Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 4, 2021 10:00pm-10:31pm GMT

10:00 pm
the government tightens covid—testing rules for travellers coming to the uk. passengers will have to take a test before their departure from abroad in an effort to limit the spread of the virus. we've always said we will act swiftly if we need to, if the changing data requires that, and that's why i've decided to bring in this change on predeparture tests.
10:01 pm
and nigeria will be added to the red list of countries because of the growing number of omicron cases. also tonight... thousands of homes in scotland and northern england begin a second weekend without power after storm arwen. the parents of a teenager suspected of a deadly school shooting have pleaded not guilty to involuntary manslaughter — after they were found hiding in a basement. and could pole position at the first saudi arabian grand prix be decisive for lewis hamilton? good evening. the government has announced the return of pre—departure coronavirus tests for passengers travelling to the uk. from tuesday, people must take a test within 48 hours of travelling
10:02 pm
from any country that's not on the red list, regardless of whether they've been vaccinated. and on monday, nigeria will be added to the travel red list. only british and irish nationals will be allowed to enter the uk from there and will have to isolate in a quarantine hotel at their own expense. the changes follow increasing pressure on ministers in recent days from scientists and labour, who warned there were "gaping holes" in the uk's covid defences. our political correspondent ben wright reports. travellers arriving into london on eurostar trains this evening did not need to take a covid test before boarding, but from 4am on tuesday morning the rules change. everyone entering the uk will have to show proof of a negative test, whether they've been vaccinated or not. we are they've been vaccinated or not. - are seeing an increasing number of cases linked to travel and we've always said we will act swiftly if
10:03 pm
we need to, if the changing data requires that, and that's why i've decided to bring in this change on predeparture tests. i stress these are temporary measures. we want to remove them as soon as we possibly can, but before we learn more about omicron it's right that we have these measures in place. passengers will have to — these measures in place. passengers will have to take _ these measures in place. passengers will have to take a _ these measures in place. passengers will have to take a pcr _ these measures in place. passengers will have to take a pcr or— these measures in place. passengers will have to take a pcr or lateral - will have to take a pcr or lateral flow test within 48 hours of getting on a train, boat or plane. it's an abrupt change of tack by the government. earlier this week downing street said any further restrictions would have a detrimental effect on the travel industry and passengers. labour had called for predeparture industry and passengers. labour had called for predepa rtu re tests industry and passengers. labour had called for predeparture tests since tuesday. we called for predeparture tests since tuesda . ~ ~' ., called for predeparture tests since tuesda . ~ ~ ., ., , ., tuesday. we know from the first wave and from the — tuesday. we know from the first wave and from the delta _ tuesday. we know from the first wave and from the delta wave _ tuesday. we know from the first wave and from the delta wave that - tuesday. we know from the first wave and from the delta wave that the - and from the delta wave that the pandemic accelerates when you have lots and lots of different, new cases seeding here from abroad and that's why we just need this basic simple thing of a test before people get onto the aeroplane, and that's why it's reallyjust so
10:04 pm
disappointing that the government has left it until nearly two weeks after omicron was first identified. i'm glad they have now u—turn, but they should move much faster on these covid border measures. the arrival of the omicron variant had already prompted a change to travel rules with passengers required to take a pcr test within two days of landing in the uk. the latest move has caused dismay within the industry. i has caused dismay within the indust . ~ �* , ., has caused dismay within the indust . ~ �*, ., , , industry. i think it's a step too far. i industry. i think it's a step too far- i think— industry. i think it's a step too far. i think it _ industry. i think it's a step too far. i think it will— industry. i think it's a step too far. i think it will damage - far. i think it will damage consumer confidence — far. i think it will damage consumer confidence because yet again you've -ot confidence because yet again you've got another layer of complexity being _ got another layer of complexity being added to travel. government a- roved being added to travel. government approved quarantine _ being added to travel. government approved quarantine hotels - being added to travel. government approved quarantine hotels are - being added to travel. government approved quarantine hotels are setj approved quarantine hotels are set to get busier too. nigeria becomes the 11th country to be added to the growing travel red list, from early monday uk and irish citizens arriving from nigeria must self—isolate for ten days at their own expense. while bolstering the borders might help slow the spread of the new variant, vaccines are the
10:05 pm
first line of defence. we will speak to ben in a moment. gps in england have been told they can defer some of the services they provide in order to allow doctors to deliver covid boosterjabs instead. routine health checks for those over 75 and some minor procedures will be put on hold until at least april. campaigners for the elderly say the move by nhs england discriminates against them. ben wrightjoins me now. a twin emphasis on testing travellers and boosterjabs? travellers and booster “abs? yes, vaccines remain h travellers and booster “abs? yes, vaccines remain the _ travellers and boosterjabs? ye: vaccines remain the bedrock of travellers and boosterjabs? 123 vaccines remain the bedrock of the government's covid strategy and the arrival of the new variant has given arrival of the new variant has given a boost to the booster programme, but there remains a huge amount we don't know about maicon. government scientists are trying to work out its effect on everybody and what we have seen our policy is being brought in over the last week or so to try and buy time, so we've seen facemask sporting in new settings in england, bringing england into line with the rest of the uk. last
10:06 pm
weekend new travel restrictions were announced. in the days since i think there has been growing pressure on there has been growing pressure on the government to make this move and introduce predeparture testing. we know from minutes of a meeting of government scientists seen by the bbc held on monday, their view was it would be valuable to make this change. labour have been urging predeparture testing to be brought in and suddenly the saturday evening thatis in and suddenly the saturday evening that is what ministers announced. we are going to have to get used to people realising that measures that we thought had gone are starting in some instances to creep back. ben wriuht, some instances to creep back. ben wright. for — some instances to creep back. ben wright. for the _ some instances to creep back. ben wright, for the moment, some instances to creep back. ben wright, forthe moment, thank some instances to creep back. ben wright, for the moment, thank you. the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk show there were 42,848 new infections recorded, in the latest 24—hour period. however in scotland, the authorities are investigating the figures there as the case numbers are lower than expected. on average, 45,104 cases were reported per day in the last week. there were 127 deaths, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test, which means the average number of deaths over the past seven days was 118.
10:07 pm
and more than 19.8 million people have received their boosterjab. people in around 9,000 homes are facing a second weekend without power in parts of scotland and northern england, following storm arwen. those affected are now bracing themselves for almost freezing temperatures forecast in some areas over the next 24 hours. meanwhile the energy regulator, ofgem, says the cap on the maximum amount of compensation customers people can claim from suppliers has been lifted. our correspondent peter harris sent this report from rothbury in northumberland. boots on the ground, the troops are taking supplies to those still without power. pare taking supplies to those still without power.— taking supplies to those still without ower. �* , ., ., without power. are you all right? i've come to _ without power. are you all right? i've come to make _ without power. are you all right? i've come to make sure - without power. are you all right? | i've come to make sure everything without power. are you all right? - i've come to make sure everything is all right for spy along rural farm tracks they are trying to find those in the most remote communities that could be in need and now face a 90 night without electricity. it was
10:08 pm
absolute destruction. - night without electricity. it was absolute destruction. the - night without electricity. it was i absolute destruction. the woods night without electricity. it was absolute destruction. the woods down there are _ absolute destruction. the woods down there are completely flattened full stop not _ there are completely flattened full stop not to call northumberland a national_ stop not to call northumberland a national problem until this morning is extraordinary. the national problem until this morning is extraordinary.— is extraordinary. the army's involvement _ is extraordinary. the army's involvement follows - is extraordinary. the army's - involvement follows northumberland county council declaring storm arwen a major incident. aha, county council declaring storm arwen a major incident.— a major incident. a season of goodwill. _ a major incident. a season of goodwill, what _ a major incident. a season of goodwill, what could - a major incident. a season of goodwill, what could be - a major incident. a season of| goodwill, what could be more rewarding for our soldiers than being out in local towns and villages helping those genuinely in need. : : :,, , villages helping those genuinely in need. a ., ., ., need. across scotland and northern encland, need. across scotland and northern england, freezing _ need. across scotland and northern england, freezing temperatures - england, freezing temperatures are persisting. in all around 5000 homes are still cut off. northern power grid says it still has a 700 engineering jobs, grid says it still has a 700 engineeringjobs, repairs grid says it still has a 700 engineering jobs, repairs like this one to do, before it can fully restore the power across the north—east of england and that's why it is still saying it could be the middle of next week before things get back to normal. meaning for those enduring the longest wait it's an ongoing ordeal.—
10:09 pm
an ongoing ordeal. distraught, it's terrible, an ongoing ordeal. distraught, it's terrible. it's _ an ongoing ordeal. distraught, it's terrible, it's awful, _ an ongoing ordeal. distraught, it's terrible, it's awful, really - an ongoing ordeal. distraught, it's terrible, it's awful, really awful. . terrible, it's awful, really awful. the wind, the rain, and then to top it off we got snow as well so we couldn't get out. you know, it was just awful. couldn't get out. you know, it was just awful-— couldn't get out. you know, it was 'ust awful. ., , just awful. northern power grid says its engineers — just awful. northern power grid says its engineers now— just awful. northern power grid says its engineers now have _ just awful. northern power grid says its engineers now have a _ just awful. northern power grid says its engineers now have a clearer - its engineers now have a clearer picture of the repairs needed. the long wait for power goes on. peter harris, bbc news, northumberland. the couple who killed six—year—old arthur labinjo—hughes are to have their sentences reviewed after claims they are too lenient. emma tustin was jailed for 29 years on friday for murder and child cruelty, and arthur's father, thomas hughes, was given 21 years for his manslaughter. the attorney general�*s office says the jail terms will be reviewed to "determine whether they were too low". the parents of a fifteen—year—old boy accused of killing four fellow students in the us state of michigan have pleaded not guilty to charges of involuntary manslaughter. prosecutors say ethan crumbley carried out the shooting at his school on tuesday with a semi—automatic pistol, which had been bought by his father.
10:10 pm
it's an unusual move for prosecutors to implicate the parents of a child's alleged crime. peter bowes reports. $7,500 fine and mandatory dna. in court, via video, james and jennifer crumbley wept as the charges were read. four counts of involuntary manslaughter. earlier the authorities offered a $20,000 reward for information leading to the couple's arrest. they have missed a scheduled court appearance, prompting a massive search by the authorities. they were found hiding in the basement of a warehouse after a tip—off from someone who saw their car. a tip-off from someone who saw their car. , ., . ., . ., car. they were in a commercial building. _ car. they were in a commercial building. in _ car. they were in a commercial building. in a — car. they were in a commercial building, in a room. _ car. they were in a commercial building, in a room. we - car. they were in a commercial building, in a room. we were l car. they were in a commercial i building, in a room. we were able car. they were in a commercial - building, in a room. we were able to take them into custody without incident, howeverthey take them into custody without incident, however they were very distressed as they were walking out for site prosecutors say the couple are culpable in the alleged crime of their teenage son because they ignored a sequence of events,
10:11 pm
including the concerns of teachers, that ethan crumbley might be about to use a gun. hours before the shooting, teachers raised the alarm after they spotted a drawing by the boy depicting a gun and a bloody scene with the words, the thoughts won't stop, help me. in another section of the note was a drawing of a bullet with the words, one everywhere. a bullet with the words, one everywhere-— a bullet with the words, one everywhere. this is an unusual case in a country — everywhere. this is an unusual case in a country that _ everywhere. this is an unusual case in a country that has _ everywhere. this is an unusual case in a country that has wrestled - everywhere. this is an unusual case in a country that has wrestled with i in a country that has wrestled with the scourge of school shootings for decades. ethan crumbley is accused of murdering four classmates, hannah saintjuliana was just 14, of murdering four classmates, hannah saintjuliana wasjust 14, take my 16, madison baldwin and justin schilling, both 17. if found guilty he faces a maximum sentence of life without parole. his parents could be sent to prison for up to 15 years. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. in recent years numerous small and medium—sized abattoirs have closed, and there are concerns
10:12 pm
more may follow. as gareth barlow, himself a former slaughterman reports, there are warnings that if more are lost, there may be significant consequences for rural economies. the north york moors. it's a landscape with agriculture at its heart. but for farmers like peter mawson, that's under threat. the majority of it is grazing land. he had to stop raising livestock after his local abattoir closed. the pigs went for good reason. there has to be a purpose, where you're making money, looking after the livestock, producing things that customers will buy and be happy with. but it reaches a point where, when it's too difficult to do that, you must stop. many smaller slaughterhouses struggle to stay open and for some farmers the lack of abattoirs able to slaughter and butcher their animals is undermining their business. and supplying direct to consumers is often far more profitable. to give you an overview idea, it might be three times as much income. it depends who i sell to, how i sell, and the carcass,
10:13 pm
so parts of it going to a restaurant would earn you less than all of it going to consumers. i've become the price—maker as opposed to the price—taker. in the 19705 there were just over 1100 red meat abattoirs in the uk. last year that figure was down to just over 200. this is one of the uk's small abattoirs. it's the abattoir that i used to work in. it's obviously closed now. this is where the livestock would have arrived. they would have come through then into here. this unit's closed and so are three more within 20 miles of here. all of their services lost from the rural economy. across the sector, abattoir owners point to finding staff, conforming to what they say are outdated regulations, and just remaining profitable, as constant challenges. but despite that, opportunities remain. abattoirs might have closed but not all of those businesses have closed.
10:14 pm
they're still there. they're now cutting plants, using the other abattoirs to do their processing for them, so it's quite a complex picture. so we've got a range of different... smaller abattoirs often provide services larger sites can't offer, enabling producers to have carcasses butchered and delivered to other businesses. and with the government's financial support forfarmers reducing, for many farms being able to supply direct to buyers and maximise profit will be increasingly vital for their survival. farmers have diversified - and they've got burger bars, farm shops, farmers' . markets, box schemes. a whole range of rural businesses are dependent on having - this service from us. abattoirs are often overlooked. they're the unglamorous part of the food supply chain. but without them and without smaller units that support local economies, there's a real risk that farms and the countryside may be forced
10:15 pm
into significant change. gareth barlow, bbc news. with all the sport now, here's karthi gnanasegaram at the bbc sport centre. hello. hello, thank you very much. there are only two races left of this year's formula one season and just eight points separate the top two. the drama continued as lewis hamilton took pole position for the saudi arabian grand prix, while the world championship leader max verstappen crashed and will start third. adam wild reports. this is a formula one's newest track, cheddar, sparkling from above, still nothing compared to the dazzling drama below. lewis hamilton can't win the saudi street circuit. he can though see it slip away. but that pressure only part of the context. hamilton suggests he isn't comfortable racing in a country so strongly criticised by human rights groups, choosing a game to wear the
10:16 pm
rainbow flag his helmet. this was qualifying but what happened in the final seconds here may go some way towards deciding the entire season. hamilton first with his last best effort, a flying lap that put him into pole position. now in red bull's max verstappen had little over a minute to go even quicker. he looked certain to do so, until this. commentator: he hits the wall! hermann tilke —— hamilton keeping pole amidst extraordinary drama. just two races left, this season is far from extraordinary drama. just two races left, this season is farfrom over. adam wild, bbc news. three different teams have been top of the premier league table today. but if you don't want to know the details, it's time to pop out of the room, as match of the day and sportscene in scotland follow soon on bbc one. it is manchester city who are the league leaders for the first time this season, after they beat watford 3—1 at vicarage road. down in the relegation zone, newcastle united had theirfirst league win of the season. they beat burnley1—0.
10:17 pm
chelsea — who were league leaders at the start of the day — lost 3—2 at west ham. southampon and brighton drew. and liverpool briefly went to the top of the table after a late goal gave them a 1—0 win at wolves. rangers are seven points clear at the top of the scottish premiership table after a 3—0 win over dundee. aberdeen beat st mirren. while hibernian and motherwell drew. england's netballers beat jamaica to win their three test series, as they prepare to defend their commonwealth games title next year. england followed up last week's win with a 66 points to 47 victory in nottingham today, in the second of the three—match series which had been postponed due to the pandemic. the world's oldest former test cricketer, eileen ash, has died at the age of 110. the bowler made her debut for england in 1937, and played seven tests either side of world war ii. ash rang the bell at lord's ahead of
10:18 pm
the women's world cup final in 2017. and the new zealand spinner ajaz patel has become only the third bowler in cricket history to take all ten wickets in one test match innings. he achieved the feat against india. that's all from may. a reminder dominic raab willjoin andrew marr 9am tomorrow on bbc one. good night.
10:19 pm
10:20 pm
hello, this is bbc news with me, lukwesa burak. one person has died and dozens have been injured on indonesia's java island, after a volcano, mount semeru, erupted. evacuation efforts have been hampered by choking smoke, a power blackout, and rainstorms during the eruption which turned the debris into mud. the bbc�*s astudestra ajangrastry reports. the debris into mud. the bbc�*s astudestra ajangrastri reports. videos circulating on social media show people are running away
10:21 pm
from thick, giant volcanic ash. nearby villages are covered in debris. according to witnesses, it's pitch dark due to the ashes from the volcano. a bridge which connects two regencies in east of java has been completely cut off due to the flow of hot lava from mount semeru. this 100 metre long bridge was destroyed by hot clouds flowing through a river. the event prompted the disaster management agency to warn residents to stay away from river channels or valleys that originate from mount semeru, given the large numbers of volcanic materials that flow through the river. this is the first eruption of semeru in almost a decade. the last eruption was in 2002
10:22 pm
and the volcanic material travelled as far as 2000 metres. from indonesia, astudestra ajengrastri. in the last hour, the white house has confirmed that president biden will hold a video call with vladimir putin next week amid growing fears that russia may be preparing to launch a full—scale invasion of ukraine. tensions between russia and ukraine have been building for some time in the wake of russia's annexation of crimea. these are ukrainian troops stationed in the donietsk region on the russian border. on friday, ukraine warned that russia is amassing more than 90,000 troops on the other side. it's saying its intelligence analysis points to a possible invasion at the end of january next year. bbc russian senior correspondent olga ivshina gave us an impression of what to expect from these talks. what is interesting is recently mr putin, during one of his public speeches, actually gave a hint that in a way he's enjoying this tension, enjoying this build—up of pressure.
10:23 pm
he said, yes, we have seen that, the intelligence reports from the western side, yes, we have seen that, the result of harsh rhetoric on the other side, but they should be worried, that is what we need. in a way, he is enjoying this nervous situation in the west. but also he needs it from the internal point of view, from the internal political point of view because russia's economy is struggling, coronavirus cases are on the rise so in order to distract attention from things that are going wrong inside the country, he definitely needs this international... ..these challenges in the international arena just to show that we have enemies outside, let's concentrate on that. let's look at some of the day's developments as the omicron strain of coronavirus continues to spread. scientists in botswana say the omicron strain, which was first detected in southern
10:24 pm
african more than a week ago, had probably been in circulation since september. health officials there say it could already have spread widely around the world, before other countries started to impose travel bans. there have been protests in austria against the coronavirus lockdown — which has been extended until at least the 11th of december. unvaccinated people who break those rules now also face fines of up to 500 euros. protests also in the netherlands — here in the city of utrecht — against the coronavirus restrictions which came into force last weekend. the country saw violent protests two weeks ago after the government announced plans to ban most people who have not been vaccinated from bars, restaurants and other public places. hundreds of people have attended a vigil for 12—year—old ava white,
10:25 pm
who was fatally stabbed in liverpool city centre last month. balloons, some in the shape of the letter a, were released at the start of the vigil. family and friends were among those who gathered near the scene of the attack to pay tribute to her. a 14—year—old boy, who cannot be named for legal reasons, has been charged with ava's murder and possession of a bladed object. counting is under way in the gambia for the first election since the former president, yahyahjammeh, left office in 2017. the west african country has a unique method to allow people to cast their ballots. high levels of illiteracy mean they are given marbles to put into barrels supporting their preferred candidates, rather than voting papers. they are then added up. our correspondent thomas naadi sent this report. polls closed at 5pm local time but those who were still in the queue were allowed to cast their marbles. the vote counting and tallying is currently under way
10:26 pm
across the country. the first past the post system is used to determine the winner of the elections, which means that the candidate with the highest number of votes is declared the winner. both president adama barrow, and the opposition candidate ousainu darboe are confident of victory. whoever winds this election will be expected to turn the economy around, especially the vital tourism sector which has been hit hard by the covid—19 pandemic. thomas naadi, bbc news, the gambia. now there's only three weeks to christmas and if you're already feeling festive, take a look at these pictures. the christmas tree lights were switched on in manger square in bethlehem. the festive season actually began there last weekend, with a christmas market and a service at the church of nativity. three christian denominations —
10:27 pm
the armenians, roman catholics and greek orthodox — share control of the church in the west bank town. time for a look at the weather now. hello there. it's been a cold day today, we've had some rain, sleet and snow. some good spells of sunshine across the south. tomorrow looks similar, but there could be more in the way of sunshine along northern and western areas. most of the showers will be further east. it's this are of low pressure which has been bringing the unsettled weather through today, sitting just to the northeast of the country — this is where we have seen the wettest of the weather and also some snow, but the blue colours show that that cold air is in place right across the uk, strong northwesterly winds have just accentuated the cold feel right across the board. through this evening and overnight it stays quite wet through central, northern and eastern areas. there will be some snow certainly over the hills. further west, a bit drier, clearer spells, lighter winds here so it could turn cold with a touch of frost and even ice where we've had
10:28 pm
the rain through today. tomorrow it looks like we will start to see a bit of a difference, this area of low pressure will affect the eastern side of the country. a ridge of high pressure will bring drier weather to the west. it will kill off most of the showers. there will still be a few showers around, particularly in wales, southwest england, but increasing amounts of sunshine further east, closer to the low, and again quite wet, southeast scotland, parts of eastern england, a few of those showers getting in towards the midlands and the winds will be strongest here as well, closer to the low. further west slightly lighter winds. many parts of scotland and northern ireland will have a better day — quite cold but plenty of sunshine around. further east, it's also going to feel cold with the showers and that strong northeasterly breeze. through sunday night, the showers fizzle away, it turns cold and clear for a while, then the next frontal system sweeps in, a band of rain with some snow over the hills of scotland and the pennines. temperatures will be coming up, though, towards the end of the night so it looks like most of that will revert back to rain. this frontal system crosses the country during monday. behind it, another cold air mass,
10:29 pm
brisk northwest winds and plenty of showers. the rain spreads its way eastwards. it could be heavy and persistent for a time, eventually the snow will clear away from the northern hills. then it is brighter into the afternoon with sunshine and showers. these showers will be blustery, heavy in the northwest and turning increasingly wintry once again as it turns colder, but still fairly mild across the far southwest. then for tuesday and wednesday, it could turn very unsettled. we could be looking at a very deep area of low pressure moving in off the atlantic, which could bring us a spell of very windy weather.
10:30 pm
hello. this is bbc news with alice baxter.
10:31 pm
—— lu kewsa burak.

40 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on