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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 2, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today. a deal for an extra 114 million doses of covid vaccines — they'll be available for future booster programmes, and could combat new variants. a year after the uk became the first country in the world to approve the pfizer vaccine — the company's boss calls for children as young as five to be vaccinated . an emotional alec baldwin outlines the events that led to the death of cinematographer, halyna hutchins, on a movie set. the trigger wasn't pulled. i didn't pull the trigger. so you never pulled the trigger?
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no, no, no. i would never point a gun at anyone and pull a trigger at them, never. what did you think happened? counting the cost of soaring energy bills — another hike next year could mean our gas bills double. there's a warning millions will struggle to afford to heat their homes. victory for the top three in the premier league, as liverpool thrash everton in the merseyside derby, to turn up the pressure on rafa benitez. it's another cold start to the day. wintry showers and icy stretches. there is also some sunshine. all the details throughout the programme. good morning. it's thursday, the 2nd of december. the government has ordered an extra 114 million doses of covid vaccine, to be used for potential booster programmes over the next two years. the health secretary, sajid javid, said the deals future—proof the uk's vaccination programme. simonjones reports. relax your arm, light scratch. all done.
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the government has promised to offer a boosterjab to all eligible adults in england by the end ofjanuary. but it's also looking further ahead, to a time when boosters may be needed again and again, so it's secured an additional 60 million doses of the moderna vaccine, and 5a million doses of the pfizer jab. they will be the latest vaccines that they will have, because as we're seeing right now, there's a new variant, there's potentially new variants in the future. we know that covid is going to be around for a while. we have to learn to live with it, and one of the ways to learn to live with it is to make sure we got of the vaccines that we need, and that they're future proof. it's exactly a year since this happened. we have some breaking news for you this morning, because in the last few minutes we've heard that the first coronavirus vaccine has been approved for use in the uk. that was the pfizer vaccine. 12 months on, more than 150 million first, second and boosterjabs of the different vaccines, have been administered across the uk.
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at present, children aged between 12 and 15 are offered a vaccine. the boss of pfizer, in an interview with the bbc, says five to 11—year—olds should getjabbed too. i think that covid in schools is thriving. i believe that this is disturbing significantly the education system. and there are kids that will have severe symptoms. so, there is no doubt in my mind that the benefits completely, completely are in favour of doing it. while the vaccines continue to roll off the production line, pfizer has already started work on an updated omicron version of its jab, should it be needed. the world health organization says early signs suggest that most cases of the new variant are mild. scientists say they still need a few more days to determine its potential threat. simon jones, bbc news. with people talking about of the
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christmas plans, the prime minister has refused to deny christmas parties were held at downing street last year. he parties were held at downing street last ear. . , parties were held at downing street last ear. ., , , , ., ., last year. he has insisted no covid rules were — last year. he has insisted no covid rules were broken. _ let's speak to our chief political correspondent adam fleming. we are curtailing our plans around christmas this year. what we are talking about is what happened last year, but then the rules were even more stringent, weren't they? yeah, as we enter — more stringent, weren't they? yeah, as we enter christmas _ more stringent, weren't they? yeah, as we enter christmas party - more stringent, weren't they? yeah, as we enter christmas party season l as we enter christmas party season in the _ as we enter christmas party season in the real— as we enter christmas party season in the real world, we are as we enter christmas party season in the realworld, we are in christmas _ in the realworld, we are in christmas party season in the news world _ christmas party season in the news world. there are various stories around — world. there are various stories around christmas parties at various times _ around christmas parties at various times the — around christmas parties at various times. the first report is in the mirror— times. the first report is in the mirror that— times. the first report is in the mirror that there were several boozy gatherings. — mirror that there were several boozy gatherings, as the paper describes it, gatherings, as the paper describes it. in_ gatherings, as the paper describes it, in downing street in november and december last year, at times when _ and december last year, at times when either london or england was in restrictions— when either london or england was in restrictions that meant you shouldn't be having gatherings. the bbc has _ shouldn't be having gatherings. the bbc has spoken to one source who attended _ bbc has spoken to one source who attended what sounds like a party, where _ attended what sounds like a party, where there was catering and there was booze — where there was catering and there was booze and they were party games.
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but the _ was booze and they were party games. but the prime minister is saying that everything that happened in downing — that everything that happened in downing street during that period what was — downing street during that period what was in the rules. interesting, the prime — what was in the rules. interesting, the prime minister is not repeating what i _ the prime minister is not repeating what i heard yesterday from a downing — what i heard yesterday from a downing street source, an explicit deniat— downing street source, an explicit denial that those parties had taken place _ denial that those parties had taken place the — denial that those parties had taken place. the prime minister is saying something — place. the prime minister is saying something more nuanced. the second stories— something more nuanced. the second stories about christmas parties happening this year where the government advice seems to be getting — government advice seems to be getting more nuanced as well. until yesterday. — getting more nuanced as well. until yesterday, the health secretary was saying _ yesterday, the health secretary was saying was, your party should go ahead _ saying was, your party should go ahead as — saying was, your party should go ahead as planned, take sensible precautions like making sure the room _ precautions like making sure the room is — precautions like making sure the room is well ventilated and take a laterai— room is well ventilated and take a lateral flow test to check you don't have covid — lateral flow test to check you don't have covid before you go. enter the work _ have covid before you go. enter the work and _ have covid before you go. enter the work and pensions secretary on itv last night, _ work and pensions secretary on itv last night, halfjokingly, may be fullyjokingly, saying, you also now shouldn't— fullyjokingly, saying, you also now shouldn't be snogging, in her words, strangers— shouldn't be snogging, in her words, strangers under the mistletoe. that is now— strangers under the mistletoe. that is now a _ strangers under the mistletoe. that is now a little extra bit of advice added _ is now a little extra bit of advice added to— is now a little extra bit of advice added to the guidance and perhaps making _ added to the guidance and perhaps making it _ added to the guidance and perhaps making it a bit more confusing for people _ making it a bit more confusing for people about what you should and shouldn't — people about what you should and
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shouldn't be doing at a christmas party _ shouldn't be doing at a christmas party. and — shouldn't be doing at a christmas party. and also, the government starting — party. and also, the government starting to— party. and also, the government starting to get involved in more intimate — starting to get involved in more intimate personal matters, you could say. intimate personal matters, you could say the _ intimate personal matters, you could say. the third strand about christmas parties, the increasing number— christmas parties, the increasing number of— christmas parties, the increasing number of organisations and venues saying _ number of organisations and venues saying that — number of organisations and venues saying that people are cancelling as a result _ saying that people are cancelling as a result of— saying that people are cancelling as a result of the omicron variant. that— a result of the omicron variant. that could _ a result of the omicron variant. that could have a serious knock—on effect _ that could have a serious knock—on effect for _ that could have a serious knock—on effect for the christmas economy. adam, _ effect for the christmas economy. adam, thank you. interesting that you use the word snogging. it has been a while since we have used that word. , ., ., ~ , , ., word. only at work. in my personal life... word. only at work. in my personal life--- you — word. only at work. in my personal life... you stick _ word. only at work. in my personal life... you stick to _ word. only at work. in my personal life... you stick to being _ word. only at work. in my personal life... you stick to being a - life... you stick to being a political — life... you stick to being a political correspondent - life... you stick to being a | political correspondent and life... you stick to being a - political correspondent and keep life... you stick to being a _ political correspondent and keep the rest of it out of it! six. political correspondent and keep the rest of it out of it!— rest of it out of it! six minutes ast rest of it out of it! six minutes past six- _ the actor alec baldwin says he didn't pull the trigger of the gun that fatally wounded cinematographer halyna hutchins the star made the claim to the american network abc news which will tonight air his first sit—down interview since the incident in october. our north america correspondent david willis reports. it's six weeks since
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halyna hutchins was fatally shot on the set of alec baldwin's western movie rust. we've had two people accidentally shot on a movie set by a prop gun. but as the weeks have gone by, the circumstances surrounding the cinematographer�*s death have become increasingly complicated. a statement released by local detectives only hours after the shooting, referred to a firearm discharged by alec baldwin. but now the actor himself is giving his version of events. the trigger wasn't pulled, i didn't pull the trigger. so you never pulled the trigger? no, no, no. i would never point a gun at anyone and pull the trigger at them, never. what did you think happened? how did a real bullet get on that set? i have no idea. someone put a live bullet in a gun, a bullet that wasn't even supposed to be on the property. police retrieved hundreds of rounds of ammunition from the film set, including, it is thought, other live rounds. they've been investigating reports of dissatisfaction on the part of crew members, who staged a walk—out the day
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before the fatal shooting. and claims by the woman in charge of firearm safety, hannah gutierrez—reed, whose lawyers have said the gun could have been sabotaged. six weeks on from the tragedy in this remote part of northern new mexico, and the investigation appears to be growing more complex by the day. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. a 19—year—old man has been arrested over the death of a teenage girl in hamilton, south lanarkshire. amber gibson, who was 16, was reported missing from her home in the hillhouse area on friday. her body was discovered in a nature reserve on sunday. police scotland say enquiries are still ongoing. everton and liverpool fans united for a minute's applause at the merseyside derby last night, in memory of ava white, the 12 year—old girl who was killed last week. fans also held a banner raising awareness about knife crime. ava was stabbed in liverpool city
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centre last thursday. a11i—year—old boy has been charged with murder. a judgement is expected this morning, in the appeal by associated newspapers in its ongoing privacy dispute with the duchess of sussex. the group — which publishes the mail on sunday — are appealing against the ruling not to hold a full trial, after the paper reproduced parts of a handwritten letter from the duchess to her father, thomas markle, in 2019. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, reports. it began with a letter written by the duchess of sussex just three months after her wedding to prince harry, and sent in august 2018 to her father thomas. their relationship at the time was difficult. on the 9th of february, 2019, the mail on sunday published lengthy extracts from the letter, which had been given to the newspaper by mr markle. meghan, strongly supported by her husband, brought a civil action against associated newspapers, publishers of the mail on sunday,
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claiming that her privacy had been breached. she said the letter had disclosed intimate thoughts and feelings. in february of this year, a judge at the high court ruled in meghan's favour. he said the disclosures in the newspaper had been manifestly excessive, and were hence unlawful. he said the issues were so clear—cut there was no need for a full trial. associated newspapers appealed and produced evidence that they hoped would show the issues were not as clear—cut as had been thought. they produced a witness statement from meghan markle's former communications secretary, which indicated meghan markle had written the letter to her father knowing it might be leaked, and meghan had authorised cooperation with the authors of a book about her and her husband, something she had previously denied. today's decision will decide whether meghan's privacy case should, after all, go to a full trial. if that were to happen, there
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would be the prospect of meghan and her estranged father giving evidence against each other in court. nicholas witchell, bbc news. voters will head to the polls in a parliamentary by—election in the seat of old bexley and sidcup today. the vote will find the successor to james brokenshire, the tory mp who died from lung cancer in october. polls open at 7am and close at 10 o'clock tonight. an art installation of a traditional irish pub has been unveiled as the winner of this year's turner prize. it was created by 11 belfast—based artists known as the array collective. they said the piece is in response to issues including abortion rights and mental health. it features photos, memorabilia and videos — some of them representing hidden political messages about sexuality and identity. there is always so much more than what you first see. that is the beauty of it. it is 11 minutes past
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six. cold again this morning. great everywhere. have you noticed on the roads? stay safe out there. it could be icy. sarah will tell us more. good morning. good morning. it is a cold start to the day. we have got sub zero temperatures in many areas. and some icy stretches. certainly on untreated surfaces. we have had showers already. more to come. they have been falling as sleet and snow for many. you can see snow showers in the north of scotland, down the east coast of england, but also through parts of the midlands into wales. some of them putting into southern england as well. certainly some ice where we have got those showers falling on sub zero services. through the day most places will see some sunshine. we will continue to see the blustery showers in parts of eastern scotland, close to the east coast of england, and the one or two in the west coast of wales. temperatures
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three to four degrees. in the west things will turn milder. eight degrees for the likes of belfast. we have got patchy rain falling snow over high ground of scotland. even to relatively low levels some could fall as sleet and snow. as it turns milder it will turn back to rain later. much of england and wales dry as we head through the evening hours. tonight, that area of cloud with its patchy rain, some snow on the leading edge that even to low levels, pushes east across the country. by the time we get to tomorrow morning, it would be quite as cold as it is this morning. heading towards the weekend, the winds turn to more of a north—westerly direction once again, bringing further showers. in milder day to come tomorrow. once again, things said to turn chile as we look towards the weekend. thank you.— towards the weekend. thank ou. ~ , ., , ., thank you. well, it is cold. lots of --eole thank you. well, it is cold. lots of peeple thinking — thank you. well, it is cold. lots of people thinking about _
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thank you. well, it is cold. lots of people thinking about how- thank you. well, it is cold. lots of people thinking about how they i thank you. well, it is cold. lots of| people thinking about how they are going to be heating their homes. unfortunately, prices are getting higher. everything seems a bit more expensive at the moment, but there are warnings we could be about to pay even more to heat our homes in the new year. ben's looking at this issue for us. good morning. at the moment there is a price cap. when that is lifted in the new year a significant increase on the way. good morning. the warning that gas bills could be doubling by the time we get into the new year. that is because energy prices have been rising for months now. last year a typical annual dual fuel bill wasjust over now. last year a typical annual dual fuel bill was just over £1000. but as we are saying, you might of the price cap, the upper limit providers can charge you, that went up by 12% in october. it meant 15 million people saw their bill go up as a result. typical annual dual fuel bill is now around £1200 per year.
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that is a record increase. and the bad news is it probably won't end there. ofgem is expected to raise there. ofgem is expected to raise the price cap again early next year. we don't know what that will mean for bills but the charity national energy action, it has forecast a £550 increase in april to the dual fuel bill. it means bills would have doubled in more than 18 months. catherine from west yorkshire says she has to decide whether she can afford to turn her heating on, or find other ways to stay warm. i very rarely put the heating on, to be honest. i've got blankets. i use my hairdryer. basically i wrapped myself in a blanket i'd use my hairdryer to warm me up. i'm very, very funny about putting the heating on because even when it's on, my anxiety levels are so high and i'm constantly like timing it. when can i turn it off? how quickly will it last? everything like that. it's a nightmare.—
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last? everything like that. it's a nightmare. so, what is causina it's a nightmare. so, what is causing that _ it's a nightmare. so, what is causing that massive - it's a nightmare. so, what is causing that massive hike i it's a nightmare. so, what is causing that massive hike in | it's a nightmare. so, what is - causing that massive hike in prices? well, the wholesale energy price, what suppliers pay for gas and electricity, has recent all—time high. it has gone up by 250% since january. energy providers have been passing that cost onto customers. usually at this point we would say the best way to find better prices to shop around for a cheaper deal. but, there are very few deals around at the moment. that in part is down to the fact that so many smaller energy firms have already gone bust this year. 20 firms have gone out of business, with the collapse of zog yesterday. iamjoined by i am joined by the energy a nalyst analyst ellen fraser. we have seen huge increases in wholesale prices. they are being passed on to customers. we probably have not seen the worst of it. many people will be
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cautioned by the price cap? that’s cautioned by the price cap? that's exactly right- _ cautioned by the price cap? that's exactly right. the _ cautioned by the price cap? that's exactly right. the price _ cautioned by the price cap? that's exactly right. the price cap - cautioned by the price cap? that's exactly right. the price cap went l cautioned by the price cap? that's. exactly right. the price cap went up around about 12% of the beginning of october. wholesale prices have been significantly higher than the price cap actually reflects. that price cap actually reflects. that price cap actually reflects. that price cap actually cautions consumers from that hike for now. that is the challenge. it is a temporary ease, if you like. but ultimately, suppliers are still paying the cost on the wholesale market. that cost has to flush out somewhere. the expectation is that of the prices are going to increase quite a materially when we hit the 1st of april. ofgem are looking at the pricing mechanism at the moment. industry analysts expect that is going to be somewhere around a 40% increase we can expect in april. ads, increase we can expect in april. a huge increase of those builds do go up huge increase of those builds do go up as forecast. let's talk about
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people who may have been a customer of one of these energy firms that have gone bust. they have automatically been moved to a new provider. they have already seen a big increase?— big increase? they will have done. quite often _ big increase? they will have done. quite often the _ big increase? they will have done. quite often the smaller _ big increase? they will have done. quite often the smaller suppliers i big increase? they will have done. | quite often the smaller suppliers in the market were trying to grow market share by offering prices that were below the price cap. unfortunately, in a market where the wholesale price is so high, those prices were unfortunately unsustainable for many of them. though suppliers couldn't afford to continue and went bust. when those suppliers are appointed a replacement, all of those customers will be migrated from the failed customer onto a new supplier and effectively will be offered the price cap. they will have already seen quite a significantjump from the cheaper tariff that they probably diligently sought in the
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market, to go up to the price cap, and we will see likely further increases in april. is and we will see likely further increases in april.— increases in april. is there anything _ increases in april. is there anything that _ increases in april. is there anything that we - increases in april. is there anything that we can - increases in april. is there anything that we can be i increases in april. is there . anything that we can be doing increases in april. is there - anything that we can be doing to try to keep our costs down right now? it seems the prices are heading in one direction. the usual advice to shop around doesn't work. there are very few options for moving. how do we keep our bills down? the few options for moving. how do we keep our bills down?— keep our bills down? the simple d namic keep our bills down? the simple dynamic is _ keep our bills down? the simple dynamic is purely _ keep our bills down? the simple dynamic is purely to _ keep our bills down? the simple dynamic is purely to use - keep our bills down? the simple dynamic is purely to use less - dynamic is purely to use less energy. that is very difficult for customers like the one you spoke to customers like the one you spoke to an who are very conscious already about heating their homes. we need to make sure those customers are using things like the warm home discount to effectively subsidise their energy bill. there is some help available directly through the government or many of the bigger energy suppliers have funds they can help customers to tap into to ease the pain of their energy bill. for the pain of their energy bill. for the rest of us, we have to be honest, we are quite lazy about how we use energy. leaving doors open,
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windows open, leaving appliances are switched on, not using our heating timers to reflect when we needed the house to be worn. we need to get much, much more aware and conscious about when we use our energy, but also start to think about it has a longer term investment in our homes to make sure we are well insulated and any heat we pump into houses are retained for as long as possible. good to have your thoughts. thank you for being with us. ellen fraser, an energy analyst, on the increase we may see. the price cap to be reviewed more regularly so we don't see a big increase. nonetheless it seems bills are heading in the wrong direction. really keen to hear from you on this one. are you already struggling with your energy bills? have you got any tips for others? let us know. thank you, ben. i've got a tip. this
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is a terrible confession. i told my kids if they touch the thermostat they will get a terrible electric shock. ., ., ., , , shock. you are not the first parents to have admitted _ shock. you are not the first parents to have admitted that. _ shock. you are not the first parents to have admitted that. it _ shock. you are not the first parents to have admitted that. it works! - to have admitted that. it works! until now- _ to have admitted that. it works! until now- i _ to have admitted that. it works! until now. i thought _ to have admitted that. it works! until now. i thought you - to have admitted that. it works! until now. i thought you were i to have admitted that. it works! - until now. i thought you were going to say— until now. i thought you were going to say santa wouldn't come. of course to say santa wouldn't come. course not. let's take a look at today's papers. the daily telegraph leads with the report that the uk government has purchased enough booster doses to last two more winters, and could protect the country against emerging variants. the daily mirror reports that number 10 had a christmas gathering the day before harsher covid restrictions were imposed last year. downing street has said no rules were broken. the daily mail urges ministers to "stop being christmas killjoys", after the health secretary's recommendation that people should take lateral flow tests before attending gatherings. and the most read story on the bbc news website is alec baldwin's first sit—down interview
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since a cinematographer was killed on the set of his film rust. the actor has insisted that he did not pull the trigger of the gun that fatally wounded halyna hutchins. cani can i tell you a lovely story? i want to tell you the story of a turtle. this turtle here was washed up, a rare turtle, there are only about 9000 which remain in the world. it was found on a welsh beach 5200 miles from its home in the gulf of mexico. it usually enjoys temperatures of 25 to 30 degrees. the water it was washed up on, the local temperature was eight degrees. it had real problems. it was in cold water shock. it had real problems. it was in cold watershock. it it had real problems. it was in cold water shock. it was found by a family. and it did begin to move when gently prodded by specialists. it has been nicknamed raphael by
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gethin from the family after the teenage mutant ninja turtle character. it is doing well. it has had a critical 48 hours. it is doing really well. it is been checked hourly, day and night, rehydrated. it will be recuperated for the next few months, then returned to the ocean between north and south america. they get up to two foot long and weigh some £88—macs and can live up to 50 years. he or she will be released. and hopefully, be happy. be released. and hopefully, be ha . _ ., , ., �* ., be released. and hopefully, be ha... ., �* ., ., be released. and hopefully, be happy. raphael. and head home to mexico. lovely. _ happy. raphael. and head home to mexico. lovely. i— happy. raphael. and head home to mexico. lovely. iwas_ happy. raphael. and head home to mexico. lovely. i was going - happy. raphael. and head home to mexico. lovely. i was going to - happy. raphael. and head home to| mexico. lovely. i was going to show you a picture of a fat dog but you have trumped me. pressures in the social care system are leaving thousands of disabled people struggling to recruit personal assistants, who can help them live independently. pas can help out with day to day tasks, but with over 100,000
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vacancies in the sector, many people with disabilities are finding it difficult to get the support they need. our disability affairs correspondent, nikki fox, reports. hello, guys! hello. sam and alex study media at college and are both working in a career towards a career in tv. we have like, a double act. we bounce off each other. ..and finish each other�*s... ..sentences. the 16—year—old twins have spinal muscular atrophy. and for them to be as independent as everyone else, they need a team of personal assistants, or pas. we've only got one at the minute. we've had a struggle with getting carers. so, i think we're still putting out advertisements for getting someone. i mean, if you just put our faces on the advertisement... yeah. that would help, yeah. "hello, look at us!" "and we gorgeous?! "want to get us dressed every morning?
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ring here." the twins' mum sarah has a budget from the council, and uses it to directly employ pas to support her boys for 50 hours a week. but at the moment she can only find someone who does 15 hours, leaving her to do the rest. being on my own with them the majority of the time, it is difficult, it is hard work. i am literally running out of ideas of where to get some help. what has the response been like from all your efforts? it's been very, very limited. and the family aren't alone. with100,000 vacancies in the care sector, disabled people are finding it almost impossible to recruit. a shortage of workers from abroad, the pandemic and vaccine hesitancy have all played a part. i've heard some really bad stories. people terrified that they're going to lose theirjobs. i've even heard people contemplating suicide, because they can't face the thought of going back to literallyjust existing.
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katie runs a recruitment website to help find pas. she believes the wages disabled people are able to offer, a figure often set by the local authority, is also a problem. everyone that gets a care budget has no control over how much they get to pay a pa. and in particular i've noticed a massive rise in wage requests from british nationals. it needs to be looked at, increasing people's care funding, so that they can employ the pa and the support that they need. the government says it is the local authority's responsibility to play a key role in supporting disabled people recruit and retain staff in their area. and it's investing an additional {5.4 billion into social care. we always wanted to be in tv. as a comedy duo. for sam and alex, they want their future career success to be determined on whether they're good enough to make it, not on whether they have someone to help
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them get up and ready for work in the morning. nikki fox, bbc news. this is something we will be talking about later in the programme. lots of people don't realise the importance of a personal assistant to help with everyday life. and if there is a shortage, of course, as we have seen in so much of the caring sector, the impact that will have. we'll talk more about it in a of hours. , ,, ., ., , of hours. let us know if that is something _ of hours. let us know if that is something that _ of hours. let us know if that is something that affects - of hours. let us know if that is something that affects you - of hours. let us know if that is something that affects you or| of hours. let us know if that is| something that affects you or it of hours. let us know if that is i something that affects you or it is a job you are considering. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello and welcome to bbc london. i'm victoria hollins. a police officer has been sprayed in the face with an unknown substance by a passing pedestrian whilst on duty near parliament. the met says the officer was attacked with a
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substance around apm last night but did not need hospital treatment. heathrow has reopened to terminal four as a dedicated facility for processing arrivals from red list countries. the measure will keep passengers arriving from destinations on the high risk list away from other travellers. the red list has been resurrected with ten countries in southern africa due to concerns about the omicron coronavirus bearing. celebrities including ellie goulding, chris martin and dame emma thompson have lent their voices to a short film highlighting the impact of homelessness at christmas. 12 sirens screaminu. homelessness at christmas. 12 sirens screaming- the _ homelessness at christmas. 12 sirens screaming. the 62nd _ homelessness at christmas. 12 sirens screaming. the 62nd film _ homelessness at christmas. 12 sirens screaming. the 62nd film from - homelessness at christmas. 12 sirens screaming. the 62nd film from the i screaming. the 62nd film from the chari , screaming. the 62nd film from the charity. crisis. _ screaming. the 62nd film from the charity, crisis, change _ screaming. the 62nd film from the charity, crisis, change the - screaming. the 62nd film from the charity, crisis, change the lyrics i charity, crisis, change the lyrics of the 12 days of christmas to describe the experience of people forced leave their homes during the festive period and it comes as the latest ons figures show that 888 people lost their lives on the streets in england and wales in
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2020. getting a job is not always easy especially for recent graduates going through virtual applications, but one young londoner tried a different approach to attract employers attention. he created a p°ptup employers attention. he created a pop—up stand at canary wharf which helped landing his dream job. the 2a —year—old from redbridge said he felt bogged down by the normal recruitment process. ads, felt bogged down by the normal recruitment process.— felt bogged down by the normal recruitment process. a degree used to be the beginning _ recruitment process. a degree used to be the beginning of _ recruitment process. a degree used to be the beginning of success i recruitment process. a degree used to be the beginning of success but l to be the beginning of success but now it's more the minimum requirement. there are so many barriers to get to speak to someone. ifound that barriers to get to speak to someone. i found that recruiters got annoyed with me because i kept calling every other day just to see with me because i kept calling every other dayjust to see if with me because i kept calling every other day just to see if anything was available. if other day just to see if anything was available.— other day just to see if anything was available. if you are heading out on public _ was available. if you are heading out on public transport, - was available. if you are heading out on public transport, this i was available. if you are heading out on public transport, this is i was available. if you are heading i out on public transport, this is how tfl services are looking and there is a good service on the tube apart from the metropolitan line which has minor delays. let's see what the weather has in store. another cold start this morning with a little bit of frost out there as temperatures are around 0 c mark and high pressure is building from the south—west and we have a few showers
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which could turn a little bit wintry as it runs in to this colder air and we've already had a feature this morning and a bit of wintry nyssa further south and that is clearing away but showers in the east could penetrate further inland and some sunny spells but it heals going to feel cold and a north—westerly breeze and temperatures between three and 5 c and factoring in the wind it will feel colder. overnight tonight, clearto wind it will feel colder. overnight tonight, clear to start with and thatis tonight, clear to start with and that is where we will get the minimum temperature around —1 but milder air is minimum temperature around —1 but milderair is on minimum temperature around —1 but milder air is on its way back bringing some rain into friday and the temperature by the end of the night rising to around two or 3 c. we have some spells of rain tomorrow, much milderair coming in so we are looking at temperatures in double figures but this low—pressure system through the weekend again drags in some cold air, so the temperature is going to drop and it will stay largely unsettled and quite blustery and the wind is feeling chilly and temperatures back down in single figures. i will feeling chilly and temperatures back down in single figures.— down in single figures. i will be back in half—
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down in single figures. i will be back in half an _ down in single figures. i will be back in half an hour. _ down in single figures. i will be back in half an hour. see i down in single figures. i will be back in half an hour. see you i down in single figures. i will be i back in half an hour. see you then. goodbye. hello this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. coming up on breakfast this morning. after last yea r�*s cancelled christmas carols, we'll hear from the schools hoping to hold their nativities in front of a full audience once again. we'll see how a rescue centre is looking after orphaned seal pups, after they were separated from their mothers during storm arwen. and england striker ellen white will be here to tell us about becoming the lionesses' record goalscorer. in a sign booster covid vaccines may be part of our lives for some time yet, the government has announced a deal to purchase more than 100 million doses over the next two years. it comes as the current booster campaign is being significantly ramped up —
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with a plan to offer it to all eligible adults in england by the end of january. let's find out how the rollout is going — we're joined by one of our regular gps, dr rosemary leonard. hi, rosemary. when you heard on a personal level as a gp, putting this into practice, the government announcement about more boosters, what was going through your mind? i'm spending this morning giving boosters — i'm spending this morning giving boosters but we had decided that we are going _ boosters but we had decided that we are going to stop our clinic at christmas _ are going to stop our clinic at christmas because we need to concentrate on regular work and a lot of— concentrate on regular work and a lot of this — concentrate on regular work and a lot of this regular work means there have been— lot of this regular work means there have been newspaper headlines that we are _ have been newspaper headlines that we are checking on valuable people and we _ we are checking on valuable people and we are — we are checking on valuable people and we are doing it anyway but we have _ and we are doing it anyway but we have a _ and we are doing it anyway but we have a lot — and we are doing it anyway but we have a lot of kick boxing that has to be _ have a lot of kick boxing that has to be done — have a lot of kick boxing that has to be done to owners part of the basic— to be done to owners part of the basic income the end of march and we can't be _ basic income the end of march and we can't be measuring blood pressure is on healthy— can't be measuring blood pressure is on healthy people at the same time as doing _ on healthy people at the same time as doing booster vaccines. we would dearly— as doing booster vaccines. we would dearly love _ as doing booster vaccines. we would dearly love to do booster vaccines but at _ dearly love to do booster vaccines but at the — dearly love to do booster vaccines but at the moment we are saying we have to _ but at the moment we are saying we have to do _ but at the moment we are saying we have to do in — but at the moment we are saying we have to do in our clinic which is
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between — have to do in our clinic which is between three practices together, 30 or 35,000 _ between three practices together, 30 or 35,000 patients and we are look we cannot— or 35,000 patients and we are look we cannot do it all and at the moment— we cannot do it all and at the moment that regular income which we have to _ moment that regular income which we have to earn, — moment that regular income which we have to earn, we need to do that otherwise — have to earn, we need to do that otherwise we will have to make our staff redundant so we have a real dilemma — staff redundant so we have a real dilemma on our hands about what do we prioritise — dilemma on our hands about what do we prioritise and we are waiting for guidance _ we prioritise and we are waiting for guidance from nhs england on this. you make _ guidance from nhs england on this. you make it sound like you literally can't afford to do the boosters but i was reading that gps do get money for giving the boosters, don't they? does that not compensate? unfortunately we have this system for the _ unfortunately we have this system for the quality and outcomes framework where we have a huge chunk of money— framework where we have a huge chunk of money and this was historically and it's— of money and this was historically and it's all— of money and this was historically and it's all a bit political but it was _ and it's all a bit political but it was taken _ and it's all a bit political but it was taken away from us many years ago. _ was taken away from us many years ago. so _ was taken away from us many years ago. so we — was taken away from us many years ago, so we had to earn it back and we earn _ ago, so we had to earn it back and we earn it— ago, so we had to earn it back and we earn it back by looking after diabetics, — we earn it back by looking after diabetics, people with long—term conditions which we are doing anyway
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now and _ conditions which we are doing anyway now and i_ conditions which we are doing anyway now and i have to reiterate that a lot of— now and i have to reiterate that a lot of this — now and i have to reiterate that a lot of this earning back involves getting — lot of this earning back involves getting the right computer code so the box _ getting the right computer code so the box is — getting the right computer code so the box is ticked and normally on a thursday— the box is ticked and normally on a thursday morning i would be sitting there _ thursday morning i would be sitting there checking lists and checking that the — there checking lists and checking that the right codes were on to the patients— that the right codes were on to the patients and it's a lot of micromanagement, just sitting with a spreadsheet now, which is more important. — spreadsheet now, which is more important, me doing that or putting a booster— important, me doing that or putting a booster in— important, me doing that or putting a booster in an arm? and unfortunately they increase the money — unfortunately they increase the money for doing boosters and that's not the _ money for doing boosters and that's not the issue. we can't be doing both _ not the issue. we can't be doing both we — not the issue. we can't be doing both. we are being pulled into many different— both. we are being pulled into many different directions. can�*t both. we are being pulled into many different directions.— different directions. can't you chance different directions. can't you change the — different directions. can't you change the the _ different directions. can't you change the the surgery i different directions. can't you i change the the surgery operates so you have somebody doing the admin side who can do admin and people like yourself, medically qualified to do the boosters, is there not a way of doing both?— to do the boosters, is there not a way of doing both? unfortunately we have one lovely _ way of doing both? unfortunately we have one lovely lady, _ way of doing both? unfortunately we have one lovely lady, sam, - way of doing both? unfortunately we have one lovely lady, sam, and i- have one lovely lady, sam, and i will mention her by name because she's— will mention her by name because she's been— will mention her by name because she's been fantastic for the last year— she's been fantastic for the last year and — she's been fantastic for the last year and our senior administrator has been — year and our senior administrator
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has been wholly occupied in biting patients— has been wholly occupied in biting patients were boosters and sorting the appointment so you have a problem — the appointment so you have a problem we only have so many staff we can _ problem we only have so many staff we can employ and if we are running the booster— we can employ and if we are running the booster campaign we end up with a lot of— the booster campaign we end up with a lot of the _ the booster campaign we end up with a lot of the staff and the health care assistants and nurses also involved — care assistants and nurses also involved in— care assistants and nurses also involved in the booster campaign, so the boost _ involved in the booster campaign, so the boost campaign, yes, we have the wherewithai— the boost campaign, yes, we have the wherewithal and we are willing, but what we _ wherewithal and we are willing, but what we have not got is the workforce to do the boosters and do all of _ workforce to do the boosters and do all of the _ workforce to do the boosters and do all of the regular work, particularly the tick box work as welt _ particularly the tick box work as weii. 30— particularly the tick box work as well, , .. particularly the tick box work as well, , ., ., particularly the tick box work as well. ,~. ., ,._ ., well. so you are saying, end of the ear, well. so you are saying, end of the year. after — well. so you are saying, end of the year, after christmas, _ well. so you are saying, end of the year, after christmas, we - well. so you are saying, end of the year, after christmas, we can't i well. so you are saying, end of the year, after christmas, we can't do | year, after christmas, we can't do any more boosters here?- year, after christmas, we can't do any more boosters here? unless we have some — any more boosters here? unless we have some of _ any more boosters here? unless we have some of the _ any more boosters here? unless we have some of the other— any more boosters here? unless we have some of the other ? _ any more boosters here? unless we have some of the other ? we - any more boosters here? unless we have some of the other ? we want l any more boosters here? unless we| have some of the other ? we want to have some of the other? we want to care for— have some of the other ? we want to care for sick— have some of the other? we want to care for sick patients and have been carihg _ care for sick patients and have been carihg for— care for sick patients and have been caring for them even right the way throughout. we are seeing patients face—to—face but i cannot be ticking boxes _ face—to—face but i cannot be ticking boxes and — face—to—face but i cannot be ticking boxes and cannot have my staff doing checks _ boxes and cannot have my staff doing checks on _ boxes and cannot have my staff doing checks on computer lists and doing boosters _ checks on computer lists and doing boosters at — checks on computer lists and doing boosters at the same time. on vaccines. _ boosters at the same time. on vaccines. we — boosters at the same time. on vaccines, we hear this
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boosters at the same time. q�*i vaccines, we hear this morning from the boss of pfizer saying there is a strong case now for giving the vaccine to children as young as five and some people might say he would say that but as a doctor, what are you thinking on that. he says he cannot handle any more vaccinations that your surgery but are general public population scale, what you think about the idea of going down the low in age groups. i think about the idea of going down the low in age groups.— the low in age groups. i think it needs looking _ the low in age groups. i think it needs looking at _ the low in age groups. i think it needs looking at very _ the low in age groups. i think it needs looking at very carefullyl the low in age groups. i think it i needs looking at very carefully and it's a _ needs looking at very carefully and it's a job _ needs looking at very carefully and it's a job for the experts. in general. _ it's a job for the experts. in general, covid in children is a mild disease _ general, covid in children is a mild disease and — general, covid in children is a mild disease and at the moment there are hu-e disease and at the moment there are huge numbers of children off school who have _ huge numbers of children off school who have no symptoms at all which is a different— who have no symptoms at all which is a different question and there have been rare _ a different question and there have been rare events of cardiac inflammation with the vaccine in children— inflammation with the vaccine in children and i have to say these are incredibly— children and i have to say these are incredibly rare but with any vaccination campaign you have to look at _ vaccination campaign you have to look at it— vaccination campaign you have to look at it and weigh up the risks and benefits and bearing in mind it isa mild— and benefits and bearing in mind it
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is a mild disease, this is a tricky question— is a mild disease, this is a tricky question and not one for me to answer~ — question and not one for me to answer~ it's_ question and not one for me to answer. it's definitely one for the joint _ answer. it's definitely one for the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation on the paediatrician is in the _ immunisation on the paediatrician is in the best— immunisation on the paediatrician is in the best for the children's interest _ in the best for the children's interest. . in the best for the children's interest. , ., , ., , ., interest. here is a question you will love to _ interest. here is a question you will love to answer. _ interest. here is a question you will love to answer. should i interest. here is a question you i will love to answer. should people be snogging at christmas parties this year? i ask it not out of personal interest, but a government minister said on the news last night that she thought that that should be avoided but she has been accused of mixed messages from the government about what should be happening and whether the government should be stating something on that. what do you think? if stating something on that. what do ou think? , ., . stating something on that. what do ou think? ,~. ., ., stating something on that. what do ou think? , ., ., ., ., stating something on that. what do ou think? ,~. ., ., ., , you think? if you are going to use the miss also. — you think? if you are going to use the miss also, use _ you think? if you are going to use the miss also, use it _ you think? if you are going to use the miss also, use it with - you think? if you are going to use the miss also, use it with a i you think? if you are going to use the miss also, use it with a bit i you think? if you are going to use the miss also, use it with a bit of| the miss also, use it with a bit of caution — the miss also, use it with a bit of caution - — the miss also, use it with a bit of caution. — mistletoe. the miss also, use it with a bit of caution. - mistletoe.— caution. - mistletoe. that is not dreadfully _ caution. - mistletoe. that is not dreadfully clear. _ caution. - mistletoe. that is not dreadfully clear. people - caution. - mistletoe. that is not dreadfully clear. people have i caution. - mistletoe. that is not dreadfully clear. people have to | dreadfully clear. people have to make their _ dreadfully clear. people have to make their own _ dreadfully clear. people have to make their own minds - dreadfully clear. people have to make their own minds up i dreadfully clear. people have to make their own minds up on i dreadfully clear. people have to | make their own minds up on this dreadfully clear. people have to i make their own minds up on this one. they really— make their own minds up on this one. they really do. people have to take personal— they really do. people have to take personal responsibility and in the same _ personal responsibility and in the same way— personal responsibility and in the same way that some people say i don't _ same way that some people say i don't want — same way that some people say i don't want to go to a christmas party— don't want to go to a christmas party at — don't want to go to a christmas party at all, if you do find
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yourself _ party at all, if you do find yourself in close contact with people. _ yourself in close contact with people, actually, for young people who are _ people, actually, for young people who are snogging under the mistletoe, right now you are far more _ mistletoe, right now you are far more likely to get a nasty cough and cold which _ more likely to get a nasty cough and cold which are absolutely rampant everywhere, so if you snog somebody, you are _ everywhere, so if you snog somebody, you are putting yourself at risk of getting _ you are putting yourself at risk of getting a — you are putting yourself at risk of getting a virus of some sort. | getting a virus of some sort. don't think getting a virus of some sort. i don't think we've ever had the word snog on breakfast as we have had it this morning, but thank you for upping the snog count and thank you forjoining us and we will speak to you soon. forjoining us and we will speak to ou soon. . ~' forjoining us and we will speak to ou soon. ., ~ ,~. forjoining us and we will speak to you soon-_ i'm - forjoining us and we will speak to you soon._ i'm talking l you soon. thank you. i'm talking about the _ you soon. thank you. i'm talking about the word, _ you soon. thank you. i'm talking about the word, not _ you soon. thank you. i'm talking about the word, not the - you soon. thank you. i'm talking about the word, not the action. | about the word, not the action. don't look at me when you say that word. . ., don't look at me when you say that word. , ., , ., ., ., word. there is no mistletoe. you are luc . hello, mike. i am trying to ensure wa . you hello, mike. i am trying to ensure way- you are _ hello, mike. i am trying to ensure
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way. you are safe. _ the thumping win over their neighbours keeps liverpool in that runaway group of three at the top of the premier league, just behind manchester city and chelsea, who also won last night. in contrast, there were boos from the everton fans, at the end to turn up the heat on manager rafael benitez, asjoe lynskey reports. the gap on merseyside is clear. two teams from the same city are now so far apart. liverpool seem unstoppable, and everton can't halt their slide down the league. even nine minutes in the first goal had been coming, but then the biggest match in town belong to one of the biggest players in the world. salah! finds the net! of course he does. that's just how he likes it.
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already this game was drifting beyond everton but they did not help themselves. salah was seventh at this week's ballon d'or, but in the premier league's rankings, he's by far the top scorer. right now, he rarely misses. that made it 3—1, and with diogojota's fourth, everton were at a modern low. their worst home loss in this match since the �*80s. their coach was once liverpool's manager. it is still the reds fans who sing his name. after this kind of game, it's not easy, but i have to believe we will do well, so i'm convinced in the second part of the league, we will do well, but we have to start winning. i like what i see. this was by far the best performance we've shown
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this was by far the best performance we've shown here at goodison since i was at liverpool and it's a very important moment. the top of the premier league as relentless as teams around them keep winning, chelsea stay top. they found a way throughout watford by 2—1. waiting for a slip—up are manchester city, who did this to aston villa. it's an absolutely fantastic goal. city are one point behind chelsea and one above liverpool. the gap is tight, but there are three clubs at the top who push each other on. rangers went seven points clear at the top of the scottish premiership after a 1—0 win at hibernian, thanks to a late penalty by kemar roofe. there were also victories for aberdeen and dundee, while it finished goalless between st mirren and ross county. the ongoing concern over the freedom and safety of chinese tennis star peng shaui means the women's tennis association, has now suspended all tournaments in china. peng disappeared from public view for three weeks last month, after accusing a top chinese official of sexual assault. since then chinese state media has released photos and videos appearing to show peng
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and the player did say in a video call with the international olympic committee president, that she was safe and well but the wta have said the video was "insufficient evidence" of her freedom and safety, and have now decided to pull tournaments out of china because they say, pung's case is "bigger than the business". this is something we simply cannot walk away from. if we walk away from what we have requested and reflecting the domestic abuse or abuse issues, what we are telling the world is that not addressing sexual assault with the respect and seriousness it requires, because it is difficult, is ok. and it is not. the ashes now are less than a week away, and while england's preparations have been heavily affected by rain and storms on the australian east coast, the tourists' record wicket taker says they're more confident than ever that they can win back the ashes,
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away from home, for the first time in 10 years. james anderson was speaking to the project ashes podcast. it's not like years ago when there was such a dominant force in australia that you are going there tentatively thinking you might win if we could just do this or that, but now we have seen them in india, the last two series here, south africa have one here, and it's definitely not an impossible task. plenty of hopes for england and this time next week i will be reporting on the first session, the first day of play in the gabba in brisbane where england have only won twice since the war, so maybe they can turnit since the war, so maybe they can turn it around and breakfast will be the place, wake up and we will be reporting on the ashes as it happens overnight. you reporting on the ashes as it happens overniaht. ., ., �* , overnight. you won't quite be there. but ou overnight. you won't quite be there. but you can — overnight. you won't quite be there. but you can imagine _ overnight. you won't quite be there. but you can imagine it. _ overnight. you won't quite be there. but you can imagine it. you - overnight. you won't quite be there. but you can imagine it. you can i but you can imagine it. you can aint but you can imagine it. you can paint pictures- _ but you can imagine it. you can paint pictures. we _ but you can imagine it. you can paint pictures. we will- but you can imagine it. you can paint pictures. we will make i but you can imagine it. you can i paint pictures. we will make people feel like they _ paint pictures. we will make people feel like they are _ paint pictures. we will make people feel like they are there. _ paint pictures. we will make people feel like they are there. if _ paint pictures. we will make people feel like they are there. if anyone i feel like they are there. if anyone can, the feel like they are there. if anyone can. they can- — seal pups who were separated
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from their mothers during storm arwen are now on the road to recovery at an animal hospital in norfolk. the young pups were swept away by the high winds last weekend — and now they will spend five months at the shelter before being released back into the wild. our reporter alex dunlop has been to see them. not the most elegant way to have breakfast, but a sort of fish soup in a syringe is keeping these grey seal pups alive. for the next five months, the rspca team at east winch will be foster parents to these six orphans of storm arwen. it battered swathes of the country over the weekend, mother seals and their offspring separated by fierce tidal waves. the mother's milk is substantial and is all they have and it takes three weeks for them to wean, so for the first three weeks, very, very important for them to be with their mother. so, how did frida's feeding go earlier today? she's doing really well. evangelo and his team look after seals from all over the country, so even more could be
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heading this way. two orphaned pups from yorkshire are due in the next day or so. they will be joining 188 hedgehogs and other wildlife already here, and while they look adorable, they have attitude. as cute as they are, we do need to bear in mind these are wild animals and we want them to keep that wild instinct, that innate instinct they have to be away from people because that will allow them to succeed even more so once they've been rehabilitated and reintroduced. all of this care will cost. the food bill alone is £27 per seal per week. they don't always know we are trying to help and as they get bigger and start to eat the fish, they start to enjoy that a lot more and that's quite nice to see, and then when you get out the other side and release them and see them go after months of care, you know you've done a good job. after four months indoors, the orphan seal pups will be allowed outside into a pool like this to continue their rehabilitation. they should be released in the early spring. norfolk has england's largest grey seal colony. it's now the height of the pupping
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season and more winter storms could be on their way. the advice, as ever — if you see a seal pup alone on the beach and you are worried, alert a wildlife organisation but above all else, leave it alone. alex dunlop, bbc news. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. and, a light dusting of snow behind you. are you hinting at something? possibly. good morning to you at home and we have some cold weather today and the temperature is a little bit up and down as we head towards the weekend but this is the picture this morning in great yarmouth and we've had wintry showers overnight and some lying snow on the cards and many of us will wake up to some slippery surfaces on any untreated surfaces so cold and icy start today for many
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of us and some showers in the forecast but equally a bit of wintry sunshine around as well and we have low pressure out towards the east and higher pressure in the south—west and that combination is drawing on the wind is from a northerly direction so coming all the way from the arctic and streaming down across the uk and over the past few hours this is where the showers have been falling on we've had snow showers across parts of northern scotland on the east coast of england but also through parts of wales, the midlands and drifting down to the london region with some sleet and snow and its falling on the really cold sub zero surfaces so a risk of ice over the next few hours and the met office have issued warnings of the icy conditions this morning. through the course of the day we will see showers across eastern scotland and down the east coast of england and it also windy in the east with gusts of a0 or 50mph that they will ease through the day and one or two showers further west for the likes of pembrokeshire towards cornwall most other places having a lot of fine weather and just three or a in the east but we are typically
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looking at about six up to 8 c towards the west so more cloud working in here with some outbreaks of rain and proceeding the rave there will be some snow through tonight, even down to low levels but after milder air moves on in the night it will turn back to rain, so this time tomorrow morning won't be as cold as this morning and you will notice the milder theme to the weather through friday. on friday we have a couple of weather fronts and this one clearing up towards the east and another one following on from the west so for much of england and wales it will be a cloudy day with initially rain in the south and east are more wet weather working in from the south—west later on. some brighter skies for a time for northern ireland and scotland but more of the showers working in from the north—west later in the day but temperatures between six or 9 in the north but we could see 11 or 12, so much milder in the south tomorrow. it is a short lived milder theme because heading towards the weekend with the chilly weather moving and there will still be showers around so saturday, early
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rain clearing the east and then sunshine and showers moving in on a cold north—westerly wind and some of them wintry over the higher ground but top temperatures of around five up but top temperatures of around five up to 9 and then on sunday another day of sunshine and some of those showers are wintry over the higher ground and it won't feel warm with temperatures around five to 9 and feeling colder when you add the wind but do watch out for the icy conditions around in the next few hours. you can't help you get in the festive mood when there is a dusting of snow and we are about to talk about nativity plays. were you part of a nativity play? i about nativity plays. were you part of a nativity play?— of a nativity play? i did. i think! was obviously, _ of a nativity play? i did. i think! was obviously, the _ of a nativity play? i did. i think! was obviously, the angel, i of a nativity play? i did. i think i | was obviously, the angel, always of a nativity play? i did. i think i i was obviously, the angel, always an angei~ _ was obviously, the angel, always an angei~ i_ was obviously, the angel, always an angel. i remembera little was obviously, the angel, always an angel. i remember a little tinsel halo _ angel. i remember a little tinsel halo. ., ., ., ., , halo. you thought that was obvious, but only you. _ halo. you thought that was obvious, but only you, sarah. _
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halo. you thought that was obvious, but only you, sarah. i _ halo. you thought that was obvious, but only you, sarah. i obviously i halo. you thought that was obvious, but only you, sarah. i obviously was| but only you, sarah. i obviously was the back end of a donkey. i was the back end of a donkey. i was humpty dumpty- _ the back end of a donkey. i was humpty dumpty. humpty- the back end of a donkey. i was i humpty dumpty. humpty dumpty, in the back end of a donkey. i was - humpty dumpty. humpty dumpty, in the nativity story. — humpty dumpty. humpty dumpty, in the nativity story. of — humpty dumpty. humpty dumpty, in the nativity story, of course, _ humpty dumpty. humpty dumpty, in the nativity story, of course, how— humpty dumpty. humpty dumpty, in the nativity story, of course, how could i nativity story, of course, how could i forget? nativity story, of course, how could iforget? brute nativity story, of course, how could i foret? ~ . nativity story, of course, how could iforaet? ~ . . nativity story, of course, how could iforaet? ~ ., ., ., ., i forget? we had an alternative approach- _ i forget? we had an alternative approach- we _ i forget? we had an alternative approach. we are _ i forget? we had an alternative approach. we are talking i i forget? we had an alternative approach. we are talking about i forget? we had an alternative i approach. we are talking about this morninu. approach. we are talking about this morning- our— approach. we are talking about this morning. our produce _ approach. we are talking about this morning. our produce was - approach. we are talking about thisj morning. our produce was moaning that the mister men had crept into a nativity play with his children. it's that time of year stop it's that time again, when schools get ready to put on christmas carol concerts and nativity plays. and — after last year's covid cancellations — there was lots of extra excitement ahead of this fesive season. i think of parents as well, they do enjoy seeing the little ones. but the newly—identified omicron variant means teachers are having to decide whether to scale back their plans again? fiona lamdin is at a school in south london this morning to find out if the show will go on there. in this wiltshire primary, it is
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dress rehearsal today. they have got just four days before their nativity. christmas with the mister men. before covid, the children would perform their nativity in the local church, but now they are filming it and they are inviting families in for the screening which will happen in this outdoor classroom. i will happen in this outdoor classroom.— will happen in this outdoor classroom. ., ~, ,, , will happen in this outdoor classroom. i will happen in this outdoor classroom. ., ~, ,, [m classroom. i am mister silly. i am the kina. classroom. i am mister silly. i am the king- i— classroom. i am mister silly. i am the king- i am _ classroom. i am mister silly. i am the king. i am mister— classroom. i am mister silly. i am the king. i am mister grumpy. i classroom. i am mister silly. i am| the king. i am mister grumpy. are ou the king. i am mister grumpy. are you pleased _ the king. i am mister grumpy. are you pleased your— the king. i am mister grumpy. are you pleased your family _ the king. i am mister grumpy. are you pleased your family can i the king. i am mister grumpy. are you pleased your family can come| the king. i am mister grumpy. are i you pleased your family can come and watch you? you pleased your family can come and watch ou? . you pleased your family can come and watch you? yes! it's exciting because we've _ watch you? yes! it's exciting because we've heard - watch you? .esi it's exciting because we've heard about it watch you? .93�*: it's exciting because we've heard about it at home with the _ because we've heard about it at home with the rehearsals _ because we've heard about it at home with the rehearsals and _ because we've heard about it at home with the rehearsals and to _ because we've heard about it at home with the rehearsals and to come - because we've heard about it at home with the rehearsals and to come on i with the rehearsals and to come on site and _ with the rehearsals and to come on site and see — with the rehearsals and to come on site and see it— with the rehearsals and to come on site and see it and _ with the rehearsals and to come on site and see it and the _ with the rehearsals and to come on site and see it and the actual- site and see it and the actual excitement— site and see it and the actual excitement of— site and see it and the actual excitement of the _ site and see it and the actual excitement of the kids - site and see it and the actual excitement of the kids being| site and see it and the actual. excitement of the kids being in class _ excitement of the kids being in class and — excitement of the kids being in class and having _ excitement of the kids being in class and having parents - excitement of the kids being in class and having parents there | excitement of the kids being in. class and having parents there is really— class and having parents there is realiy speciai _ class and having parents there is really special to _ class and having parents there is really special to share _ class and having parents there is really special to share it - class and having parents there is really special to share it as - class and having parents there is really special to share it as a i really special to share it as a family — really special to share it as a famil . �* . :, , really special to share it as a famil. �*, :, ,~ �* ., , family. it's lovely and we're really excited. family. it's lovely and we're really excited- we _ family. it's lovely and we're really excited. we won't _ family. it's lovely and we're really excited. we won't able _ family. it's lovely and we're really excited. we won't able to - family. it's lovely and we're really excited. we won't able to last i family. it's lovely and we're really| excited. we won't able to last year with our daughter so it's more
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special this year and they really enjoyed filming and is super excited for the big opening moment. the nativity has _ for the big opening moment. the nativity has been an integral part of our— nativity has been an integral part of our school and we were never going _ of our school and we were never going to — of our school and we were never going to let covid stop us from putting — going to let covid stop us from putting on our special performance. after a _ putting on our special performance. after a few — putting on our special performance. after a few more days of travelling, during _ after a few more days of travelling, during which — after a few more days of travelling, during which they _ after a few more days of travelling, during which they were _ after a few more days of travelling, during which they were stopped i after a few more days of travelling, during which they were stopped at i during which they were stopped at various— during which they were stopped at various times _ during which they were stopped at various times by _ during which they were stopped at various times by the _ during which they were stopped at various times by the police - during which they were stopped at various times by the police ? i during which they were stopped at various times by the police ? lastl various times by the police ? last year— various times by the police ? last year the — various times by the police ? last year the majority— various times by the police ? last year the majority of _ various times by the police ? last year the majority of primary- various times by the police ? last. year the majority of primary schools including _ year the majority of primary schools including this — year the majority of primary schools including this one _ year the majority of primary schools including this one in— year the majority of primary schools including this one in fleetwood - year the majority of primary schools including this one in fleetwood puti including this one in fleetwood put their nativity — including this one in fleetwood put their nativity online. _ including this one in fleetwood put their nativity online. they- their nativity online. they eventually _ their nativity online. they eventually arrived - their nativity online. they eventually arrived in - their nativity online. they- eventually arrived in bethlehem. their nativity online. they— eventually arrived in bethlehem. butt eventually arrived in bethlehem. but this year eventually arrived in bethlehem. this year they hope it can go ahead, with some precautions. the audience are being asked to wear masks and carry out lateral flows. irate are being asked to wear masks and carry out lateral flows.— carry out lateral flows. we are scalin: it carry out lateral flows. we are scaling it down _ carry out lateral flows. we are scaling it down compared - carry out lateral flows. we are scaling it down compared to l carry out lateral flows. we are - scaling it down compared to previous endeavours. we are doing it in single year groups and normally we would put lots of the year groups together, but we are not mixing the parents from one class to another, so we have put lots of things in place to try to keep everybody safe but it's very, very difficult as a
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balancing act and i am acutely aware that i'm not going to please everybody but we are really going to try. everybody but we are really going to t . �* . ., , everybody but we are really going to try. but with the uncertainty around this new variant _ try. but with the uncertainty around this new variant of _ try. but with the uncertainty around this new variant of covid, _ try. but with the uncertainty around this new variant of covid, this - this new variant of covid, this school, like many up and down the country, are ready to adapt their plans. it country, are ready to adapt their lans. . . country, are ready to adapt their lans, , country, are ready to adapt their lans. . , , ., , country, are ready to adapt their lans. , ., , ' . plans. it has been really difficult and we've been _ plans. it has been really difficult and we've been a _ plans. it has been really difficult and we've been a bit _ plans. it has been really difficult and we've been a bit stressed i plans. it has been really difficult i and we've been a bit stressed this week. i speak to lots of other colleagues and it's a big decision and a judgment call and i think we have to take into account the staff and the reception and year one, do they want to go for it. we did agree before the new variant came on the scene and we can only do what we feel is right and it's a special moment for the children and very traditional and there is a lot of emotion attached to an emotive subject. in such a difficult balancing act. the decision we make today might not feel 0k in a couple of days, but at the moment, full steam ahead and we are looking forward to having parents in. fine. forward to having parents in. one, two, forward to having parents in. one,
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two. three. _ forward to having parents in. one, two, three. back— forward to having parents in. one, two, three. back here, _ forward to having parents in. one, two, three. back here, it's - forward to having parents in. one, two, three. back here, it's all- two, three. back here, it's all outside- _ two, three. back here, it's all outside- 50 — two, three. back here, it's all outside. so they _ two, three. back here, it's all outside. so they are - two, three. back here, it's all outside. so they are getting l two, three. back here, it's all- outside. so they are getting ready outside. 50 they are getting ready to roll out the red carpet and serve up to roll out the red carpet and serve up the popcorn as guests attend this primary�*s premier. so, humpty dumpty made an appearance. i so, humpty dumpty made an appearance-— so, humpty dumpty made an appearance. so, humpty dumpty made an auearance. ., ~ . ., , appearance. i told you. ahead of my time. appearance. i told you. ahead of my time- let's — appearance. i told you. ahead of my time- let's go _ appearance. i told you. ahead of my time. let's go live _ appearance. i told you. ahead of my time. let's go live to _ appearance. i told you. ahead of my time. let's go live to fiona - appearance. i told you. ahead of my time. let's go live to fiona who - appearance. i told you. ahead of my time. let's go live to fiona who is i time. let's go live to fiona who is live at a school— time. let's go live to fiona who is live at a school in _ time. let's go live to fiona who is live at a school in south _ time. let's go live to fiona who is live at a school in south london . live at a school in south london where they are preparing for this. you must have been an angel in your nativity. you must have been an angel in your nativi . ., . you must have been an angel in your nativi . ., , . ~ you must have been an angel in your nativity-_ she's i nativity. you smooth talker. she's not sure. nativity. you smooth talker. she's not sure- we _ nativity. you smooth talker. she's not sure. we are _ nativity. you smooth talker. she's not sure. we are at _ nativity. you smooth talker. she's not sure. we are at a _ nativity. you smooth talker. she's not sure. we are at a school- nativity. you smooth talker. she's not sure. we are at a school in - not sure. we are at a school in wandsworth — not sure. we are at a school in wandsworth and _ not sure. we are at a school in wandsworth and it's _ not sure. we are at a school in wandsworth and it's been - not sure. we are at a school in wandsworth and it's been a i wandsworth and it's been a christmassy start to the morning because — christmassy start to the morning because it's snowing outside and they are — because it's snowing outside and they are going ahead with a nativity and they— they are going ahead with a nativity and they have the dress rehearsal in the next _ and they have the dress rehearsal in the next couple of hours and we are in the _ the next couple of hours and we are in the school — the next couple of hours and we are in the school hall and a teacher at the back— in the school hall and a teacher at the back is— in the school hall and a teacher at the back is sorting out the last minute — the back is sorting out the last minute props, so let's come over to joe. minute props, so let's come over to joe good _ minute props, so let's come over to joe. good morning. a tricky decision to go— joe. good morning. a tricky decision to go ahead — joe. good morning. a tricky decision to go ahead today or not? i joe. good morning. a tricky decision
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to go ahead today or not?— to go ahead today or not? i don't think so. to go ahead today or not? i don't think s0- we _ to go ahead today or not? i don't think so. we have _ to go ahead today or not? i don't think so. we have hired - to go ahead today or not? i don't think so. we have hired local- think so. we have hired local theatre — think so. we have hired local theatre and _ think so. we have hired local theatre and theatre - think so. we have hired local- theatre and theatre performances are happening _ theatre and theatre performances are happening so — theatre and theatre performances are happening so we _ theatre and theatre performances are happening so we feel— theatre and theatre performances are happening so we feel confident. - happening so we feel confident. we've _ happening so we feel confident. we've asked _ happening so we feel confident. we've asked all— happening so we feel confident. we've asked all of _ happening so we feel confident. we've asked all of our - happening so we feel confident. we've asked all of our parents i happening so we feel confident. l we've asked all of our parents to take a _ we've asked all of our parents to take a lateral _ we've asked all of our parents to take a lateral flow— we've asked all of our parents to take a lateral flow and _ we've asked all of our parents to take a lateral flow and they i we've asked all of our parents to take a lateral flow and they werej take a lateral flow and they were met ntasks— take a lateral flow and they were met masks in— take a lateral flow and they were met masks in the _ take a lateral flow and they were met masks in the performance . take a lateral flow and they were . met masks in the performance and take a lateral flow and they were i met masks in the performance and we can spread _ met masks in the performance and we can spread out— met masks in the performance and we can spread out the _ met masks in the performance and we can spread out the family _ met masks in the performance and we can spread out the family groups i met masks in the performance and we can spread out the family groups and. can spread out the family groups and we think— can spread out the family groups and we think tet — can spread out the family groups and we think let christmas _ can spread out the family groups and we think let christmas go _ can spread out the family groups and we think let christmas go ahead i can spread out the family groups and we think let christmas go ahead buti we think let christmas go ahead but let's do— we think let christmas go ahead but let's do it _ we think let christmas go ahead but let's do it safely. _ we think let christmas go ahead but let's do it safely. find _ we think let christmas go ahead but let's do it safely.— let's do it safely. and for the children. _ let's do it safely. and for the children, obviously, - let's do it safely. and for the children, obviously, it i let's do it safely. and for the children, obviously, it is i let's do it safely. and for the children, obviously, it is nice let's do it safely. and for the i children, obviously, it is nice that their— children, obviously, it is nice that their families can see them do it live in— their families can see them do it live in the — their families can see them do it live in the theatre. this their families can see them do it live in the theatre.— their families can see them do it live in the theatre. this time last ear we live in the theatre. this time last year we were _ live in the theatre. this time last year we were doing _ live in the theatre. this time last year we were doing a _ live in the theatre. this time last year we were doing a live - live in the theatre. this time last year we were doing a live virtual| year we were doing a live virtual performance _ year we were doing a live virtual performance but _ year we were doing a live virtual performance but you _ year we were doing a live virtual performance but you have - year we were doing a live virtual performance but you have to i performance but you have to understand _ performance but you have to understand the _ performance but you have to understand the children i performance but you have to understand the children that| performance but you have to - understand the children that magic moment— understand the children that magic moment when— understand the children that magic moment when they _ understand the children that magic moment when they see _ understand the children that magic moment when they see their - understand the children that magic moment when they see their mum| understand the children that magic. moment when they see their mum or dad or— moment when they see their mum or dad or their— moment when they see their mum or dad or their grandparents— moment when they see their mum or dad or their grandparents and - moment when they see their mum or dad or their grandparents and they i dad or their grandparents and they .ive dad or their grandparents and they give them — dad or their grandparents and they give them a — dad or their grandparents and they give them a wave, _ dad or their grandparents and they give them a wave, you _ dad or their grandparents and they give them a wave, you can't - dad or their grandparents and they give them a wave, you can't get i dad or their grandparents and they i give them a wave, you can't get that when _ give them a wave, you can't get that when you _ give them a wave, you can't get that when you are — give them a wave, you can't get that when you are doing _ give them a wave, you can't get that when you are doing it _ give them a wave, you can't get that when you are doing it virtually, i give them a wave, you can't get that when you are doing it virtually, so i when you are doing it virtually, so as tong _ when you are doing it virtually, so as tong as— when you are doing it virtually, so as tong as we _ when you are doing it virtually, so as long as we can _ when you are doing it virtually, so as long as we can do _ when you are doing it virtually, so as long as we can do it— when you are doing it virtually, so as long as we can do it safely, i when you are doing it virtually, so as long as we can do it safely, we| as long as we can do it safely, we will do _ as long as we can do it safely, we will do everything _ as long as we can do it safely, we will do everything for— as long as we can do it safely, we will do everything for that - as long as we can do it safely, we will do everything for that special| will do everything for that special moment — will do everything for that special moment. ., . ., . . moment. you had to change some lans. moment. you had to change some plans tonight— moment. you had to change some plans. tonight in _ moment. you had to change some plans. tonight in the _ moment. you had to change some plans. tonight in the space - moment. you had to change some plans. tonight in the space were i plans. tonight in the space were meant _ plans. tonight in the space were meant to— plans. tonight in the space were meant to have a christmas party and it is now— meant to have a christmas party and it is now off — meant to have a christmas party and it is now off. we meant to have a christmas party and it is now off-— it is now off. we were meant to be havin: a it is now off. we were meant to be having a big _ it is now off. we were meant to be having a big dance _ it is now off. we were meant to be having a big dance tonight - it is now off. we were meant to be having a big dance tonight but i it is now off. we were meant to be having a big dance tonight but the | having a big dance tonight but the thing _ having a big dance tonight but the thing is _ having a big dance tonight but the thing is you — having a big dance tonight but the thing is you have _ having a big dance tonight but the thing is you have to _ having a big dance tonight but the thing is you have to look- having a big dance tonight but the thing is you have to look at - having a big dance tonight but the thing is you have to look at everyi thing is you have to look at every event _ thing is you have to look at every event and — thing is you have to look at every event and now. _ thing is you have to look at every event and now, on— thing is you have to look at every event and now, on sunday, - thing is you have to look at every event and now, on sunday, theyi event and now, on sunday, they tirought— event and now, on sunday, they brought out— event and now, on sunday, they brought out the _ event and now, on sunday, they brought out the directive - event and now, on sunday, they brought out the directive that i event and now, on sunday, they. brought out the directive that you have to _ brought out the directive that you have to wear _ brought out the directive that you have to wear masks _ brought out the directive that you have to wear masks in _ brought out the directive that you have to wear masks in communal| brought out the directive that you - have to wear masks in communal areas in all settings _
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have to wear masks in communal areas in all settings so — have to wear masks in communal areas in all settings so we _ have to wear masks in communal areas in all settings so we couldn't _ have to wear masks in communal areas in all settings so we couldn't have i in all settings so we couldn't have parents _ in all settings so we couldn't have parents standing _ in all settings so we couldn't have parents standing here _ in all settings so we couldn't have parents standing here drinking i in all settings so we couldn't have i parents standing here drinking and partving _ parents standing here drinking and partying with — parents standing here drinking and partying with masks _ parents standing here drinking and partying with masks on, _ parents standing here drinking and partying with masks on, so - parents standing here drinking and partying with masks on, so we i partying with masks on, so we cancetted _ partying with masks on, so we cancetted it— partying with masks on, so we cancelled it but— partying with masks on, so we cancelled it but the _ partying with masks on, so we cancelled it but the ones- partying with masks on, so we cancelled it but the ones we i partying with masks on, so we i cancelled it but the ones we can do for the _ cancelled it but the ones we can do for the children— cancelled it but the ones we can do for the children safely, _ cancelled it but the ones we can do for the children safely, we - cancelled it but the ones we can do for the children safely, we will- cancelled it but the ones we can do for the children safely, we will do. for the children safely, we will do it. �* . . ~ i. for the children safely, we will do it. brilliant. thank you very much. in the it. brilliant. thank you very much. in the next — it. brilliant. thank you very much. in the next couple _ it. brilliant. thank you very much. in the next couple of— it. brilliant. thank you very much. in the next couple of hours, i it. brilliant. thank you very much. in the next couple of hours, we i it. brilliant. thank you very much. | in the next couple of hours, we will be here _ in the next couple of hours, we will be here in— in the next couple of hours, we will be here in the dress rehearsal and this witt— be here in the dress rehearsal and this will be — be here in the dress rehearsal and this will be hopefully full of children, mary andjoseph this will be hopefully full of children, mary and joseph and we will see _ children, mary and joseph and we will see the whole thing is they get ready— will see the whole thing is they get ready to _ will see the whole thing is they get ready to perform to their families. it is exciting. thank you, fiona. do you remember the butterflies in your stomach when you get ready to go on stage? bit stomach when you get ready to go on state? �* . stomach when you get ready to go on state? �* , . stomach when you get ready to go on state? . , . . , ., stage? all the mums and dads waiting outside. stage? all the mums and dads waiting outside- and — stage? all the mums and dads waiting outside. and you _ stage? all the mums and dads waiting outside. and you have _ stage? all the mums and dads waiting outside. and you have your— stage? all the mums and dads waiting outside. and you have your one i stage? all the mums and dads waiting outside. and you have your one line. | outside. and you have your one line. and ou outside. and you have your one line. and you look — outside. and you have your one line. and you look like _ outside. and you have your one line. and you look like humpty _ outside. and you have your one line. and you look like humpty dumpty. i and you look like humpty dumpty. some things never change. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello and welcome to bbc london. i'm victoria hollins. a police officer has been sprayed in the face with an unknown substance by a passing pedestrian, whilst on duty near parliament. the met says the officer was attacked with a substance
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last night, but did not need hospital treatment. detectives are appealing for help to find an ii—year—old boy from afghanistan who has been in britain for less than a month. mohammed khan was last seen in deptford at around four o'clock on tuesday. officers are growing increasingly concerned for the boy, who doesn't know his way around and doesn't speak much english. heathrow has reopened terminal 4 as a dedicated facility for processing arrivals from red list countries. the measure will keep passengers arriving from destinations on the high risk list, away from other travellers. the red list has been resurrected, with ten countries in southern africa, due to concerns about the omicron coronavirus. getting a job is not always easy especially for recent graduates going through virtual applications. but one young londoner tried a different approach to attract employers' attention. he created a pop—up stand at canary wharf, which helped landing his dream job.
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the 24—year—old from redbridge said he felt bogged down by the normal recruitment process. a degree used to be the pinnacle of success, but now it's more the minimum requirement. there are so many barriers to get to speak to someone. i found that recruiters got annoyed with me because i kept calling every other day just to see if anything was available. if you are heading out on public transport, this is how tfl let's see what the weather has in store. good morning. another cold start this morning, with a little bit of frost out there as temperatures are around the zero mark and high pressure is building from the south—west. we have a few showers which could turn a little bit wintry as it runs in to this colder air,
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and we've already had a feature this morning and a bit of wintriness further south. that is clearing away, but showers in the east could penetrate further inland and some sunny spells, but it is going to feel cold with a north—westerly breeze, and temperatures between three and five degrees. factoring in the wind, it will feel colder. overnight tonight, clear to start with, and that is where we will get the minimum temperature around —i, but milder air is on its way back, bringing some rain into friday. and the temperature by the end of the night rises to around two or 3 c. we have some spells of rain tomorrow, much milderair coming in, so we are looking at temperatures in double figures/ but this low—pressure system through the weekend again drags in some cold air, so the temperature is going to drop and it will stay largely unsettled and quite blustery, and the wind is feeling chilly and temperatures back down in single figures. i'll be back in half an hour. see you then. goodbye.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today. a deal for an extra 114 million doses of covid vaccines — they'll be available for future booster programmes and could combat new variants. a year after the uk became the first country in the world to approve the pfizer vaccine, the company's boss calls for children as young as five to be vaccinated. an emotional alec baldwin outlines the events that led to the death of cinematographer, halyna hutchins, on a movie set. the trigger wasn't pulled. i didn't pull the trigger. so you never pulled the trigger? no, no, no. i would never point a gun at anyone and pull a trigger at them, never. what did you think happened? a sixth day without power — thousands of people are struggling to cope with freezing temperatures in the aftermath of storm arwen.
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victory for the top three in the premier league, as liverpool thrash everton in the merseyside derby, to turn up the pressure on rafa benitez. good morning. another cold start. sub zero temperatures. some icy stretches and wintry showers. most of us will see some sunshine later. details in ten minutes. good morning. it's thursday, the 2nd of december. the government has ordered an extra 114 million doses of covid vaccine, to be used for potential booster programmes over the next two years. the health secretary, sajid javid, said the deals future—proof the uk's vaccination programme. simonjones reports. relax your arm, light scratch. all done. the government has promised to offer a boosterjab to all eligible adults in england by the end ofjanuary.
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but it's also looking further ahead, to a time when boosters may be needed again and again, so it's secured an additional 60 million doses of the moderna vaccine, and 5a million doses of the pfizer jab. they will be the latest vaccines that they will have, because as we're seeing right now, there's a new variant, there's potentially new variants in the future. we know that covid is going to be around for a while. we have to learn to live with it, and one of the ways to learn to live with it is to make sure we've got the vaccines that we need, and that they're future proof. it's exactly a year since this happened. we have some breaking news for you this morning, because in the last few minutes we've heard that the first coronavirus vaccine has been approved for use in the uk. that was the pfizer vaccine. 12 months on, more than 150 million first, second and boosterjabs of the different vaccines, have been administered across the uk. at present, children aged between 12 and 15 are offered a vaccine. the boss of pfizer, in an interview with the bbc,
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says five to 11—year—olds should getjabbed too. i think that covid in schools is thriving. i believe that this is disturbing significantly the education system. and there are kids that will have severe symptoms. so, there is no doubt in my mind that the benefits completely, completely are in favour of doing it. while the vaccines continue to roll off the production line, pfizer has already started work on an updated omicron version of its jab, should it be needed. the world health organization says early signs suggest that most cases of the new variant are mild. scientists say they still need a few more days to determine its potential threat. simon jones, bbc news. the prime minister has refused to deny that christmas parties were held in downing street last year, when the uk was in lockdown. but he insisted no covid rules were broken.
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let's speak to our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. this goes on and on. front page of some of the papers again this morning? some of the papers again this mornin: ? . some of the papers again this morning?— some of the papers again this mornin: ? . , ., , some of the papers again this mornin. ? . , . , . morning? yeah, bizarrely, there are a slew of christmas _ morning? yeah, bizarrely, there are a slew of christmas party _ morning? yeah, bizarrely, there are a slew of christmas party related i a slew of christmas party related stories _ a slew of christmas party related stories today. these claims about christmas — stories today. these claims about christmas parties in downing street in 2020, _ christmas parties in downing street in 2020, is — christmas parties in downing street in 2020, is continuing. the bbc has spoken— in 2020, is continuing. the bbc has spoken to _ in 2020, is continuing. the bbc has spoken to a — in 2020, is continuing. the bbc has spoken to a source who was in downing — spoken to a source who was in downing street in december last year. _ downing street in december last year. who— downing street in december last year, who said there was an evening where _ year, who said there was an evening where there — year, who said there was an evening where there was food, there was atcohot— where there was food, there was alcohol and they were party games. the government is sticking to its line the government is sticking to its tine that — the government is sticking to its line that anything that happened was within— line that anything that happened was within the _ line that anything that happened was within the rules in that place at that time, _ within the rules in that place at that time, because remember, there were different rules across england and in _ were different rules across england and in london at various points. those _ and in london at various points. those government sources are not repeating _ those government sources are not repeating the words they said to me when _ repeating the words they said to me when they— repeating the words they said to me when they explicitly said yesterday there _ when they explicitly said yesterday there were no parties. separately, they work— there were no parties. separately, they work and pensions secretary therese _ they work and pensions secretary therese coffey has been on itv
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giving — therese coffey has been on itv giving people some advice about what they should or crucially, should not be doing _ they should or crucially, should not be doing under the mistletoe this year _ year. i - year. i don't think year. — idon't think there should be too i don't think there should be too much snogging under the mistletoe. you don't need to do things like that. but i think we should all be trying to enjoy the christmas ahead of us and that's why we are working so hard to get the deployment of as many vaccines as possible. and, of course, continuing to encourage people who have not been vaccinated at all yet, to come forward. her comments about snogging are not officiat— her comments about snogging are not official government advice. officially the government does not want to _ officially the government does not want to go there. talking about not going _ want to go there. talking about not going places, hospitality reporting lots going places, hospitality reporting tots of— going places, hospitality reporting lots of cancellations as a result of people _ lots of cancellations as a result of people being worried about the new variant~ _ people being worried about the new variant~ i_ people being worried about the new variant. i think that is something the government wants to avoid because — the government wants to avoid because they don't want lots of damage — because they don't want lots of damage to the economy. it damage to the economy. it att— damage to the economy. it all comes down to messaging again. thank you. the actor alec baldwin says he didn't pull the trigger of the gun that fatally wounded cinematographer halyna hutchins on the set of his film, rust. the star made the claim
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to the american network abc news, which will tonight air his first sit—down interview since the incident in october. our north america correspondent david willis reports. it's six weeks since halyna hutchins was fatally shot on the set of alec baldwin's western movie rust. we've had two people accidentally shot on a movie set by a prop gun. but as the weeks have gone by, the circumstances surrounding the cinematographer�*s death have become increasingly complicated. a statement released by local detectives only hours after the shooting, referred to a firearm discharged by alec baldwin. but now the actor himself is giving his version of events. the trigger wasn't pulled, i didn't pull the trigger. so you never pulled the trigger? no, no, no. i would never point a gun at anyone and pull the trigger at them, never. what did you think happened? how did a real bullet get on that set? i have no idea. someone put a live bullet in a gun, a bullet that wasn't even supposed
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to be on the property. police retrieved hundreds of rounds of ammunition from the film set, including, it is thought, other live rounds. they've been investigating reports of dissatisfaction on the part of crew members, who staged a walk—out the day before the fatal shooting. and claims by the woman in charge of firearm safety, hannah gutierrez—reed, whose lawyers have said the gun could have been sabotaged. six weeks on from the tragedy in this remote part of northern new mexico, and the investigation appears to be growing more complex by the day. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. a 19—year—old man has been arrested over the death of a teenage girl in hamilton, south lanarkshire. amber gibson, who was 16, was reported missing from her home in the hillhouse area on friday. her body was discovered in a nature reserve on sunday. police scotland say enquiries are still ongoing. everton and liverpool fans united
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for a minute's applause at the merseyside derby last night, in memory of ava white, the 12 year—old girl who was killed last week. fans also held a banner raising awareness about knife crime. ava was stabbed in liverpool city centre last thursday. a 14—year—old boy has been charged with murder. an art installation of a traditional irish pub has been unveiled as the winner of this year's turner prize. it was created by 11 belfast—based artists known as the array collective. they said the piece is in response to issues including abortion rights and mental health. it features photos, memorabilia and videos, some of them representing hidden political messages about sexuality and identity. it's almost like a little treasure hunt through there to pick the bits of art that mean things. you can see
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the overall picture. then it's up to you how you interpret little bits. i like that. it you how you interpret little bits. i like that. . . you how you interpret little bits. i like that. , , , like that. it is eight minutes past seven. like that. it is eight minutes past seven- and _ like that. it is eight minutes past seven. and the _ like that. it is eight minutes past seven. and the weekend - like that. it is eight minutes past i seven. and the weekend approaches. hopefully it is going to be better than last weekend. sarah is going to tell us. good morning. sarah is going to tell us. good morninu. ,., ., sarah is going to tell us. good mornin _ ,., ., ., sarah is going to tell us. good morninu. ., , . morning. good morning. it may be a touch less colder _ morning. good morning. it may be a touch less colder than _ morning. good morning. it may be a touch less colder than last _ morning. good morning. it may be aj touch less colder than last weekend. at the temperatures are up and down in the next few days. today, a cold start. some icy stretches. this is the picture in buckinghamshire. there is a dusting of sleet and snow around for some of us. it is falling on cold surfaces as well. that means there is some ice to start of the day. feeling cold wherever you are. many of us should have a largely fine and dry day with some sunshine. this is where we have seen the wintry showers falling in recent hours, particularly for scotland, northern scotland has seen some snow showers. everyone is down the east coast of england, some in wales and
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west midlands. some iciness around this morning for many of us. quite a lot of clear sky. a cold northerly breeze. there will be some sunshine. the winds will ease gradually in the east but we could see a0 to 50 mph gusts in the next few hours. sealed some of those wintry showers in eastern scotland and eastern england lingering through the day. temperatures three to four degrees in the east. milder weather toward the west. later on today, we see the cloud pushing rain into the west of scotland. that will be preceded by some snowfall. northern ireland also sing some rain and sleet later on. it could become heavy. much of england and wales ending the day on a largely dry node. as we had through this evening and overnight at the cloud and patchy rain, just before it turns into rain we could see sleet and snow to lower levels. by see sleet and snow to lower levels. by the time we get to tomorrow morning, temperatures not as cold as they were this morning. milder
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weatherfor a time on they were this morning. milder weather for a time on friday. then weather for a time on friday. then we see the next area of low pressure pushing its way east. that will bring further wintry showers and quite a chilly feel for bring further wintry showers and quite a chilly feel for the bring further wintry showers and quite a chilly feel for the weekend. thank you, sarah. a bit better than last week. still the legacy of that storm a week ago goes on, doesn't it? fit week ago goes on, doesn't it? of course. there are still thousands of people waking up this morning in freezing cold homes, after losing power six days ago, when storm arwen caused widespread damage. welfare centres and hot food are being provided in some places, with energy companies working with emergency services, local councils and the british red cross. tim muffett reports. no power, no water. linda and paul from aberdeenshire have had a grim five days. this from aberdeenshire have had a grim five da s. �* . from aberdeenshire have had a grim five da s. . , ., ., . five days. as time has gone and i think we have _ five days. as time has gone and i think we have become _ five days. as time has gone and i think we have become more i five days. as time has gone and i i think we have become more exhausted. no lighting. so it's really been a struggle. slowly this granite building is getting colder and colder. in
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building is getting colder and colder. . . building is getting colder and colder. , , , . ., , colder. in upper teesdale in county durham, malcolm _ colder. in upper teesdale in county durham, malcolm and _ colder. in upper teesdale in county durham, malcolm and sandra i colder. in upper teesdale in county durham, malcolm and sandra are i colder. in upper teesdale in county i durham, malcolm and sandra are also feeling the strain. i’m durham, malcolm and sandra are also feeling the strain.— feeling the strain. i'm riddled with arthritis. i've _ feeling the strain. i'm riddled with arthritis. i've had _ feeling the strain. i'm riddled with arthritis. i've had two _ feeling the strain. i'm riddled with arthritis. i've had two heart i arthritis. i've had two heart attacks _ arthritis. i've had two heart attacks. obviously make the medication. no heating, no water, no sanitary~ _ medication. no heating, no water, no sanitary~ we — medication. no heating, no water, no sanitary. we have had to put snow into the _ sanitary. we have had to put snow into the pans. sanitary. we have had to put snow into the pans-— into the pans. community spirit is no substitute _ into the pans. community spirit is no substitute for _ into the pans. community spirit is no substitute for electricity i into the pans. community spirit is no substitute for electricity and i no substitute for electricity and water, but volunteers are trying to plug the gap. water, but volunteers are trying to plug the gap-— water, but volunteers are trying to plug the gap. since the power went off last week. _ plug the gap. since the power went off last week, we _ plug the gap. since the power went off last week, we have _ plug the gap. since the power went off last week, we have been - plug the gap. since the power went off last week, we have been out i off last week, we have been out distributing camping stoves, warm clothes, porridge, hot soup, water and basically, checking on people. as the days have gone on, you know, people are cold and tired.— people are cold and tired. business and ener: people are cold and tired. business and energy manager _ people are cold and tired. business and energy manager greg - people are cold and tired. business and energy manager greg kanda i and energy manager greg kanda visited county durham yesterday. the communications from some of the companies — communications from some of the companies early on, i'll be frank, was not _ companies early on, i'll be frank, was not as— companies early on, i'll be frank, was not as good as it could have been _ was not as good as it could have been that — was not as good as it could have been. that will be one of the lessons _
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been. that will be one of the lessons we will be looking to learn from _ lessons we will be looking to learn from this — lessons we will be looking to learn from this. but lessons we will be looking to learn from this. �* .. ., ., from this. but the reaction from some residents _ from this. but the reaction from some residents was _ from this. but the reaction from some residents was blunt. i from this. but the reaction from | some residents was blunt. you're from this. but the reaction from i some residents was blunt. you're an mp i want some residents was blunt. you're an mp i want to — some residents was blunt. you're an mp i want to hear _ some residents was blunt. you're an mp i want to hear from _ some residents was blunt. you're an mp i want to hear from you - some residents was blunt. you're an mp i want to hear from you that i some residents was blunt. you're an mp i want to hear from you that you | mp i want to hear from you that you are going to go back and bluntly kick as. what i would expect from my government is to go back and say, right, where did it go wrong and how do we know it went wrong? it right, where did it go wrong and how do we know it went wrong?— do we know it went wrong? it makes no difference — do we know it went wrong? it makes no difference to _ do we know it went wrong? it makes no difference to us, _ do we know it went wrong? it makes no difference to us, does _ do we know it went wrong? it makes no difference to us, does it - do we know it went wrong? it makes no difference to us, does it really? i no difference to us, does it really? we need _ no difference to us, does it really? we need people who are going to do something, not people are going to walk around the village, have a chat and move _ walk around the village, have a chat and move on. walk around the village, have a chat and move om— and move on. electricity might be elusive, and move on. electricity might be elusive. but _ and move on. electricity might be elusive, but hot _ and move on. electricity might be elusive, but hot food _ and move on. electricity might be elusive, but hot food and - and move on. electricity might be elusive, but hot food and drink. and move on. electricity might be elusive, but hot food and drink is| elusive, but hot food and drink is on offer from elusive, but hot food and drink is on offerfrom some elusive, but hot food and drink is on offer from some power elusive, but hot food and drink is on offerfrom some power companies. bloody cold. to be honest, it's been very cold. by sunday night we have run out of candles. an camping gas cylinders gave out. so after we cooked our meal, cooking on a frying pan on an open log fire. challenging, that was! it worked. it
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did work. we are not dead. taste challenging, that was! it worked. it did work. we are not dead. we have on staff. did work. we are not dead. we have on staff- lt's — did work. we are not dead. we have on staff. it's nearly _ did work. we are not dead. we have on staff. it's nearly a _ did work. we are not dead. we have on staff. it's nearly a week - did work. we are not dead. we have on staff. it's nearly a week since i on staff. it's nearly a week since storm arwen struck. yet many communities are still struggling. tim muffett, bbc news. let's talk to andy smith, who joins us from cumbria. i will explain. you are in your office where there is power, but you don't live far away. tell me about the situation at home? hello. thank you for inviting me on. yeah, _ hello. thank you for inviting me on. yeah, we _ hello. thank you for inviting me on. yeah, we are — hello. thank you for inviting me on. yeah, we are ok. it's been really tough _ yeah, we are ok. it's been really tough it's— yeah, we are ok. it's been really tough. it's really challenging, obviously. this morning was so cold. we have _ obviously. this morning was so cold. we have frost on the ground. it was reading _ we have frost on the ground. it was reading -2 — we have frost on the ground. it was reading —2 on my van. it really difficult — reading —2 on my van. it really difficult to _ reading —2 on my van. it really difficult to get out of bed. we had no electricity since last friday. no running _ no electricity since last friday. no running water. no heating and no internet~ —
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running water. no heating and no internet. . ~ ., . internet. talk to me about the dama . e internet. talk to me about the damage that _ internet. talk to me about the damage that you _ internet. talk to me about the damage that you see - internet. talk to me about the damage that you see around i internet. talk to me about the i damage that you see around where internet. talk to me about the - damage that you see around where you live near kendal? taste damage that you see around where you live near kendal?— live near kendal? we are six miles out of candles. _ live near kendal? we are six miles out of candles. it's _ live near kendal? we are six miles out of candles. it's a _ live near kendal? we are six miles out of candles. it's a very - live near kendal? we are six miles out of candles. it's a very rural- out of candles. it's a very rural community _ out of candles. it's a very rural community. we actually live around the woods — community. we actually live around the woods. 35 community. we actually live around the woods. x: , ., . the woods. 35 trees were down. i am 'ust the woods. 35 trees were down. i am just showing — the woods. 35 trees were down. i am just showing a _ the woods. 35 trees were down. i am just showing a picture _ the woods. 35 trees were down. i am just showing a picture of _ the woods. 35 trees were down. i am just showing a picture of a _ just showing a picture of a 300—year—old tree which came down in your back garden. it 300-year-old tree which came down in your back garden-— your back garden. it did indeed. luckil , your back garden. it did indeed. luckily. it _ your back garden. it did indeed. luckily, it felt _ your back garden. it did indeed. luckily, it felt the _ your back garden. it did indeed. luckily, it felt the full _ your back garden. it did indeed. luckily, it felt the full length i your back garden. it did indeed. luckily, it felt the full length of| luckily, it felt the full length of the field — luckily, it felt the full length of the field at the bottom of our garden — the field at the bottom of our garden. a couple of other trees literally— garden. a couple of other trees literally missed my neighbours because — literally missed my neighbours because my car is by a couple of inches — because my car is by a couple of inches lt— because my car is by a couple of inches. . , because my car is by a couple of inches. , , ,, ., , ., inches. it is terrifying. i know you are on your _ inches. it is terrifying. i know you are on your sixth _ inches. it is terrifying. i know you are on your sixth day _ inches. it is terrifying. i know you are on your sixth day without i inches. it is terrifying. i know you i are on your sixth day without power. give me an idea of how you as a community are coping with this, just the basics in terms of food, for example, and making sure each other is safe? . i. , ,, is safe? yeah, so everyone is kind of looking — is safe? yeah, so everyone is kind of looking after _ is safe? yeah, so everyone is kind of looking after each _ is safe? yeah, so everyone is kind of looking after each other. i is safe? yeah, so everyone is kind of looking after each other. there | of looking after each other. there is a real— of looking after each other. there is a real community spirit here in
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the two — is a real community spirit here in the two connecting villages. everybody is rolling around looking after the _ everybody is rolling around looking after the older people. last night we had _ after the older people. last night we had a — after the older people. last night we had a fish and chip van, a local spit and _ we had a fish and chip van, a local spit and crackle, they came around, they were _ spit and crackle, they came around, they were giving out fish and chips to the _ they were giving out fish and chips to the two— they were giving out fish and chips to the two villages. so yeah, the community— to the two villages. so yeah, the community spirit is there, as it always— community spirit is there, as it always is— community spirit is there, as it always is when things like this happen — always is when things like this ha en. , , . always is when things like this hauen. , , . . ,, happen. indeed. i bet fish and chips never tasted — happen. indeed. i bet fish and chips never tasted so _ happen. indeed. i bet fish and chips never tasted so good, _ happen. indeed. i bet fish and chips never tasted so good, did _ happen. indeed. i bet fish and chips never tasted so good, did they? i happen. indeed. i bet fish and chips| never tasted so good, did they? no! what have you been told by the power companies in terms of what is happening? we have heard from the power companies that these are not simple fixes. they are seeing electricity pole snapped. they are not quick fixes as they move along. yeah, exactly. we haven't been told anything. _ yeah, exactly. we haven't been told anything. to— yeah, exactly. we haven't been told anything, to be honest. i go online every— anything, to be honest. i go online every day— anything, to be honest. i go online every day onto the electricity north west website and every day it says it will— west website and every day it says it will be _ west website and every day it says it will be back on by apm. but yeah,
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that has— it will be back on by apm. but yeah, that has been the case for a week. we did _ that has been the case for a week. we did have a team out on tuesday night _ we did have a team out on tuesday night at _ we did have a team out on tuesday night at midnight. we went out to speak— night at midnight. we went out to speak to — night at midnight. we went out to speak to them but they said they couldn't— speak to them but they said they couldn't find fault —— the fault. they— couldn't find fault —— the fault. they basically left within half an hour _ they basically left within half an hour 0ne — they basically left within half an hour. one guy had made the journey from norwich to help out. it's hard to be _ from norwich to help out. it's hard to be angry— from norwich to help out. it's hard to be angry with these guys when you are talking _ to be angry with these guys when you are talking to them on your doorstep because _ are talking to them on your doorstep because you know that they are doing everything _ because you know that they are doing everything they can. but if they are working _ everything they can. but if they are working in— everything they can. but if they are working in terrible weather conditions. they arrived there all hours _ conditions. they arrived there all hours we — conditions. they arrived there all hours. we have got much respect for them _ hours. we have got much respect for them. , . . , hours. we have got much respect for them. , . , ., ~ hours. we have got much respect for them. , . , . ,, ., them. just finally, talk to me about, them. just finally, talk to me about. you — them. just finally, talk to me about, you know, _ them. just finally, talk to me about, you know, the - them. just finally, talk to me about, you know, the tricks i them. just finally, talk to me | about, you know, the tricks of them. just finally, talk to me - about, you know, the tricks of being locked down without power? what has been keeping you going? foretell. locked down without power? what has been keeping you going?— been keeping you going? well, it's like the good _ been keeping you going? well, it's like the good old _ been keeping you going? well, it's like the good old days, _ been keeping you going? well, it's like the good old days, i _ been keeping you going? well, it's like the good old days, i suppose. | like the good old days, i suppose. conversations around the fire. we are lucky. — conversations around the fire. we are lucky, we have got a wood burner and a _ are lucky, we have got a wood burner and a well—stocked woodpile. so are
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our evening — and a well—stocked woodpile. so are our evening stand to be huddled around — our evening stand to be huddled around the wood burner. we have also .one around the wood burner. we have also gone lpg _ around the wood burner. we have also gone lpg gas, so at least we have .ot gone lpg gas, so at least we have got a _ gone lpg gas, so at least we have got a harp — gone lpg gas, so at least we have got a harp that we can call gone. we have to _ got a harp that we can call gone. we have to get — got a harp that we can call gone. we have to get creative in the kitchen. and it's _ have to get creative in the kitchen. and it'siust— have to get creative in the kitchen. and it'sjust a case of... board games, — and it'sjust a case of... board games, cards, just filling the time. preparations are key. spending the day light— preparations are key. spending the day light hours getting ready for when _ day light hours getting ready for when it — day light hours getting ready for when it does turn cold and dark. you know, when it does turn cold and dark. you know. andy. — when it does turn cold and dark. you know. andy. l— when it does turn cold and dark. gm. know, andy, i know you have got the respite of the office and you have got power, but i can see this is wearying and it is understandable. so, i wish you well. i wish all of you well. and i'll be ceding power to come back on. well done forjust persevering. to come back on. well done for 'ust persevering.— persevering. thank you for talking to us. persevering. thank you for talking to us- thank _ persevering. thank you for talking to us. thank you _ persevering. thank you for talking to us. thank you very _ persevering. thank you for talking to us. thank you very much. i persevering. thank you for talking to us. thank you very much. take | to us. thank you very much. take care. to us. thank you very much. take care- let's _ to us. thank you very much. take care. let's see _ to us. thank you very much. take care. let's see if— to us. thank you very much. take care. let's see if we _ to us. thank you very much. take care. let's see if we can - to us. thank you very much. take care. let's see if we can get i to us. thank you very much. tag age: care. let's see if we can get some answers from andy. joined byjim cardwell, head of paris —— policy
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development at northern power grid. i know you guys out flat out. i guess the key thing people like andy need to know is when on earth are they going to get reconnected? how is it looking?— is it looking? morning. i represent northern power— is it looking? morning. i represent northern power grid, _ is it looking? morning. i represent northern power grid, we - is it looking? morning. i represent northern power grid, we serve i is it looking? morning. i represent- northern power grid, we serve people in yorkshire — northern power grid, we serve people in yorkshire. the storm took out by 240.000 _ in yorkshire. the storm took out by 240,000 people. as a region we are probably— 240,000 people. as a region we are probably one of the worst affected. the good _ probably one of the worst affected. the good news is we are down to, the vast majority — the good news is we are down to, the vast majority of those are being done _ vast majority of those are being done to— vast majority of those are being done to a — vast majority of those are being done to a minute. i vast majority of those are being done to a minute.— vast majority of those are being done to a minute. i don't believe it! i done to a minute. i don't believe it! i don't — done to a minute. i don't believe it! i don't believe _ done to a minute. i don't believe it! i don't believe it! _ done to a minute. i don't believe it! i don't believe it! hang i done to a minute. i don't believe it! i don't believe it! hang on i done to a minute. i don't believe it! i don't believe it! hang on a i it! i don't believe it! hang on a minute. it! i don't believe it! hang on a minute- l _ it! i don't believe it! hang on a minute. idon't... _ it! i don't believe it! hang on a minute. idon't... ok, - it! i don't believe it! hang on a minute. i don't... ok, we i it! i don't believe it! hang on a i minute. i don't... 0k, we have it! i don't believe it! hang on a - minute. i don't... 0k, we have power reconnected- — minute. i don't... 0k, we have power reconnected. please _ minute. i don't... 0k, we have power reconnected. please tell _ minute. i don't... 0k, we have power reconnected. please tell me - minute. i don't... 0k, we have power reconnected. please tell me that - reconnected. please tell me that wasn't a power cut. the reconnected. please tell me that wasn't a power cut.— wasn't a power cut. the irony is that as the _ wasn't a power cut. the irony is that as the energy _ wasn't a power cut. the irony is that as the energy efficient - that as the energy efficient lighting turning off. so, badly timed~ — lighting turning off. so, badly timed~ i—
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lighting turning off. so, badly timed. i apologise for that. i think it was peeple _ timed. i apologise for that. i think it was people like _ timed. i apologise for that. i think it was people like gandhi - timed. i apologise for that. i think it was people like gandhi who - timed. i apologise for that. i think| it was people like gandhi who were so frustrated they were going to your connection out the back and trying to get your revenge. thank you for reconnecting. you are obviously energy efficient. you are saying they will get reconnected soon, just like you?— saying they will get reconnected soon, just like you? soon, 'ust like you? indeed. we have not soon, just like you? indeed. we have ot 11,500 soon, just like you? indeed. we have got 11,500 customers _ soon, just like you? indeed. we have got 11,500 customers are _ soon, just like you? indeed. we have got 11,500 customers are still- got ii,500 customers are still without— got 11,500 customers are still without power. still significant numbers. it has come down a long way from 240,000. that is due to the big effort _ from 240,000. that is due to the big effort from _ from 240,000. that is due to the big effort from our people in the field. we have _ effort from our people in the field. we have got over 2000 people working with this _ we have got over 2000 people working with this. we have had great mutual support— with this. we have had great mutual support from people in the south of england _ support from people in the south of england to — support from people in the south of england to help with this, which is gratefully— england to help with this, which is gratefully received, and also working _ gratefully received, and also working with local forums locally to look at _ working with local forums locally to look at welfare for those people. i think— look at welfare for those people. i think in— look at welfare for those people. i think in terms of getting those lights — think in terms of getting those lights back on, we have got the vast majority— lights back on, we have got the vast majority of— lights back on, we have got the vast majority of our customers, we have .ot majority of our customers, we have got dates _ majority of our customers, we have got dates and times this week when we are _ got dates and times this week when we are getting people on. we recognise some people will go longer — recognise some people will go longer. there are some hard to reach areas _ longer. there are some hard to reach areas the _ longer. there are some hard to reach areas. the kind of damage we are talking _ areas. the kind of damage we are talking about here, with a number of
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temporary— talking about here, with a number of temporary fixes as we go. we are looking _ temporary fixes as we go. we are looking at— temporary fixes as we go. we are looking at a — temporary fixes as we go. we are looking at a temporary fixing including mobile generation as well as doing _ including mobile generation as well as doing the repairs in parallel, but the — as doing the repairs in parallel, but the damage is extensive. you talk about the _ but the damage is extensive. gm. talk about the hard to reach communities. there were some suggestions in parliament yesterday that it could be close to christmas by the time some of those are reconnected. is that really the case? it could be another few weeks? we think that is probably a bit extreme — we think that is probably a bit extreme in terms of expectation but it's very— extreme in terms of expectation but it's very difficult to work these things— it's very difficult to work these things out, to give an absolute date _ things out, to give an absolute date i— things out, to give an absolute date. i guess our challenge is to work— date. i guess our challenge is to work tirelessly, work with those communities and see what we can do to either— communities and see what we can do to either help them to run their lives _ to either help them to run their lives in — to either help them to run their lives in a — to either help them to run their lives in a way while we get of the lights _ lives in a way while we get of the lights back on, but in the meantime we are _ lights back on, but in the meantime we are working as hard as we can to do this _ we are working as hard as we can to do this one — we are working as hard as we can to do this. one of the things we announced this week was providing welfare _ announced this week was providing welfare support to those homes that need support. they might need someone — need support. they might need someone else to stay. they may not have friends — someone else to stay. they may not have friends and family. we know a number— have friends and family. we know a number of— have friends and family. we know a number of people have moved out for a period _ number of people have moved out for a period we — number of people have moved out for a period. we think that is a good thing _ a period. we think that is a good thing to—
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a period. we think that is a good thing to do _ a period. we think that is a good thing to do. but like gandhi, they are suffering. these sort of things, we have _ are suffering. these sort of things, we have said we will provide reasonable costs for accommodation and food, _ reasonable costs for accommodation and food, so people can be more comfortable and we will work with those _ comfortable and we will work with those communities who have to stay off a little _ those communities who have to stay off a little bit longer because we appreciate that is what is needed. what _ appreciate that is what is needed. what are — appreciate that is what is needed. what are you learning through this process about how we can prevent it being this bad, or anything like as bad, in future storms? are there things we can do differently to protect ourselves?— things we can do differently to protect ourselves? yeah, the main effort that we _ protect ourselves? yeah, the main effort that we are _ protect ourselves? yeah, the main effort that we are taking _ protect ourselves? yeah, the main effort that we are taking place - protect ourselves? yeah, the main effort that we are taking place out| effort that we are taking place out there _ effort that we are taking place out there is _ effort that we are taking place out there is about our work route in the field in _ there is about our work route in the field in terms of the techniques they are — field in terms of the techniques they are using to get those lights on, temporary fixes for permanent repairs _ on, temporary fixes for permanent repairs or— on, temporary fixes for permanent repairs or rebuilds, largely these are the _ repairs or rebuilds, largely these are the power lines you see in fields — are the power lines you see in fields, these are rural communities. yes, _ fields, these are rural communities. yes of— fields, these are rural communities. yes, of course, we have learned from
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the past _ yes, of course, we have learned from the past of— yes, of course, we have learned from the past of these kind of events, and absolutely, we are looking at those _ and absolutely, we are looking at those we — and absolutely, we are looking at those. we are also thinking about how we _ those. we are also thinking about how we can — those. we are also thinking about how we can communicate with our customers — how we can communicate with our customers. the energy minister made a point _ customers. the energy minister made a point about communication and the importance _ a point about communication and the importance of doing that and being able to— importance of doing that and being able to do— importance of doing that and being able to do that so we can get through— able to do that so we can get through to people. i think there will be — through to people. i think there will be a — through to people. i think there will be a number of opportunities here for— will be a number of opportunities here for us — will be a number of opportunities here for us. we hear some of the frustrations— here for us. we hear some of the frustrations of our customers. they will be _ frustrations of our customers. they will be an— frustrations of our customers. they will be an opportunity here, after this event, — will be an opportunity here, after this event, to see where we could have _ this event, to see where we could have improved things. but right now, our real— have improved things. but right now, our real focus is on doing the things— our real focus is on doing the things we _ our real focus is on doing the things we can right now to get people — things we can right now to get people back on and communicate with them effectively to make sure they know _ them effectively to make sure they know when they will have their lights — know when they will have their lights back on.— know when they will have their liuhts back on. g . ., ., lights back on. ok, jim. we managed -- weird like — lights back on. ok, jim. we managed -- weird like you _ lights back on. ok, jim. we managed -- weird like you reconnected - lights back on. ok, jim. we managed -- weird like you reconnected your. —— weird like you reconnected your own supply this morning. thank you for explaining and giving the update. for explaining and giving the u date. , ., ~ for explaining and giving the udate. , ., ,, that was funny but so many people are dealing with this as well. exactly. andy is lucky. he can go to
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the office. you can charge his phone, he can make calls. it is the older couple who had nowhere else to go... older couple who had nowhere else to co. .. , older couple who had nowhere else to i o, _ _ , ,., older couple who had nowhere else to no... r ., ., older couple who had nowhere else to 90- - -— good i go... frying pan on a log fire. good to hear things _ go... frying pan on a log fire. good to hear things are _ go... frying pan on a log fire. good to hear things are moving - go... frying pan on a log fire. good to hear things are moving in - go... frying pan on a log fire. good to hear things are moving in the . to hear things are moving in the right direction. a to hear things are moving in the right direction.— right direction. 24 minutes past seven. the bracelet of a world war two airman executed by the nazis has been returned to his family — more than 70 years after he was killed. freddie habgood's plane was shot down over france in1941i. he survived the crash but died in a concentration camp, where the bracelet was recently recovered. our defence correspondent jonathan beale reports. the hours of darkness over hitler's germany _ the hours of darkness over hitler's germany are about to be made hideous — germany are about to be made hideous. the men of bomber command know well— hideous. the men of bomber command know well what they have to do. the raf know well what they have to do. ire: raf bombing campaign of the second world war was one of the most dangerous and deadly missions. on
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july the 28th, 1944, hundreds of lancaster bombers left eastern england for another raid over germany. one of those airmen was sergeant freddie hapgood. he was just 21. his nephew and niece grew up just 21. his nephew and niece grew up knowing little about what happened to their uncle. we didn't know much of the details about it because my father never talked about it. i because my father never talked about it. :, ._ , ., because my father never talked about it. :, :_ , ., , because my father never talked about it. i always feel a bit cheated that we never knew _ it. i always feel a bit cheated that we never knew him. _ it. i always feel a bit cheated that we never knew him. because, - it. i always feel a bit cheated that| we never knew him. because, you know, _ we never knew him. because, you know. he — we never knew him. because, you know, he would have beenjust a bit younger— know, he would have beenjust a bit younger than our father. he would have married and we would have bagged — have married and we would have bagged more cousins. that's a whole line of— bagged more cousins. that's a whole line of your— bagged more cousins. that's a whole line of your family you've lost. two ofthe line of your family you've lost. two of the seven _ line of your family you've lost. two of the seven crew _ line of your family you've lost. ii-hif.�* of the seven crew died that line of your family you've lost. “ii-mp of the seven crew died that night when there lancaster was shot down by a german fighter over france. freddie was among those who managed to bail out. fine freddie was among those who managed to bailout. , , ., to bail out. one escapes, three go into a prisoner— to bail out. one escapes, three go into a prisoner of _ to bail out. one escapes, three go into a prisoner of war _
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to bail out. one escapes, three go into a prisoner of war camp - to bail out. one escapes, three go into a prisoner of war camp and i to bail out. one escapes, three go i into a prisoner of war camp and poor fred hapgood falls into the hands of the dreaded gestapo. and from then, we know what happened to him. freddie hapgood was betrayed by a local, who handed him over to the gestapo. they took them here. this concentration camp in alsace. but three years ago, a local girl found something unusual in the earth. she was 'ust something unusual in the earth. eyre: wasjust working during her holidays was just working during her holidays and raking the yard, tidying it. suddenly she saw a gleaming something in the soil. it was a bracelet. it something in the soil. it was a bracelet. :, , :, , ., bracelet. it was the only thing that was ever found, _ bracelet. it was the only thing that was ever found, the _ bracelet. it was the only thing that was ever found, the only _ bracelet. it was the only thing that was ever found, the only surviving | was ever found, the only surviving item _ was ever found, the only surviving item that — was ever found, the only surviving item that was ever found in the ash pit. item that was ever found in the ash pit~ and _ item that was ever found in the ash pit~ and i_ item that was ever found in the ash pit. and i think the only reason being _ pit. and i think the only reason being is— pit. and i think the only reason being is because it was silver. freddie's_ being is because it was silver. freddie's bracelet, the last moment of his final mission, was returned to the family. in a simple ceremony in london, they handed over to the head the air force. i
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in london, they handed over to the head the air force.— head the air force. i think this is the perfect _ head the air force. i think this is the perfect place _ head the air force. i think this is the perfect place to _ head the air force. i think this is the perfect place to put - head the air force. i think this is the perfect place to put it, - head the air force. i think this is | the perfect place to put it, really. it is on display. i think a lot of people come here and visit. thea;r people come here and visit. they ho -e that people come here and visit. they hope that others _ people come here and visit. they hope that others will _ people come here and visit. they hope that others will now - people come here and visit. they hope that others will now remember the uncle they never knew. jonathan beale, bbc news. the fact that was returned to the family and they could just feel something of the history. something tangible. it must mean so much. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello and welcome to bbc london. i'm victoria hollins. detectives are appealing for help to find an 11 —year—old boy from afghanistan who has been in britain for less than a month and has gone missing from south london. mohammed khan was last seen in deptford
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around four o'clock on tuesday. officers say they are growing increasingly concerned for the boy who does not know his way around and doesn't speak much english. a police officer has been sprayed in the face with an unknown substance by a passing pedestrian, whilst on duty near parliament. the met says the officer was attacked with a substance last night, but did not need hospital treatment. heathrow has reopened terminal 11 as a dedicated facility for processing arrivals from red list countries. the measure will keep passengers arriving from destinations on the high risk list, away from other travellers. the red list has been resurrected, with ten countries in southern africa, due to concerns about the omicron coronavirus. getting a job is not always easy especially for recent graduates going through virtual applications. but one young londoner tried a different approach to attract employers' attention. he created a pop—up stand at canary wharf, which helped landing his dream job. the 24—year—old from redbridge said
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he felt bogged down by the normal recruitment process. a degree used to be the pinnacle of success, but now it's more the minimum requirement. there are so many barriers to get to speak to someone. i found that recruiters got annoyed with me because i kept calling every other day just to see if anything was available. if you are heading out on public transport, this is how tfl let's see what the weather has in store. good morning. another cold start this morning, with a little bit of frost out there as temperatures are around the zero mark and high pressure is building from the south—west. we have a few showers which could turn a little bit wintry as it runs in to this colder air, and we've already had a feature this morning and a bit
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of wintriness further south. that is clearing away, but showers in the east could penetrate further inland and some sunny spells, but it is going to feel cold with a north—westerly breeze, and temperatures between three and five degrees. factoring in the wind, it will feel colder. overnight tonight, clear to start with, and that is where we will get the minimum temperature around —i, but milder air is on its way back, bringing some rain into friday. and the temperature by the end of the night rises to around two or 3 c. we have some spells of rain tomorrow, much milderair coming in, so we are looking at temperatures in double figures/ but this low—pressure system through the weekend again drags in some cold air, so the temperature is going to drop and it will stay largely unsettled and quite blustery, and the wind is feeling chilly and temperatures back down in single figures. i'll be back in an hour. see you then. goodbye.
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hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. today marks one year since the uk became the first country in the world to approve the pfizer—biontech coronavirus jab — paving the way for mass vaccination. a week later — in a moment most of us will remember — the first dose was administered to margaret keenan in coventry. let's remind ourselves of those events. good morning, you are watching bbc breakfast _ good morning, you are watching bbc breakfast and we have breaking news pi-s breakfast and we have breaking news pigs in _ breakfast and we have breaking news pigs in the last few minutes we've heard that — pigs in the last few minutes we've heard that the first coronavirus banksy has been approved for use in the uk _ banksy has been approved for use in the uk. , ., , , banksy has been approved for use in the uk. , :,, , ., ._ the uk. this has been manufactured b the us the uk. this has been manufactured by the us pharmaceutical _ the uk. this has been manufactured by the us pharmaceutical company i by the us pharmaceutical company pfizer. , , :, , by the us pharmaceutical company pfizer. , , . pfizer. help is on its way. when the vaccine is rolled _ pfizer. help is on its way. when the vaccine is rolled out, _ pfizer. help is on its way. when the vaccine is rolled out, things - pfizer. help is on its way. when the vaccine is rolled out, things will - vaccine is rolled out, things will .et vaccine is rolled out, things will get better— vaccine is rolled out, things will get better and we will start that process — get better and we will start that process next week.— get better and we will start that process next week. good morning, tuesday the _ process next week. good morning, tuesday the eighth _ process next week. good morning, tuesday the eighth of _ process next week. good morning, tuesday the eighth of december. process next week. good morning, | tuesday the eighth of december and our top story and in the last few
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minutes the uk's max vaccination programme against coronavirus has begun. programme against coronavirus has beuun. , , programme against coronavirus has berun_ , , ., programme against coronavirus has berun. , , ., ., programme against coronavirus has berun_ , , ., :, programme against coronavirus has beuun. , , ., begun. this is margaret who you can see there, begun. this is margaret who you can see there. and _ begun. this is margaret who you can see there, and she _ begun. this is margaret who you can see there, and she is _ begun. this is margaret who you can see there, and she is 91 _ begun. this is margaret who you can see there, and she is 91 next - begun. this is margaret who you can see there, and she is 91 next week. see there, and she is 91 next week and was the first person to receive the pfizerjab at university college hospital in coventry and the prime minister has accused it a huge step for it — step forward in the fight against the disease. a year on, our medical editor, fergus walsh, has been speaking to pfizer's chief executive, albert bourla. in the interview, which took place before the omicron variant was identified, fergus began by asking him where the world would be without covid vaccines. i think we will be in a very, very difficult position. i think the fundamental structure of our society will be threatened. i think we will be counting
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trillions of economic losses. i think it will be a challenge in human relationships. i think we will see things that we have only see in movies. in october the fda, the american regulator, approved your vaccine for five to ii—year—olds after successful trials. do you think immunising at that age group is likely to happen in the uk and europe. i believe it's a very good idea. i think that covid in schools is thriving and i believe that this is disturbing significantly the educational system and there are kids who have had severe symptoms, so there's no doubt in my mind that the benefits completely, completely are in favour of doing it. you are also doing trials in the underfives. do you think eventually we will see the under fives being immunised? we will wait to see the studies. we are using very,
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very small doses, so we want to make sure that we are perfectly safe. the question is, are we going to be effective in those low doses? and this is what we are waiting to see. if the studies prove that these very low doses are effective in these kids i think it's a very good way to utilise the vaccines to protect them. half the world's population, roughly, has now received at least one dose of covid vaccine but in the poorest nations it is something like one in 20 people. is it fair to say that the rich nations have grabbed most of the vaccine doses and you, in a sense, have helped them? i think it is fair to say that the richer nations utilised first the vaccine. in fact, the poor countries from day one, it cost. and there are countries where we gave them at the cost of a takeaway meal, so the price was not an issue. but the availability was limited and many countries placed orders,
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like the uk, very early. how do you think anti— vaccine stories that appear should best be countered? there are a number of people who are afraid of the vaccine. others are afraid of covid, some are afraid more of the vaccine. and they are not going to be convinced with scientific arguments. i think, for those who are just afraid, the only emotion of human beings that is stronger than fear is love. so i am using always this argument that the decision to get another vaccine is not going to influence only your health, it's going to affect the health of others, and particularly the health of the people you love the most because they are the ones that you interact with. so, take your courage to overcome your fears and do the right thing. that was the chief executive of pfizer, albert bourla, speaking to our medical editor, fergus walsh.
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fergus joins us now from windsor. it is interesting hearing albert's thoughts. you were talking to him before we had heard much about the omicron variant and really want to talk about what pfizer is doing in terms of that?— terms of that? since omicron emerged. _ terms of that? since omicron emerged, like _ terms of that? since omicron emerged, like other - terms of that? since omicron - emerged, like other manufacturers, pfizer worked on a template for ovarian vaccine, just as they did against the beta variant on delta and produced those tweaked vaccine versions in the hundred days and they were never needed. it's worth pointing out that the vaccines we use are the original vaccines against the wuhan strain and have worked very well and continue to do so but he said they will continue to work on that and will have a vaccine ready in three months but a
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wide—ranging interview including a big defence from him, which you would expect, of the massive profits that pfizer has made out of the pandemic, something like £26,000,000,000 of revenue from the vaccine alone. they also have an antiviral medicine which is likely to get approved very shortly and in the last few minutes, a company, gsk, havejust had a embody infusion treatment for people with mild to moderate covid, but not a vaccine but something once you got infected that has been improved by the nhra so we have another weapon in the armoury and we talk a lot about vaccines but we've come a long way since start of the pandemic for very a trick — effective treatments for covid. we can't believe it's a year since the vaccine was first
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announced.— since the vaccine was first announced. ~ ,, :, :, announced. we know the government has announced _ announced. we know the government has announced a _ announced. we know the government has announced a bulk— announced. we know the government has announced a bulk order _ announced. we know the government has announced a bulk order of - has announced a bulk order of 114,000 has announced a bulk order of 111i,000 boosters over the next couple of years so i think the message is clear that vaccines are part of our lives for a few years. hundred doses that underlines the dominance of the nhra technology as opposed to that used by oxford astrazeneca which is now being supplanted partly as a result of the rare side effects that can happen with that vaccine which has been superseded in terms of boosters in the uk and a lot of other leading nations have chosen
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this technology. pfizer is confident about what they are doing and their vaccine has to be stored at —70 so there's been an issue about rolling out to contribute fragile health systems but i was told they will be rolling out a new formulation for sub saharan africa which can be kept in the fridge for three months which he said would be a game changers for countries because a lot of vaccine inequity and he defended himself against the charge that the vaccine makers help the origination grabs most of the jabs. fishd makers help the origination grabs most of the jabs.— makers help the origination grabs most of the jabs. most of the 'abs. and thank you for correcting. — most of the jabs. and thank you for correcting, hundred _ most of the jabs. and thank you for correcting, hundred and _ most of the jabs. and thank you for i correcting, hundred and 14,000,000. vaccinating children are still in the great debate about which age
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groups should receive it. who did say we are seeing an increase amongst schoolchildren. the say we are seeing an increase amongst schoolchildren. the us has led the way- — amongst schoolchildren. the us has led the way. something _ amongst schoolchildren. the us has led the way. something like - amongst schoolchildren. the us has led the way. something like two - amongst schoolchildren. the us has| led the way. something like two and a half million five to ii —year—olds in the us have received a scaled—down version of the vaccine, a reduced dose and it was said they would make a decision before christmas and beyond that, there are trials ongoing in the under fives beyond that, there are trials ongoing in the underfives but pfizer said they had to wait and see, a mini dose, would prove to be safe and effective so the direction
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of travel is ever younger parts of the population being immunised. always good to talk to you and the busy year and i always good to talk to you and the busy yearand i imagine always good to talk to you and the busy year and i imagine the next year will be as busy. thank you. let's stay on the issue of vaccinating primary school aged children. we can speak now to professor adam finn — who is a member of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. we heard the boss of pfizer saying that he thinks it's perfectly safe and that five to 12 —year—olds should start being jabbed. where are we? what are the pros and cons? as fergus explained, as you work down through the ages there is a law of diminishing returns because luckily for us children are seldom seriously affected by the virus. unlike other
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viruses which have caused real problem in children, but what you get by immunising children is primarily an indirect production of adults and the extent to which we can protect adults by avoiding them being infected by children with current vaccines is uncertain. that is the balance. we clearly want to protect children as much as possible and we have good evidence that the vaccine even at a low dose produces a really good protective immune response in children and produces fewer side effects because of the lower dose. but should we be focusing on adults who more commonly get seriously ill. 50 focusing on adults who more commonly get seriously ill-— get seriously ill. so this is what ou are get seriously ill. so this is what you are wrestling _ get seriously ill. so this is what you are wrestling with. - get seriously ill. so this is what you are wrestling with. what i get seriously ill. so this is what l you are wrestling with. what kind get seriously ill. so this is what i you are wrestling with. what kind of timescale are you wrestling with? when will mums and dads know your
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recommendation? irate when will mums and dads know your recommendation?— when will mums and dads know your recommendation? we can't recommend the use of the — recommendation? we can't recommend the use of the vaccine _ recommendation? we can't recommend the use of the vaccine until _ recommendation? we can't recommend the use of the vaccine until it _ recommendation? we can't recommend the use of the vaccine until it is i the use of the vaccine until it is authorised and we've not done that at all except the people at very high risk. we have already recommended that the younger children, even though the vaccine is not authorised should be offered but offering to all healthy children before the regulator has spoken is something we would be reluctant to do but once the recommendation for authorisation comes through, this is something we need to engage with and produce an answer on quickly because people want to know. thea;r produce an answer on quickly because people want to know.— people want to know. they will have heard the pfizer _ people want to know. they will have heard the pfizer boss _ people want to know. they will have heard the pfizer boss talking i people want to know. they will have heard the pfizer boss talking about i heard the pfizer boss talking about people under five, heard the pfizer boss talking about people underfive, really heard the pfizer boss talking about people under five, really young preschool children and realistically, but what are the chances of another year we will be talking about vaccines for everybody?— talking about vaccines for eve bod ? :, ., .,
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everybody? that far into the future is hard to predict. _ everybody? that far into the future is hard to predict. if— everybody? that far into the future is hard to predict. if you _ everybody? that far into the future is hard to predict. if you look i everybody? that far into the future is hard to predict. if you look at i is hard to predict. if you look at influenza in the sense if changes on the immunised people every year, we tend to focus on the group where there is the biggest problem rather than immunise everyone in the population. in terms of the very young children we've been seeing a handful of babies, newborn babies, often premature babies getting serious covid but the number of children between the age of six months and five years where the next trial is coming who get seriously ill with this infection, again, very, very low. it's a mild infection in children and as you move down the risk—benefit debate gets more difficult to balance. i gets more difficult to balance. i suppose every child that gets a vaccine here, that is a vaccine that cannot be given somewhere else in the world to an older person who might need it. there is the whole
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ethical debate about whether we should be vaccinating children at all. :, , should be vaccinating children at all. ., , . ., , should be vaccinating children at all. :, _ ., _., should be vaccinating children at all. ., ,. ., , :, all. that is certainly part of it. as time goes _ all. that is certainly part of it. as time goes by, _ all. that is certainly part of it. as time goes by, it's i all. that is certainly part of it. as time goes by, it's not i all. that is certainly part of it. as time goes by, it's not so i all. that is certainly part of it. i as time goes by, it's not so much the supply of vaccine that is limiting vaccine equity but the ability to deliver the vaccines so during the course of next year we could expect the number of doses available to countries around the world to really go up rapidly but that doesn't mean they will necessarily be able to provide the vaccines to people as quickly as we would like right now in this country we have to think in the same terms. we have given ourselves a big challenge of offering boosters to adults in the next two months and literally the numbers of pairs of hands of people who will be up to get the vaccines will be the limiting step. it get the vaccines will be the limiting step.— get the vaccines will be the limiting step. it is beyond two months and — limiting step. it is beyond two months and the _ limiting step. it is beyond two months and the government | limiting step. it is beyond two i months and the government announced this morning they've ordered another hundred million different vaccines for the next couple of years to work
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as boosters. is itjust going to be booster, booster, booster? is this our new world? it’s booster, booster, booster? is this our new world?— our new world? it's hard to say if we will all _ our new world? it's hard to say if we will all need _ our new world? it's hard to say if we will all need boosters i we will all need boosters indefinitely and it depends on how much further the virus can evolve. as with the flu virus, it changes every year and we have to reformulate the vaccine and re— immunise people at risk. and that could happen with coronavirus, but whether it will require everybody to get boosters every year, i think thatis get boosters every year, i think that is unclear at this point in time. it that is unclear at this point in time. , ~ that is unclear at this point in time. , ,, ., i. :, time. it feels like a young - long ear, time. it feels like a young - long year. but — time. it feels like a young - long year. but has — time. it feels like a young - long year, but has it _ time. it feels like a young - long year, but has it in _ time. it feels like a young - long year, but has it in a _ time. it feels like a young - long year, but has it in a long i time. it feels like a young - long year, but has it in a long year i time. it feels like a young - long j year, but has it in a long year for year, but has it in a long yearfor you, has it flowed by markets kind both i look back and think two years went by. fin both i look back and think two years went b . :, ., ., :, went by. on the other hand, a lot has happened _ went by. on the other hand, a lot has happened and _ went by. on the other hand, a lot has happened and every i went by. on the other hand, a lot has happened and every week i went by. on the other hand, a lot i has happened and every week seems to bring a new challenge.— bring a new challenge. certainly does. bring a new challenge. certainly does- thank _ bring a new challenge. certainly does. thank you _ bring a new challenge. certainly does. thank you very _ bring a new challenge. certainly does. thank you very much i
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bring a new challenge. certainly i does. thank you very much indeed. when you think of the logic you feel it so much but it has absolutely flown. : ,:, it so much but it has absolutely flown. : :, ~' it so much but it has absolutely flown. ~ ., ,, ., :, ., flown. about a week ago we had never said omicron- — flown. about a week ago we had never said omicron. and _ flown. about a week ago we had never said omicron. and we _ flown. about a week ago we had never said omicron. and we still— flown. about a week ago we had never said omicron. and we still can't i flown. about a week ago we had never said omicron. and we still can't say i said omicron. and we still can't say it right. irate said omicron. and we still can't say it riuht. ~ ~' , said omicron. and we still can't say itriuht.~ ~' , , ~~ it right. we will keep trying. mike, aood it right. we will keep trying. mike, good morning- _ it right. we will keep trying. mike, good morning. football— it right. we will keep trying. mike, good morning. football theme i it right. we will keep trying. mike, l good morning. football theme going on. and you have some action over there. a load of action coming up. one city but contrasting emotions in liverpool. liverpool beat their neighbours, everton 4—1 to pile the pressure on rafa benitez in his first merseyside derby, against his former club. liverpool captain jordan henderson's early goal got the match off to the perfect start for the visitors. mo salah was on top form, and added to that soon after, with a superb finish,
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sending some home fans to the exits with less than 20 minutes gone. they will have missed demerai gray, who did give everton a little hope. but that was extinguished in the second half, thanks to a second from salah, and diogojota who rounded the rout off. i'm convinced in the second part of the league — i'm convinced in the second part of the league we will do well and but we have _ the league we will do well and but we have to start winning to keep the belief— we have to start winning to keep the belief but— we have to start winning to keep the belief but the way we're doing at the beginning, when we had the players — the beginning, when we had the players available and the team was playing _ players available and the team was playing and the team was creating and winning games is what i expect for the _ and winning games is what i expect for the second part of the leak. chelsea stay top of the premier league after a hard—earned win over watford, hakim ziyech with the winner at vicarage road. thomas tuchel�*s side have now won five straight away games in the league. manchester city remain a point behind chelsea in second — they beat aston villa 2—1 at villa park, bernardo silva with the pick of the goals for pep guardiola's side, condemning steven gerrard to his first defeat as villa manager. rangers went seven points clear at the top
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of the scottish premiership after a 1—0 win at hibernian, thanks to a late penalty by kemar roofe. there were also victories for aberdeen and dundee, while it finished goalless between st mirren and ross county. next we are going to reflect on the historic, record—breaking night for england's women on tuesday, as they thrashed latvia 20—nil — it's their highest ever competitive score and four players scored hattricks. but it was particularly, special night for man city's ellen white, who became the lionesses' record goal scorer with 48. let's take a look at a few of those she's bagged along the way. coming on, is ellen white, of arsenal who has come on to score in her last four appearances. this could be opening. _ her last four appearances. this could be opening. white! and. her last four appearances. this i could be opening. white! and there it is. into white, _ could be opening. white! and there it is. into white, and _ could be opening. white! and there it is. into white, and she _ could be opening. white! and there it is. into white, and she has- it is. into white, and she has scored again _ it is. into white, and she has scored again for— it is. into white, and she has
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scored again for england. i it is. into white, and she has| scored again for england. and it is. into white, and she has- scored again for england. and that is the equaliser _ scored again for england. and that is the equaliser for _ scored again for england. and that is the equaliser for england. i scored again for england. and that is the equaliser for england. she l is the equaliser for england. she only needs one chance.- is the equaliser for england. she only needs one chance. ellen white, composed. — only needs one chance. ellen white, composed. lovely — only needs one chance. ellen white, composed, lovely finish. _ only needs one chance. ellen white, composed, lovely finish. cool- only needs one chance. ellen white, composed, lovely finish. cool as i only needs one chance. ellen white, composed, lovely finish. cool as you like. ellenjoins us now from home in derbyshire. huge from home in derbyshire. congratulations on the i( and huge congratulations on the 100 caps and breaking the goal—scoring record for your country, superb. just wondering, that match against latvia and i heard the commentators say 17— zero twice. he had lost count. what was it like for the players? how did you keep sally?— was it like for the players? how did ou kee sall ? :, you keep sally? good morning. do you know what? — you keep sally? good morning. do you know what? it — you keep sally? good morning. do you know what? it was _ you keep sally? good morning. do you know what? it was an _ you keep sally? good morning. do you know what? it was an amazing i you keep sally? good morning. do you know what? it was an amazing win i you keep sally? good morning. do you know what? it was an amazing win for| know what? it was an amazing win for us and _ know what? it was an amazing win for us and we _ know what? it was an amazing win for us and we have players that scored
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their first _ us and we have players that scored their first goals for england, so i feel a _ their first goals for england, so i feel a lot — their first goals for england, so i feel a lot of pride for them and i am really— feel a lot of pride for them and i am really proud of them but we were 'ust am really proud of them but we were just really— am really proud of them but we were just really clinical and ruthless on the night — just really clinical and ruthless on the night and we really wanted the win and _ the night and we really wanted the win and score a lot of goals as well — win and score a lot of goals as well. ~ :, :, win and score a lot of goals as well. . :, ., , :, , ., well. what are the milestones mean for ou, well. what are the milestones mean for you, especially _ well. what are the milestones mean for you, especially your _ well. what are the milestones mean for you, especially your nation's i for you, especially your nation's top scorer and we saw you close your eyes and grab the badge. talk us through your emotions when he realised what you had achieved. i’m realised what you had achieved. i'm not afraid to admit i did cry because _ not afraid to admit i did cry because i_ not afraid to admit i did cry because i feel like it's been spoken about— because i feel like it's been spoken about a _ because i feel like it's been spoken about a lot — because i feel like it's been spoken about a lot and obsolete kelly smith has held _ about a lot and obsolete kelly smith has held the record for a long time and she _ has held the record for a long time and she is— has held the record for a long time and she is someone i really look up to, so— and she is someone i really look up to, so it _ and she is someone i really look up to, so it felt — and she is someone i really look up to, so it felt really emotional to finally— to, so it felt really emotional to finally surpass her and break the record _ finally surpass her and break the record and — finally surpass her and break the record and to be surrounded by my team—mates. it was really special to have my— team—mates. it was really special to have my family in the crowd, so i felt really — have my family in the crowd, so i felt really emotional but really proud — felt really emotional but really proud of— felt really emotional but really proud of the same time. absolutely and so ou proud of the same time. absolutely and so you should _ proud of the same time. absolutely and so you should be. _ proud of the same time. absolutely and so you should be. if _ proud of the same time. absolutely and so you should be. if you i proud of the same time. absolutely and so you should be. if you get i proud of the same time. absolutely and so you should be. if you get a l and so you should be. if you get a hat—trick in the game, but you get to keep the ball, but with so many players who got the match ball? or
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did you all get one? i players who got the match ball? or did you all get one?— did you all get one? i think the kit men were freaking _ did you all get one? i think the kit men were freaking out _ did you all get one? i think the kit men were freaking out that i did you all get one? i think the kit men were freaking out that they l did you all get one? i think the kit i men were freaking out that they had to give _ men were freaking out that they had to give up— men were freaking out that they had to give up four balls, but everybody .ot to give up four balls, but everybody got a _ to give up four balls, but everybody got a football and i was really proud — got a football and i was really proud to— got a football and i was really proud to be alongside three amazing talented _ proud to be alongside three amazing talented players who also got hat tricks _ talented players who also got hat tricks on — talented players who also got hat tricks on the night. so, just really proud, _ tricks on the night. so, just really proud, to— tricks on the night. so, just really proud, to be _ tricks on the night. so, just really proud, to be honest. you tricks on the night. so, 'ust really proud, to be honest.i tricks on the night. so, 'ust really proud, to be honest. you are meant to be ruthless _ proud, to be honest. you are meant to be ruthless but _ proud, to be honest. you are meant to be ruthless but you've _ proud, to be honest. you are meant to be ruthless but you've never i proud, to be honest. you are meant| to be ruthless but you've never seen anything like that, 20— zero and didn't get to the point it was embarrassing and you felt sorry for your opponents seeing their reaction? i your opponents seeing their reaction?— your opponents seeing their reaction? ~' :, , �* reaction? i think for us, we didn't choose the _ reaction? i think for us, we didn't choose the group _ reaction? i think for us, we didn't choose the group and _ reaction? i think for us, we didn't choose the group and we i reaction? i think for us, we didn't choose the group and we can i reaction? i think for us, we didn'tj choose the group and we can only play what — choose the group and we can only play what is in front of us. to score — play what is in front of us. to score 20 _ play what is in front of us. to score 20 goals, it doesn't look particularly great but we can only do what — particularly great but we can only do what is — particularly great but we can only do what is in front of us and we were _ do what is in front of us and we were professional and we respect latvia _ were professional and we respect latvia as — were professional and we respect latvia as a — were professional and we respect latvia as a team but like you say, we want — latvia as a team but like you say, we want to — latvia as a team but like you say, we want to keep improving game by game. _ we want to keep improving game by game, scoring goals, keeping the performance and standards are size possible _ performance and standards are size possible and that is what the
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manager wanted from us on the night. absolutely _ manager wanted from us on the night. absolutely. did they say anything to you afterwards? thea;r absolutely. did they say anything to you afterwards?— you afterwards? they didn't, to be fair. we you afterwards? they didn't, to be fair- we just _ you afterwards? they didn't, to be fair. we just got _ you afterwards? they didn't, to be fair. we just got around _ you afterwards? they didn't, to be fair. we just got around in i you afterwards? they didn't, to be fair. we just got around in terms l you afterwards? they didn't, to be| fair. we just got around in terms of ourgroup— fair. we just got around in terms of ourgroup and team fair. we just got around in terms of our group and team to be thankful and be _ our group and team to be thankful and be really proud of everyone in the team — and be really proud of everyone in the team and to end the year on a bil the team and to end the year on a big high— the team and to end the year on a big high for— the team and to end the year on a big high for us as well as england. you have — big high for us as well as england. you have certainly done that. is there any goal of the 48 that stands out for you. we have loved your celebrations with the spyglass eyes. anything that stands out?— celebrations with the spyglass eyes. anything that stands out? making my debut and scoring _ anything that stands out? making my debut and scoring on _ goal against japan in germany. every goal i _ goal against japan in germany. every goal i scored for england i'm really proud _ goal i scored for england i'm really proud of— goal i scored for england i'm really proud of and i have a lot of pride in playing — proud of and i have a lot of pride in playing for my country, so, yes, i'm in playing for my country, so, yes, im super— in playing for my country, so, yes, i'm super proud of the amount i've scored _ i'm super proud of the amount i've scored and — i'm super proud of the amount i've scored and hopefully there is more to come _ scored and hopefully there is more to come l — scored and hopefully there is more to come. ~ :, , ., :, to come. i know it is hard to 'udge in terms of — to come. i know it is hard to 'udge in terms of where i to come. i know it is hard to 'udge in terms of where you i to come. i know it is hard to 'udge in terms of where you are i to come. i know it is hard to 'udge in terms of where you are in i to come. i know it is hard to judge in terms of where you are in world \ in terms of where you are in world football given latvia respect, but is it the best you have been in and
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has the most potential to go on and win the world cup? we has the most potential to go on and win the world cup?— win the world cup? we have some amazinal win the world cup? we have some amazingly talented _ win the world cup? we have some amazingly talented players - win the world cup? we have some amazingly talented players in - win the world cup? we have some amazingly talented players in the i amazingly talented players in the team _ amazingly talented players in the team and we have a good balance of youth _ team and we have a good balance of youth coming through, those that have a _ youth coming through, those that have a number of caps and those more experienced, _ have a number of caps and those more experienced, so at the moment we are in a good _ experienced, so at the moment we are in a good place and i think february camp— in a good place and i think february camp will_ in a good place and i think february camp will be a test for us. we are playing _ camp will be a test for us. we are playing some supremely talented nations_ playing some supremely talented nations in spain and germany and canada _ nations in spain and germany and canada and — nations in spain and germany and canada and that will be a big test but we _ canada and that will be a big test but we just want to make england proud _ but we just want to make england proud on — but we just want to make england proud on the family proud and hopefully we are doing that and we are on— hopefully we are doing that and we are on the — hopefully we are doing that and we are on the right path, really. you are on the right path, really. you are certainly _ are on the right path, really. you are certainly an _ are on the right path, really. um, are certainly an inspiration to so many and we have a lady here with us, 12 —year—old imogen who has inspired thousands to help her doing keepy—uppies doing everyone for the 7.2 million key workers in the uk and i think you have a message for her. i and i think you have a message for her. . .
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and i think you have a message for her. , . ., her. i just want to say congratulations - her. i just want to say congratulations and i her. i just want to say congratulations and it} her. i just want to say l congratulations and it is her. i just want to say _ congratulations and it is phenomenal what you _ congratulations and it is phenomenal what you have done, the amount of money— what you have done, the amount of money you — what you have done, the amount of money you have made and for the amount— money you have made and for the amount of— money you have made and for the amount of awareness as well and i'm super— amount of awareness as well and i'm super proud — amount of awareness as well and i'm super proud of you and i'm sure your family— super proud of you and i'm sure your familyare— super proud of you and i'm sure your family are under big thank you congratulations, imogen. ellen, that is so lovely- — congratulations, imogen. ellen, that is so lovely. good _ congratulations, imogen. ellen, that is so lovely. good morning. - congratulations, imogen. ellen, that is so lovely. good morning. imogen, you can't have ellen, top england score and not ask her a question. what would you like to ask ellen? were you playing football at my age? what football where you are playing when you _ what football where you are playing when you were 12?— when you were 12? good morning, imoaen. i when you were 12? good morning, imogen- i was— when you were 12? good morning, imogen. i was playing _ when you were 12? good morning, imogen. i was playing for - when you were 12? good morning, imogen. i was playing for arsenal| when you were 12? good morning, i imogen. i was playing for arsenal at the centre _ imogen. i was playing for arsenal at the centre of— imogen. i was playing for arsenal at the centre of excellence, _ imogen. i was playing for arsenal at the centre of excellence, actually, l the centre of excellence, actually, so i the centre of excellence, actually, so i was _ the centre of excellence, actually, so i was very— the centre of excellence, actually, so i was very lucky— the centre of excellence, actually, so i was very lucky to _ the centre of excellence, actually, so i was very lucky to be _ the centre of excellence, actually, so i was very lucky to be playing . so i was very lucky to be playing for arsenal _ so i was very lucky to be playing for arsenal and _ so i was very lucky to be playing for arsenal and playing - so i was very lucky to be playing for arsenal and playing for- so i was very lucky to be playing for arsenal and playing for such| so i was very lucky to be playing. for arsenal and playing for such a bil for arsenal and playing for such a big club, — for arsenal and playing for such a big club, feeling _ for arsenal and playing for such a big club, feeling very— for arsenal and playing for such a big club, feeling very honoured . for arsenal and playing for such a l big club, feeling very honoured and for me. _ big club, feeling very honoured and for me. i_ big club, feeling very honoured and for me. iiust — big club, feeling very honoured and for me, ijust loved _ big club, feeling very honoured and for me, ijust loved playing - for me, ijust loved playing football— for me, ijust loved playing football and _ for me, ijust loved playing football and doing - for me, ijust loved playing football and doing it - for me, ijust loved playing football and doing it with l for me, ijust loved playing football and doing it with a| for me, ijust loved playing - football and doing it with a smile on nty— football and doing it with a smile on n1yface,_ football and doing it with a smile on my face, surrounded - football and doing it with a smile on my face, surrounded by- football and doing it with a smile on my face, surrounded by my. on my face, surrounded by my team-mates _ on my face, surrounded by my team—mates. it's— on my face, surrounded by my team—mates. it's amazing - on my face, surrounded by my. team—mates. it's amazing being on my face, surrounded by my- team—mates. it's amazing being part of a team _ team—mates. it's amazing being part of a team and — team—mates. it's amazing being part ofa team and i— team—mates. it's amazing being part of a team and i was— team—mates. it's amazing being part of a team and i was really— team—mates. it's amazing being part of a team and i was really lucky. - team—mates. it's amazing being part of a team and i was really lucky. so i of a team and i was really lucky. so what of a team and i was really lucky. fl: what is of a team and i was really lucky. what is the tip for imogen if she
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wants to follow in your footsteps? the one tip, at 12? just wants to follow in your footsteps? the one tip, at 12?— the one tip, at 12? just keep workin: the one tip, at 12? just keep working hard, _ the one tip, at 12? just keep working hard, practising - the one tip, at 12? just keep| working hard, practising your garden — working hard, practising your garden. you've _ working hard, practising your garden. you've been - working hard, practising your garden. you've been doing. working hard, practising your garden. you've been doing a| working hard, practising your. garden. you've been doing a lot working hard, practising your- garden. you've been doing a lot of keepy-uppies_ garden. you've been doing a lot of keepy-uppies i_ garden. you've been doing a lot of keepy—uppies i think. _ garden. you've been doing a lot of keepy—uppies i think. but- garden. you've been doing a lot of keepy—uppies i think. but practice| keepy—uppies i think. but practice on your— keepy—uppies i think. but practice on your right _ keepy—uppies i think. but practice on your right foot _ keepy—uppies i think. but practice on your right foot and _ keepy—uppies i think. but practice on your right foot and left - keepy—uppies i think. but practice on your right foot and left foot - keepy—uppies i think. but practice| on your right foot and left foot and keep working — on your right foot and left foot and keep working hard _ on your right foot and left foot and keep working hard and _ on your right foot and left foot and keep working hard and hopefully. keep working hard and hopefully great _ keep working hard and hopefully great things _ keep working hard and hopefully great things will— keep working hard and hopefully great things will happen. - keep working hard and hopefully great things will happen.- great things will happen. ellen, ureat great things will happen. ellen, treat to great things will happen. ellen, great to have — great things will happen. ellen, great to have you _ great things will happen. ellen, great to have you joining - great things will happen. ellen, great to have you joining us - great things will happen. ellen, | great to have you joining us this morning and somebody particularly delighted to be on the sofa with you. let's introduce you properly. why don't you tell people what you have done because i think it's brilliant. �* , ' brilliant. i've completed 7.1 million keepy-uppies - brilliant. i've completed 7.1| million keepy-uppies where brilliant. i've completed 7.1 i million keepy-uppies where i brilliant. i've completed 7.1- million keepy-uppies where i did a million keepy—uppies where i did a keepy-uppy million keepy—uppies where i did a keepy—uppy for every key work in the country— keepy—uppy for every key work in the country and _ keepy—uppy for every key work in the country and i— keepy—uppy for every key work in the country and i was inspired by captain— country and i was inspired by captain tom when he was walking round _ captain tom when he was walking round his— captain tom when he was walking round his garden and he was so amazing — round his garden and he was so amazing and i was so inspired by him _ amazing and i was so inspired by him. ~ ., ' ., amazing and i was so inspired by him. . ., ' ., ., amazing and i was so inspired by him. ~ ., ' ., ., . ., , him. wow, 7.1 million. you had lots of --eole him. wow, 7.1 million. you had lots of peeple helping _ him. wow, 7.1 million. you had lots of people helping you _ him. wow, 7.1 million. you had lots of people helping you to _ him. wow, 7.1 million. you had lots of people helping you to get - him. wow, 7.1 million. you had lots of people helping you to get to - him. wow, 7.1 million. you had lots of people helping you to get to the | of people helping you to get to the total but you must be exhausted. after finishing the challenge it was
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mixed _ after finishing the challenge it was mixed emotions, really. ifelt really— mixed emotions, really. ifelt really proud of myself. i really appreciate the support from loads of people _ appreciate the support from loads of people across the world. has it been fun? yes, people across the world. has it been fun? yes. it — people across the world. has it been fun? yes, it was _ people across the world. has it been fun? yes, it was really _ people across the world. has it been fun? yes, it was really fun. - people across the world. has it been fun? yes, it was really fun. sarah, i fun? yes, it was really fun. sarah, we must get _ fun? yes, it was really fun. sarah, we must get your— fun? yes, it was really fun. sarah, we must get your part _ fun? yes, it was really fun. sarah, we must get your part in _ fun? yes, it was really fun. sarah, we must get your part in this - we must get your part in this because the issue the original thought was to do a couple of hundred a day and he decided to do some maths and figure out if she did that for 90 years or something? it that for 90 years or something? it would have taken her 97 years if she carried _ would have taken her 97 years if she carried on— would have taken her 97 years if she carried on with _ would have taken her 97 years if she carried on with her— would have taken her 97 years if she carried on with her 200 _ would have taken her 97 years if she carried on with her 200 a _ would have taken her 97 years if she carried on with her 200 a day- would have taken her 97 years if she carried on with her 200 a day so - would have taken her 97 years if she carried on with her 200 a day so shej carried on with her 200 a day so she thought. _ carried on with her 200 a day so she thought. i_ carried on with her 200 a day so she thought. i need— carried on with her 200 a day so she thought, i need to _ carried on with her 200 a day so she thought, i need to up _ carried on with her 200 a day so she thought, i need to up that— carried on with her 200 a day so she thought, i need to up that a - carried on with her 200 a day so she thought, i need to up that a little i thought, i need to up that a little bit, thought, i need to up that a little bit. which — thought, i need to up that a little bit. which she _ thought, i need to up that a little bit, which she did _ thought, i need to up that a little bit, which she did but _ thought, i need to up that a little bit, which she did but also - thought, i need to up that a little bit, which she did but also she i bit, which she did but also she managed _ bit, which she did but also she managed to— bit, which she did but also she managed to rally _ bit, which she did but also she managed to rally around - bit, which she did but also she managed to rally around the l managed to rally around the footballing _ managed to rally around the footballing community, - managed to rally around the footballing community, so l managed to rally around the - footballing community, so thousands of people _ footballing community, so thousands of people around _ footballing community, so thousands of people around the _ footballing community, so thousands of people around the country- footballing community, so thousands of people around the country and - of people around the country and around _ of people around the country and around the — of people around the country and around the world _ of people around the country and around the world helped, - of people around the country and around the world helped, which i of people around the country and . around the world helped, which they did. did— around the world helped, which they did. , , ., around the world helped, which they did. , i. ~ ., around the world helped, which they did. , ~ ., , . did. did you know she had it in her? she is a bit — did. did you know she had it in her? she is a bit of— did. did you know she had it in her? she is a bit of a _ did. did you know she had it in her?
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she is a bit of a determined - did. did you know she had it in her? she is a bit of a determined little i she is a bit of a determined little .irl, she is a bit of a determined little girl, a _ she is a bit of a determined little girl, a tiigger_ she is a bit of a determined little girl. a trigger goal— she is a bit of a determined little girl, a bigger goal now, - she is a bit of a determined little girl, a bigger goal now, but - she is a bit of a determined little girl, a bigger goal now, but veryl girl, a bigger goal now, but very determined _ girl, a bigger goal now, but very determined and _ girl, a bigger goal now, but very determined and she _ girl, a bigger goal now, but very determined and she set - girl, a bigger goal now, but very determined and she set her- girl, a bigger goal now, but veryl determined and she set her mind girl, a bigger goal now, but very- determined and she set her mind to 7.1 determined and she set her mind to h million— determined and she set her mind to h million and — determined and she set her mind to 7.1 million and that _ determined and she set her mind to 7.1 million and that she _ determined and she set her mind to 7.1 million and that she was - determined and she set her mind to 7.1 million and that she was going . 7.1 million and that she was going to achieve — 7.1 million and that she was going to achieve that, _ 7.1 million and that she was going to achieve that, come _ 7.1 million and that she was going to achieve that, come rain- 7.1 million and that she was going to achieve that, come rain or- 7.1 million and that she was going l to achieve that, come rain or shine. 71 point _ to achieve that, come rain or shine. 71 point million _ to achieve that, come rain or shine. 71 point million keepy—uppies. - to achieve that, come rain or shine. 71 point million keepy—uppies. howl 71 point million keepy—uppies. how many broken windows? ihla 71 point million keepy-uppies. how many broken windows?— many broken windows? no broken windows but _ many broken windows? no broken windows but i _ many broken windows? no broken windows but i think _ many broken windows? no broken windows but i think a _ many broken windows? no broken windows but i think a phone - many broken windows? no broken windows but i think a phone broke i many broken windows? no broken i windows but i think a phone broke at one point _ windows but i think a phone broke at one point. because _ windows but i think a phone broke at one point. because she _ windows but i think a phone broke at one point. because she was - windows but i think a phone broke at| one point. because she was watching herself— one point. because she was watching herself and _ one point. because she was watching herself and filming _ one point. because she was watching herself and filming herself— one point. because she was watching herself and filming herself doing - one point. because she was watching herself and filming herself doing it i herself and filming herself doing it on her— herself and filming herself doing it on her twitter. _ herself and filming herself doing it on her twitter. you _ herself and filming herself doing it on her twitter.— herself and filming herself doing it on her twitter. you have had loads of celebrities _ on her twitter. you have had loads of celebrities and _ on her twitter. you have had loads of celebrities and footballers, - of celebrities and footballers, people like ellen supporting you, but to capital, the letter arrives from fifa and you are nominated for the best fan award. what a moment. i the best fan award. what a moment. i was so shocked because ijust came home _ was so shocked because ijust came home from — was so shocked because ijust came home from school and i was upstairs in my— home from school and i was upstairs in my bedroom and my mum shouted for me to _ in my bedroom and my mum shouted for me to come _ in my bedroom and my mum shouted for me to come downstairs and said lmogen. — me to come downstairs and said imogen, come downstairs and i thought. — imogen, come downstairs and i thought, what have i done? i was really— thought, what have i done? i was really scared. and she hands me the phone _
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really scared. and she hands me the phone and _ really scared. and she hands me the phone and says you are on here and i was really— phone and says you are on here and i was really amazed because i was on the and _ was really amazed because i was on the and l'm — was really amazed because i was on the and i'm against the denmark and german— the and i'm against the denmark and german fans and finland fans and then there — german fans and finland fans and then there is me and i was like, oh, my goodness— then there is me and i was like, oh, my goodness and i was so happy. it�*s my goodness and i was so happy. [ills comin- my goodness and i was so happy. coming home. my goodness and i was so happy. it�*s coming home. you are going to win it. h coming home. you are going to win it. ~' coming home. you are going to win it. ~ .. �* coming home. you are going to win it. ~ �* . coming home. you are going to win it. i think we can't have you here, can ou it. i think we can't have you here, can you hear _ it. i think we can't have you here, can you hear to — it. i think we can't have you here, can you bear to do _ it. i think we can't have you here, can you bear to do any _ it. i think we can't have you here, can you bear to do any more - can you bear to do any more keepy—uppies? can you bear to do any more keepy-uppies?_ can you bear to do any more keepy—uppies? flan. show us what you keepy-uppies? can. show us what you have been keepy—uppies? can. show us what you have been up to and tell us what you have been up to and tell us what you have been up to and tell us what you have been nominated. take your place beside our stage and thank you so much. . .. . , ., . much. there are the cameras or all rirht? much. there are the cameras or all right? feel— much. there are the cameras or all right? feel free _ much. there are the cameras or all right? feel free to _ much. there are the cameras or all right? feel free to kick _ much. there are the cameras or all right? feel free to kick it _ much. there are the cameras or all right? feel free to kick it around. i good catch. we are not
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. 0ur headlines today. a deal for an extra 114 million doses of covid vaccines — they'll be available for future booster programmes and could combat new variants. an emotional alec baldwin outlines the events that led to the death of cinematographer, halyna hutchins, on a movie set. the trigger wasn't pulled. i didn't pull the trigger. so you never pulled the trigger? no, no, no. i would never point a gun at anyone and pull a trigger at them, never. counting the cost of soaring energy bills — another hike next year could mean our gas bills double. there's a warning millions will struggle to afford to heat their homes. liverpool make the neighbours suffer in the merseyside derby to keep pace with manchester city and chelsea at the top of the premier league, and turn up the pressure on everton
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boss, rafa benitez. good morning. it isa it is a cold start. after wintry showers overnight, some icy stretches first thing. many of us will see some wintry sunshine. details coming up. good morning. it's thursday, the 2nd of december. the government has ordered an extra 114 million doses of covid vaccine, to be used for potential booster programmes over the next two years. the health secretary, sajid javid, said the deals future proof the uk's vaccination programme. simonjones reports. relax your arm, slight scratch. all done. the government has promised to offer a boosterjab to all eligible adults in england by the end ofjanuary. but it's also looking further ahead, to a time when boosters may be needed again and again, so it's secured an additional 60 million doses of the moderna vaccine, and 5a million doses
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of the pfizer jab. they will be the latest vaccines that they will have, because as we're seeing right now, there's a new variant, there's potentially new variants in the future. we know that covid is going to be around for a while. we have to learn to live with it, and one of the ways to learn to live with it is to make sure we've got the vaccines that we need, and that they're future proof. it's exactly a year since this happened. we have some breaking news for you this morning, because in the last few minutes we've heard that the first coronavirus vaccine has been approved for use in the uk. that was the pfizer vaccine. 12 months on, more than 150 million first, second and boosterjabs of the different vaccines, have been administered across the uk. at present, children aged between 12 and 15 are offered a vaccine. the boss of pfizer, in an interview with the bbc, says five to ii—year—olds should getjabbed too. i think that covid in schools is thriving.
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i believe that this is disturbing significantly the education system. and there are kids that will have severe symptoms. so, there is no doubt in my mind that the benefits completely, completely are in favour of doing it. while the vaccines continue to roll off the production line, pfizer has already started work on an updated omicron version of its jab, should it be needed. the world health organization says early signs suggest that most cases of the new variant are mild. scientists say they still need a few more days to determine its potential threat. simon jones, bbc news. lots of people thinking about christmas plans, christmas parties. should they go ahead? the focus in downing street is about whether christmas parties were held legally and properly last year. the uk was in lockdown. the and properly last year. the uk was in lockdown— and properly last year. the uk was in lockdown. ~ , . , in lockdown. the prime minister has insisted no covid _
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in lockdown. the prime minister has insisted no covid rules _ in lockdown. the prime minister has insisted no covid rules were - in lockdown. the prime minister has insisted no covid rules were broken. let's talk to adam fleming. so, what is a party? i am so surprised i am one of these people who us to ask. good question. it is a question the mirror— good question. it is a question the mirror newspaper is now asking for the second — mirror newspaper is now asking for the second day in a row after they first reported claims of boozy bashers — first reported claims of boozy bashers in downing street in number 10, in— bashers in downing street in number 10, in novemberand december last year _ 10, in novemberand december last year at— 10, in novemberand december last year. at various points either england _ year. at various points either england or london were in severe covid _ england or london were in severe covid restrictions. downing street have said — covid restrictions. downing street have said that anything that happened in the building was within the rules— happened in the building was within the rules in that place at that time — the rules in that place at that time but— the rules in that place at that time. but this morning, sources are not repeating the words they use to me yesterday morning, when they said explicitly— me yesterday morning, when they said explicitly there were no parties. the bbc— explicitly there were no parties. the bbc has spoken to somebody who was in _ the bbc has spoken to somebody who was in downing street in december, who said _ was in downing street in december, who said they are was at least one point _ who said they are was at least one point where there was a booze, there was food _ point where there was a booze, there was food and they were party games. 0k, was food and they were party games. 0k. but— was food and they were party games. 0k. but it _ was food and they were party games.
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ok, but it wasn't a party. so, when are we allowed to snog? did you ever think is political correspond and i would be asking you that question? i would be asking you that question? i mean, it does cross my mind every now and _ mean, it does cross my mind every now and again. it is mean, it does cross my mind every now and again-— now and again. it is a general question. _ now and again. it is a general question. just _ now and again. it is a general question, just to _ now and again. it is a general question, just to be - now and again. it is a general question, just to be clear. - now and again. it is a general. question, just to be clear. this now and again. it is a general- question, just to be clear. this is question, 'ust to be clear. this is because question, just to be clear. this is because therese _ question, just to be clear. this is because therese coffey, - question, just to be clear. this is because therese coffey, the - question, just to be clear. this is| because therese coffey, the work question, just to be clear. this is - because therese coffey, the work and pensions _ because therese coffey, the work and pensions secretary, was on itv last night _ pensions secretary, was on itv last night heing — pensions secretary, was on itv last night being interviewed by robert peston _ night being interviewed by robert peston. they were discussing the new rules for— peston. they were discussing the new rules for going to christmas parties _ rules for going to christmas parties. this is what therese coffey said about — parties. this is what therese coffey said about the mistletoe. i said about the mistletoe. i don't _ said about the mistletoe. i don't think there should be much snogging underneath the mistletoe. you don't need to do things like that. but i think we should all try to enjoy the christmas ahead of us and that is why we are working so hard to get the deployment of as many vaccines as possible. now, the government guidelines, all they say. _ now, the government guidelines, all they say, and what ministers have been _ they say, and what ministers have been sang — they say, and what ministers have been sang officially until now, is you should not cancel your plans. if you should not cancel your plans. if you go _ you should not cancel your plans. if you go to _ you should not cancel your plans. if you go to a — you should not cancel your plans. if you go to a christmas party, think about— you go to a christmas party, think about a _ you go to a christmas party, think about a lateral flow test before you io about a lateral flow test before you go and _ about a lateral flow test before you go and make sure the room is well
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ventilated — go and make sure the room is well ventilated when you are there. there is no guidance on what you should be doing _ is no guidance on what you should be doing under— is no guidance on what you should be doing under the mistletoe. now you can see _ doing under the mistletoe. now you can see ministers straying into that tricky— can see ministers straying into that tricky territory of them kind of telling — tricky territory of them kind of telling people what to do about guite _ telling people what to do about quite sort of intimate aspects of their— quite sort of intimate aspects of their lives, which is something the governmentjust does not really want to do _ governmentjust does not really want to do at— governmentjust does not really want to do. at the same time, the government does not want to spook people _ government does not want to spook people so— government does not want to spook people so much about this new variant— people so much about this new variant that they start cancelling all their — variant that they start cancelling all their christmas parties and christmas drinks and work lunches, because _ christmas drinks and work lunches, because that can have a serious effect _ because that can have a serious effect on — because that can have a serious effect on the economy, because it is a bl- effect on the economy, because it is a big time _ effect on the economy, because it is a big time for the hospitality industry _ a big time for the hospitality industry. there are early signs that is what _ industry. there are early signs that is what is _ industry. there are early signs that is what is starting to happen. there — is what is starting to happen. there have been since. —— science. when you turned up to work this morning and you saw that snogging would be used, intimate or contact was another phrase you thought would be appropriate, yeah? .ng was another phrase you thought would be appropriate, yeah?— be appropriate, yeah? as 'ournalist ou never be appropriate, yeah? as 'ournalist you neverwantfi be appropriate, yeah? as 'ournalist you never want to h be appropriate, yeah? as 'ournalist you never want to say _ be appropriate, yeah? as 'ournalist you never want to say the]- be appropriate, yeah? as journalist you never want to say the same - be appropriate, yeah? as journalist i you never want to say the same word over and _ you never want to say the same word overand over— you never want to say the same word overand overagain you never want to say the same word over and over again because it gets repetitive — over and over again because it gets repetitive. when i was on five live we did _ repetitive. when i was on five live we did a _
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repetitive. when i was on five live we did a snogging, passing, smooching and then i added in an intimate — smooching and then i added in an intimate oral contact, which i think was the _ intimate oral contact, which i think was the worst out of all the words. we all— was the worst out of all the words. we all agree, actually. i would stick to snogging, adam. enjoy! stick to snogging, adam. en'o ! . v stick to snogging, adam. en'o ! ., �*, ., , stick to snogging, adam. en'o! , enjoy! that's a little bit safer. it's like being _ enjoy! that's a little bit safer. it's like being at _ enjoy! that's a little bit safer. it's like being at a _ enjoy! that's a little bit safer. it's like being at a school- enjoy! that's a little bit safer. | it's like being at a school disco this morning.— it's like being at a school disco this morning. it's important. we are regressing back to school. it it's important. we are regressing back to school.— back to school. it does feel a bit like that. eight _ back to school. it does feel a bit like that. eight minutes - back to school. it does feel a bit like that. eight minutes past - back to school. it does feel a bit i like that. eight minutes past eight. an update from hollywood this morning. the actor alec baldwin says he didn't pull the trigger of the gun that fatally wounded cinematographer halyna hutchins on the set of his film, rust. the star made the claim to the american network abc news, which will tonight air his first sit—down interview since the incident in october. our north america correspondent david willis reports. it's six weeks since halyna hutchins was fatally shot on the set of alec baldwin's western movie rust.
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we've had two people accidentally shot on a movie set by a prop gun. but as the weeks have gone by, the circumstances surrounding the cinematographer�*s death have become increasingly complicated. a statement released by local detectives only hours after the shooting, referred to a firearm discharged by alec baldwin. but now the actor himself is giving his version of events. the trigger wasn't pulled, i didn't pull the trigger. so you never pulled the trigger? no, no, no. i would never point a gun at anyone and pull the trigger at them, never. what did you think happened? how did a real bullet get on that set? i have no idea. someone put a live bullet in a gun, a bullet that wasn't even supposed to be on the property. police retrieved hundreds of rounds of ammunition from the film set, including, it is thought, other live rounds. they've been investigating reports of dissatisfaction on the part of crew members, who staged a walk—out the day before the fatal shooting. and claims by the woman
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in charge of firearm safety, hannah gutierrez—reed, whose lawyers have said the gun could have been sabotaged. six weeks on from the tragedy in this remote part of northern new mexico, and the investigation appears to be growing more complex by the day. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. a 19—year—old man has been arrested over the death of a teenage girl in hamilton, south lanarkshire. amber gibson, who was 16, was reported missing from her home in the hillhouse area on friday. her body was discovered in a nature reserve on sunday. police scotland say enquiries are still ongoing. everton and liverpool fans united for a minute's applause at the merseyside derby last night, in memory of ava white, the 12 year—old girl who was killed last week. fans also held a banner raising awareness about knife crime. ava was stabbed in liverpool city centre last thursday. a ilt—year—old boy has been
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charged with murder. ten minutes past eight is the time. i told you we would get an update on the weather. are you going to take us through the next couple of days? we have had a couple of pictures like that at this morning. yes, good morning. the weather is still causing us a little bit of disruption at the moment. it is cold, another wintry start. we have got notjust a widespread frost, but also some lying snow, even down to low lying levels. that is because we have had wintry showers pushing south overnight. today, after a cold and icy start, quite a lot of dry weather on the cards. sunshine around. the bulk of the uk should see some wintry sunshine. this is where the showers up and falling in recent hours. snow in the north of scotland, heavy snow showers reasoning and, some flurries of snow and some rain in the west towards southern parts of england and wales.
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in the next few hours, most of those showers should clear from the south. we are left with icy stretches. it is also going to be windy along the east coast. the brisk winds will tend to ease later. we will keep the showers in the east. a wintry flavour. some showers in western wales. the cloud will increase from the west later as the milder air moves in. we could see eight degrees in plymouth but only two to three in the east. this afternoon we will see the east. this afternoon we will see the rain moving into the west of scotland, and it will be preceded by some snow. at least for a time before it turns back to rain. wed in northern ireland. much of england and wales ending the day on a drying out. as we head through tonight, the rain in the west moves east. as it bombs into the cold air there could be some snow. by the time we get to tomorrow morning it won't be as cold out there as it was this morning. a milder day tomorrow but things once again a set to turn pretty chilly through the course of the weekend.
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sarah, thank you. pressures in the social care system are leaving thousands of disabled people struggling to recruit personal assistants, who help them live independently. pas can help out with day—to—day tasks, but with more than 100,000 vacancies in the sector, many people with disabilities are finding it difficult to get the support they need. our disability affairs correspondent nikki fox reports. hello, guys! hello. sam and alex study media at college and are both working towards a career in tv. we have like, a double act. we bounce off each other. ..and finish each other�*s... ..sentences. the ig—year—old twins have spinal muscular atrophy. and for them to be as independent as everyone else, they need a team of personal assistants, or pas. we've only got one at the minute. we've had a struggle with getting carers. so, i think we're still putting out advertisements for getting someone.
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i mean, if you just put our faces on the advertisement... yeah. that would help, yeah. "hello, look at us!" "aren't we gorgeous?! want to get us dressed every morning? ring here." the twins' mum sarah has a budget from the council, and uses it to directly employ pas to support her boys for 50 hours a week. but at the moment she can only find someone who does 15 hours, leaving her to do the rest. being on my own with them the majority of the time, it is difficult, it is hard work. i am literally running out of ideas of where to get some help. what has the response been like from all your efforts? it's been very, very limited. and the family aren't alone. with100,000 vacancies in the care sector, disabled people are finding it almost impossible to recruit. a shortage of workers from abroad, the pandemic and vaccine hesitancy have all played a part. i've heard some really bad stories.
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people terrified that they're going to lose theirjobs. i've even heard people contemplating suicide, because they can't face the thought of going back to literallyjust existing. katie runs a recruitment website to help find pas. she believes the wages disabled people are able to offer, a figure often set by the local authority, is also a problem. everyone that gets a care budget has no control over how much they get to pay a pa. and in particular i've noticed a massive rise in wage requests from british nationals. it needs to be looked at, increasing people's care funding, so that they can employ the pa and the support that they need. the government says it is the local authority's responsibility to play a key role in supporting disabled people recruit and retain staff in their area. and it's investing an additional £5.1t billion into social care.
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we always wanted to be in tv. as a comedy duo. for sam and alex, they want their future career success to be determined on whether they're good enough to make it, not on whether they have someone to help them get up and ready for work in the morning. nikki fox, bbc news. joining us now is fazilet hadi, who's head of policy at the charity disability rights uk. fazilet, thank you for your time. talk to me about why there is a shortage of these personal assistants?— shortage of these personal assistants? . ,, , ., . ~ assistants? thank you, nag. i think that the story _ assistants? thank you, nag. i think that the story we _ assistants? thank you, nag. i think that the story we have _ assistants? thank you, nag. i think that the story we have just - assistants? thank you, nag. i think that the story we have just heard . that the story we have just heard actually — that the story we have just heard actually covers the points very eloquently. so, the pay for care workers — eloquently. so, the pay for care workers is — eloquently. so, the pay for care workers is far too low and we see an exodus— workers is far too low and we see an exodus towards retail, hospitality, distribution. a lot of people get
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paid more than a care worker, despite — paid more than a care worker, despite the skills they need to do the job _ despite the skills they need to do the job. as again in the broadcast it was— the job. as again in the broadcast it was mentioned, the pool of care workers _ it was mentioned, the pool of care workers has — it was mentioned, the pool of care workers has been curtailed because of brexit _ workers has been curtailed because of brexit. there are people who were from the _ of brexit. there are people who were from the eu — of brexit. there are people who were from the eu who are no longer with us. from the eu who are no longer with us so— from the eu who are no longer with us so these — from the eu who are no longer with us. so these problems are leading to a huge _ us. so these problems are leading to a huge shortage of care workers. your— a huge shortage of care workers. your package showed that where disabled — your package showed that where disabled people and their families employ care workers, personal assistants, they sometimes get a very little — assistants, they sometimes get a very little support. i know the government says, go to the local authority. — government says, go to the local authority, but local authorities are quite _ authority, but local authorities are quite patchy and what they provide to those _ quite patchy and what they provide to those people as we found during the pandemic. we to those people as we found during the pandemic-— to those people as we found during the pandemic. we saw in the report ofthe the pandemic. we saw in the report of the impact _ the pandemic. we saw in the report of the impact this _ the pandemic. we saw in the report of the impact this has _ the pandemic. we saw in the report of the impact this has had - the pandemic. we saw in the report of the impact this has had on - the pandemic. we saw in the report of the impact this has had on some | of the impact this has had on some people. notjust in terms of getting on with day—to—day life, but also
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psychologically, if there is that stress that you don't have someone who is there to assist you being the best you can possibly be? absolutely. again, through the pandemic we saw that the nhs and social— pandemic we saw that the nhs and social care — pandemic we saw that the nhs and social care were very different but both are _ social care were very different but both are needed. and social care is there _ both are needed. and social care is there to _ both are needed. and social care is there to enable disabled people, as you say. _ there to enable disabled people, as you say, to — there to enable disabled people, as you say, to live are best lives, to help _ you say, to live are best lives, to help us _ you say, to live are best lives, to help us with _ you say, to live are best lives, to help us with those practical tasks. shopping. — help us with those practical tasks. shopping, eating, bathing, prodding on are— shopping, eating, bathing, prodding on are clothes. but more than that, because _ on are clothes. but more than that, because we — on are clothes. but more than that, because we want to live a lie. whether— because we want to live a lie. whether you are working aged disabled people, oran older whether you are working aged disabled people, or an older person with disabilities, you do need support— with disabilities, you do need support to live a lie. you might need _ support to live a lie. you might need support to get out and about, to be _ need support to get out and about, to be part — need support to get out and about, to be part of the community. and with this — to be part of the community. and with this shortage in care staff, we are finding — with this shortage in care staff, we are finding that things are cut back
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to existing, not thriving. the government _ to existing, not thriving. the government has _ to existing, not thriving. tue: government has published to existing, not thriving. tt;e: government has published its to existing, not thriving. tt9: government has published its white paper on social care, that came yesterday. £5.1t billion extra is going to be put in social care over the three years. no one ever says, whatever amount of money, is enough. but what do you need to see specifically done with this money? i should it be targeted and where should it be targeted and where should it be directed to make a difference?— should it be directed to make a difference? well, it's a little bit disingenuous _ difference? well, it's a little bit disingenuous to _ difference? well, it's a little bit disingenuous to talk _ difference? well, it's a little bit disingenuous to talk about - difference? well, it's a little bit disingenuous to talk about the l disingenuous to talk about the government giving 5.4 billion to social— government giving 5.4 billion to social care, because a huge percentage of that, i think it is something like 3.67 billion, will go 'ust something like 3.67 billion, will go just on— something like 3.67 billion, will go just on capping care costs. that won't _ just on capping care costs. that won't improve social care. so then we are _ won't improve social care. so then we are left— won't improve social care. so then we are left with about 1.7 billion spread — we are left with about 1.7 billion spread across three years, which the government— spread across three years, which the government have, you know, they have come _ government have, you know, they have come out _ government have, you know, they have come out yesterday with some very small—scale improvements to housing,
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supported _ small—scale improvements to housing, supported housing in the community, repairs. _ supported housing in the community, repairs, adaptations, some digital stuff and — repairs, adaptations, some digital stuff and some provisions about professional qualifications for care workers _ professional qualifications for care workers. and some very limited money for innovation. but that does not tackle _ for innovation. but that does not tackle the — for innovation. but that does not tackle the £7 billion extra a year that is— tackle the £7 billion extra a year that is needed for social care. it doesn't — that is needed for social care. it doesn't fix — that is needed for social care. it doesn't fix the heart of the problem at all _ doesn't fix the heart of the problem at all. :. doesn't fix the heart of the problem at all. . . ~ doesn't fix the heart of the problem at all. . . ,, , ., , at all. fazilet, thank you very much. at all. fazilet, thank you very much- just — at all. fazilet, thank you very much. just to _ at all. fazilet, thank you very much. just to clarify, - at all. fazilet, thank you very much. just to clarify, 3.6 - at all. fazilet, thank you very i much. just to clarify, 3.6 billion will be put towards that means test for the lifetime cap on care fees. and the government said that plans will include £1.7 billion earmarked for improving services. it's 20 minutes past eight. everything seems more expensive at the moment, but there are warnings we could be about to pay even more to heat our homes in the new year.
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ben's looking at this issue for us. yes, and a warning it could get worse before it gets better. good morning. there's a warning our gas bills could soon be double what we were paying last winter. energy prices have been increasing for months now. last year, a typical annual dual fuel bill was just over £1,000. but the recent increase in the price cap — that's the upper limit that providers can charge you for gas and electricity — mean that same annual bill is now around £1,200 a year. 15 million people saw their bill rise as a result. it is a record increase. it probably won't end there. ofgem is expected to raise there. ofgem is expected to raise the price cap again early next year. we don't know what that could mean for a bills. at the charity, national energy action, that is forecasting a £550 increase to the dual fuel cap forecasting a £550 increase to the dualfuel cap in forecasting a £550 increase to the dual fuel cap in april. forecasting a £550 increase to the dualfuel cap in april. that forecasting a £550 increase to the dual fuel cap in april. that would mean that gas prices will have
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doubled injust 18 months. we spoke to catherine from west yorkshire, who says she now has to decide whether she can afford to turn her heating on, or find other ways to keep warm. i very rarely put the heating on, to be honest. i've got blankets. i use my hairdryer. basically i wrap myself in a blanket and use my hairdryer to warm me up. i'm very, very funny about putting the heating on because even when it's on, my anxiety levels are so high and i'm constantly like timing it. when can i turn it off? how quickly will it last? everything like that. it's a nightmare. just a nightmare. a lot of you getting in touch about that this morning. what is behind that massive rise in prices? well, wholesale energy prices, what suppliers pay for gas and electricity they sell to us, that has reached an all—time high. the wholesale gas price has gone up by 250% since january.
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energy providers have inevitably been passing that cost on to us as customers. usually at this point, we have said before, we would normally recommend you shop around to find a cheaper deal on price comparison sites. but the problem is right now, there are very few of those deals available. and that is in part down to the fact that many smaller energy firms, the ones that were competing with cheaper prices, they have already gone bust. 20 firms have gone out of business so far this year. the latest was zog, which collapsed yesterday. the only real tip for people now is to keep your house well insulated and do what you can to use less energy. maybe turn off the lights, spend less time in the shower, shorter and colder washing machine cycles. we have been asking you for your thoughts. first, let's listen to one energy expert. quite often the smaller suppliers in the market were actually trying to grow market share by offering prices
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that were below the price cap. now, unfortunately in a market where the whole —— wholesale prices so high, those prices were unsustainable for many of them and those suppliers could not afford to continue and went bust. could not afford to continue and went bust-— could not afford to continue and went bust. . , . :, , :, , went bust. that is a real problem for energy _ went bust. that is a real problem for energy firms _ went bust. that is a real problem for energy firms now _ went bust. that is a real problem for energy firms now that - went bust. that is a real problem for energy firms now that were i for energy firms now that were competing and taking on some of the big providers. they have found prices have risen too much. they are not able to pass that onto us immediately because of that price cap. it means they have gone under. a lot of customers automatically transferred to new providers. if you are being transferred, you will find your bill probably goes if you are on a fixed rate deal, that is not honoured by the new company. a lot of people get in touch. one person has said they really put the heating on, occasionally for 20 minutes, then take it straight off. i might wear tights under myjeans, keep my coat on in the house, and i wear a hot water bottle. occasionally i will
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have a bath but i worry about the cost of heating the water. john has got a different view. he says, look at what some people are paying for their phone or tv package. put things in the right order, concentrate on what is important. he is happy to sit indoors with a coat on. he grew up when no one had central heating. carol from cumbria said when her supply went bust she was transferred to a new one but bills have gone up so much, she says, she is 62, lives alone, works full—time, is out of the house between seven and five monday to friday, but he cannot understand how they can justify this rise. many customers right now really feeling the effects of that. the warning that it the effects of that. the warning thatitis the effects of that. the warning that it is going to get worse before it gets better with that £550 forecast to happen in april of next year. that is the increase in the price cap. so many things going up in price right now. not least energy bills. it might make things in the new year look a bit more expensive. the real problem is that it pushes up the real problem is that it pushes up inflation across the board. we will keep an eye on that.
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something that is going to warm your cockles. when you haven't got the heating. cockles. when you haven't got the heatinr. . . cockles. when you haven't got the heatinr. , , :, :, , heating. this is going to give us so much natural _ heating. this is going to give us so much natural warmth. _ heating. this is going to give us so much naturalwarmth. look. - heating. this is going to give us so much naturalwarmth. look. this i heating. this is going to give us so| much naturalwarmth. look. this is much natural warmth. look. this is wandsworth, a primary school in wandsworth, a primary school in wandsworth in south london. they are practising for their nativity. let's listening. you said you were humpty dumpty. there is a zebra. is it a cow? all sorts of furry onesies. i am loving this. . . , sorts of furry onesies. i am loving this. ,, . , , :, , :, this. shall we 'ust stay on this for the next this. shall we just stay on this for the next three _ this. shall we just stay on this for the next three weeks? _ this. shall we just stay on this for the next three weeks? it - this. shall we just stay on this for the next three weeks? it might i this. shall we just stay on this for| the next three weeks? it might be this. shall we just stay on this for i the next three weeks? it might be a bit much. fiona _ the next three weeks? it might be a bit much. fiona landon _ the next three weeks? it might be a bit much. fiona landon reporting i the next three weeks? it might be a bit much. fiona landon reporting in| bit much. fiona landon reporting in a few minutes. _ schools are having to deal with this new variant of covid and what that means for potential christmas shows. we will hear from that particular
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school. , :, , , we will hear from that particular school. , :, , :, :, we will hear from that particular school. , :, :, :, :, school. the show stays on for now. then, school. the show stays on for now. then. what — school. the show stays on for now. then, what were _ school. the show stays on for now. then, what were you _ school. the show stays on for now. then, what were you in _ school. the show stays on for now. then, what were you in the - school. the show stays on for now. i then, what were you in the nativity? i was a shepherd. brute then, what were you in the nativity? i was a shepherd.— i was a shepherd. we have a shepherd. — i was a shepherd. we have a shepherd, humpty - i was a shepherd. we have a shepherd, humpty dumpty, | i was a shepherd. we have a . shepherd, humpty dumpty, the i was a shepherd. we have a - shepherd, humpty dumpty, the of a donkey. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello and welcome to bbc london. i'm victoria hollins. anii an 11 —year—old boy from afghanistan who has been in britain for less than a month and has gone missing from south london. mohammed khan was last seen in deptford around four o'clock on tuesday. officers say they are growing increasingly concerned for the boy who does not know his way around and doesn't speak much english. cannabis plants worth an estimated £1,000,000 have been found in a warehouse in east london. police found 1,000 plants in cultivation equipment at the site in ferry lane in raynham on tuesday. officers
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believe such a seizure will have a large impact on drug supplies instruction — in london. heathrow has reopened terminal 4 as a dedicated facility for processing arrivals from red list countries. the measure will keep passengers arriving from destinations on the high risk list, away from other travellers. the red list has been resurrected, with ten countries in southern africa, due to concerns about the omicron coronavirus. getting a job is not always easy especially for recent graduates going through virtual applications. but one young londoner tried a different approach to attract employers' attention. he created a pop—up stand at canary wharf, which helped landing his dream job. the 24—year—old from redbridge said he felt bogged down by the normal recruitment process. a degree used to be the pinnacle of success, but now it's more the minimum requirement. there are so many barriers to get to speak to someone. i found that recruiters got annoyed with me because i kept calling every other day just to see if anything was available. if you are heading out on public transport, this is how tfl
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services are looking. a good service on most lines. just a minor delay on the district, metropolitan and waterloo and city. let's see what the weather has in store. good morning. another cold start this morning, with a little bit of frost out there as temperatures are around the zero mark and high pressure is building from the south—west. we have a few showers which could turn a little bit wintry as it runs in to this colder air, and we've already had a feature this morning and a bit of wintriness further south. that is clearing away, but showers in the east could penetrate further inland and some sunny spells, but it is going to feel cold with a north—westerly breeze, and temperatures between three and five degrees. factoring in the wind, it will feel colder. overnight tonight, clear to start with, and that is where we will get the minimum temperature around —1, but milder air is on its way back,
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bringing some rain into friday. and the temperature by the end of the night rises to around two or 3 c. we have some spells of rain tomorrow, much milderair coming in, so we are looking at temperatures in double figures. but this low—pressure system through the weekend again drags in some cold air, so the temperature is going to drop and it will stay largely unsettled and quite blustery, and the wind is feeling chilly and temperatures back down in single figures. i'll be back in around half an hour. see you then. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. morning live is on bbc one after breakfast. let's find out what gethin and kimberley have in store. very christmassy there, and i did notice that your decorations were up and i notice you were jealous
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yesterday. t and i notice you were 'ealous yesterdayfi and i notice you were 'ealous esterda . . :, . :, , yesterday. i am even more 'ealous toda . yesterday. i am even more 'ealous today. we — yesterday. i am even more 'ealous today. we have i yesterday. i am even more 'ealous today. we have nativity _ yesterday. i am even more jealous today. we have nativity plays - yesterday. i am even more jealous today. we have nativity plays and. today. we have nativity plays and sinrain , today. we have nativity plays and singing. can _ today. we have nativity plays and singing. can you _ today. we have nativity plays and singing, can you raise _ today. we have nativity plays and singing, can you raise us - today. we have nativity plays and singing, can you raise us that? ii singing, can you raise us that? i think we are happy with the trees. i thought— think we are happy with the trees. i thoughtjohn was going think we are happy with the trees. i thought john was going to have a word _ coming up on morning live: the festive season has begun but with the stress of organising the big day and eating and drinking more than usual, this time of year can be tough on our hearts. dr xand explains how to protect yours from potential attacks this christmas and why sleep is the key to keeping it in top condition all year round. plus — 60% of accidents in the home happen in the kitchen, 1 and surprisingly, blunt knives are one the most. common causes of injuries. our chef anna haugh shows us how to safely sharpen - them and how to chop, i slice and carve like a pro — saving you precious time. a lot of knives there. and it's a message that we hear every year, a dog is for life not just for christmas. but as the demand for puppies skyrockets this month, singer and dog—lover ricky wilson shares some timely advice for anyone who's thinking of adding a four—legged friend
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to their family. plus, it's important to make a good first impression- iat a job interview but if you're. on a low income, it can be tricky to afford a new outfit. mr motivator visits a projectl in manchester that's clothing and coaching applicants for free - to help them [and their dream roles. which i think is lovely. i've never seen him like _ which i think is lovely. i've never seen him like that. _ which i think is lovely. i've never seen him like that. he _ which i think is lovely. i've never seen him like that. he is - which i think is lovely. i've never seen him like that. he is not - which i think is lovely. i've never seen him like that. he is not the| seen him like that. he is not the mister motivator _ seen him like that. he is not the mister motivator we _ seen him like that. he is not the mister motivator we know. - and it's the show that lets us experience the most glamourous places in the world without leaving our sofa. giles coren and monica galetti tell us about the brand new series of amazing hotels and what it takes to be classed as one of the most luxurious on the planet. there's been a lot of sound effects from _ there's been a lot of sound effects from you _ there's been a lot of sound effects from you there this morning. | there's been a lot of sound effects from you there this morning. i was 'ust from you there this morning. i was just looking _ from you there this morning. i was just looking wistfully _ from you there this morning. i was just looking wistfully at _ from you there this morning. i was just looking wistfully at those clips — just looking wistfully at those clips at — just looking wistfully at those cli s. : . just looking wistfully at those clis. : , :, just looking wistfully at those clis. m :, . " , clips. a bit of escapism at 915 this morninr. clips. a bit of escapism at 915 this morning- we _ clips. a bit of escapism at 915 this morning. we are _ clips. a bit of escapism at 915 this morning. we are all— clips. a bit of escapism at 915 this morning. we are all looking - morning. we are all looking wistfully at _ morning. we are all looking wistfully at it _ morning. we are all looking wistfully at it here. - morning. we are all looking i wistfully at it here. amazing. morning. we are all looking - wistfully at it here. amazing. i'm sure they will tell us it's really hard work working on the show. t
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hard work working on the show. i know! just like this one. we - hard work working on the show. i know! just like this one. we will| know! just like this one. we will see ou know! just like this one. we will see you later — know! just like this one. we will see you later guys. _ they might have the garlands and lights and tinsel, but we have got what counts. lights and tinsel, but we have got what counts-— what counts. nativity plays. after last ear's what counts. nativity plays. after last year's covid _ what counts. nativity plays. after last year's covid ang _ what counts. nativity plays. after| last year's covid ang cancellations there's been a lot of excitement. but the newly—identified omicron variant means teachers are having to decide whether to scale back their plans again. fiona lamdin is at a school in south london this morning to find out if the show will go on there. she is backstage. are they ready to go? she is backstage. are they ready to no? , she is backstage. are they ready to to? , ., , , she is backstage. are they ready to to? , ., , . ., she is backstage. are they ready to no? ,~~~ ,~ . go? they absolutely are and in full dress rehearsal _ go? they absolutely are and in full dress rehearsal and _ go? they absolutely are and in full dress rehearsal and we _ go? they absolutely are and in full dress rehearsal and we are - go? they absolutely are and in full| dress rehearsal and we are peaking from backstage, but come and have a look because if you don't feel christmas like yes, you will. it's so sweet — christmas like yes, you will. it's so sweet and they have their performance this afternoon and this is literally— performance this afternoon and this is literally the last minute rehearsals and tweaking some costumes and we have had a couple of donkey— costumes and we have had a couple of donkey tail— costumes and we have had a couple of donkey tail issues but they are
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really— donkey tail issues but they are really practising and what is really exciting _ really practising and what is really exciting is— really practising and what is really exciting is the parents are allowed to comment and they have decided that they— to comment and they have decided that they are cracking on and they will have — that they are cracking on and they will have the parents coming in wearing — will have the parents coming in wearing masks with their lateral flow but — wearing masks with their lateral flow but not all schools have been able to _ flow but not all schools have been able to make that decision, as we been _ able to make that decision, as we been finding out as we talked to schools — been finding out as we talked to schools up and down the country. in this wiltshire primary, it is dress rehearsal today. they have gotjust four days before their nativity. christmas with the mr men. before covid, the children would perform their nativity in the local church, but now they are filming it and they are inviting families in for the screening which will happen in this outdoor classroom. iam mrsilly. i am the king. lam mrgrumpy.
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are you pleased your family can come and watch you? yes! it's exciting because we've heard . about it at home with the rehearsals and to come on site and see it and the actual excitement - of the kids being in class - and having parents there is really special to share it as a family. it's lovely and we're really excited. we weren't able to last year with our daughter so it's more special this year and they really enjoyed filming and is super excited for the big opening moment. the nativity has been an integral part of our school and we were never going to let covid stop us from putting on our special performance. after a few more days of travelling, during which they were stopped at various times by the police. last year the majority of primary schools including this one in fleetwood put their nativity online. they eventually arrived in bethlehem. but this year they hope it can go ahead, with some precautions. the audience are being asked to wear
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masks and carry out lateral flows. we are scaling it down compared to previous endeavours. we are doing it in single year groups and normally we would put lots of the year groups together, but we are not mixing the parents from one class to another, so we have put lots of things in place to try to keep everybody safe but it's very, very difficult as a balancing act and i am acutely aware that i'm not going to please everybody, but we are really going to try. but with the uncertainty around this new variant of covid, this school, like many up and down the country, are ready to adapt their plans. it has been really difficult and we've been a bit stressed this week. i speak to lots of other colleagues and it's a big decision and a judgment call and i think we have to take into account the staff and the reception and year one, do they want to go for it.
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we did agree before the new variant came on the scene and we can only do what we feel is right and it's a special moment for the children and very traditional and there is a lot of emotion attached to an emotive subject. it's such a difficult balancing act. the decision we make today might not feel ok in a couple of days, but at the moment, full steam ahead and we are looking forward to having parents in. one, two, three. back here, it's all outside. so they are getting ready to roll out the red carpet and serve up the popcorn as guests attend this primary�*s premiere. we are interrupting the dress rehearsal to have a chat with some of the stars. who do we have here? my of the stars. who do we have here? my name is india and i am going to be playing a donkey in the play. hello, my name is alex and i am going _ hello, my name is alex and i am going to — hello, my name is alex and i am going to play the cow.—
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hello, my name is alex and i am . going to play the cow._ my going to play the cow. fantastic. my name is annie _ going to play the cow. fantastic. my name is annie and _ going to play the cow. fantastic. my name is annie and i _ going to play the cow. fantastic. my name is annie and i will— going to play the cow. fantastic. my name is annie and i will play - going to play the cow. fantastic. my name is annie and i will play the - name is annie and i will play the cannel~ — name is annie and i will play the cannel~ lifti— name is annie and i will play the cannel. : :, , name is annie and i will play the cannel. ::, , :, :, .. name is annie and i will play the cannel. , . cannel. of course, look at your brilliant head. _ cannel. of course, look at your brilliant head. what _ cannel. of course, look at your brilliant head. what is - cannel. of course, look at your brilliant head. what is your - brilliant head. what is your favourite line? t brilliant head. what is your favourite line?— brilliant head. what is your favourite line? :, :, favourite line? i have got sand in my eyelashes- — favourite line? i have got sand in my eyelashes. fantastic. - favourite line? i have got sand in my eyelashes. fantastic. do - favourite line? i have got sand in my eyelashes. fantastic. do you| favourite line? i have got sand in - my eyelashes. fantastic. do you have a favourite line, _ my eyelashes. fantastic. do you have a favourite line, alex? _ my eyelashes. fantastic. do you have a favourite line, alex? yes. _ my eyelashes. fantastic. do you have a favourite line, alex? yes. moo!. . a favourite line, alex? yes. moo!. you can do — a favourite line, alex? yes. moo!. you can do that _ a favourite line, alex? yes. moo!. you can do that louder. moo!. - a favourite line, alex? yes. moo!. i you can do that louder. moo!. what about you? — you can do that louder. moo!. what about you? i — you can do that louder. moo!. what about you? i was _ you can do that louder. moo!. what about you? i was a _ you can do that louder. moo!. what about you? i was a donkey - you can do that louder. moo!. what about you? i was a donkey the - you can do that louder. moo!. what about you? i was a donkey the last i about you? i was a donkey the last time i looked. _ about you? i was a donkey the last time i looked. stand _ about you? i was a donkey the last time i looked. stand up, _ about you? i was a donkey the last time i looked. stand up, india, - about you? i was a donkey the last i time i looked. stand up, india, show me our time i looked. stand up, india, show me your special _ time i looked. stand up, india, show me your special tail. _ time i looked. stand up, india, show me your special tail. my _ time i looked. stand up, india, show me your special tail. my mom - time i looked. stand up, india, show! me your special tail. my mom sewed me your special tail. my mom sewed m tail me your special tail. my mom sewed my tail on- — me your special tail. my mom sewed my tail on- your— me your special tail. my mom sewed my tail on. your mum _ me your special tail. my mom sewed my tail on. your mum has _ me your special tail. my mom sewed my tail on. your mum has great - my tail on. your mum has great sewin: my tail on. your mum has great sewing skills. _ my tail on. your mum has great sewing skills. you _ my tail on. your mum has great sewing skills. you have - my tail on. your mum has great sewing skills. you have you - my tail on. your mum has great sewing skills. you have you got| sewing skills. you have you got coming to watch you? mr; sewing skills. you have you got coming to watch you? my mum, my dad and my brother- — coming to watch you? my mum, my dad and my brother. does _ coming to watch you? my mum, my dad and my brother. does it _ coming to watch you? my mum, my dad and my brother. does it feel _ and my brother. does it feel brilliant to _ and my brother. does it feel brilliant to know _ and my brother. does it feel brilliant to know they - and my brother. does it feel brilliant to know they are . and my brother. does it feel - brilliant to know they are watching you. mt; brilliant to know they are watching ou. ~ , , :, , brilliant to know they are watching ou. g ,:, brilliant to know they are watching ou. v, ,., :, brilliant to know they are watching ou. v, ,., :, , brilliant to know they are watching ou. v, ,., .,'::. , :, you. my brother is 13 and his name is isaac. hello _ you. my brother is 13 and his name is isaac. hello to _ you. my brother is 13 and his name is isaac. hello to him. _ you. my brother is 13 and his name is isaac. hello to him. are - you. my brother is 13 and his name is isaac. hello to him. are you - is isaac. hello to him. are you excited to _ is isaac. hello to him. are you excited to be _ is isaac. hello to him. are you excited to be performing - is isaac. hello to him. are you excited to be performing in i is isaac. hello to him. are you i excited to be performing in front is isaac. hello to him. are you - excited to be performing in front of your family? excited to be performing in front of yourfamily? mr; excited to be performing in front of your family?— excited to be performing in front of our famil ? y :. , , :. your family? my daddy, mummy and auntie are going _
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your family? my daddy, mummy and auntie are going to _ your family? my daddy, mummy and auntie are going to come. _ your family? my daddy, mummy and auntie are going to come. who - your family? my daddy, mummy and auntie are going to come. who is - auntie are going to come. who is cominr auntie are going to come. who is coming to _ auntie are going to come. who is coming to watch _ auntie are going to come. who is coming to watch you? _ auntie are going to come. who is coming to watch you? i've - auntie are going to come. who is coming to watch you? i've got. auntie are going to come. who is| coming to watch you? i've got my auntie are going to come. who is - coming to watch you? i've got my mum and dad coming — coming to watch you? i've got my mum and dad coming to _ coming to watch you? i've got my mum and dad coming to watch _ coming to watch you? i've got my mum and dad coming to watch me. _ coming to watch you? i've got my mum and dad coming to watch me. what - coming to watch you? i've got my mum and dad coming to watch me. what is i and dad coming to watch me. what is our and dad coming to watch me. what is your favourite — and dad coming to watch me. what is your favourite song? _ and dad coming to watch me. what is your favourite song? favourite - and dad coming to watch me. what is your favourite song? favourite song, | your favourite song? favourite song, guys? your favourite song? favourite song, au s? ,, your favourite song? favourite song, au s? ~ is your favourite song? favourite song, guys?_ is that _ your favourite song? favourite song, guys?_ is that the - your favourite song? favourite song, guys?_ is that the one i guys? knock knock. is that the one we will hear- _ guys? knock knock. is that the one we will hear. let's _ guys? knock knock. is that the one we will hear. let's hear— guys? knock knock. is that the one we will hear. let's hear a _ guys? knock knock. is that the one we will hear. let's hear a bit - guys? knock knock. is that the one we will hear. let's hear a bit of- we will hear. let's hear a bit of knock knock. # knock knock, who is that? there is someone at the doubt. knock, knock, who is their quest might no room for any more. knock, knock, who is there? there is somebody out the door. knock, knock, who is there? no room for any more. no room, no room. we are full up. no room, no room. bad luck. knock, knock. who's there?—
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room, no room. bad luck. knock, knock. who's there? while that is aroin on. knock. who's there? while that is going on- you _ knock. who's there? while that is going on. you have _ knock. who's there? while that is going on. you have been - knock. who's there? while that is going on. you have been teaching these guys. come away a tiny bit so we can hear you but see them in the background crash but how many weeks have they been working on this quest by any reception teacher will tell you how long it takes for the preparation that goes into it, but they've done a marvellous job. we they've done a marvellous 'ob. we are they've done a marvellousjob. we are stage ready now so it will be on at two _ are stage ready now so it will be on at two o'clock this afternoon. tell us what you _ at two o'clock this afternoon. tell us what you are _ at two o'clock this afternoon. tell us what you are doing, because you are going to a theatre. what have the parents got to do? we are going to a theatre. what have the parents got to do?— are going to a theatre. what have the parents got to do? we are still erformin: the parents got to do? we are still performing and — the parents got to do? we are still performing and have _ the parents got to do? we are still performing and have a _ the parents got to do? we are still performing and have a live - the parents got to do? we are still. performing and have a live audience which _ performing and have a live audience which we _ performing and have a live audience which we are thrilled about but our parents _ which we are thrilled about but our parents will need to take a lateral flow and — parents will need to take a lateral flow and wear a mask. we need to make _ flow and wear a mask. we need to make sure — flow and wear a mask. we need to make sure it's as safe as possible. was that— make sure it's as safe as possible. was that a — make sure it's as safe as possible. was that a hard decision to make? with theatre is still open we didn't think— with theatre is still open we didn't think it _ with theatre is still open we didn't think it was, actually and we really wanted _ think it was, actually and we really wanted to— think it was, actually and we really wanted to give the children at wandsworth prep to have the opportunity to have a live audience and wave _ opportunity to have a live audience and wave their mum and dad and grandparents and experience, so we
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are thrilled — grandparents and experience, so we are thrilled. we grandparents and experience, so we are thrilled-— are thrilled. we hope it goes well. can't wait to _ are thrilled. we hope it goes well. can't wait to see _ are thrilled. we hope it goes well. can't wait to see the _ are thrilled. we hope it goes well. can't wait to see the next - are thrilled. we hope it goes well. | can't wait to see the next number. let's have a quick word with the head. you have been watching behind the scenes. what are you thinking? t the scenes. what are you thinking? i am so proud of them. they look absolutely — am so proud of them. they look absolutely fantastic— am so proud of them. they look absolutely fantastic and - am so proud of them. they look absolutely fantastic and it - am so proud of them. they look absolutely fantastic and it is - am so proud of them. they lookl absolutely fantastic and it is that heart-warming _ absolutely fantastic and it is that heart—warming moment, - absolutely fantastic and it is that heart—warming moment, isn't. absolutely fantastic and it is that heart—warming moment, isn't iti absolutely fantastic and it is that. heart—warming moment, isn't it and absolutely fantastic and it is that - heart—warming moment, isn't it and i don't _ heart—warming moment, isn't it and i don't think— heart—warming moment, isn't it and i don't think there _ heart—warming moment, isn't it and i don't think there will _ heart—warming moment, isn't it and i don't think there will be _ heart—warming moment, isn't it and i don't think there will be a _ heart—warming moment, isn't it and i don't think there will be a dry - heart—warming moment, isn't it and i don't think there will be a dry eye - don't think there will be a dry eye in the _ don't think there will be a dry eye in the house _ don't think there will be a dry eye in the house when _ don't think there will be a dry eye in the house when you _ don't think there will be a dry eye in the house when you see - don't think there will be a dry eye in the house when you see thesel don't think there will be a dry eye - in the house when you see these guys perform~ _ in the house when you see these guys perform~ we — in the house when you see these guys perform we are — in the house when you see these guys perform. we are so _ in the house when you see these guys perform. we are so proud. _ in the house when you see these guys perform. we are so proud. you- in the house when you see these guys perform. we are so proud.— perform. we are so proud. you have had to cancel— perform. we are so proud. you have had to cancel some _ perform. we are so proud. you have had to cancel some things. - perform. we are so proud. you have had to cancel some things. tonight i had to cancel some things. tonight was meant to _ had to cancel some things. tonight was meant to be _ had to cancel some things. tonight was meant to be the _ had to cancel some things. tonight was meant to be the xmas - had to cancel some things. tonight was meant to be the xmas party i had to cancel some things. tonight| was meant to be the xmas party for parents _ was meant to be the xmas party for parents and — was meant to be the xmas party for parents and teachers _ was meant to be the xmas party for parents and teachers and _ was meant to be the xmas party for parents and teachers and we - was meant to be the xmas party for parents and teachers and we were i parents and teachers and we were going _ parents and teachers and we were going to _ parents and teachers and we were going to have _ parents and teachers and we were going to have a _ parents and teachers and we were going to have a big _ parents and teachers and we were going to have a big shindig - parents and teachers and we were going to have a big shindig but. parents and teachers and we were going to have a big shindig but we had to— going to have a big shindig but we had to cancel— going to have a big shindig but we had to cancel because _ going to have a big shindig but we had to cancel because we - going to have a big shindig but we had to cancel because we couldn'tt had to cancel because we couldn't ensure _ had to cancel because we couldn't ensure the — had to cancel because we couldn't ensure the safety— had to cancel because we couldn't ensure the safety of— had to cancel because we couldn't ensure the safety of everyone - ensure the safety of everyone crowded — ensure the safety of everyone crowded together, _ ensure the safety of everyone crowded together, so - ensure the safety of everyone crowded together, so that - ensure the safety of everyone crowded together, so that is i crowded together, so that is cancelled _ crowded together, so that is cancelled but _ crowded together, so that is cancelled but this _ crowded together, so that is cancelled but this can - crowded together, so that is cancelled but this can be - crowded together, so that is i cancelled but this can be done safely— cancelled but this can be done safely and _ cancelled but this can be done safely and it's _ cancelled but this can be done safely and it's for— cancelled but this can be done safely and it's for the - cancelled but this can be done safely and it's for the children| cancelled but this can be done - safely and it's for the children and the parents — safely and it's for the children and the parents get _ safely and it's for the children and the parents get that _ safely and it's for the children and the parents get that magic- safely and it's for the children and i the parents get that magic moment and it— the parents get that magic moment and it is— the parents get that magic moment and it is safe. — the parents get that magic moment and it is safe, so _ the parents get that magic moment and it is safe, so it's— the parents get that magic moment and it is safe, so it's important- the parents get that magic moment and it is safe, so it's important it i and it is safe, so it's important it goes _ and it is safe, so it's important it goes ahead _ and it is safe, so it's important it goes ahead-— and it is safe, so it's important it goes ahead. and it is safe, so it's important it roesahead. , . . :, :, goes ahead. last year you had to go oane goes ahead. last year you had to go online and it — goes ahead. last year you had to go online and it means _ goes ahead. last year you had to go online and it means so _ goes ahead. last year you had to go online and it means so much - goes ahead. last year you had to go online and it means so much more i goes ahead. last year you had to go i online and it means so much more you don't have to do that. we online and it means so much more you don't have to do that.— don't have to do that. we had a virtual audience _ don't have to do that. we had a virtual audience last _ don't have to do that. we had a virtual audience last year - don't have to do that. we had a virtual audience last year and i don't have to do that. we had a l virtual audience last year and we were _ virtual audience last year and we were live. — virtual audience last year and we were live, which _ virtual audience last year and we were live, which was _ virtual audience last year and we were live, which was amazing. virtual audience last year and we l were live, which was amazing but when _ were live, which was amazing but when you — were live, which was amazing but when you are _ were live, which was amazing but when you are a _ were live, which was amazing but when you are a child _ were live, which was amazing but when you are a child you - were live, which was amazing but when you are a child you just - were live, which was amazing butl when you are a child you just need that moment _ when you are a child you just need that moment when _ when you are a child you just need that moment when you _ when you are a child you just need that moment when you see - when you are a child you just need that moment when you see your. that moment when you see your parents — that moment when you see your parents in — that moment when you see your parents in the _
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that moment when you see your parents in the audience - that moment when you see your parents in the audience and - that moment when you see your| parents in the audience and they waive _ parents in the audience and they waive or— parents in the audience and they waive or give _ parents in the audience and they waive or give you _ parents in the audience and they waive or give you a _ parents in the audience and they waive or give you a little - parents in the audience and they waive or give you a little wink. parents in the audience and theyi waive or give you a little wink and a smile _ waive or give you a little wink and a smile. , :. waive or give you a little wink and a smile. , . :, waive or give you a little wink and a smile. , . . ., waive or give you a little wink and a smile. , . . . ,:, :, a smile. they are waving at someone off the side- — a smile. they are waving at someone off the side. can _ a smile. they are waving at someone off the side. can we _ a smile. they are waving at someone off the side. can we hear— a smile. they are waving at someone off the side. can we hear a _ a smile. they are waving at someone off the side. can we hear a bit - off the side. can we hear a bit more? we are hearing you and enjoy you so much. what is the next song? we are camels. taste you so much. what is the next song? we are camels-— we are camels. we have a bit of a disute. we are camels. we have a bit of a dispute- ltorn _ we are camels. we have a bit of a dispute. born in _ we are camels. we have a bit of a dispute. born in a _ we are camels. we have a bit of a dispute. born in a barn. _ we are camels. we have a bit of al dispute. born in a barn. something is cominr dispute. born in a barn. something is coming on. _ dispute. born in a barn. something is coming on. so — dispute. born in a barn. something is coming on, so you _ dispute. born in a barn. something is coming on, so you better - dispute. born in a barn. something is coming on, so you better sing i dispute. born in a barn. something| is coming on, so you better sing and enjoy it. share is coming on, so you better sing and en'o it. : , :, is coming on, so you better sing and en'o it. : i. . j is coming on, so you better sing and en'o it. : ,, . h enjoy it. are you ready? it's the final song- _ # there's a new dawning for the earth. # god has sent it into jesus's hands. we come believe it.
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he is the king. we can believe it. # the bells ringing out, there is a new day dawning for the earth. # god has sent his messengers to and his saviourjesus christ. we can each day, we can believe it. # let us all rejoice. there a new day dawning for the earth. # god has centres and his saviourjesus christ. he is the king. # we can believe it. hagar saviourjesus christ. he is the king. # we can believe it. how cute is that? i am — king. # we can believe it. how cute is that? i am mesmerised. - king. # we can believe it. how cute is that? i am mesmerised. i- king. # we can believe it. how cute is that? i am mesmerised. iwas-
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is that? i am mesmerised. i was slirhtl is that? i am mesmerised. i was slightly concerned _ is that? i am mesmerised. i was slightly concerned because - is that? i am mesmerised. i was slightly concerned because mary nearly got a black eye when the camel started stretching out. tt’s camel started stretching out. it's not a camel started stretching out. it's rrot a camel- _ camel started stretching out. tii's not a camel. that is a cow. camel started stretching out. it's| not a camel. that is a cow. mary, cow, not a camel. that is a cow. mary, cow. camel- _ not a camel. that is a cow. mary, cow, camel. donkey, _ not a camel. that is a cow. mary, cow, camel. donkey, conquer- not a camel. that is a cow. mary, t cow, camel. donkey, conquer all. cow, camel. donkey, conquerall. cockrell at the end. was there a mister man? we cockrell at the end. was there a mister man?— cockrell at the end. was there a mister man? ~ :, . . ,, , :, mister man? we loved that. thank you so much to wandsworth _ mister man? we loved that. thank you so much to wandsworth prep - mister man? we loved that. thank you so much to wandsworth prep and - mister man? we loved that. thank you so much to wandsworth prep and i'm i so much to wandsworth prep and i'm feeling christmassy now. mike so much to wandsworth prep and i'm feeling christmassy now.— feeling christmassy now. mike has been feeling _ feeling christmassy now. mike has been feeling christmassy. - feeling christmassy now. mike has been feeling christmassy. it - feeling christmassy now. mike has been feeling christmassy. itjust i been feeling christmassy. it 'ust brinrs been feeling christmassy. it 'ust brings back fl been feeling christmassy. it 'ust brings back memories. �* been feeling christmassy. it 'ust brings back memories. i i been feeling christmassy. itjust brings back memories. i was - brings back memories. i was impressed — brings back memories. i was impressed with _ brings back memories. i was impressed with the - brings back memories. i was impressed with the mooing i brings back memories. i was i impressed with the mooing and brings back memories. i was - impressed with the mooing and i remember being a cow and i never got to make the noise. itrul’ere remember being a cow and i never got to make the noise.— to make the noise. were you the front or the _ to make the noise. were you the front or the back? _ to make the noise. were you the front or the back? i _ to make the noise. were you the front or the back? i was - to make the noise. were you the front or the back? i was on - to make the noise. were you the front or the back? i was on my i to make the noise. were you the i front or the back? i was on my own. i was the whole _ front or the back? i was on my own. i was the whole cow. _ front or the back? i was on my own. i was the whole cow. the _ front or the back? i was on my own. i was the whole cow. the singing . front or the back? i was on my own. i was the whole cow. the singing on t i was the whole cow. the singing on the actions. what a performance. i reckon everton fans would probably want to watch more of that. shifter want to watch more of that. after yesterday. _ want to watch more of that. after yesterday. i— want to watch more of that. after yesterday, i think— want to watch more of that. after yesterday, i think so. _ want to watch more of that. fire yesterday, i think so. somebody has to win, someone has to lose. but when the neighbours come round and inflict a heavy defeat it's not so nice. :, , , :,,
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inflict a heavy defeat it's not so nice._ three - inflict a heavy defeat it's not so i nice._ three camel nice. horses as well? three camel race at the — nice. horses as well? three camel race at the top _ nice. horses as well? three camel race at the top of _ nice. horses as well? three camel race at the top of the _ nice. horses as well? three camel race at the top of the premier - race at the top of the premier league. it's a three—horse race at the top of the premier league and liverpool kept up with the pace, but thumping, everton 4—1, to pile the pressure on their boss, rafa benitez, in his first merseyside derby, against his former club. liverpool captain jordan henderson's early goal, got the match off to the perfect start for the visitors before mo salah, who was on top form, added to that soon after, with a superb finish, and with less than 20 minutes gone, some home fans had seen enough and were heading home. they will have missed demarai gray, giving everton a little hope. but that was extinguished in the second half, thanks to a second from salah, and diogojota who rounded the rout off. this was by far the best performance we have shown here at goodison park since i was at liverpool and it was a very important moment and good timing because we could see in the games against manchester united and everton here that we made a big step in our development, that we can take these kind of games.
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chelsea stay top of the premier league, but they had to work hard, for a second half winner from hakim ziyech, at watford. thomas tuchel�*s side have now won, five away games on the trot in the league. manchester city remain a point behind chelsea in second — they beat aston villa 2—1 at villa park, bernardo silva with the pick of the goals for pep guardiola's side, condemning steven gerrard to his first defeat as villa manager. a footnote on the chelsea and watford game, it was suspended for more than half an hour after an emergency in the crowd. medical staff from both teams helped the fan who suffered a cardiac arrest and was eventually ta ken to who suffered a cardiac arrest and was eventually taken to hospital. and there was also a delay to the start of the second half between southampton and leicester city after a supporter fell ill during the interval at st mary's. rangers went seven points clear at the top of the scottish premiership after a 1—0 win at hibernian, thanks to a late penalty by kemar roofe. there were also victories for aberdeen and dundee, while it finished goalless
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between st mirren and ross county. the ongoing concern over the freedom and safety of chinese tennis star, peng shaui means, the women's tennis association, has now suspended all tournaments in china. peng disappeared from public view for three weeks last month, after accusing a top chinese official of sexual assault. since then chinese state media, and the player did say in a video call, with the international olympic committee president that she was safe and well. but the wta have said the video was "insufficient evidence" of her freedom and safety, and have now decided to pull tournaments out of china because they say peng's case is "bigger than the business". this is something we simply cannot walk away from. if we walk away from what we have requested, and as you reflected it is a domestic abuse issue, what we are telling the world thenis issue, what we are telling the world then is that not addressing sexual
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assault with the respect and seriousness that it requires, because it is difficult, is ok. and it is not. a lot of support from the stance of the players with novak djokovic tweeting that as well martina navratilova, principal of dollars, stand up for women everywhere and then she says, what do you say, ioc? i can barely hear you. she wants more of a stance from them. t i can barely hear you. she wants more of a stance from them. i think this will run — more of a stance from them. i think this will run and _ more of a stance from them. i think this will run and run. _ more of a stance from them. i think this will run and run. and _ more of a stance from them. i think this will run and run. and maybe . more of a stance from them. i think| this will run and run. and maybe the men's game — this will run and run. and maybe the men's game might— this will run and run. and maybe the men's game might follow— this will run and run. and maybe the men's game might follow suit. - this will run and run. and maybe the | men's game might follow suit. there are calls for — men's game might follow suit. there are calls for it. _ men's game might follow suit. there are calls for it. mike, _ men's game might follow suit. there are calls for it. mike, thank- men's game might follow suit. there are calls for it. mike, thank you - are calls for it. mike, thank you very much. sarah is taking a look at the weatherfor us this very much. sarah is taking a look at the weather for us this morning, and there has been that he has been cold, then milder and we are still feeling the effects of the storm, so what next? feeling the effects of the storm, so what next? the weather still causing a bit of disruption out there and it is cold and wintry and we have some icy stretches but there is something serene and beautiful about the
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sunrise here over the snow—covered fields in buckinghamshire so we've had some relatively low levels and over the night that's causing some issues with icy stretches on and untreated surfaces and today we expect a bit of wintry sunshine and some showers will linger through the day but we have higher pressure building in dry weather but low pressure towards the east is driving the northerly winds that are bringing notjust cold air across the uk but those wintry showers and this is the past few hours with snow flurries across the north of scotland and heavy ones around the east coast of england and even through parts of wales and southern england, some of the rain, sleet and snow showers which are clearing off towards the end of the south, have blessed the legacy of icy stretches on untreated surfaces, so a chilly start to the morning but a lot of blue sky and a lot of wintry sunshine coming through and we will keep the windy conditions around the east coast with gusts of 40 or 50mph
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the winds easing cancel if you wintry showers lingering through the day for lincolnshire and east anglia and temperatures just three or 4 on the east and we could see 8 c further west on the sky will cloud over from the west later on with some patchy rain but ahead of it for a time, further snow, almost anywhere for a time we could see the snow at low levels but it turns back into rain because milder air is working on overnight, so this time tomorrow temperatures won't be as low as this morning and we are looking at double figures from the word go in the south—west. tomorrow's weather is different to today with winds coming in from a westerly direction instead of northerly and a couple of weather fronts bringing outbreaks of rain, so the first one brings rain to southern and eastern england in the morning and that will clear away and some drier weather but more heavy showers in the north—west putting into western scotland and more rain into western scotland and more rain into the south east and wales, but look at the temperatures. 11 or 12 in the south, only six or seven
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across the north, but a brief mild speu across the north, but a brief mild spell on friday because as we head into the weekend the temperatures are yo—yoing and it feels chilly once again, so we have a north—westerly wind on saturday, driving in the mix of sunshine but also further showers which will be falling sleet and snow over the high ground. it won't be particularly warm, between five and 9 on saturday and feeling cooler than that when you add on the effect of the wind. into sunday, pretty similar and the wind. into sunday, pretty similarand we the wind. into sunday, pretty similar and we have sunny spells and a few showers coming in, mainly in the north and north—east and again, temperatures only between 509 c when you add on the wind chill and if you head out watch out for the icy conditions, but many of us should see some sunshine at times today. lovely story for you now. this is a family that has been able to remember an heirloom and an
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airman in world war ii to remember an heirloom and an airman in world war i! who was executed by the nazis and he had a bracelet that was lost and it has been returned to his family more than 70 years after he was killed. freddie habgood's plane was shot down over france in 1944. he survived the crash but died in a concentration camp — and that is where the bracelet was recently found. our defence correspondent jonathan beale reports. the hours of darkness over hitler's germany are about to be made hideous. the men of bomber command know well what they have to do. the raf bombing campaign of the second world war was one of the most dangerous and deadly missions. onjuly the 28th, 1944, hundreds of lancaster bombers left eastern england for another raid over germany. one of those airmen was sergeant freddie hapgood. he wasjust 21.
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his nephew and niece grew up knowing little about what happened to their uncle. we didn't know much of the details about it because my father never talked about it. i always feel a bit cheated that we never knew him. because, you know, he would have beenjust a bit younger than our father. he would have married and we would have bagged more cousins. that's a whole line of your family you've lost. two of the seven crew died that night when their lancaster was shot down by a german fighter over france. freddie was among those who managed to bail out. one escapes, three go into a prisoner of war camp and poor fred hapgood falls into the hands of the dreaded gestapo. and from then, we know what happened to him. freddie hapgood was betrayed by a local, who handed him over to the gestapo. they took them here. this concentration camp in alsace.
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but three years ago, a local girl found something unusual in the earth. she was just working during her holidays and raking the yard, tidying it. suddenly she saw a gleaming something in the soil. it was a bracelet. it was the only thing that was ever found, the only surviving item that was ever found in the ash pit. and i think the only reason being is because it was silver. freddie's bracelet, the last moment of his final mission, was returned to the family. in a simple ceremony in london, they handed over to the head the air force. i think this is the perfect place to put it, really. raf church. it is on display. i think a lot of people come here and visit. they hope that others will now remember the uncle they never knew. jonathan beale, bbc news.
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you can just imagine what it meant to the family. the court of appeal will today give its ruling on the latest stage of a legal battle between meghan, the duchess of sussex, and the publisher of the mail on sunday. this is the privacy case that has been going on for a while. the duchess sued associated newspapers limited after the paper reproduced parts of a handwritten letter to her father, thomas markle, in 2019. let's get more with the royal commentatorjennie bond. good morning. ithink good morning. i think this has been going on for ages, in an out different parts of the appeals and hearings but today is a really significant moment, potentially. filth. significant moment, potentially. 0h, es. significant moment, potentially. oh, yes- today's — significant moment, potentially. oh, yes. today's verdict will decide whether— yes. today's verdict will decide whether or not we are going to see meghan— whether or not we are going to see meghan markle and possibly prince harry in—
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meghan markle and possibly prince harry in court which would be sensational. the appeal hearing which _ sensational. the appeal hearing which your viewers will probably remember over three days was quite explosive _ remember over three days was quite explosive because some emails were revealed _ explosive because some emails were revealed between meghan, harry and their then _ revealed between meghan, harry and their then press secretary who had come _ their then press secretary who had come forward with witness statements on these _ come forward with witness statements on these emails were very revealing. they revealed for example that the duchess _ they revealed for example that the duchess had written this letter to her father— duchess had written this letter to her father with the understanding that it _ her father with the understanding that it might be leaked, which could put a different complexion on what she wrote. — put a different complexion on what she wrote, but more particularly the emails— she wrote, but more particularly the emails led _ she wrote, but more particularly the emails led to meghan having to apologise to the court during the hearing — apologise to the court during the hearing because she had forgotten, she said. _ hearing because she had forgotten, she said, that she had told her press — she said, that she had told her press secretary that he could talk to the _ press secretary that he could talk to the authors of a book, which was quite _ to the authors of a book, which was quite a _ to the authors of a book, which was quite a revealing book published last year. — quite a revealing book published last year, finding freedom. harry and meghan insisted they had not collaborated with the authors of the book but _ collaborated with the authors of the book but she had forgotten she had told the _ book but she had forgotten she had told the press secretary which he
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leaked _ told the press secretary which he leaked on — told the press secretary which he leaked on several occasions, so and ithink— leaked on several occasions, so and i think today's verdict is going to tell us— i think today's verdict is going to tell us whether or not the judges feel that — tell us whether or not the judges feel that that has some bearing on the appeal and whether it should be heard _ the appeal and whether it should be heard in— the appeal and whether it should be heard in a _ the appeal and whether it should be heard in a trial. we the appeal and whether it should be heard in a trial.— heard in a trial. we will get that decision from _ heard in a trial. we will get that decision from the _ heard in a trial. we will get that decision from the court - heard in a trial. we will get that decision from the court a - heard in a trial. we will get that decision from the court a little i heard in a trial. we will get that i decision from the court a little bit later today with coverage on the bbc. you said it would be sensational and i guess because of their star quality, harry, potentially meghan, in a court room, that's really unusual in terms of history, royal history, to get members of the royal family in a court room. tt members of the royal family in a court room-— members of the royal family in a court room. , : . , :, . court room. it is certainly not what the r0 al court room. it is certainly not what the royal family _ court room. it is certainly not what the royal family do _ court room. it is certainly not what the royal family do and _ court room. it is certainly not what the royal family do and you - court room. it is certainly not what the royal family do and you have i court room. it is certainly not what| the royal family do and you have to id the royal family do and you have to go back— the royal family do and you have to go back to — the royal family do and you have to go back to the 1890s and the then prince _ go back to the 1890s and the then prince of— go back to the 1890s and the then prince of wales, later edward vii, who appeared as a witness in a court case then— who appeared as a witness in a court case then and then you have another hundred _ case then and then you have another hundred years, a century, up to 1990 when _ hundred years, a century, up to 1990 when princess margaret's son, viscount — when princess margaret's son, viscount linley, went to court and appeared — viscount linley, went to court and appeared in— viscount linley, went to court and appeared in a trial which it was the
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today— appeared in a trial which it was the today newspaper which doesn't exist any more. _ today newspaper which doesn't exist any more, he took them to court because — any more, he took them to court because they said had been behaving in a rowdy— because they said had been behaving in a rowdy way in a pub. he won the case _ in a rowdy way in a pub. he won the case and _ in a rowdy way in a pub. he won the case and got — in a rowdy way in a pub. he won the case and got £30,000 damages. royals do sue~ _ case and got £30,000 damages. royals do sue~ the _ case and got £30,000 damages. royals do sue. the queen has sued the sun newspaper— do sue. the queen has sued the sun newspaper on a couple of occasions and diana _ newspaper on a couple of occasions and diana has sued, but these are always— and diana has sued, but these are always settled out of court, so you are talking — always settled out of court, so you are talking a once in 100 years event — are talking a once in 100 years event if— are talking a once in 100 years event if we do see these young royals — event if we do see these young royals in— event if we do see these young royals in court.— event if we do see these young ro als in court. ~ . :, . royals in court. what would it mean to mechan royals in court. what would it mean to meghan markle _ royals in court. what would it mean to meghan markle if _ royals in court. what would it mean to meghan markle if effectively - royals in court. what would it mean to meghan markle if effectively she| to meghan markle if effectively she wins today and there is no trial? well, that may well happen. clearly, that is— well, that may well happen. clearly, that is a _ well, that may well happen. clearly, that is a big — well, that may well happen. clearly, that is a big victory for her. she has not — that is a big victory for her. she has not been backward in coming forward _ has not been backward in coming forward in — has not been backward in coming forward in protecting what she sees as her— forward in protecting what she sees as her privacy and rights and she clearly— as her privacy and rights and she clearly feels strongly about this letter _ clearly feels strongly about this letter and she won't want to go to trial. _ letter and she won't want to go to trial, certainly, because one possibility is that her father would be summoned as a witness for associated newspapers, so we would
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have father and daughter facing each other in— have father and daughter facing each other in court on opposite sides of the argument. other in court on opposite sides of the argument-— other in court on opposite sides of the argument. thank you very much indeed and we _ the argument. thank you very much indeed and we will _ the argument. thank you very much indeed and we will get _ the argument. thank you very much indeed and we will get a _ the argument. thank you very much indeed and we will get a response i indeed and we will get a response from you later on the bbc. thanks. and that will be covered on the bbc news channel throughout the day as well. you're watching bbc breakfast.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. a new way of life — the government secures a deal for an extra 114 million doses of covid vaccines which could combat new variants for next winter and beyond. a year after the uk became the first country in the world to approve the pfizer vaccine, the company's boss calls for children as young as five to be vaccinated. there is no doubt in my mind that the benefits completely, completely are in favour of doing it. scientists believe they have found "the trigger" that leads to extremely rare blood clots after the oxford—astrazeneca vaccine. counting the cost of soaring energy bills... another hike next year could mean gas bills double —
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with a warning millions will struggle to afford to heat their homes.

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