rain at lower levels but there could be snow in the hills. and a widespread frost with the risk of ice on untreated surfaces. through thursday, high pressure builds from the atlantic. if you look at the isobars on the east coast, windy first thing and we will see showers, wintry on the hills. but a lot of dry weather and sunshine. wintry to low levels in northern scotland. cloud building in the west, with a new weather front bringing rain. although it won't be as windy
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tomorrow, temperatures for some are lower. 3—4 quite widely and even five in london. through thursday night into friday, the front moves to the east, preceded by snow on the leading edge. and high pressure building behind. by friday morning, the remnants of this front across the remnants of this front across the south—east. behind it, dry weather. showers ahead of the next weather. showers ahead of the next weather front and those are the temperatures. not as low as the next couple of days and higher across the far south—west. couple of days and higher across the farsouth—west. into couple of days and higher across the far south—west. into the weekend, low—pressure is coming our way to bring unsettled conditions with showers and longer spells of rain. but sunday at this stage looks like the driest day of the weekend but temperatures are down. so they are all over the place the next few days.
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it is very changeable. forty years ago, the first aids—related death was reported — it went on to claim thousands of lives throughout the eighties and nineties, many of them young, gay men. this year, to mark world aids day, there's a very special exhibition in liverpool honouring all those lives lost. josh parry is there and can tell us more about it. good morning. iam good morning. i am at a particularly special exhibition to mark a particularly special world aids day. it has been 40 years since the first reported aids related deaths in the uk and here in liverpool they are commemorating that with a display of the aids memorial quilt, a grassroots project to commemorate and celebrate lives we lost in the aids crisis. at the time of their
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death was no official formal recognition so people rallied around and created these beautiful quilt panels that have been on display around the world. in the uk, by the early 90s, we had own uk aids memorial quilt and this one is to remember brian king, a beautiful quilt created by his best friends. backin quilt created by his best friends. back in 1996, they sent it off to be displayed in an exhibition and thought they would never see it again. earlierthis thought they would never see it again. earlier this week, thought they would never see it again. earlierthis week, i had thought they would never see it again. earlier this week, i had the privilege of being there when they were reunited with it. take a look at this. music: smalltown boy by bronski beat. i remember seeing him for the first time. this is a story of friendship. falling into the room,
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laughing his head off with a big, long scarf on. we bumped into each other and, from that moment on, we gelled in a way that i have never experienced with anybody else ever since. we were suddenly brian and jerry. and we stayed brian and jerry until the day he died. whenjocelyn and jerry met brian, the bond was instant. the amazing thing about brian was he made everybody feel like that. he had the capacity to make everybody in a room feel like they were the most important person in the room to him. together, they discovered liverpool's gay scene. brian took me to my first club. he dressed me up and back—combed my hair and, somehow, we managed to get in.
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and somebody did that with a little shutter to let us in. and we were in. and as soon we were in, we just dived on the dance floor and never looked back. it felt like there wasn't anything we couldn't do. it felt like, you know, the world was waiting, basically. obviously, later in that period, quite a lot changed. suddenly, we started to hear i think, maybe in the pink paper, or whatever paper it was, there was this disease killing americans. and we couldn't think that there was a disease just killing gays, you know. you just didn't think that. and then suddenly it happened. there was that look of, you know, thinness that sort of... i remember being really sort of overwhelmed by that. there was a vinnie and colin who were two wonderful gay men. camp, zhoozhy, leathery, wonderful. and they died. and it wasn't until then that we realised something really big and all—encompassing
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was going on. everything changed. do you remember when brian told you that he had found out he was hiv positive? it was incredibly strange, because i saw him and i immediately knew it was positive. ijust looked at him. we stopped being the brian and gerry we always were. we immediately stopped being young. ijust sort of had to kind of pretend it was all going to be fine. you know. but, at the same time, it was sort of like a blow to the stomach. brian died aged 29, one year before life—saving treatment for hiv would become widely available. and, in the face of fear and grief and hopelessness,
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this is how the world tried to remember. i have sort of been to see a few of the showings of the quilt and wondered if i might see brian's, but it has never been out on exhibit. and now, obviously, it is going on display in liverpool. do you want to come and see it for the first time in 25 years? yeah. it's time, i think. how are you both feeling? it is overwhelming. ifeel quite shaky, to be honest. it is stunning. it has aged well. i hope we have aged as well as it. it is just beautiful to see how
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proud jerry and jocelyn are of the quilt they made in memory of a friend. but it is important today on world aids day to remember not everyone could live so openly with their hiv status. this quilt is particularly poignant today. it was made for a friend by a friend. however, the stigma that prevails around this disease still exist today and there was a request from their family to have today and there was a request from theirfamily to have it today and there was a request from their family to have it removed from their family to have it removed from the quilt. obviously it was not possible without damaging the other panel so instead it is covered up with a quilt and will remain that way until the day the stigma ends. somebody who knows a lot more about thatis somebody who knows a lot more about that is serena kavanagh. shejoins me now from a local hiv charity. we just heard the reality of hiv and aids in the 80s and 905. it just heard the reality of hiv and aids in the 805 and 905. it is not the same reality today?
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today to be diagnosed, with effective treatment, you cannot pa55 effective treatment, you cannot pass the virus on. it is a campaign, an amazing movement in hiv and our journey with it. find amazing movement in hiv and our journey with it— journey with it. and as we heard, the anel journey with it. and as we heard, the panel of— journey with it. and as we heard, the panel of the _ journey with it. and as we heard, the panel of the quilt _ journey with it. and as we heard, the panel of the quilt that - journey with it. and as we heard, the panel of the quilt that cannot j the panel of the quilt that cannot be displayed, 5tigma prevails today. how important are these quilts in tackling that 5tigma how important are these quilts in tackling that stigma and ultimately keeping people 5afe. hate tackling that stigma and ultimately keeping people safe.— tackling that stigma and ultimately keeping people safe. we are working in partnership _ keeping people safe. we are working in partnership with _ keeping people safe. we are working in partnership with 24 _ keeping people safe. we are working in partnership with 24 kitchen - in partnership with 24 kitchen 5treet5 in partnership with 24 kitchen streets that has enabled us to exhibit the cuts are part of our work is to stop that 5tigma exhibit the cuts are part of our work is to stop that stigma and we have asked people to have those conversations. having the quilt here and hearing stories of each individual, each panel made for one of those people who has died keeps the story is alive and we can learn from that and challenge the stigma
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people experience today. fine from that and challenge the stigma people experience today. one thing we heard from _ people experience today. one thing we heard from that _ people experience today. one thing we heard from that story _ people experience today. one thing we heard from that story of- people experience today. one thing we heard from that story of brian i we heard from that story of brian and jocelyn and jerry, that was quite a long time ago and some stories have been forgotten. are you hoping the quilts might uncover stories you might not know about? if people remember someone making a quilt panel or have letters relating to a court panel, get in touch and we can reunite them with the quotes. i am going to bring you over an hour to graham. it is important to remember these quilts are a living memorial to those who lost their lives in the aids crisis, but many of them, when they are in hospital, being treated, the stigma was so much that they would not be named or give false names. graham is a textile artist who has created a panel of the quilt to remember people who could not be named. tell me how important that is. it is
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important because what you have shown before, there are people who cannot be named due to stigma so this quilt was a reaction to that, to celebrate the people who cannot be named, give them a quilt of their own that people can come to. it can be whatever it needs to be for the individual. it be whatever it needs to be for the individual. : be whatever it needs to be for the individual. , ., , ,., , individual. it is absolutely beautiful. _ individual. it is absolutely beautiful. how— individual. it is absolutely beautiful. how long - individual. it is absolutely beautiful. how long has i individual. it is absolutely beautiful. how long has it individual. it is absolutely - beautiful. how long has it taken to make? it beautiful. how long has it taken to make? ., : beautiful. how long has it taken to make? j ., .. beautiful. how long has it taken to make? .,~ ., beautiful. how long has it taken to make? ., ,, ., ., make? it has taken about two weeks. a lot of reflection, _ make? it has taken about two weeks. a lot of reflection, as _ make? it has taken about two weeks. a lot of reflection, as well— make? it has taken about two weeks. a lot of reflection, as well for - make? it has taken about two weeks. a lot of reflection, as well for me. . a lot of reflection, as well for me. what it is the condition is linked to in terms of heritage and people who have passed. it has been an emotional experience to go through the emotions of what people experienced in the 805 and 905. these quilts will be on display for the next five days here in liverpool but their legacy will reach beyond that. they are being remembered
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online using a qr code system so they can be an international memorial and hopefully help to tackle some of that stigma. studio: they are beautiful. stay with us, headlines coming up. good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. our headlines today. the nhs gears up for a major expansion of the vaccine booster programme, with all adults
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in england to be offered the jab by the end of january. extremely ambitious targets, so that means boosterjabs, at mass vaccination centres, gp surgeries and your local community pharmacy. are you saying "don't" to the christmas do? the health secretary tells breakfast parties can go ahead as planned but with several reports of cancellations in response to omicron, how is hospitality coping? disruption for hundreds of thousands of university students across the uk, as lecturers and other staff begin three days of strike action. thousands of people in england and scotland spend a fifth night without power because of damage caused by storm arwen. good morning. today is going to be cold and windy, we have some rain moving southwards and behind that sunshine and showers. increasingly the showers will be wintry at lower levels across the north of scotland. all of the details later in the
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programme. it's wednesday 1st december. our main story. the nhs is gearing up for a major expansion of the vaccine booster programme, with hospitals and thousands of community sites set to offer the jab. the health secretary sajid javid has told breakfast that people should wait until they're invited for the jab, and insisted that there will be capacity to offer them to all adults in england by the end of january. let's get more now from our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. sajid javid trying to provide some reassurance a short time ago? yes. reassurance a short time ago? yes, the government _ reassurance a short time ago? yes, the government is _ reassurance a short time ago? yes, the government is trying _ reassurance a short time ago? joe: the government is trying to strike a balance with the vaccine programme between urging everyone to go and get the boosterjabs because they think that is the best insurance policy against the omicron variant if it turns out to be more transmissible than previous variants, but also try to manage demand so the system isn't swamped
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and the demand outstrips supply. that's why the message of, get your boosterjab is also accompanied of, wait until you are told to get it. it looks like it will go down the age range for the under 405 in a five year chunks week by week. so the by the end of january, five year chunks week by week. so the by the end ofjanuary, everyone over the age of 18 will have been offered the chance to get a booster jab. a similar balance being struck in terms of how we live our lives in the face of the potential risk from the face of the potential risk from the omicron variant. some people saying, let's be tougher, like labour saying you need to go further on international travel rules and reintroduce the rule where you have to have a negative test before you got on the plane or train to come back to the uk from abroad. you have jenny harries, the head of the uk health security agency, saying, maybe you should cut back on socialising a little bit. then on the other end of the spectrum, there is more than 30 conservative mp5 yesterday who voted against the new rule that you have to go to
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isolation if you have come into contact with somebody who has tested positive for omicron. in the middle you have the government saying, carry on your daily business and your socialising is normal but take extra precautions. for example, if you are having a christmas party, make sure it is well ventilated and think about taking one of those lateral flow tests so you can check whether you are negative or positive before you go. that is what sajid javid was advising we'll do this morning. javid was advising we'll do this morninu. �* ._, javid was advising we'll do this morninu. �* : ., javid was advising we'll do this mornin., �* , ., , javid was advising we'll do this morninu. �* , ., , ., javid was advising we'll do this morninr.�* ., , ., , morning. always all be a bit cautious. — morning. always all be a bit cautious, it _ morning. always all be a bit cautious, it might _ morning. always all be a bit cautious, it might be - morning. always all be a bit - cautious, it might be depending on the part— cautious, it might be depending on the part you are going to come are going _ the part you are going to come are going to. _ the part you are going to come are going to, sensible to take lateral flow test— going to, sensible to take lateral flow test before you go. the guidance has always been out there, throughout— guidance has always been out there, throughout the pandemic the vast majority— throughout the pandemic the vast majority of people have been very sensible _ majority of people have been very sensible and they know when they might— sensible and they know when they might have to take a test or should they wear— might have to take a test or should they wear a — might have to take a test or should they wear a facemask. they are sensible — they wear a facemask. they are sensible precautions we should all take _ sensible precautions we should all take. : sensible precautions we should all take. , ,., , sensible precautions we should all take. , , ., sensible precautions we should all take. , ., . , sensible precautions we should all take. , ., . take. these sorts of balances are havin: to take. these sorts of balances are having to be _
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take. these sorts of balances are having to be struck _ take. these sorts of balances are having to be struck all _ take. these sorts of balances are | having to be struck all throughout the pandemic. having to be struck all throughout the pandemic-— having to be struck all throughout the pandemic. sometimes they are re the pandemic. sometimes they are pretty difficult _ the pandemic. sometimes they are pretty difficult and _ the pandemic. sometimes they are pretty difficult and controversial. i pretty difficult and controversial. what makes it difficult at the moment is the lack of hard scientific data about what the omicron variant actually means. we will have to wait a couple of weeks, maybe even a month, before that data gets firmed up. maybe even a month, before that data gets firmed up— gets firmed up. thank you very much, adam, live gets firmed up. thank you very much, adam. live in — gets firmed up. thank you very much, adam, live in westminster. _ you've got lots of questions on this, and we'll try and give you some answers with our expert panel, dr chris smith and professor linda bauld at 8.30am. lots of questions about travel in particular as well. there is some important news on that. from today, anyone over the age of 12 heading to spain, from the uk, must be fully vaccinated. up until now, travellers could either show a vaccination certificate or a negative pcr test. let's get the details from guy hedgcoe, who is in madrid. what are these new rules, if you tell it from the uk, what do you
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face? — if you turn up from the uk? if you're travelling is nonessential from the uk to spain, you need a vaccination certificate. it's no longer the case that you can simply use a negative pcr test. there are some exceptions, children under the age of 12, spanish residents in the uk, for example, are exempt from that. and other citizens of the eu are exempt. it'sjust that. and other citizens of the eu are exempt. it's just british people travelling from the uk to spain. this is driven by concerns over the new variant. there have been very few cases so far in spain of the variant. since monday we have had two cases confirmed in madrid, a handful of other suspected cases currently being analysed. the government is concerned about this. and by extension, there is concern within the tourism industry about these new restrictions because the british tourism market is the single biggest market. in a normal year,
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around 20 million british people would visit spain. this year we have seen nothing like those figures. however, the tourism season has picked up a bit since the summer, and in september or october, there have been very good figures for arrivals both from the uk and other countries. there is concern within the tourism industry and spain in general about the impact that the variant is going to have on that industry. and of course, in broader as well. ., .. industry. and of course, in broader as well. ., ,, , ., industry. and of course, in broader as well. ., ~' , ., , industry. and of course, in broader as well. ., ,, i. , . industry. and of course, in broader as well. ., ~' , . : , hundreds of thousands of students are facing disruption, as lecturers and other staff begin three days of strike action. they're demanding better pensions, pay and working conditions. our education correspondent, elaine dunkley is in leeds. there is quite a turn out there, elaine. : ., , , ~ elaine. yes, there really is. and the university — elaine. yes, there really is. and the university staff, _ elaine. yes, there really is. and the university staff, it _ elaine. yes, there really is. and the university staff, it would - the university staff, it would usually be that they would be on campus teaching but they are out
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here protesting today. you will see placards about pension, pay, working conditions, and these strikes are happening across the uk in universities in uk, glasgow, london, and i have been talking to staff who says that morale is at an all—time low. on the other side, the management say they cannot meet the financial demands of the union because they would have to catch things —— cut things like research and potentiallyjobs. nicky blake is the president of the universities and college union. in the middle of all of this, there are students who are also facing huge disruption, what are your concerns for staff? hate what are your concerns for staff? we are exhausted staff facing 35% cuts to our— are exhausted staff facing 35% cuts to our pension based on a dodgy valuation— to our pension based on a dodgy valuation and alongside that, a 20% pay cut— valuation and alongside that, a 20% pay cut any— valuation and alongside that, a 20% pay cut any real carbs —— real terms in the _ pay cut any real carbs —— real terms in the last— pay cut any real carbs —— real terms in the last 12 — pay cut any real carbs —— real terms in the last 12 years. rampant inequality and insecure work. we
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want _ inequality and insecure work. we want to _ inequality and insecure work. we want to be — inequality and insecure work. we want to be teaching and supporting students _ want to be teaching and supporting students but we are here because we need to— students but we are here because we need to make progress on these issues _ need to make progress on these issues so — need to make progress on these issues so that our working conditions are healthy lending conditions are healthy lending conditions for students. the national union _ conditions for students. the national union of _ conditions for students. iie: national union of students conditions for students. "iie: national union of students says conditions for students. i““ie: national union of students says 70% of students are supporting you at the moment. the longer this goes on, do you think you will be able to maintain that support from students who are paying £9,000 of these and had just gone to 18 months of disruption due to the pandemic? i’m disruption due to the pandemic? i'm absolutely certain and i think the support— absolutely certain and i think the support will increase. students are here supporting yesterday, that we are on the same side, their learning _ that we are on the same side, their learning conditions are our working conditions — learning conditions are our working conditions and healthy stuff means healthy _ conditions and healthy stuff means healthy students. the conditions and healthy stuff means healthy students.— conditions and healthy stuff means healthy students. the university and colle . e healthy students. the university and college union _ healthy students. the university and college union says _ healthy students. the university and college union says there _ healthy students. the university and college union says there demands i healthy students. the university and i college union says there demands are straightforward. those representing universities say there are no simple solutions. in the middle of all of this, millions of students face a challenging time ahead.- this, millions of students face a challenging time ahead. thank you very much. — challenging time ahead. thank you very much, elaine. _ a british football coach who was jailed for 25 years in the united arab emirates
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for possessing cbd vape oil has had his sentenced reduced to 10 years on appeal. billy hood was arrested earlier this year after four bottles of the liquid, which contains cannabis oil, were found in his car in dubai. he claims he was forced to sign a confession in arabic, despite not speaking the language. the uae has denied the accusation. speaking on this programme, billy's mother said she was devastated by the latest developments. we thought yesterday that we were going to find out that billy was going to be able to come home. he's done nothing wrong, and he's being told that the charges have been dropped against him, and yet he's still there for another ten years. it's heartbreaking, absolutely heartbreaking. we just need someone else to help us so much, to bring him home, please. around 45,000 people have spent another night without power in england and scotland, following storm arwen at the weekend. suppliers say 90 % of people who lost power have now been reconnected with engineers working around the clock.
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in cumbria, one of the worst affected regions, the council says urgent help is needed. it is ten past eight. let's find out what the weather is going to be like for the next few days, hopefully no more storms. irlot for the next few days, hopefully no more storms-— for the next few days, hopefully no . more storms._ i more storms. not sure about that. i have 'ust more storms. not sure about that. i have just seen _ more storms. not sure about that. i have just seen your— more storms. not sure about that. i have just seen your little _ more storms. not sure about that. i have just seen your little rain - have just seen your little rain splattered picture, maybe? this isn't too bad, there are no storms forecast at the moment. we aren't expecting any. but we have some rain pushing south as you can see from this weather watches picture in warwickshire. this band of rain is a different fermenting as it moves southwards, not all of us are seeing this rain, some starting off with some sunshine. behind it we have a straight northerly, it will turn colder through the day but there will be sunshine and showers. increasingly some of the sunshine —— showers wilful as snow in the lower levels. it will be windy wherever
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you are, but particularly around the coast. temperatures two degrees in the north, but still in the milder air ahead of the north, but still in the milder airahead of the the north, but still in the milder air ahead of the weather front in the far south of england by mid afternoon. that will change as the rain continues to push southwards, the cold air filtering in clearer skies tonight, a widespread frost and risk of ice on untreated surfaces. showers across the east of the country and part of the west and south—west. most of these will be of rain, more likely to be sleet or snow on the hills. increasingly, showers across the north of scotland wilful as snow is all levels. a cold and frosty start tomorrow, a lot of dry weather and sunshine. windy to start across the east, but still some snow showers. the rental ease across the day, generally not as windy as —— the wind will ease across the day, generally not as windy as today. the cloud thickens in the west, it will feel cold. as
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the weather front comes in, it will bring less cold air with it but at the weekend we go back into cold air once again. so the weather is all over the place. the issue of heart problems in sport were brought back into stark focus in the summer, when the danish footballer christian erisken had a cardiac arrest on the pitch at euro 2020. the former tottenham player survived thanks to the fast actions of the medics who used a defibrillator to restart his heart. following that incident the premier league announced it would donate more than 2,000 devices to grassroots football clubs in england and wales. one of them has been installed at a primary school in north london where a pitch is named after ugo ehiogu, the former premier league defender who died from a cardiac arrest in 2017. breakfast�*s graham satchell reports. an after—school training session at seven sisters primary school in north london. they are playing on the ugo ehiogu pitch. the money for this facility donated
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by ugo ehiogu's family. there wasn't a better father in the world. he was your best friend. he was brilliant. and, as a husband, we were together 22 years. yes, kind, thoughtful, caring, generous. one in a million. very, very special man. commentator: gareth southgate to take the free kick. _ looking for ehiogu! ugo ehiogu was a brilliant, towering defender. he played for middlesbrough, rangers, aston villa and england. he was a coach at spurs when he suffered a cardiac arrest. he was just 44. i mean, our world changed sort of in a second, as you can imagine. but, he had been monitored, he had been checked out. there were no signs at all. so it was completely out of the blue. the children are getting a lesson in how to save a life if someone collapses. chest compressions
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and a defibrillator. leading the class, the spurs club doctor, ravi gill. good, good technique. i like that. modern day defibrillators are very easy—to—use, very safe, very effective. so the earlier it can be recognised and chest compressions given, use of the defibrillator given, can really make a significant impact saving someone's life. watching the lesson, former referee chris foy and ugo ehiogu's team—mate at aston villa, dion dublin. he probably had the best body that i have ever seen in my life. abs and pecs. i'm still working on trying to find the abs and the pecs and i never will look like him, unfortunately. but take him over the white line and he became a bit of an animal. you know, somebody who took no prisoners, who was a leader, who was a good friend. and, yes, i miss him. if it can hit someone of ugo's stature and fitness levels, then, you know, we have to do this. we have to get these defibs everywhere, so everybody
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knows where they are, everybody knows how to use them. it has been almost six months since danish player christian eriksen collapsed on the pitch at the euros. as his team—mates formed a protective ring around him, doctors shocked his heart back into life. terrifying scenes eerily similar almost a decade earlier. the crowd horrified as medics treated bolton midfielder fabrice muamba. his heart stopped for 78 minutes. there was fear. people were scared, people were realising something wasn't right. the guy was lying on the ground and there was panic amongst people. chris foy was the fourth official that day. i remember vividly as he was being carried from the field, the doctor was still doing cpr, was still working on him. he survived. it's the knowledge,
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and these defibrillators are just so important. i just can't stress it enough. we really have got to get the message out there because they mightjust save a life. the premier league is now installing 2000 defibrillators at grassroots facilities like this across england and wales. if it can help one person and make others more aware of this happening and educate people, then it is for a greater cause. it could happen to someone you know i and love and if you don't know how i to cope with it and help, then what use are - they there, really? obi ehiogu desperately hoping that what happened to his dad can be prevented from happening again. graham satchell, bbc news. well said. some powerful messages there. let's now speak to cardiologist dr andrew deaner who helped save former footballer fabrice muamba's life.
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good morning, andrew. i could see you smiling as you heard that peace, talking about these defibrillators getting out into the community and making a difference. how much difference can they make? thea;r making a difference. how much difference can they make? they can make a huge _ difference can they make? they can make a huge difference. _ difference can they make? they can make a huge difference. there - difference can they make? they can make a huge difference. there are. make a huge difference. there are two parts to saving a life when someone has a cardiac arrest. firstly, recognising what's happening and starting cpr. and then having rapid access to a defibrillator. and you can turn what would be almost inevitable tragic outcomes into a survival rate of well over 50% or even more. stand outcomes into a survival rate of well over 50% or even more. and when ou sa well over 50% or even more. and when you say rapid — well over 50% or even more. and when you say rapid access, _ well over 50% or even more. and when you say rapid access, how _ well over 50% or even more. and when you say rapid access, how many - you say rapid access, how many minutes are we talking about at that point? ii minutes are we talking about at that oint? , ., . minutes are we talking about at that oint? i. ., ., ., ., ,., point? if you are doing good cpr, so ou are point? if you are doing good cpr, so you are doing _ point? if you are doing good cpr, so you are doing good, _ point? if you are doing good cpr, so you are doing good, rapid _ point? if you are doing good cpr, so you are doing good, rapid central. you are doing good, rapid central chest compression is, you have got a few minutes. the sooner you can get the defibrillator the better. if you can get it within two or three minutes, that your best chance. i think the christian eriksen incident
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really illustrates how effective it could be. one of the players started doing cpr on their colleague, and the defibrillator was there within a few moments and i think a single shock was effective. and by the fire __ by shock was effective. and by the fire —— by the time he was being wheeled off of the pitch he was awake already. that really illustrates how effective it can be. i already. that really illustrates how effective it can be.— effective it can be. i think a lot of it us are _ effective it can be. i think a lot of it us are probably _ effective it can be. i think a lot of it us are probably quite - effective it can be. i think a lot i of it us are probably quite scared about the idea of using a defibrillator. it is complicated kit, by the looks of things. i don't know whether i would trust myself to know whether i would trust myself to know what to do, that i might make things worse. what would your message be on that? you things worse. what would your message be on that? things worse. what would your messaue be on that? ., ., . ~ message be on that? you cannot make thins an message be on that? you cannot make things any worse _ message be on that? you cannot make things any worse than _ message be on that? you cannot make things any worse than someone's - message be on that? you cannot make things any worse than someone's had i things any worse than someone's had already been stopped. you really are going to do any harm —— someone's heart being stopped. do the chest compressions, and then open the defibrillator, it speaks to you, it will talk to you through the stages.
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it says, carry on compressions, connect these pads immediately and start following the instructions and giving an electric shock and it will tell you when it is giving an electric shock. many of them will do the shock on its own without you even having to press a button. you are one of — even having to press a button. you are one of the _ even having to press a button. you are one of the people credited with saving fabrice muamba's live on that awful day. talk us through what happened on that case. looking at it from the outside, it seemed a very different case to christian eriksen. fabrice muamba's heart stopped for a much longer time. yes. fabrice muamba's heart stopped for a much longer time.— much longer time. yes, it was different- _ much longer time. yes, it was different. usually _ much longer time. yes, it was different. usually you - much longer time. yes, it was different. usually you would i much longer time. yes, it was - different. usually you would expect of the defibrillator to be effective after one, two or three shocks. but with the brace, we had to shock him multiple times. it was only after a long period of resuscitation with more advanced methods using drugs, that we got his hard—working. usually the defibrillator is effective. —— that he got his heart
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working. it proves how important cardiac massage is. we had a whole group of people doing cardiac massage who were well trained. i only came along after five minutes. the physio started the massage after he recognised it was a cardiac arrest and then the club doctors and paramedics continued to the cardiac massage. if they had not been doing that, anything else we would have done would have been futile because they would not have been enough blood getting to his brain to keep him alive. that is something we see. i look after patients at the barts heart centre who have had community cardiac arrests, and we know if someone nearby started cardiac massage immediately, the outcome is going to be good. and other occasions, where we have got the heart working but there has been no cardiac massage for five or ten minutes, patients do not wake up or they wake up with serious brain damage. so if you ever seen someone
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collapsed, stop and help and do cardiac massage. if you get a chance to learn how to do it, please do, there are so many courses available. search online, cpr training near to you. they will also show you how to use a defibrillator.— use a defibrillator. 2000 defibrillator _ use a defibrillator. 2000 defibrillator is _ use a defibrillator. 2000 defibrillator is going - use a defibrillator. 2000 defibrillator is going to i use a defibrillator. 2000 - defibrillator is going to sports clubs across the country, is that enough? i clubs across the country, is that enou~h? clubs across the country, is that enou . h? ., enough? i get the feeling that there are more and _ enough? i get the feeling that there are more and more _ enough? i get the feeling that there are more and more deliberately - enough? i get the feeling that there are more and more deliberately tos| are more and more deliberately tos around. if you go to a shopping centre or a football match, you will see the sign for a defibrillator. people who install them in other sites like churches or village halls will have a sign outside, or they may even install the device outside the village hall. there are more and more like that. the more we can get, the better. 2000 additional defibrillators, the that is fantastic. a virgin media havejust put them in all of their vans so
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there are mobile defibrillators around. there are increasing numbers but the more area. people are putting them and telephone boxes in small villages. there is a lot of work being done to try and improve survival after cardiac arrest and thatis survival after cardiac arrest and that is fantastic.— that is fantastic. thank you for “oininr that is fantastic. thank you for joining us- _ that is fantastic. thank you for joining us. thank _ that is fantastic. thank you for joining us. thank you. - that is fantastic. thank you for joining us. thank you. the - that is fantastic. thank you for - joining us. thank you. the important messare joining us. thank you. the important message there. _ joining us. thank you. the important message there, you _ joining us. thank you. the important message there, you cannot - joining us. thank you. the important message there, you cannot make . joining us. thank you. the important message there, you cannot make it. message there, you cannot make it worse so have a go. find message there, you cannot make it worse so have a go.— worse so have a go. and reassuring that ou worse so have a go. and reassuring that you can — worse so have a go. and reassuring that you can follow _ worse so have a go. and reassuring that you can follow the _ that you can follow the instructions, it tells you what to do. 23 minutes past eight. we have talked about christmas and what the variance have meant, will it be a christmas party, ? variance have meant, will it be a christmas party,? fir variance have meant, will it be a christmas party,?— christmas party,? or will it be outside with _ christmas party,? or will it be outside with your _ christmas party,? or will it be outside with your coat - christmas party,? or will it be outside with your coat on! - christmas party,? or will it be j outside with your coat on! and christmas party,? or will it be - outside with your coat on! and the im act on outside with your coat on! and the impact on business, _ outside with your coat on! and the impact on business, and _ outside with your coat on! and the impact on business, and is - outside with your coat on! and the j impact on business, and is looking into it, a party for one? yes. impact on business, and is looking into it, a party for one?—
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into it, a party for one? yes, we were really _ into it, a party for one? yes, we were really wanting _ into it, a party for one? yes, we were really wanting a _ into it, a party for one? yes, we were really wanting a good - were really wanting a good separation. i have put on my festive shoes! thank you for noticing. you need a tree! _ we're back in the breakfast arms. we're gearing up for the work gangs' arrivals. the festive cheer, the excess, perhaps even some moments of regret that make christmas dos so special. there might now be more restrictions in england with masks required in shops and on public transport but there aren't the same measures for the hospitality sector. pubs, restaurants, and bars want to keep it that way. this is the golden season for them and many have been adding ventilation, enhancing hygeine and offering more sanitation. last week, before many of us had heard of omicron, booking platform designmynight told breakfast they'd taken just over 35,000 bookings for christmas events in december, not far off the same period in 2019. they've since told us that after the weekend's announcement on restrictions, they saw a 14% increase in cancellations on saturday and a similarjump in
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cancellations on sunday. it was a similar weekend for damian who runs a restaurant in peterborough. ok, so, quite shockingly, over 20 reservations have been cancelled, 20 reservations for groups over the weekend. so the groups between six to 46, 48 guests, so you can imagine the number. and the main explanation was they are concerned because of the new variant of the virus, they don't know what's going to happen and they don't know if we're going to go into lockdown. well, it's a massive, massive financial impact. really important to say that the cancellations we've reported represent a small minority of the christmas parties. the health secretary told breakfast you shouldn't change your christmas plans — but to be sensible, and think about taking a test. so really this comes down to individual choice. were they ready to jump on the christmas conga in london yesterday?
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we went to ask. we are. we are going to one a week saturday. and we're not pulling out. absolutely not. i would definitely think twice before i go for a christmas party or anything like that. we're both double jabbed i so we're not overly worried. we've got a christmas party at the moment, | so we're still going to that. and do you know what? usually when we asked viewers about something like this, they come back — i could come down hard one way or another but there has been a mixed response. graham saying, no stopping me this year. sarah saying she is booking a big do. keith saying, his wife has just been told that their christmas tour is cancelled and she has to work from home but she is relieved. the most messages we have had is about the mixed messaging from government. on the one hand forcing people to quarantine and wear masks, on the other hand, saying, don't
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worry, go out and party. lizzie says, numberten worry, go out and party. lizzie says, number ten slapped jenny harry is down but they told us to wear masks on a train that you can go to a gig completely free of mask wearing, this is mixed messages galore. their one message from hospitality is, if you are going to cancel, let them know well in advance. the last year and a half has been dreadful for them and the more advanced notice they get, they bring in stocks, the west you can do is be a no—show. the bring in stocks, the west you can do is be a no-show._ is be a no-show. the problem with lettin: is be a no-show. the problem with letting people _ is be a no-show. the problem with letting people know _ is be a no-show. the problem with letting people know in _ is be a no-show. the problem with letting people know in advance - is be a no-show. the problem with letting people know in advance is i is be a no-show. the problem with i letting people know in advance is we will not know for a few weeks whether this is a threat or not, this variant. those businesses need to know sooner, though. stand this variant. those businesses need to know sooner, though.— this variant. those businesses need to know sooner, though. and you can for: ive to know sooner, though. and you can forgive consumers _ to know sooner, though. and you can forgive consumers for _ to know sooner, though. and you can forgive consumers for not _ to know sooner, though. and you can forgive consumers for not being - forgive consumers for not being certain either way. about going out and being in a group setting. thank ou ve and being in a group setting. thank you very much- _ and being in a group setting. thank you very much. we _ and being in a group setting. thank you very much. we are _ and being in a group setting. thank you very much. we are hoping - and being in a group setting. “i“iag“i«; you very much. we are hoping to make things simply clarified in about
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five minutes, we have lots of questions being answered here in a few minutes. hopefully we will have some kind of expert opinions on whether or not you should be thinking about going to your christmas party are visiting and —— elderly relative. christmas party are visiting and -- elderly relative.— elderly relative. chris and linda are normally — elderly relative. chris and linda are normally hit _ elderly relative. chris and linda are normally hit on _ elderly relative. chris and linda are normally hit on a _ elderly relative. chris and linda are normally hit on a saturday i are normally hit on a saturday morning to take your questions but they are popping in especially on wednesday because we have had samey questions. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. the mayor has warned an entire tube line could close if transport for london does not get more funding from central government. talks have begun on another bailout to try to keep tube and bus services running past the end of next week. the government's previously said it's shown its commitment to positive discussions around tfl's future. without government support, injanuary, we are going to have to make tough decisions which could be cutting our bus services by almost 20%, cutting our tube services by almost 10%.
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and the experience people have using the bakerloo line, of 50—year—old trains, which are already ten years past their life expectancy, having to be endured for the next 20 years. the charity centrepoint says this christmas more than 4000 young people could be homeless in london — the highest number since 2016. it says calls to its national helpline are up by more than 30% — driven largely by the effects of the pandemic. is being held in essex in the new year. it's a project byjosephine melville, who's been collecting the stories and experiences of women for her project in southend called know your roots. know your roots the project is important to me because their conversation around the way that black women style their hair, how they feel comfortable about their hair, has been an ongoing thing but
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never really addressed. travel now... there are severe delays on the overground. it has reopened with severe delays. the piccadilly line has problems with leaves on the line. there's no service between rayners lane and uxbridge. hello, good morning. it felt mild for this time of year yesterday, but that mild air was with us for one day only and now it is set to turn colder once more. we saw a cold front go through last night. that gave us wet and windy weather for a time but the weather front has now largely cleared through. so it is a mostly dry start to the morning. plenty of cloud. we will see sunshine emerge and there is still a brisk north—westerly wind blowing, so a blustery day of weather. we are coming into chillier feeling air, too, so the highest
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temperatures will be this morning, unusually, and then they will tend to drop off as we head towards the end of the day. so gradually feeling colder. there will be showers through the afternoon. perhaps the odd sharper one at times, but still some limited sunny spells. as we head through this evening and overnight, the skies will clear, the showers will fade away. the winds will lighten and there will be a frost developing into thursday morning. so it is a cold, frosty start to the day tomorrow. it is a calmer looking day of weather. the winds are lighter, now northerly, and there will be sunshine on and off throughout the day. temperatures will not get much past mid—single figures. so it will be feeling colder. on friday, turning wet, windy and a bit milder. i'm back in half an hour. now it's back tojon and sally. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. morning live is on bbc one after breakfast. let's find out what gethin and kimberleyhave in store. and kimberley have in store.
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good morning. coming up on morning live. it's the first day of december and the countdown to christmas is on. rav wilding has a warning about a new scam that involves a fake banking app that could catch you out if you're buying and selling online this month. plus we'll hear from one victim who says she couldn't believe how realistic it seemed. and we love to shake it on our chips and add it to our favourite dishes for flavour. but with around 70% of us consuming too much salt every day, dr rupy explains exactly how much is good for us. and he's got some tips for the healthy seasonings you could try instead. demand for christmas trees is up by 15% this year. but there's loads of debate over whether it's more sustainable to pick a real or a fake one. presenterjames stewart finds out the answer once and for all. plus they're the family from kent whose songs about life in lockdown have been watched by millions worldwide. and they count football legend gary lineker and actor eddie redmayne
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among theirfans. the marsh family tell us about hoping to be this year's christmas number one and they perform their new single for us. how exciting. and if that doesn't put you in the festive mood, matthew kelly just might. he tells us how performing in panto always leaves him with stars in his eyes. see you at 9.15. i like what you did there. thanks. i like what you did there. thanks. i know you appreciate those. how come you have your tree up and we do not have hours? that is a good point. we should probably say we had nothing to do with this. it was kimberly. vaccination centres offering booster jabs will be popping up "like christmas trees" according to the prime minister. more than 14 million people in england alone are now eligible for a booster jab, after the government announced all adults would be
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offered an additional dose. boosters will be available at 1,500 community pharmacy sites in england, as well as in hospital hubs. the military will also be brought in to help the nhs, alongside volunteers. the prime minister has said all eligible people will have been offered a booster by the end of january 2022. breakfast'sjohn maguire is at one of the pharmacies offering the boosterjab this morning. they are expecting a busy time. they are expecting a busy time. they are, sally. up to about 300 people a day. i think they have to hundred and 80 on the day at this pharmacy in west sussex. pharmacies are used to this because they do the flu jab every year and so once they started doing the first doses, second dose and other boosters, it is a well oiled machine. you are greeted by phil and diane. good
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morning. staying in the warm, good to see. people come forward. they have been invited. do not go to your pharmacy and knock on the door and expect to get the booster. wait until you are invited. vicki, how are you? a former ba cabin crew and you have been doing this for a while before going back to your old job. i have been here since january, since the vaccine centre opened and proud to be part of the team. very purposeful and supporting the community. purposeful and supporting the community-— purposeful and supporting the communi . ., ., community. you feel as if you are makin: a community. you feel as if you are making a difference? _ community. you feel as if you are making a difference? very - community. you feel as if you are making a difference? very much. community. you feel as if you are i making a difference? very much so. community. you feel as if you are - making a difference? very much so. i have personal — making a difference? very much so. i have personal purpose _ making a difference? very much so. i have personal purpose but _ making a difference? very much so. i have personal purpose but also - making a difference? very much so. i have personal purpose but also this i have personal purpose but also this is reaching out to a lot of people who need it. is reaching out to a lot of people who need it— is reaching out to a lot of people who need it. ., , ., ., ., ,., who need it. edward, you are about to net who need it. edward, you are about to get your — who need it. edward, you are about to get your booster. _ who need it. edward, you are about to get your booster. what - who need it. edward, you are about to get your booster. what are - who need it. edward, you are about to get your booster. what are your| to get your booster. what are your thoughts? it to get your booster. what are your thou . hts? : to get your booster. what are your thou . hts? , ., to get your booster. what are your thou~hts? : ., ,., ., thoughts? it is mega important, particularly _ thoughts? it is mega important, particularly with _ thoughts? it is mega important, particularly with mutations - particularly with mutations happening. with omicron at the moment. everyone should get the
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booster, particularly with christmas coming up. do our bit. hate booster, particularly with christmas coming up. do our bit.— coming up. do our bit. we will st ueeze coming up. do our bit. we will squeeze past _ coming up. do our bit. we will squeeze past you _ coming up. do our bit. we will squeeze past you and - coming up. do our bit. we will squeeze past you and come i coming up. do our bit. we will squeeze past you and come in| coming up. do our bit. we will. squeeze past you and come in and coming up. do our bit. we will - squeeze past you and come in and see bruce, who is at the sharp end. what do you think about that? zoe is about to get her booster. we can see that. and it is as simple as that. how was it? absolutely _ and it is as simple as that. how was it? absolutely fine. _ and it is as simple as that. how was it? absolutely fine. you _ and it is as simple as that. how was it? absolutely fine. you were - it? absolutely fine. you were invited to _ it? absolutely fine. you were invited to come _ it? absolutely fine. you were invited to come forward - it? absolutely fine. you were invited to come forward and i it? absolutely fine. you were i invited to come forward and you it? absolutely fine. you were - invited to come forward and you then had a choice about where you could go. why did you choose the pharmacy? it is closest to me and easy, less travelling — it is closest to me and easy, less travelling-— it is closest to me and easy, less travellinu. �* ., ., _, travelling. and important to come forward? absolutely. _ travelling. and important to come forward? absolutely. i— travelling. and important to come forward? absolutely. i do - travelling. and important to come forward? absolutely. i do not - travelling. and important to come | forward? absolutely. i do not want to catch covid, _ forward? absolutely. i do not want to catch covid, particularly - forward? absolutely. i do not want to catch covid, particularly before. to catch covid, particularly before christmas — to catch covid, particularly before christmas. this will increase immunity— christmas. this will increase immunity and i do not want to pass it onto _ immunity and i do not want to pass it onto anyone else, so i am pleased to have _ it onto anyone else, so i am pleased to have it— it onto anyone else, so i am pleased
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to have it done.— it onto anyone else, so i am pleased to have it done. bruce, you are semi retired but — to have it done. bruce, you are semi retired but pressed _ to have it done. bruce, you are semi retired but pressed back— to have it done. bruce, you are semi retired but pressed back into - to have it done. bruce, you are semi retired but pressed back into action. retired but pressed back into action over the past months. we are ramping up over the past months. we are ramping up again for over the past months. we are ramping up againforthe over the past months. we are ramping up again for the booster programme. are you concerned about pressure on pharmacies and other aspects of health care? irlot pharmacies and other aspects of health care?— health care? not really. i hope --eole health care? not really. i hope people will _ health care? not really. i hope people will book _ health care? not really. i hope people will book online - health care? not really. i hope people will book online or - health care? not really. i hope people will book online or use | health care? not really. i hope - people will book online or use 119, not contact the pharmacy directly because we want to leave lines open for people with other clinical needs. book online or 119. be patient, wait your turn. encourage people to use pharmacies because pharmacies do not interrupt other clinical services. pharmacies do not interrupt other clinicalservices. if pharmacies do not interrupt other clinical services. if we can do it it relieves pressure on gp colleagues and hospitals. its, it relieves pressure on gp colleagues and hospitals. a lot of numbers bandied _ colleagues and hospitals. a lot of numbers bandied around - colleagues and hospitals. a lot of numbers bandied around with - colleagues and hospitals. a lot ofj numbers bandied around with the objective of 23 million jabs before the end of january objective of 23 million jabs before the end ofjanuary in england. you will do about 300 here. it sounds like a drop in the ocean but with all of the different elements
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brought together, it sounds like an effective process. it is brought together, it sounds like an effective process.— brought together, it sounds like an effective process. it is and we have a lot of pharmacies _ effective process. it is and we have a lot of pharmacies that _ effective process. it is and we have a lot of pharmacies that can - effective process. it is and we have a lot of pharmacies that can be - a lot of pharmacies that can be brought online. do not underestimate how many flu jabs we do per year. we could do the same with covid and i encourage all involved to use pharmacies and relieve the pressure. gps are well overmanned and have lots of issues. help your gb, and hospitals, use your local pharmacy. we are here to help. thank you. things get going here this morning when the doors open officially in around half an hour. but they will expect to see something up to 300 people go through here. those people, of course, will be as fully protected as anyone else against, especially now with the wave of the new variant.
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studio: thank you. a busy few weeks ahead at pharmacies and doctors surgeries and vaccination centres. we've been getting loads of questions from you about the boosterjab rollout, and the new variant. so to answer them, we've got our regular panel of experts, professor linda bauld and dr chris smith. good morning. it is great to see you on a wednesday. you are normally here on a saturday but thank you so much. we will go straight in with a question. kate in farnborough asks whether it's true that you'll only be able to a pfizer boosterjab? and what do you do if you had the astrazeneca vaccine for your first two doses? good morning. a good question. a lot of people ask this. we had the results of a study that has guided a lot of decisions around the booster campaign in the uk and there is international evidence. they tested
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seven combinations of vaccines and different duration between the second dose and booster and different types. they found the best booster response comes from the mrna vaccines, which is notjust pfizer but also moderna. the majority who get boosters will get one of those vaccines. they might get a half dose of moderna. because of tiny adverse reactions was lower for the half dose. if you had astrazeneca for the first two you will probably get in mrna vaccine. a tiny number of people might be allergic to one of the constituents of these vaccines and they will get astrazeneca which will also work well but for most, pfizer and moderna.— will also work well but for most, pfizer and moderna. chris a question from helen in _ pfizer and moderna. chris a question from helen in dorset. _ pfizer and moderna. chris a question from helen in dorset. she _ pfizer and moderna. chris a question from helen in dorset. she is- pfizer and moderna. chris a question from helen in dorset. she is asking. from helen in dorset. she is asking how long you have to wait for booster if you recently had covid.
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she said she and her husband tested positive ten days ago. what she said she and her husband tested positive ten days ago.— positive ten days ago. what do they do? we don't _ positive ten days ago. what do they do? we don't want _ positive ten days ago. what do they do? we don't want people - positive ten days ago. what do they do? we don't want people acutely i do? we don't want people acutely infected _ do? we don't want people acutely infected with anything going to a centre _ infected with anything going to a centre because there is a chance you could _ centre because there is a chance you could pass _ centre because there is a chance you could pass it— centre because there is a chance you could pass it on. the guidance is to minimise _ could pass it on. the guidance is to minimise the chance of that happening and minimise the chance of your immune system being overwhelmed because _ your immune system being overwhelmed because you _ your immune system being overwhelmed because you are trying to react to and recover — because you are trying to react to and recover from coronavirus and respond — and recover from coronavirus and respond to— and recover from coronavirus and respond to a booster the current guidance — respond to a booster the current guidance is you should wait a month after you _ guidance is you should wait a month after you have been acutely diagnosed, had a positive test and recovered — diagnosed, had a positive test and recovered. wait a month and you could _ recovered. wait a month and you could have — recovered. wait a month and you could have vaccination and that would — could have vaccination and that would go — could have vaccination and that would go for a booster as well. 28 would go for a booster as well. 213 days. would go for a booster as well. days. this would go for a booster as well. 23 days. this from leanne. the guidance states my vaccine should — the guidance states my vaccine should be — the guidance states my vaccine should be fined _ the guidance states my vaccine should be fined for— the guidance states my vaccine should be fined for six - the guidance states my vaccine should be fined for six months. j the guidance states my vaccine i should be fined for six months. is my now— should be fined for six months. is my now original— should be fined for six months. is my now original vaccine _ should be fined for six months. is
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my now original vaccine not - should be fined for six months. is my now original vaccine not as i my now original vaccine not as efficient— my now original vaccine not as efficient as _ my now original vaccine not as efficient as first _ my now original vaccine not as efficient as first thought? - my now original vaccine not as efficient as first thought? fire i my now original vaccine not as efficient as first thought? are we auoin to efficient as first thought? are we going to need — efficient as first thought? are we going to need jabs _ efficient as first thought? are we going to need jabs and _ efficient as first thought? are we going to need jabs and boosters. efficient as first thought? are we i going to need jabs and boosters the time? going to need “abs and boosters the time? ., ., , ., , time? there are two questions. it has waned- _ time? there are two questions. it has waned- it _ time? there are two questions. it has waned. it is _ time? there are two questions. it has waned. it is not _ time? there are two questions. it has waned. it is not the _ time? there are two questions. it has waned. it is not the initial i time? there are two questions. it has waned. it is not the initial or. has waned. it is not the initial or second dose you got is not worth anything any more, it gives protection but we know from studies the protection has particularly after six months after the second dose. the boosters, will we have to have them indefinitely? it is unlikely although some groups might need them more frequently. vaccine boosts the immune response on the front line. imagine it is a battle. those in the army at the front of the line as in they are charging ahead are the antibodies produced. in the background there is the memory t cells and b cells. when we get a booster they are rejuvenated and strengthen and may strengthen a longer period. we may have this longer period. we may have this longer lasting immunity after
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several doses of a vaccine that is retained. it might not be as good in older groups. i do not think sally you and i will turn up every six months for booster. we might need some in future but we do not know. this question has come in in the past few on twitter. pepsi asks,... there are two things. jcvi was waiting for more safety data in the real world to look at millions of 12-15 real world to look at millions of 12—15 year olds to make sure there were no more adverse, rare side effects. they are reassured. the second is two doses provides a more robust response but the jcvi second is two doses provides a more robust response but thejcvi in the face of omicron is giving new guidance and trying to strengthen
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it. that is the basis of decisions that brings us in line with other countries and many parents and young people will welcome that news. that is brilliant. chris, _ people will welcome that news. that is brilliant. chris, a _ people will welcome that news. that is brilliant. chris, a question from robin and it is the big question. at the moment we do not have crystal balls and _ at the moment we do not have crystal balls and time machine so we cannot move _ balls and time machine so we cannot move forward in time and do what we need to— move forward in time and do what we need to do— move forward in time and do what we need to do which is observation. we have the _ need to do which is observation. we have the genetic data on the virus that enabled us to look at where in its code _ that enabled us to look at where in its code it — that enabled us to look at where in its code it has changed compared with strains we have been dealing with _ with strains we have been dealing with we — with strains we have been dealing with. we know where the changes are and therefore have an idea as to what _ and therefore have an idea as to what sort — and therefore have an idea as to what sort of changes they will make in the _ what sort of changes they will make in the appearance of the virus in terms _ in the appearance of the virus in terms of— in the appearance of the virus in terms of how it interacts with our immune — terms of how it interacts with our immune system. that is no replacement for observation.
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observations made in southern africa chiefly— observations made in southern africa chiefly look _ observations made in southern africa chiefly look at people much younger. they have _ chiefly look at people much younger. they have a — chiefly look at people much younger. they have a younger population on average _ they have a younger population on average compared to the uk. and they have a _ average compared to the uk. and they have a different vaccination profile compared — have a different vaccination profile compared to the uk. although we can say at _ compared to the uk. although we can say at the _ compared to the uk. although we can say at the moment the day to look reassuring — say at the moment the day to look reassuring from south africa, very trivial— reassuring from south africa, very trivial symptoms, probably not a problem. — trivial symptoms, probably not a problem, might be more transmissible but does _ problem, might be more transmissible but does not seem to translate into severe _ but does not seem to translate into severe disease, for that reason we need _ severe disease, for that reason we need to— severe disease, for that reason we need to see — severe disease, for that reason we need to see hard data in what happens _ need to see hard data in what happens in a population like our own to be _ happens in a population like our own to be reassured. that will take time because _ to be reassured. that will take time because people do not instantly catch _ because people do not instantly catch coronavirus and develop complications. it will take 2—3 weeks — complications. it will take 2—3 weeks for— complications. it will take 2—3 weeks for those studies to be done. in weeks for those studies to be done. in the _ weeks for those studies to be done. in the background, we are doing experiments where we can look at the performance of immune responses people _ performance of immune responses people have made to vaccines administered and ask how protective do we _ administered and ask how protective do we expect the existing immune
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responses — do we expect the existing immune responses from people of different a-es responses from people of different ages and _ responses from people of different ages and durations since their vaccination against this new variant? _ vaccination against this new variant? the current word on the street— variant? the current word on the street from — variant? the current word on the street from various authorities and people _ street from various authorities and people involved is they anticipate these _ people involved is they anticipate these vaccines we have been using will continue to work and we will be protected — will continue to work and we will be protected. but that is no replacement for observational data that will— replacement for observational data that will be gathered in the coming weeks _ that will be gathered in the coming weeks. ., ., : that will be gathered in the coming weeks. . . , , that will be gathered in the coming weeks. . ., , , ., ., that will be gathered in the coming weeks. . ., , weeks. that leads us onto this ruestion weeks. that leads us onto this question from _ weeks. that leads us onto this question from helen. - weeks. that leads us onto this question from helen. how- weeks. that leads us onto this question from helen. how big | weeks. that leads us onto this. question from helen. how big a concern is _ question from helen. how big a concern is it _ question from helen. how big a concern is it the _ question from helen. how big a concern is it the vaccines - question from helen. how big a concern is it the vaccines might| question from helen. how big a i concern is it the vaccines might not be as— concern is it the vaccines might not be as effective _ concern is it the vaccines might not be as effective against _ concern is it the vaccines might not be as effective against the - concern is it the vaccines might not be as effective against the new- be as effective against the new omicron — be as effective against the new omicron strain? _ be as effective against the new omicron strain?— omicron strain? given we have invested enormous _ omicron strain? given we have invested enormous time - omicron strain? given we have invested enormous time and i omicron strain? given we have - invested enormous time and energy and money— invested enormous time and energy and money in vaccinating a significant number of people, we hope _ significant number of people, we hope that— significant number of people, we hope that has not amounted to zero and this— hope that has not amounted to zero and this is— hope that has not amounted to zero and this is not going to be confronted by a variant that can swerve — confronted by a variant that can swerve around the immune response and cause _ swerve around the immune response and cause problems. my instinct is the immune responses we will have
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made _ the immune responses we will have made to— the immune responses we will have made to these vaccines will be sufficient — made to these vaccines will be sufficient to protect people, because we have seen this already. when _ because we have seen this already. when the _ because we have seen this already. when the delta variant arrived, it was well — when the delta variant arrived, it was well protected against by vaccines— was well protected against by vaccines made from original strains of coronavirus collected from people in china _ of coronavirus collected from people in china and — of coronavirus collected from people in china and elsewhere in the world two years— in china and elsewhere in the world two years ago. we expect the new responses _ two years ago. we expect the new responses we will make, while not perfect _ responses we will make, while not perfect because the virus is changed, will probably defend against — changed, will probably defend against severe disease which is what we want _ against severe disease which is what we want the vaccines to do, to prevent— we want the vaccines to do, to prevent people having to go to hospitat — prevent people having to go to hosital. ., ., , ., , ., hospital. linda, do you share chris's optimism _ hospital. linda, do you share chris's optimism on - hospital. linda, do you share chris's optimism on the - hospital. linda, do you share i chris's optimism on the vaccine working against omicron? idea chris's optimism on the vaccine working against omicron? idea and in terms of protection _ working against omicron? idea and in terms of protection against _ working against omicron? idea and in terms of protection against severe i terms of protection against severe disease and mortality, i described the parts of the immune system and i think part of our immune memory are there and will be in relation to this variant. transmission is a
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concern and protection against infection is likely to be less. the vaccines are training our immune system to recognise in particular the spike protein and there are many mutations on the spike protein in this variant. we should give science time to do the work and not be panicking. government has to make decisions, but we will know more soon and i do share chris's view. linda, this is from keith in east kilbride who asks... does travelling make the difference? this is controversial with all the travel restrictions. we have seen it in 14 countries. i had a look last night. in scotland we have a number of cases not linked to travel which suggests some community spread. the reason travel restrictions have been introduced is to buy time. the virus
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travels with people and moose between people and they take it onto a plane and take it somewhere else. if you can —— it moves with people. if you can —— it moves with people. if we see more community spread in places like the uk and elsewhere, travel restrictions become less proportionate. ii travel restrictions become less proportionate-— proportionate. if you have 'ust tuned in. fl proportionate. if you have 'ust tuned in. it i proportionate. if you have 'ust tuned in, it is - proportionate. if you have 'ust tuned in, it is not - proportionate. if you havejust tuned in, it is not saturday i tuned in, it is not saturday morning. chris and linda havejoined us mid week because there has been so much going on and we have had so many questions. like so much going on and we have had so many questions-— many questions. like this one from gordon. many questions. like this one from gordon- given _ many questions. like this one from gordon. given the _ many questions. like this one from gordon. given the mutation - gordon. given the mutation invariably— gordon. given the mutation invariably leads— gordon. given the mutation invariably leads to - gordon. given the mutation invariably leads to it - gordon. given the mutation invariably leads to it finding gordon. given the mutation - invariably leads to it finding the best environment— invariably leads to it finding the best environment to _ invariably leads to it finding the best environment to prosper, i invariably leads to it finding the i best environment to prosper, and invariably leads to it finding the - best environment to prosper, and the older generation _ best environment to prosper, and the older generation have _ best environment to prosper, and the older generation have been— best environment to prosper, and the older generation have been given - best environment to prosper, and the older generation have been given the| older generation have been given the most protection _ older generation have been given the most protection, is _ older generation have been given the most protection, is it— older generation have been given the most protection, is it likely— older generation have been given the most protection, is it likely the - most protection, is it likely the mutation — most protection, is it likely the mutation that— most protection, is it likely the mutation that thrives _ most protection, is it likely the mutation that thrives in - most protection, is it likely the. mutation that thrives in children who had — mutation that thrives in children who had less _ mutation that thrives in children who had less protection - mutation that thrives in children who had less protection from i who had less protection from vaccination _ who had less protection from vaccination, and _ who had less protection from vaccination, and could - who had less protection from vaccination, and could this i who had less protection from i vaccination, and could this lead who had less protection from - vaccination, and could this lead to a new— vaccination, and could this lead to a new child — vaccination, and could this lead to a new child epidemic? _ vaccination, and could this lead to a new child epidemic? iirlt�*hait- vaccination, and could this lead to a new child epidemic?— vaccination, and could this lead to a new child epidemic? what you think of that,
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a new child epidemic? what you think of that. chris? _ a new child epidemic? what you think of that, chris? by _ a new child epidemic? what you think of that, chris? by protecting - a new child epidemic? what you think of that, chris? by protecting older. of that, chris? by protecting older people we leave children open to another virus in the future. there are two things — another virus in the future. there are two things to _ another virus in the future. there are two things to consider. - another virus in the future. there i are two things to consider. number one is— are two things to consider. number one is this — are two things to consider. number one is this virus will infect anybody— one is this virus will infect anybody susceptible to infection of anybody susceptible to infection of any age _ anybody susceptible to infection of any age. and yes we have targeted the vaccinations initially at the oldest — the vaccinations initially at the oldest people because they are at highest _ oldest people because they are at highest risk if they get severe disease — highest risk if they get severe disease. but we have to move down the age _ disease. but we have to move down the age spectrum to younger people bein- the age spectrum to younger people being covered. i do not think there is a risk— being covered. i do not think there is a risk they— being covered. i do not think there is a risk they will be particularly exposed — is a risk they will be particularly exposed to infection any more than other— exposed to infection any more than other people. the other thing to bear— other people. the other thing to bear in — other people. the other thing to bear in mind is there is an age spectrum _ bear in mind is there is an age spectrum with respect to severity of disease _ spectrum with respect to severity of disease with this virus. younger people — disease with this virus. younger people tend to have trivial involvement with it compared to those _ involvement with it compared to those who are older. probably the long-term — those who are older. probably the long—term outcome will be we will end up— long—term outcome will be we will end up with a virus, in years ahead, a virus— end up with a virus, in years ahead, a virus that— end up with a virus, in years ahead, a virus that has changed itself so it accommodates us and we will have
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changed _ it accommodates us and we will have changed ourselves so we accommodate it. it changed ourselves so we accommodate it it will _ changed ourselves so we accommodate it. it will become endemic. we will have _ it. it will become endemic. we will have its— it. it will become endemic. we will have its circulate through the human population— have its circulate through the human population indefinitely. the evidence is in the late 18005, a pandemic— evidence is in the late 18005, a pandemic at the time people thought was a _ pandemic at the time people thought was a former flu because they did not know— was a former flu because they did not know what viruses were then. but now scientists accept probably that pandemic— now scientists accept probably that pandemic was a new coronavirus. if you look— pandemic was a new coronavirus. if you look at— pandemic was a new coronavirus. if you look at the coronavirus that cause _ you look at the coronavirus that cause common colds today, you can find the _ cause common colds today, you can find the one — cause common colds today, you can find the one we think caused that scourge _ find the one we think caused that scourge in— find the one we think caused that scourge in the 18005 and killed millions — scourge in the 18005 and killed millions. it has since settled down to become — millions. it has since settled down to become a fairly trivial infection in us _ to become a fairly trivial infection in us and — to become a fairly trivial infection in us and we, because we catch it across— in us and we, because we catch it across our— in us and we, because we catch it across our lifetimes, do not have a problem _ across our lifetimes, do not have a problem with it because by the time we are _ problem with it because by the time we are elderly and more vulnerable we are elderly and more vulnerable we have _ we are elderly and more vulnerable we have caught it so many times we do not _ we have caught it so many times we do not have — we have caught it so many times we do not have a severe run—in with it. we anticipate — do not have a severe run—in with it. we anticipate this new coronavirus will probably follow the same track
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in the _ will probably follow the same track in the years ahead. it is will probably follow the same track in the years ahead.— in the years ahead. it is how we live with it _ in the years ahead. it is how we live with it in _ in the years ahead. it is how we live with it in the _ in the years ahead. it is how we live with it in the meantime. i live with it in the meantime. this question is from paul. i was previously _ this question is from paul. i was previously boosted _ this question is from paul. i was previously boosted at _ this question is from paul. i was previously boosted at five - this question is from paul. i was previously boosted at five months and three — previously boosted at five months and three weeks. _ previously boosted at five months and three weeks. now— previously boosted at five months and three weeks. now we - previously boosted at five months and three weeks. now we have i previously boosted at five months i and three weeks. now we have three months _ and three weeks. now we have three months i_ and three weeks. now we have three months i am — and three weeks. now we have three months. i am wondering _ and three weeks. now we have three months. i am wondering why. - and three weeks. now we have three months. i am wondering why. paul. months. i am wondering why. paul is sa in: months. i am wondering why. paul is saying he was denied _ five months and now he is told it is three months. what has changed? is it omicron? it is and also more safety data. the initial decision to have that gap was based on the fact that if you had a longer gap it looked like the booster boosted you more and that is fair enough, the data suggested that. we are now in winter with a new variant. we know there is waning from the second dose. it is a more precautionary approach to say let's get boosters out now. if you look at the pfizer
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trial on boosters and what israel and others have done, they boosted all adults as we are about to do. you start with the most vulnerable but then go down the age range. shorter duration for caution and signs suggest that is not a bad idea, and also lets roll it out to all adults. idea, and also lets roll it out to all adults-— idea, and also lets roll it out to all adults. ~ ., ., ., ., all adults. we have one from yvonne in kent who — all adults. we have one from yvonne in kent who says _ all adults. we have one from yvonne in kent who says i _ all adults. we have one from yvonne in kent who says i had _ all adults. we have one from yvonne in kent who says i had my _ all adults. we have one from yvonne in kent who says i had my moderna i in kent who says i had my moderna booster on saturday afternoon... she wants to know she had a normal reaction to a booster. look, you can never say never in medicine — look, you can never say never in medicine. everybody is different so everybody — medicine. everybody is different so everybody can have different reactions to different things in different ways. i cannot say 100% that different ways. i cannot say100% that is— different ways. i cannot say100% that is not— different ways. i cannot say 100% that is not because of some mild reaction — that is not because of some mild reaction to— that is not because of some mild reaction to the vaccine. what i can say is _
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reaction to the vaccine. what i can say is there — reaction to the vaccine. what i can say is there are lots of respiratory infections — say is there are lots of respiratory infections at the moment that will produce _ infections at the moment that will produce those symptoms. there are many— produce those symptoms. there are many viruses that cause an infection of the _ many viruses that cause an infection of the eyes — many viruses that cause an infection of the eyes. another virus that causes — of the eyes. another virus that causes the _ of the eyes. another virus that causes the common cold frequently do this. causes the common cold frequently do this they— causes the common cold frequently do this. they also cause swellings of the adenoids and also irritation of respiratory— the adenoids and also irritation of respiratory passages including the eustachian tubes. it is possible, given— eustachian tubes. it is possible, given the — eustachian tubes. it is possible, given the frequency with which these other infections are around, it could — other infections are around, it could be — other infections are around, it could be just bad luck that yes you have the _ could be just bad luck that yes you have the booster, but you also caught — have the booster, but you also caught something in the meantime and there is— caught something in the meantime and there is something else causing side effects— there is something else causing side effects but because of what is foremost in your mind is the covid booster. _ foremost in your mind is the covid booster. it — foremost in your mind is the covid booster. it is _ foremost in your mind is the covid booster, it is not unreasonable to say perhaps that was the cause of this _ say perhaps that was the cause of this we — say perhaps that was the cause of this. we don't know is the answer. it this. we don't know is the answer. it could _ this. we don't know is the answer. it could be — this. we don't know is the answer. it could be the booster but it is more _ it could be the booster but it is more likely you have run into another— more likely you have run into another infection that accounts for the other— another infection that accounts for the other symptoms.—
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another infection that accounts for the other symptoms. thank you so much. a fantastic _ the other symptoms. thank you so much. a fantastic explanation. i the other symptoms. thank you so i much. a fantastic explanation. thank you to everybody who has been in touch with a question. we hope we have made things a little clearer. i guess you are back on saturday. we will get two more questions then. shall we have some fun? we need some fun. 20 years ago, it was the inspiration for the iconic film starring nicole kidman and ewan mcgregor. now, a stage version of mouoin rouge has opened on the west end. # no matter your sin, you're welcome here #. moulin rouge arrives in london after a hugely successful launch on broadway. like the movie it's based on, the stage show is an assault on the senses, with one of the most lavish sets on the west end. we've treated this theatre in a 360 way, right? so when you come to this theatre, when you step off denman street, you are in the moulin rouge —
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whether you're in the back row or the front row, the show is happening all around you. and let's take a walk out. just show us what's happening in the auditorium. absolutely. so, over here, we've got this amazing windmill that, as you see right now, is rotating. we've got this incredible elephant. there's 800 square metres of red velvet. we've got go—go cages that are used for performers. here's can—can seating, so some people actually sit here this close to the action. so it has that kind of nightclub vibe. and have you ever been to the real moulin rouge? i've been outside the doors, i've knocked on the doors, but i haven't been let in, yes. why wouldn't they let you in? because i went in on sunday at 11am. i think they're probably recuperating at that point. or at church. yeah, that's right. but it's notjust the stage. the costumes are equally over the top. there is just about 300 in total for our principal performers and there's 8600 rhinestones that are on satine's
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diamond costume alone. and do you have to keep a spare bucket of rhinestones in case one falls off? yes, they always fall off. yes, there's a huge bucket — buckets of rhinestones in the back. # i was made for loving you, baby, you were made for loving me. - # the only way of loving me, baby, is to pay a lovely fee.# baz luhrmann's original film starred ewan mcgregor and nicole kidman as christian and satine — two star—crossed lovers in 19th century paris who serenaded each other with medleys of pop songs. for the musical, even more songs have been crammed in. this sequence now includes 20 hits in just five minutes. it was really exciting to be able to kind of mine for anti—love songs. so as he's presenting these love songs to her, she's able to refute them with her own songs that she brings into the mix.
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# need you by my side, girl, you'll be my bride. # never be denied everlasting love. # what's love got to do, got to do with it? # come what may.# for the london production, satine is played by liisi lafontaine, who makes a spectacular entrance every night. yes, i enter by trapeze swing. something i never thought i would say. doing it every night is so surreal and you just hear like a slight gasp and then it's applause, and it's just this crazy way to start the show. satine, as fans of the film will know, has quite a tragic story in the final act. how do you prepare yourself for that emotionally every night? it's difficult.
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i mean, especially with covid and with how much collective grief we've all experienced in the last few years. i think that dying every day is deeper than it would have been two years ago. i think what we're all willing to sacrifice and the people we've lost along the way is kind of all represented within that moment. but i feel like it's such a poetic ending and it makes everything make more sense. and so it's almost like a sacrifice. liisi says audiences have been in tears at every night of previews for moulin rouge the musical. so if you do plan to go, remember to pack a box of tissues. when i said fun. i think we also gave away the ending. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines... the nhs gears up for a major expansion of the vaccine booster programme, with all adults in england to be offered the jab by the end of january. when you get your call, this is really part of a national mission where you can play a part. please do, you know, a step up and roll up your sleeves and get protected. more disruption for students as university staff begin a three—day trike over pay, working conditions and pensions. around 25,000 people have spent a fifth night without power in north england and scotland after storm arwen has devastated infrastructure. a 15—year—old has killed three fellow students and injured eight others in a school shooting in the us state of michigan.

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