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tv   BBC News at Ten  BBC News  December 1, 2021 10:00pm-10:31pm GMT

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tonight at 10pm... stepping up the vaccine booster campaign across the uk, with firefighters and soldiers among those called to help out. this was the scene at a centre in llangefni — welsh ministers admit the booster programme will put the nhs under immense pressure. we recognise that the workforce is absolutely exhausted, which is why we are really making sure that the net is really cast much wider this time to make sure that we can ask those volunteers to come back in. as preparations for christmas go ahead, some doctors say it's best to avoid large gatherings but ministers say it's the individual�*s responsibility. we've all got a role to play in this, it is a national mission what we've set out in vaccinations,
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we can all play a role. we'll have more on the situation here in wales and across the uk. also on the programme... reforming the social care system in england — more details emerge of the £1.7 billion to be raised by a new levy. efforts continue to restore power to tens of thousands of people in parts of england, scotland and wales who've spent a fifth night without electricity after storm arwen. why the welsh government says there are too many second homes in wales and that action is now needed. and the art installation depicting a traditional irish pub, named as the winner of this year's turner prize. and coming up in the sport on the bbc news channel... a busy night in the premier league with six matches, including the merseyside derby between everton and liverpool.
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welcome to bbc news at ten, which comes from cardiff tonight, in the new headquarters of bbc wales in the heart of the welsh capital. during the day ministers from scotland, northern ireland, england and wales held talks to co—ordinate their efforts on the roll—out of the booster programme. a target of the end ofjanuary, to complete the programme has been agreed in england and scotland, but as yet, wales and northern ireland have not signed up to that. nhs england is issuing detailed guidance to hospitals, pharmacists and gps about expanding the booster roll—out but doctors�* leaders have expressed concern about the extra burden at a challenging time. our health editor hugh pym reports. a vaccination centre on anglesey, preparing like so many others around the uk to fire up the booster programme. it's a big ask for the nhs at a time
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of intensifying winter pressures. and the welsh health minister says help will be sought across local communities. we recognise that the workforce is absolutely exhausted, which is why we are really making sure that the net is really cast much wider this time to make sure that we can ask those volunteers to come back in. the minister said firefighters and military personnel could be deployed, but gps in wales have warned it'll need big vaccination centres to be set up again rather than relying on their practices. where gps have the time and aren't exhausted and wish to contribute as they did initially, then they could help with these centres, but at the moment, from a general practice point of view within our own infrastructure, we really are under the cosh. this pharmacist in hull, like others, is increasing opening hours to offer boosterjabs seven days a week. responding to the call by ministers
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to tackle the new variant. the best way to continue to defend ourselves is through our fantastic vaccine programme and it's exactly why we are expanding the booster programme. hospitals will be part of the push to get more boosters done, expanding their existing vaccination hubs to give more slots to members of the public. this centre and others like it have been asked to create a lot more capacity. that'll mean extra appointments, but also possibly having to find more space, which will be far from straightforward. of course, it'll also mean more staff from the hospital moving to do the jabs. the medical director told me that however busy, her colleagues would rise to the challenge. i can't overstress the commitment there is amongst nurses and doctors to make sure that people get vaccinated. if i was to askjust every one of our doctors and every one of our nurses to do one extra shift to do some vaccination, that would be a lot of vaccinators. today, monica, who's a teacher, came to getjabbed.
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she was eligible and had her booster. i feel i need to protect the people i work with cos i'm surrounded by people all day every day and children from different backgrounds, different family set—ups. health officials in scotland have repeated advice to people to get a lateral flow test before going to family gatherings over christmas, a point also made by the health secretary at westminster. and in northern ireland, there've been warnings of disruptions in schools before the christmas break because of a shortage of teachers partly linked to covid isolation. it's another reminder that while we don't know enough about the new variant, the virus, as it is now, is still spreading. hugh pym, bbc news. oue health editor, hugh pym, joins us now. can we talk about the kind of pressure there is, really, to get this booster programme delivered, and what in logistical and practical terms does that mean? this accelerated _ terms does that mean? this accelerated booster - terms does that mean? ti 3 accelerated booster programme bringing millions more into its
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scope more rapidly than had been planned is going to involve, as we have been hearing, a huge effort in the uk nations, but it's something which at least ministers, health officials, nhs staff, volunteers, pharmacists and other vaccinated can do something about. what they can't really influence is how quickly we learn more about the new variant. it had been thought that might take three weeks or more, but the who has said today that we could get more information about how transmissible it is within days, and they go on to say that actually some of the cases they have seen at least have been mild. that still doesn't offer much clarity over what will happen in the weeks ahead for the public into the festive season. sajid javid, the health secretary, has made the point that, for england, he would recommend lateral flow tests for people going to parties. he says, don't cancel your plans but get those lateral flow tests, and that echoes advice given by professor
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jason leitch in scotland, the national clinical director there, again, don't change your plans, get lateralflow again, don't change your plans, get lateral flow tests, and again, don't change your plans, get lateralflow tests, and he again, don't change your plans, get lateral flow tests, and he added again, don't change your plans, get lateralflow tests, and he added it also might be an idea for your gathering to ask people are vaccinated, so still a message about caution, at least until we know more about omicron.— caution, at least until we know more about omicron. thank you, hugh pym, with the latest — about omicron. thank you, hugh pym, with the latest thoughts. _ the latest coronavirus figures in the uk show there were just under 19,000 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period. on average, there were just over 43,500 new cases reported per day in the last week. the latest figures show there were over 7,500 people in hospital being treated for coronavirus yesterday. 171 deaths were recorded — that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—i9 test. on average in the past week, 122 covid—related deaths were recorded every day. there have now been more than 145,000 deaths linked to covid in the uk.
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on vaccinations, more than 18.5 million people have now had a boosterjab. borisjohnson has refused to deny reports that christmas parties were held in downing street last year but he insisted that no covid rules were broken. at prime minister's questions, the labour leader, sir keir starmer, accused mrjohnson of hypocrisy for ignoring the rules that he'd imposed on everyone else. our political editor, laura kuenssberg, has the story. a warning — her report contains some flashing images. good cheer? was there too much of it in number ten last year? when covid rules meant schmoozing like this in downing street was most definitely not allowed? is that good gin, prime minister? reports this morning suggested a boozy party happened behind the shiny black door. should we cancel christmas parties? a political opportunity too tempting for the opposition leader to let pass.
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ias millions were locked down lastl year, was a christmas party thrown in downing street for dozens - of people on december the 18th? what i can tell the right honourable gentlemen is that all guidance was followed completely during number ten. and can i recommend to the right honourable gentleman that he does the same with his own christmas party? borisjohnson wasn't at the said event, but didn't squash the suggestion it happened. he's not denied it. he says no rules were broken. both of those things can't be true, prime minister. - he's taking the british public for fools. - at a time when public health messaging is so vital, how can the public trust a prime minister when he thinks it is one rule for him and one for everybody else? they should concert their line
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of attack more closely. i have said before he is talking total nonsense. this mightjangle nerves for the government right now as this place is waiting anxiously for more information about the new covid variant. will mps be asked to back tighter rules again? will the government repeat the sudden clamp—down of last christmas? we've spoken to an attendee of the alleged gathering on the 18th of december last year. they said there were several dozen people there with food, drink and games, and it went on past midnight. reasonable interactions in a workplace were then allowed, but socialising was meant to be off—limits. lockdown was back the next day. 12 months on, with doubts again about this christmas, it is deeply awkward for number ten. three, two, one! cheering. for now, the prime minister and, of course, the public must wait in a kind of limbo. the countdown to clarity about the new covid variant
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could still take a couple of weeks, and until then, none of us can know what this christmas will bring. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, downing street. at westminster, the government has outlined more details of its ten—year plan to reform the social care system in england. while reforms, including an £86,000 cap on care costs, were outlined in september today's announcement details how they'll spend £1.7 billion of money raised by a new health and social care levy. the government will be investing £300 million in housing, with a focus on increasing the range of new supported housing options. and £500 million will be spent on the social care workforce over the next few years, focusing on training for staff. but labour says the plan "falls woefully short of the mark" and fails to deal with immediate pressures facing the social care system. our social affairs editor, alison holt, reports.
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click "clinician" in the corner and then push "go". this is the sort of gym session that helps steve maintain his strength. it's set for an hour. he broke his neck in a car accident as a teenager. he has live—in support as well as daily visits from care workers like jazzmine. the ambition of the government plans is to make it easierfor more people to live independently, partly with the help of technology and adapted housing. obviously, i can do so much myself, but there is a lot i can't do, and that's where the carers come in. how important is it that the government gets this right and really invests in care? oh, definitely. you know, unless a miracle does happen with me, but it's... i'm going to need it for the rest of my life. there will be money to ensure more care staff get the sort of regular training that jazzmine receives, but the plans stop short of a professional register for care workers and don't address pay. it is a skilled role.
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the things that we have to do out in the community, i don't think people realise, you know? we are taking responsibility when we are administering medication. we are trusting that a pharmacy has filled out a blister pack correctly and we are taking responsibility for that. in the house of commons, the care minister describes the ten—year plan as a significant step forward after past governments have failed to act. the reform of social care in this country is an issue that has been ducked for far too long, but we will do whatever it takes on this tough challenge, and we will do this to get it right. ministers have utterly failed to deal with the immediate pressures facing social care as we head into one of the most difficult winters on record. and they have failed to set out the long—term vision and more fundamental reforms we need to deliver a care system fit for the future. i'm going to have a look at other alternatives. and care providers like this hartfordshire home care company are alreadyjuggling increasing
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demand and staff shortages. they welcome many of the ideas in the government plans but say the extra funding won't come soon enough to deal with current pressures. two or three weeks ago, we had 100 people waiting in our local hospital for home care that couldn't be accommodated, and that's notjust by us as a provider, that's by other providers as well, but they couldn't be accommodated because we just do not have enough people to facilitate that. for many involved in care, the plans are an important starting point. the next step is to see changes happening on the ground. alison holt, bbc news. tens of thousands of people in the north of england are preparing to spend a sixth night without electricity after storm arwen left infrastructure badly damaged. energy networks say at present there are around 30,000 households still without power. 15,500 of those
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are in the north—east of england, 7,000 in the north—west, and 7,500 in different regions of scotland. power has now been restored to almost every home in wales, as our correspondent fiona trott reports. another day and another problem. if we can move all this here... engineers from across england trying to restore power in northumberland. we've been without power since about, oh, seven o'clock on friday night, and we've coped, but boy am i glad to see these people, and apparently they're from bedford as well. in neighbouring county durham, a visit from the energy minister, greg hands. but when you've been without energy for six days the frustration starts to show. the government has said - we will stand behind assistance, we are working closely i with the british red cross and making sure that that| assistance gets to people. i do think you are kidding yourself. the red cross?
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i don't see the red cross here, ok? you can mention whatever you like at your level... yeah. but you are talking a different world to my level. rolo, come here. these farming communities are a world away from westminster. the challenge here in doddington is milking 300 cows twice a day and relying on one generator. we have to have electricity to run the machines to milk cows, and it won't wait. otherwise they get very uncomfortable, you get health problems, mastitis, etc. in aberdeenshire, this couple in torphins are relying on one fire in one room. as time has gone on, _ i think we've become more and more ragged and exhausted. no lighting. and so, it's really been a struggle, and slowly this granite building - is getting colder and colder. in areas like these people are used to working together in a crisis. but as the days go on, they say they need more than community spirit. fiona trott, bbc news,
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northumberland. the women's tennis association has suspended all tournaments in china. the move is in response to concerns about the wellbeing of the chinese player peng shuai, who disappeared from public view for three weeks after accusing a top chinese official of sexual assault. the wta chief, steve simon, said he had "serious doubts" about claims that she was "free, safe and not subject to intimidation". students at 58 universities in england, scotland and northern ireland are facing three days of disruption because staff have started a strike over pay, pensions and working conditions. the university and college union says workloads have become �*unmanageable', and it's warned that further walk—outs may take place next year. some students have expressed anger, that having paid thousands in fees, their learning is being disrupted again, after 18 months of online learning because of the pandemic. our education editor branwenjeffreys has the latest.
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# working nine to five # what a way to make a living #. fed up with their workload, angry about pay and pension changes, university lecturers say they have no option but to strike. shall we pop in here? i've met freya, who teaches on degree courses, unsure what theirfuture is as a university academic. so i have to reapply for myjob every year. i have no guaranteed hours or guaranteed employment in future. the union says young academics could lose a third of theirfuture pension. there is a hole in the pension fund, but the size of it is disputed. the issues behind this strike have been brewing for years, but, most of all, the feeling that teaching in a university, which used to be a very secure job, is now much more vulnerable and uncertain. in belfast, support from passing drivers. lecturers at some universities in both northern ireland
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and in scotland are also on strike. so what do students make of the disruption? it worries me a little bit. but i think, kind of, for me, i support it. i wouldn't want to be assessed on something that we didn't actually get taught, but i think at the same time, we don't mind too much, the situation that we might miss some in—person lectures. the uss trustee who runs the scheme has decided that more money is needed. speaking for universities in the pension scheme, one vice chancellor told me change had to happen. universities in england have been warned to minimise the effect of strikes on students. there are many things that we can do in universities to make sure that the students don't suffer. we can change deadlines, we can change teaching methods. more universities, including some in wales, mayjoin the strikes. union members at another 42 are being reballoted — raising the prospect of more
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disruption injanuary. branwen jeffreys, bbc news. here in cardiff, the first minister of wales mark drakeford has been addressing an issue that's been a growing cause of concern in parts of wales, and that's the number of second homes and holiday lets in some areas. mr drakeford says there are too many of them , and they're affecting welsh communities and property prices. the welsh labour government, supported by plaid cymru, is proposing tax increases and more planning controls to contain the trend. wales has seen average house prices rise by 15.4% this year, that's the biggest increase in the uk. in some coastal villages, such as abersoch on the llyn peninsula, nearly half the housing comprises second homes and holiday lets. from there, our wales correspondent hywel griffith reports. winter, and abersoch is in hibernation.
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on this picturesque part of pen llyn, almost half of the houses are holiday homes. the average property price is now £700,000. tom grew up here, but is priced out of his community and living in a caravan. he is a plumber, charlotte is a hairdresser, and they have been on the list for a council house for over a year, in which time little tom has arrived. this is where they will spend their first family christmas while most of the houses in abersoch will be vacant. it's just heartbreaking, really, seeing them so empty. and we are here, trying to raise ourfamily. you try and give to the community, and then you can't live in the community that you want to live in. we've got as much right as anybody else to be living here. but the prices are just way, way beyond us.
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the problems here on the llyn peninsula are acute, but they are not unique. like parts of cornwall and the lake district, over decades it's become a haven for holiday homes, but during the pandemic issues have exacerbated, prices have shot up and tensions have deepened. it has led to a new wave of protests calling on the welsh government to act, especially in communities where the future of the welsh language is under threat. on the llyn, second homeowners already have to pay an extra 100% in council tax. further increases could follow, as well as planning controls. but some of the owners feel they are being blamed when the real failure is the shortage of affordable housing. we are being used as a scapegoat because of failed national policies. if i was a politician, do i want to stand up and say, "i have failed in my duty to nominate the number of homes i've
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needed ten years ago"? i'll blame someone else, i'll blame the second homeowners. that's easy to do. the first minister says there are too many second homes in some parts of wales, but is he searching for a scapegoat? well, i never use the language of blame because i don't think that is helpful to anybody and it is not what we are in the business of doing. what we are in the business of doing is trying to make sure that local people and young people in particular have a fair chance to go on living, growing up and contributing in the communities into which they were born. communities which may have already changed forever. on the llyn, some properties have been bought up by businesses to offer as holiday lets — houses which may never be homes again. while tourism brings in a regular tide of income and investment, what makes these places unique is in danger of being washed away. hywel griffith, bbc news, pen llyn.
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the us supreme court has begun hearing arguments in the most important case on abortion rights for half a century. the court is considering a law in the state of mississippi, which bans terminations after 15 weeks. a ruling isn't expected until next summer but if the court, which is dominated byjustices with a conservative mindset, finds in mississippi's favour its expected dozens of other states could ban or restrict abortions. our correspondent sophie long sent this report. singing. this is a regular scene outside the last remaining abortion clinic in the state of mississippi. it is murder, murdering - the state of mississippi. it 3 murder, murdering children the state of mississippi. it 1 murder, murdering children is according to the law in the bible. the difficult decision women who come here have made, isjudged very publicly. this is the front line in
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a bitter battle that has gone on for decades. mississippi is trying to ban abortions after 15 weeks. if the supreme court rules in its favour, it will roll back the law that has beenin it will roll back the law that has been in place for over half a century, known as roe versus wade. it is people in the poorest communities that will feel the impact the most. we communities that will feel the impact the most.— communities that will feel the impact the most. communities that will feel the imact the most. ~ ., ., ., impact the most. we are going out in the community... _ impact the most. we are going out in the community... the _ impact the most. we are going out in the community... the students - impact the most. we are going out in the community... the students are l the community... the students are sreadin: the community... the students are spreading the _ the community... the students are spreading the anti-abortion - the community... the students are i spreading the anti-abortion message. spreading the anti—abortion message. they want it banned without the exception of incest or rape and lydia knows how that feels. i exception of incest or rape and lydia knows how that feels. i was in that situation. _ lydia knows how that feels. i was in that situation. i _ lydia knows how that feels. i was in that situation. i was _ lydia knows how that feels. i was in that situation. i was scared, - lydia knows how that feels. i was in that situation. i was scared, i - lydia knows how that feels. i was in that situation. i was scared, i was i that situation. i was scared, i was thinking, you know what, even if i am, it is amazing that there is possibility of a baby inside of me. even with the law still intact, many have been forced to travel thousands of miles from states like texas
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after abortion is banned from six weeks, two more liberal states to access the care they need. 119—year—old has come across half the country from houston to seattle. she was assaulted, did a pregnancy test that was negative, but over the coming weeks her body continue to change. i coming weeks her body continue to chance. . , coming weeks her body continue to chane. ., �* coming weeks her body continue to chance. ., �* . change. i was scared, i don't want any memory _ change. i was scared, i don't want any memory of— change. i was scared, i don't want any memory of that _ change. i was scared, i don't want any memory of that day, - change. i was scared, i don't want any memory of that day, any - any memory of that day, any affection to that person. i could not get any help for the pain i was going through. ijust had to suffer in silence. going through. i 'ust had to suffer in silence. ~ , ., , ., in silence. when people are controlling _ in silence. when people are controlling women's - in silence. when people are j controlling women's fertility in silence. when people are - controlling women's fertility and pregnant's fertility under the guise they are _ pregnant's fertility under the guise they are trying to protect their health. — they are trying to protect their health, they are controlling that person's— health, they are controlling that person's basic human rights and dignity — person's basic human rights and dignity. and that is a form of human rights _ dignity. and that is a form of human rights abuse. the dignity. and that is a form of human rights abuse-— rights abuse. the supreme court's decision will _ rights abuse. the supreme court's decision will likely _ rights abuse. the supreme court's decision will likely not _ rights abuse. the supreme court's decision will likely not come - rights abuse. the supreme court's decision will likely not come untill decision will likely not come until next summer. over the coming months,
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many will pray and others will hope it goes their side's way. sophie long, bbc news, seattle. an art installation depicting a traditional irish pub has been unveiled as the winner of this year's turner prize. the piece, by the belfast—based array collective, features photos, memorabilia and videos, some of them representing hidden political messages about sexuality and identity. our correspondent david sillito reports from the awards ceremony in coventry. the winner of the turner prize 2021... and it is... array collective. 2021. .. and it is... array collective.— 2021. .. and it is... array collective. 2021...and it is...array collective. ., . ., collective. array collective, a . rou - collective. array collective, a a-rou of collective. array collective, a group of artists _ collective. array collective, a group of artists and - collective. array collective, a group of artists and activists | collective. array collective, a - group of artists and activists from northern ireland whose turn a prize—winning artwork is more than just a pub, it is a symbolic place of good—natured debate and sang tree from sectarian conflict. this is
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your shebeen, your pub, but it is more than that, it has a political overtone to it? we more than that, it has a political overtone to it?— more than that, it has a political overtone to it? we don't all agree on everything _ overtone to it? we don't all agree on everything and _ overtone to it? we don't all agree on everything and the _ overtone to it? we don't all agree. on everything and the communities overtone to it? we don't all agree - on everything and the communities we are within and represented, don't agree on everything but we still agree on everything but we still agree to have a laugh together. array collective origins lie in progressive and liberal campaigns, creating banners and costumes for street protests and rallies. in an attempt to bring art to a less combative mood to the street theatre of northern ireland politics. we come at it _ of northern ireland politics. we come at it from a point of view to come _ come at it from a point of view to come at — come at it from a point of view to come at it— come at it from a point of view to come at it from a point of view to come at it from a point of view to come at it from a humorous point of view than _ come at it from a humorous point of view than an— come at it from a humorous point of view than an aggressive point of view _ view than an aggressive point of view you — view than an aggressive point of view. you can challenge the conversation to humour, rather than aggression — conversation to humour, rather than an uression. �* ., , ., aggression. bringing a bit of civili to aggression. bringing a bit of civility to the _ aggression. bringing a bit of civility to the debate? - aggression. bringing a bit of civility to the debate? and l aggression. bringing a bit of l civility to the debate? and the human connection. _ civility to the debate? and the human connection. this - civility to the debate? and the human connection. this is - civility to the debate? and the i human connection. this is more civility to the debate? and the - human connection. this is more than just a little drinking den, it is a desire to bring to our politics, some of the gentle warmth and conviviality of a friendly pub. david sillitoe, bbc news, coventry.
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that's it. from this new building in the heart of the capital, so from cardiff i will say good night hello. the cold air is back. thursday will be a chilly day in comparison to wednesday. we'll start a widespread frost and an ice risk in some areas and through the day, despite a little sunshine, temperatures will live. biggest ice risk on eastern scotland and wales the southwest. for the showers for pembroke and cornwall and across eastern areas in eastern scotland tending to clear to the afternoon. a lot of sparkling sunshine with highs
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of four or 5 degrees. cloud getting into northern ireland in the afternoon. across the uk overnight thursday and friday, still for the south there should be dry coming in the afternoon. a relatively fine day for the majority of the uk and milder in the south, but temperatures could get up to 11 or 12 degrees for a time. but for the weekend, the chillier air will return.

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