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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 6, 2021 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to bbc news. here are your headlines this monday morning. if you take take drugs at the weekend — so—called �*recreational�* drug users — you could have your passport and driving license removed as part of a government plan to reduce drug use in england and wales. we are putting a lot more investment, number one, into tackling the 300,000 problem drug users who drive about half of acquisitive crime and half of the homicides in this country. what do you think of the government's drugs plan — we're really interested to hear your view particularly if you work in the sector — whether it's in prisons, orfor drugs charities or in a drug rehab centre — @vicderbyshire on twitter or inst or email victoria@bbc.co.uk
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a warning from one of the creators of the astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine that a future pandemic could be even more lethal. nigeria moves onto the uk's red list for travel, meaning anybody arriving from the country must isolate in an approved hotel for ten days. the former myanmar leader aung san suu kyi — ousted in a military takeover — is sentenced to four years in prison for inciting unrest — the first in a series of verdicts that could see herjailed for life. a british teenager who survived a crocodile attack in zambia speaks for the first time about her ordeal. when the accident happened, i fully accept that the fact that i was going to lose my foot. and i accepted that. and i said to all my friends, it's fine, i've lost my foot, i'm still alive. and coming up —
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if you live in wales, your houshold is going to get a free tree to try to help to tackle carbon emissions. the home secretary, priti patel, will today publish a ten—year strategy for tackling drug misuse in england and wales — promising to deal further with criminal gangs, and also warning that recreational users could lose their passports or driving licences. 2,000 county lines gangs will be dismantled, according to a pledge by ministers. officials say there will be the largest ever single investment in treating and rehabilitating addicts, particularly in some of the most deprived areas that have the highest rates of drug—related crime. the prime minister said the government will look at taking away the passports and driving licences of "lifestyle" drug users.
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our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, has the details. drug misuse is one of the most hard to fix issues faced by government. close to a million people are thought to use cocaine in england and wales each year. in england alone, a quarter of a million people are long—term users of heroin and 180,000 use crack cocaine. many people use both. the new drug strategy will try to get the estimated 300,000 addicts in england and wales into better treatment, in the hopes of improving their lives and reducing crime. the strategy is disappointing, i think, from our point of view. it focuses far too much on what we already have, which is criminalising people who come into contact with drugs, and until we start seeing the drug problem as a health issue rather than a criminal issue, i don't think much is going to change. two thirds of all shoplifting, more than half of all burglary,
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and more than a quarter of all robberies in england and wales are thought to be drug related. ministers are also keen to emphasise a further crackdown on what are known as county lines gangs, which sell drugs into smaller towns and bring problems of violence and exploitation of vulnerable people with them. as part of the push to tackle demand, the prime minister has talked about punishing people who use drugs at nightclubs and dinner parties by taking away their passports and driving licences. daniel sandford, bbc news, westminster. in the last few minutes the prime minister borisjohnson has been addressing questions about tackling problem drug users and the county lines networks. what is new is that we are putting a lot more investment, number one, into tackling the 300,000 problem is drugs users who drive more than half of the acquisitive crime and half of
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the homicides in this country. crime has been coming down overall in the last couple of years but we are seeing a lot of problems caused by these 300,000 problem drug users are what we are doing is ramping up our campaign against the county lines networks that are preying on these users. you've got to invest in rehabilitation, everybody who knows about drugs trials, 300,000 people, their lives are chaotic and they need to be taken off drugs, put into rehab, but you've also got to come down hard on the gangsters who are making a of people's lives. we want everyone to be able to grow up in safer streets, everybody to have the right to have a safe community to grow up in and too many people have their lives blighted by these county lines gangs so you've got to do two things at once, be tougher in the county lines gangs, tougher on the criminals who are doing it but you
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also have to make sure you find those 300,000 people and help them. you cannot simply arrest them time after time and put them back in prison again and again, you've got to do rehab as well. what we are also saying is we are not going to sit idly by when you have lifestyle users also using class a drugs, we are going to be coming down tougher on them but this is about being a very tough on county lines gangs, ramping that up, we've already wrapped up 1,500 county lines gangs, we want to do 2,000 more. 0ur chief political correspondent adam fleming is in westminster. what is tougher than the police and law enforcement can do now? the? what is tougher than the police and law enforcement can do now? they are lookin: at law enforcement can do now? they are looking at this — law enforcement can do now? they are looking at this big _ law enforcement can do now? they are looking at this big strategy, _ looking at this big strategy, splitting it into three parts, the first part is looking at lifestyle users of drugs, not people who may be in the past would have said have a drug problem or causing problems for the system because they dabble.
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there will be a white paper eventually which will lead to some new legislation which will have new sanctions for them and it could include things like taking away their passport or driving licences so if you are found guilty of consuming some cocaine at a dinner party at the weekend, you will feel real consequences of that in your life. also there is quite an eye—opening suggestion that if drug dealers funds are confiscated then the police could send messages to their customers warning them about what could be coming their way. that whole process would take a while because as i said, there would have to be a white paper and legislation. the second basket of things, as the prime minister said, continued clamp—down on county lines, more enforcement and the expansion and turbo—charging of a model that has worked successfully in some places. that there are things about rehabilitation. that is where the most money is going to, that would be education, detox, treatment, all of that stuff. more at the softer
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end of the scale. and i wonder when we read the strategy later today, thatis we read the strategy later today, that is what the bulk of it will be, and actually the media coverage this morning, the politics this morning, focused on the much harder clamp—down stuff because the government feels that plays better with voters. �* . government feels that plays better with voters-— let's talk to marie edmonds. she's the founder of the charity aspirations programme. they work with woman caught up in street prostitution and substance abuse. i gather you have been seven and a half years clean from heroin, cocaine and alcohol. 15 half years clean from heroin, cocaine and alcohol.- cocaine and alcohol. is that correct? — cocaine and alcohol. is that correct? seven _ cocaine and alcohol. is that correct? seven and - cocaine and alcohol. is that correct? seven and a - cocaine and alcohol. is that correct? seven and a half. cocaine and alcohol. is that - correct? seven and a half years clean from _ correct? seven and a half years clean from heroin, _ correct? seven and a half years clean from heroin, cocaine - correct? seven and a half years clean from heroin, cocaine and| clean from heroin, cocaine and alcohol. is that correct? what do you think about this cocaine and alcohol. is that correct? seven and alcohol. is that correct? seven and a half years clean from heroin, cocaine and alcohol. is that correct? seven and a half years clean from heroin, cocaine and alcohol. is that correct? what do you think about this ten year strategy. i you think about this ten year strate: . . ., �* , you think about this ten year strate: . u, �* , , strategy. i welcome it. there's been a lot of cutbacks _ strategy. i welcome it. there's been a lot of cutbacks over _ strategy. i welcome it. there's been a lot of cutbacks over the _ strategy. i welcome it. there's been a lot of cutbacks over the past - strategy. i welcome it. there's been a lot of cutbacks over the past ten . a lot of cutbacks over the past ten years, but what the prime minister said about crime dropping during the
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last two years, it will happen during lockdown, and he's absolutely right, there needs to be more money that goes into the treatment side of things but what they need to be prepared for it every time they move one county lines, they will come straight back through. this one county lines, they will come straight back through.— one county lines, they will come straight back through. as he said, the have straight back through. as he said, they have clamped _ straight back through. as he said, they have clamped down - straight back through. as he said, they have clamped down on - straight back through. as he said, | they have clamped down on 1,500, disrupted 1,500 county lines, he said they want to do another 2,000 but when you clamp down on one, someone sets up a phone line to do it again somewhere else. absolutely. we see it a lot _ it again somewhere else. absolutely. we see it a lot in _ it again somewhere else. absolutely. we see it a lot in the _ it again somewhere else. absolutely. we see it a lot in the area _ it again somewhere else. absolutely. we see it a lot in the area i _ it again somewhere else. absolutely. we see it a lot in the area i am - it again somewhere else. absolutely. we see it a lot in the area i am in. i we see it a lot in the area i am in. what do you see? what do you see in your area? i what do you see? what do you see in our area? , ., ., ., ., , your area? i see a lot of vulnerable adults, i your area? i see a lot of vulnerable adults. i work— your area? i see a lot of vulnerable adults, i work with _ your area? i see a lot of vulnerable adults, i work with women, - your area? i see a lot of vulnerable adults, i work with women, as - your area? i see a lot of vulnerable adults, i work with women, as she | adults, i work with women, as she said, i work with a lot of vulnerable women who have fallen victim to county lines. the police, as you say, in my area have been extremely good with recognising that
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they are vulnerable women. and targeting the county lines, literally, as soon as they get one out of a flat, another to come back in the area. out of a flat, another to come back in the area-— in the area. that sounds like it will be a hard _ in the area. that sounds like it will be a hard job. _ in the area. that sounds like it will be a hard job. in _ in the area. that sounds like it will be a hard job. in terms - in the area. that sounds like it will be a hard job. in terms of| in the area. that sounds like it - will be a hard job. in terms of what the government are saying will be the government are saying will be the largest ever single investment in drug treatment, what do you think of that? bearing in mind the conservatives have cut expenditure on access to drug treatment nearly a fifth in the last ten years? it on access to drug treatment nearly a fifth in the last ten years?— fifth in the last ten years? it will be interesting _ fifth in the last ten years? it will be interesting to _ fifth in the last ten years? it will be interesting to see _ fifth in the last ten years? it will be interesting to see if - fifth in the last ten years? it will be interesting to see if that - be interesting to see if that happens. i know the overdose right over the last ten years, i know a substantial amount of people who are no longer with us since cutbacks happened and this strategy, i see they are going to put more community based enforcement in. they've done this, rehabilitation, we were one of the first pilots, they do not work, they do not work. people need to go
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into detox, into specialist treatment providers where they can get to look at the rate causes of their addiction which is always some kind of underlying trauma. that is what will tackle the war on drugs that we have at the minute. at the moment, we are losing the war on drugs. they have a long road ahead of them. ., ., r' drugs. they have a long road ahead of them. . ., ,, ., i. drugs. they have a long road ahead ofthem. ., ., ., ., of them. can i ask you, how you got into taken heroin _ of them. can i ask you, how you got into taken heroin and _ of them. can i ask you, how you got into taken heroin and cocaine? - of them. can i ask you, how you got into taken heroin and cocaine? i - of them. can i ask you, how you got | into taken heroin and cocaine? i was t in: to into taken heroin and cocaine? i was trying to numb _ into taken heroin and cocaine? i was trying to numb the _ into taken heroin and cocaine? i was trying to numb the pain _ into taken heroin and cocaine? i —" trying to numb the pain from some adverse childhood experiences that happen. i was talking to one of your colleagues earlier and i think kate middleton hit the nail on the head, addiction is not a choice and it can happen to anyone of us. and i think society, for people that have never experienced an addiction problem themselves, or that they do not have a family member, they said, they are going up there and they are doing it by choice, if somebody breaks their lead, they give their medication by
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the doctor to take away the pain for the doctor to take away the pain for the break. 0nce the doctor to take away the pain for the break. once you start taking that medication, that heroin, you become mentally and physically dependent so in the end, you are taking these drugs to function. because you cannot function without it. ., , ., because you cannot function without it. how did you get clean? you have been seven — it. how did you get clean? you have been seven and _ it. how did you get clean? you have been seven and a _ it. how did you get clean? you have been seven and a half— it. how did you get clean? you have been seven and a half years - it. how did you get clean? you have been seven and a half years withouti been seven and a half years without misusing alcohol, cocaine, and heroin? i misusing alcohol, cocaine, and heroin? q misusing alcohol, cocaine, and heroin? y ., ., misusing alcohol, cocaine, and heroin? ., ., ., , heroin? i went off to a rehab in weston-super-mare, - heroin? i went off to a rehab in weston-super-mare, they - heroin? i went off to a rehab in i weston-super-mare, they detox heroin? i went off to a rehab in - weston-super-mare, they detox me weston—super—mare, they detox me successfully and i went into a day programme in london. in the community. but i had to go out of my area to get clean, there was too much trauma in that area. i went to a day programme and they recognised and they acknowledged my trauma and they see me. some of us can be quite angry coming into recovery. when i was presenting angry, never told me i was wrong, told me,
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was presenting angry, never told me iwas wrong, told me, 0k, was presenting angry, never told me iwas wrong, told me, ok, it's ok was presenting angry, never told me i was wrong, told me, ok, it's ok to be angry so how do we look at this when you are not acting out on the anger? nevertold me when you are not acting out on the anger? never told me i was wrong for feeling how i was feeling and they build up myself esteem and my self—worth. and here we are. build up myself esteem and my self-worth. and here we are. thank ou for self-worth. and here we are. thank you for talking _ self-worth. and here we are. thank you for talking to _ self-worth. and here we are. thank you for talking to us, _ self-worth. and here we are. thank you for talking to us, we _ self-worth. and here we are. thank you for talking to us, we do - you for talking to us, we do appreciate it. thank you. dame carol black was invited by the home office earlier this year to conduct an independent review of recovery services and treatment for drug addicts. thank you for talking to us, what do you think of this strategy from the details we have heard so far? i’m details we have heard so far? i'm deliahted details we have heard so far? i'm delighted in _ details we have heard so far? in delighted in the strategy, is the response to my review. i do know thatis response to my review. i do know that is there and i hope they are going to be supportive and i hope the story we have just heard that we will have much more treatment and recovery services coming online. did ou recovery services coming online. did you include in your review, students are middle class, so—called middle
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class recreational users having their passports and driving licences potentially confiscated? ida. i potentially confiscated? no, i didn't but— potentially confiscated? no, i didn't but i — potentially confiscated? no, i didn't but | did _ potentially confiscated? no, i didn't but i did do _ potentially confiscated? no, i didn't but i did do a _ potentially confiscated? no, i didn't but i did do a section i potentially confiscated? no, i| didn't but i did do a section on recreational drugs because the prime minister is right, the cocaine trade is worth about 2,000,000,000 a year to the dealers and of course it's a violent trade so every time someone takes powdered cocaine, they are driving a very violent trade run by albanian gangs and that trade leads to more county lines and what young people drawn into that trade. the problem is the work i've done has always tried to be evidence—based, i could not find any evidence for what would work. at the moment, in enabling someone who is going to take recreational drugs to think again so you see in my review, i asked for an innovation fund so we could get some good pilots up and running quickly to think about what behavioural things we might use to change people's behaviour. indie
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behavioural things we might use to change people's behaviour. we 'ust don't change people's behaviour. we 'ust don-t know. — change people's behaviour. we 'ust don't know. how i change people's behaviour. we 'ust don't know. how would i change people's behaviour. we 'ust don't know. how would you i change people's behaviour. we just| don't know. how would you describe change people's behaviour. we just i don't know. how would you describe a recreational drug user, what is that, he was that person, how much are they taking and when? i that, he was that person, how much are they taking and when?— are they taking and when? i mean, for me, are they taking and when? i mean, for me. in — are they taking and when? i mean, for me. in the _ are they taking and when? i mean, for me, in the review, _ are they taking and when? i mean, for me, in the review, what - are they taking and when? i mean, for me, in the review, what i - for me, in the review, what i described were people who do not think of themselves as addicts. but in fact, perhaps on a friday, saturday night, at a dinner party, out in a club, will take a drug. whether it be cocaine or one of the other drugs. but we know more about cocaine, orat other drugs. but we know more about cocaine, or at least i knew more about cocaine when i did the work than about the others. and for their enjoyment. they do not think of themselves as addicted. the? enjoyment. they do not think of themselves as addicted. they also don't think about _ themselves as addicted. they also don't think about the _ themselves as addicted. they also don't think about the crime - themselves as addicted. they also don't think about the crime they . themselves as addicted. they also i don't think about the crime they are fuelling and the exploitation of vulnerable people?— fuelling and the exploitation of vulnerable people? fuelling and the exploitation of vulnerable --eole? , �* . vulnerable people? exactly. and what is it that we might _ vulnerable people? exactly. and what is it that we might do _ vulnerable people? exactly. and what is it that we might do that _ vulnerable people? exactly. and what is it that we might do that will - is it that we might do that will make them think about, every time
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they take that, they drive a really nasty international drug crime? and they are driving young people into gangs and into crimes? we really don't know what are the interventions that would give us the best return on investment, we simply don't know. flan best return on investment, we simply don't know. ., best return on investment, we simply don't know. . ., ,~ best return on investment, we simply don't know. . ., , ., best return on investment, we simply don't know— don't know. can i ask you when we talk about investment, _ don't know. can i ask you when we talk about investment, how - don't know. can i ask you when we i talk about investment, how much the cuts to these services, these treatments in the last ten years, how much the cuts to police officers have contributed to the position we are in now? than have contributed to the position we are in now?— have contributed to the position we are in now? �* ., ., , ., ., ., are in now? an enormous amount. you have seen since — are in now? an enormous amount. you have seen since 2013, _ are in now? an enormous amount. you have seen since 2013, since _ are in now? an enormous amount. you have seen since 2013, since there - have seen since 2013, since there was a change with the lansley reforms, year by year, the public health grant has suffered and therefore the money available for treatment and recovery has been reduced and that was combined with very good climate in colombia and afghanistan so we had lots of heroin
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and lots of cocaine coming into the market, flooding the market. so it was pure, easily available, by numerous roots. it's a bit like a perfect storm. cuts to all the public services and an oversupply, it was indeed the perfect storm. the result is a really terrible situation.— result is a really terrible situation. ., ~ ., ., ~ ., situation. thank you for talking to us. thank situation. thank you for talking to us- thank you _ situation. thank you for talking to us. thank you for _ situation. thank you for talking to us. thank you for your _ situation. thank you for talking to us. thank you for your messages. one of your works in the prison services and she says drug related crimes account for 90% of the prison population, anything that can be done to crack down on this before people reach the stage of committing crime to fund their habit is a good thing. howeverthere crime to fund their habit is a good thing. however there are many high earning and high functioning drug users in society and i am not sure these measures would have any effect on them. adam says i have been a long—term heroin addict for 20 years
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although clean for the last six and i now work for a homeless charity. i did it myself without any help from so—called drug addiction centres and i believe we should not be criminalising drug addicts. sue says perhaps it's mandatory drug testing for everyone on the parliamentary side, that is referring to a sunday times story yesterday which suggested they had found traces of cocaine in ten out of 11 sites where you can only go if you have a parliamentary pass. kieran says i used cannabis to help me get to sleep and i have many mental health conditions and it's the only medicine that really works. thank you for those, especially if you work in the sector or you have used drugs, whether you have been an addict or you are an addict, whether you would describe yourself as a recreational user, please get in touch with us. and of course you do not have to give your name. one of the scientists responsible for developing
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the astrazeneca vaccine has warned that future pandemics could prove to be even more lethal than covid unless more money is spent on preparations for dealing with them. dame sarah gilbert said that extra funding was needed to ensure the advances gained over the last two years were not lost. she also warned that current vaccines may not be as effective against the new 0micron variant. the next one could be worse. it could be more contagious or more lethal. we cannot allow a situation where we have gone through all we have gone through and then find that the enormous economic losses we have sustained mean that there is still no funding for pandemic preparedness. the advances we have made and the knowledge we have gained must not be lost. the experts who responded rapidly and worked relentlessly in 2020 and 2021, without whom we would still be at the mercy of the virus, must not now be asked to fade back into patient and underfunded obscurity. martin mckee is professor of european public health at the london school of hygiene
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and tropical medicine. thank you for talking to us. do you auree thank you for talking to us. do you aaree with thank you for talking to us. do you agree with sarah _ thank you for talking to us. do you agree with sarah gilbert? - agree with sarah gilbert? absolutely. people have been warning for many years about the risks of pandemics, we have a very severe one now but we have no idea what will come again later. this is fundamentally about the relationship between humans, animals, the natural environment which is the intersection where these zoonotic infections arise and there are a whole range of other viruses that could emerge at that point. can i ask ou could emerge at that point. can i ask you more _ could emerge at that point. can i ask you more broadly _ could emerge at that point. can i ask you more broadly about - could emerge at that point. can i ask you more broadly about omicron, ask you more broadly about 0micron, if i make? we see countries across europe and further afield imposing travel restrictions, especially in countries in southern africa. there was a specialist from south africa on bbc one yesterday who thought that nations were panicking unnecessarily and that cases although spreading fast in south africa, were all mild and no one had been admitted to hospital and no one had died. do you think we are
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panicking unnecessarily? imelt had died. do you think we are panicking unnecessarily? well the information _ panicking unnecessarily? well the information coming _ panicking unnecessarily? well the information coming from - panicking unnecessarily? well the information coming from south i panicking unnecessarily? well the - information coming from south africa is really contradictory. because if we look at the hospitalisation data from one province it has been going up from one province it has been going up four orfive times from one province it has been going up four or five times so there's a lot more people being admitted to hospital. there was a report that came from one of the hospitals, the steve biko academic hospital, which said many of the patients had other conditions but then we to need ask ourselves why has there been such a dramatic rise in admissions from other conditions if it's not covid—19 causing it? so we have been trying to get into these data and understand them and it's really quite challenging because there are other accounts coming out of south africa of a particularly young children being admitted her quite seriously ill. so i don't think we are in a position to say this is a mild infection at all, at the minute. ., , mild infection at all, at the minute. . , ., ., ., minute. that is what i have heard two exoerts _ minute. that is what i have heard two experts from _ minute. that is what i have heard two experts from south _ minute. that is what i have heard two experts from south africa - two experts from south africa including the doctor who first spotted it, saying that but it's
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interesting to hear your view. in terms of countries like nigeria, we will talk more about nigeria in a moment, added to the travel read list for the uk, what do you think of that? , ., . ~' of that? first of all, i think travel bans _ of that? first of all, i think travel bans are _ of that? first of all, i think travel bans are not - of that? first of all, i think travel bans are not a - of that? first of all, i think travel bans are not a good | of that? first of all, i think - travel bans are not a good idea because there is a real danger, i think we need to say clearly we should be incredibly grateful to the south african scientists and the authorities for the work they have done, the investment they put in thatis done, the investment they put in that is given us this information. the challenge is to make travel safe, not to stop it because people are going to move anyway. the idea that people move directly from one place to another, that is gone, many people will be transiting through airports in the middle east, for example. they will be coming into contact with other people and so there are lots of opportunities or there are lots of opportunities or the spread en route so the challenge is to make sure people are tested before they get on an aeroplane and are tested and isolated for a period afterwards and that should be applying to everybody. it's just about making travel safe, not
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stopping it. because 0micron is now spread widely across the world and it's really difficult to work out why some countries are being selected in this way and not others. thank you. thank you for talking to us. professor martin mckee. nigeria has become the latest country to be added to the uk's red travel list. ten other african countries were added to the list last week following concerns about the emergence of the 0micron variant. the british government says the decision is temporary and will be reviewed in three weeks. 0ur correspondent mayeni jones in lagos said this will have an economic as well as a social impact. what it's going to mean is huge amounts of disruption at a time of the year when nigerians both in the uk and back here in lagos are travelling. they are trying to see friends, trying to see relatives, particularly because over the last three years, many people had not been able to travel. i think it's also worth mentioning this time of year is hugely important for the nigerian economy, this is a country with a population of 200—million people, a lot of people live in the diaspora in the uk, in the united states.
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and they come back home at christmas. they spend money here, they eat in restaurants, they attend weddings and parties, all of this is now going to be affected by the fact that nigeria has been added to the uk red list. nigeria's high commissioner to the uk, ambassador sarafa isola, warned there were many nigerians who were now unable to get back to britain. talking of people who are travelling down here. a lot of people have gone home, doctors, nurses, working in the uk, providing health services to the nhs and when they come back, you can imagine the effect. and in addition, you are talking of the anger of 200—million people. since i assumed duty here, i am committed to deepening relationships between nigeria and the united kingdom and of course, this decision is going to hamper that and that's why i am not particularly happy about it.
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the former leader of myanmar, aung san suu kyi — who was ousted from power in a military coup earlier this year — has been sentenced to four years in prison. a government spokesman said she was found guilty of inciting unrest and violating covid restrictions during last year's election campaign. 0ur correspondent in thailand, jonathan head, says we don't know a great deal about the sentencing because it was held behind closed doors. she has not actually been seen in public since she was detained in the very first hours of the coup in february. we haven't heard very much about the proceedings, the lawyers have limited access to her, they are actually barred by the military from even talking about the court proceedings. all we do know is that she was found guilty on the first count of violating covid restrictions, apparently because an event where she waved at supporters while she was actually wearing a face mask and a face shield during last year's election campaign. the other case involves a statement
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that was put out by her party, the national league for democracy, right after the coup, calling on people to oppose it, she did not put her name to that statement and she was already incommunicado. she had already been detained. the judge decided she must bear responsibility for it. she was given two years on each count of a maximum of three years on these charges. i think to be honest, all the charges that have been piled up against ranging from one, in relation to walkie—talkies found in her house, used by her security guards, others far more serious involving allegations of corruption, breaking the official secrets act, the details hardly matter. the court process is so un— transparent and so widely condemned, so manifestly in violation of normal judicial procedures that everyone sees this as a political device. this is just the first verdict in what is expected to be a whole rolling series of verdicts that could put her in prison for more than 100 years.
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the education secretary nadhim zahawi will make a statement to mps this afternoon about his decision to order a national review into the death of six—year—old arthur labinjo—hughes. arthur's stepmother emma tustin and his father thomas hughes were jailed last week after being found guilty of causing his death. the pair had beaten and tortured arthur for several months before he died — but social workers had found "no safeguarding concerns". anisa kadri reports. remembering a little boy killed during lockdown by the people who were supposed to take care of him. the vigil over the weekend took place near the house in the west midlands where arthur labinjo—hughes was tortured by his stepmum and father. neighbours have expressed their shock and sadness. i'm a mother, i'm a grandmother. and i would go to the ends of the earth for my children, and my grandchildren. i'd never, ever let
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anything happen to them. and i think a lot needs to be done still to protect vulnerable children. arthur's stepmum emma tustin was jailed for 29 years for his murder and his father, thomas hughes, got 21 years for manslaughter. the government has now announced an urgent inspection of social care, health, police and probation services in solihull where arthur lived and died. as well as a review into lessons to be learnt nationally. they say it will be a deep and independent look into what happened. the education secretary is expected to discuss the case in parliament today. the secretary is expected to discuss the case in parliament today.— case in parliament today. the most im ortant case in parliament today. the most important thing _ case in parliament today. the most important thing is _ case in parliament today. the most important thing is that _ case in parliament today. the most important thing is that reviews - important thing is that reviews capture learning from these terrible, terrible things that happen. what we need governments to do is not to do yet another review but to actually fund the agencies in their local areas so they can embed their local areas so they can embed the learning from all the previous reviews that they do so things can
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actually improve for children. author, are you going to play for england~ — author, are you going to play for england. it�*s author, are you going to play for encland. fl .,, author, are you going to play for encland. �*, .,, ., , england. it's hoped any review will answer questions _ england. it's hoped any review will answer questions around - england. it's hoped any review will answer questions around the - england. it's hoped any review will i answer questions around the warning signs and what could have been done to help arthur. thousands of people in the north east of england are still without heating and hot water this morning — ten days on from the damage to power lines caused by storm arwen. northern powergrid says it hopes to have everyone in its area reconnected by tuesday, but there are concerns about the impact of storm barra, which is due to hit the uk tomorrow. all affected homes in scotland have now been reconnected. a british teenager who survived a crocodile attack in zambia has spoken for the first time about the ordeal. 18—year—old amelie osborn—smith from hampshire, was white—water rafting when the crocodile clamped onto her leg. louisa pilbeam has the story. amelie osborn—smith was on a gap year trip of a lifetime in zambia. but in the waters near victoria falls, the 18—year—old
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was attacked by a crocodile. she suffered such serious injuries to her leg, she feared she'd never walk again. when the accident happened, i fully accepted the fact that i was going to lose my foot. and i accepted that, and i said to all of my friends, it's fine, i've lost my foot, i'm still alive. and then i was told that my foot is going to be fine and i would get to walk again which is, it's such a relief. the accident happened on the zambezi river while amelie was white water rafting with a group. she was airlifted 214 miles to the capital lusaka where surgeons performed a life—saving operation and saved her leg. people say, like, you see your life flash before your eyes but you don't. you just think, how do i get out of this situation? and your brain just goes into overdrive and you think how to get out. but i was just very, very lucky.
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her condition was so severe, her grandmother was allowed by her bedside despite covid restrictions. i was so grateful that i was allowed to stay here with her. because she had these continuous flashbacks, and terrible dreams. amelie is expected back in the uk to be transferred to a hospital for more treatment. the student says the ordeal has made her more determined to return to zambia. i think, especially now, i've just seen that your life can be over so quickly. so if you're going to live thinking, it sounds so cliched but if you're going to live thinking "i'm going to regret everything," you're never going to have a fulfilled life. so ijust think, just do it while you can. louisa pilbeam, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol.
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the next storm is going to pack a punch tomorrow. we have rain moving from the west to the east and some others are seeing snow. that is going to continue to drift over towards east anglia and the safest way that will be slow to clear. behind it sunshine and showers, some of the sharers heavy with heel next then. north—west scotland seeing some wintering s. then. north—west scotland seeing some wintering 5. tonight some of the sharers will fade but we hang onto quite a few across the north west. there is the risk of ice on untreated surfaces and then we see the arrival of the storm coming in across ireland. it is going to bring with it widespread gales and the strongest gusts will be around the coasts and also destructive snow for parts of scotland and northern england. some of that getting down to lower levels.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: a ten—year strategy for tackling drug misuse in england and wales — a promise that more criminal gangs will be brokem up, and a warning to poeple who take deugs socially or at the weekend that they could lose their passports or driving licences. a warning from one of the creators of the astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine that a future pandemic could be even more lethal. nigeria moves onto the uk's red list for travel, meaning anybody arriving from the country must isolate in an approved hotel for ten days. the former myanmar leader aung san suu kyi — ousted in a military takeover — is sentenced to four years in prison for inciting unrest — the first in a series of verdicts that could see herjailed for the rest of her life. a british teenager who survived a crocodile attack in zambia speaks for the first time about her ordeal. and coming up —
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if you live in wales, your household is going to get a free tree to try to help to tackle carbon emissions. good morning. not since 1974 have two drivers lined up on the start line level on points for the final race of a formula one season. that though is the reality facing lewis hamilton and max versappen in what is a winner takes all in abu dhabi next weekend after hamilton won a chaotic saudi arabia grand prix yesterday, a race watched by adam wild. just two races left and still two drivers could become world champion. a the battle between lewis hamilton and max verstappen, a rivalry for the ages. but here, there was danger around every corner. this was mick schumacher�*s race coming to an end — a crash heavy enough to impact
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everyone, the aftermath costing hamilton the lead when they got back to the grid. verstappen was at the front this time, but the restart lasted less than a lap before they restopped. another pause to raise the tension, with verstappen back in front, the pair almost touched. seconds later, they definitely did. commentator: 0h, they touched and they collided! _ an incident that cost verstappen the lead, a penalty and ultimately the race. hamilton's victory in the craziest of circumstances. i the craziest of circumstances. didn't understand wi bra kes i didn't understand why he hit the brakes quite heavily and then i ran into the back of them and then he may have done so i didn't understand what was going on so i understood afterwards he was going to let us past. i afterwards he was going to let us ast. , ., afterwards he was going to let us ast, , ., ., afterwards he was going to let us ast. , ., ., ., ., past. i slowed down. i wanted to let him b . past. i slowed down. i wanted to let him by- he — past. i slowed down. i wanted to let him by. he didn't— past. i slowed down. i wanted to let him by. he didn't want— past. i slowed down. i wanted to let him by. he didn't want to _ past. i slowed down. i wanted to let him by. he didn't want to overtake l him by. he didn't want to overtake and then_ him by. he didn't want to overtake and then we touched. i don't really
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understand — and then we touched. i don't really understand what happened there. this extraordinary season now goes to the final grand prix in abu dhabi and the amazing rivalry will get the climax it deserves. it looks as though the new manchester united manager's working his magic already. the much—maligned midfielder fred — who's faced plenty of criticism from the club's fans — popping up to score the only goal of the game as they beat crystal palace in ralf rangnick�*s first match in charge. the first half—hour was exceptional, i thought. extreme high intensity and tempo. the only thing that was missing in that period of the game was the 1, 2—0. but the way the team defended as a team the whole game, we had control of the game. so i'm very happy with the game, the performance, but also with the result. patrick bamford came off the bench to score a dramatic stoppage—time equaliser for leeds united against brentford at elland road.
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understandable joy for the players and fans — but things got a bit out of hand in the directors' box. leeds director of football victor 0rta is known for his passionate displays in the stands — but he was furious and can be seen here screaming at someone and having to be restrained. tottenham are still unbeaten under new boss antonio conte. lucas moura's outstanding goal sent them on their way to a 3—0 win over bottom side norwich. spurs are nowjust two points behind the top four. aston villa manager steven gerrard got one over on his former boss brendan rodgers as villa came from behind to beat leicester 2—1 — defender ezri konsa scored both their goals in the second half. celtic have trimmed the gap to rangers at the top of the scottish premiership in a game which saw tom rogic score a brilliant individual goal. he produced some lovely footwork to wind his way
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through dundee united's defence before finding the finish to match it. the gap down to just four points. the big clubs will be in tonight's draw for the third round of the fa cup and here's a name to look out for. national league side chesterfield, who upset league two salford city away from home yesterday — liam manderville with a stunning strike, as they won 2—0. they'll be watching closely for an exciting draw later on. could it be liverpool or manchester united even? talking of stunning goals — have a look at sam kerr's for chelsea as they beat arsenal to win the delayed women's fa cup in front of 40,000 at wembley. it was fran kirby who put chelsea ahead afterjust three minutes. but look at this from kerr, signing off their 3—0 win in style. and that wrapped up the domestic treble for the blues. meanwhile, celtic beat glasgow city 1—0 to win the scottish women's premier league cup — caitlin hayes' header enough to clinch it. the first silverware that celtic women have won for 11 years.
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and china's zhao xintong said he'd be celebrating with a bit of karaoke back home in sheffield, after winning his first major snooker title. he beat luca brecel of belgium 10—5 at york's barbican to take the uk championship, one of the sport's triple crown tournaments. he said he'd be singing we are the champions. and we've had confirmation that the final ashes test in perth will be moved, due to coronavirus restrictions in western australia. no replacement venue has been named as yet but melbourne is standing by but officials in tasmania are lobbying to take an ashes test to hobart for the first time. the first test gets underway overnight tomorrow in brisbane. and we've heard in the last five mintues or so that darren gough has been appointed managing director of cricket at yorkshire. he takes the reins at his old club following a mass cull of staff after the racism crisis at the county.
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that's all the sport for now. let's get more now on the government's ten—year strategy for tackling drug use in england and wale. it's promising to break up more criminal gangs, andit�*s warned that warning poeple who take drugs socially or at the weekend could lose their passports or driving licences. really interested to hear from you this morning about your fears on the strategy and we will feed that into the conversation. our home editor mark easton is here with me now. what do we know about what is in it? it is interesting. with the drug debate you will remember there are two broad views. 0ne debate you will remember there are two broad views. one is that we should see this as a criminal justice issue, beat tough and crack down on the other week we should see it as a public health issue and look at treatment and prevention and recovery. all the sorts of pre—briefing, we don't actually get
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the details until this afternoon, all the pre—briefing has been about being tough, telling people they could lose their driving licence, about £300 million for the criminal justice system to help them crack down on county lines gangs, more drug testing, all the rest, that kind of thing. but there is a bit missing and that is what i think people in the sector are interested in because the money we have heard about so far 300 million, but we are also gearing other numbers and we do not know where we are going to end “p not know where we are going to end up but we have heard 700 million, 900 million, over three years. up but we have heard 700 million, 900 million, overthree years. if those numbers are right, you can see there are hundreds of millions not accounted for and that is the bit that many people in the sector are interested in because over the last ten years we have seen very significant cuts in drug treatment services. we had a reviewer which was published in the summer and in
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that review she said the provision of prevention and treatment was not fit for purpose and urgently needs repair and she said they should be spending over that same period of three years close to £400 million. a bit more than that over five years. so the interesting question is when we get the numbers will be actually be accepting her recommendation? if not there will be out from many in the sector they say you have been cutting drug services, we know what works, drug treatment, not taking away people's driving licence, very little evidence that would make much difference, if they do that will be a significant moment and a change in strategy because we have been seeing significant cuts to drug treatment services over the past decade. that could be hundreds of millions of pounds in drug rehabilitation essentially.—
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pounds in drug rehabilitation essentially. pounds in drug rehabilitation essentiall . , , ., essentially. yes, so the focus on the briefing _ essentially. yes, so the focus on the briefing we _ essentially. yes, so the focus on the briefing we have _ essentially. yes, so the focus on the briefing we have had - essentially. yes, so the focus on the briefing we have had so - essentially. yes, so the focus on the briefing we have had so far. essentially. yes, so the focus on the briefing we have had so far aj the briefing we have had so far a big focus on the 300,000 heroin and crack cocaine addicts. all the languages about punishment and forcing them to do this and that but also in there they are saying in the pre—briefing we had that this is going to be... pre-briefing we had that this is going to be---_ going to be... single largest investment _ going to be... single largest investment in _ going to be... single largestj investment in rehabilitation, going to be... single largest- investment in rehabilitation, yeah. exactly. what is that going to amount to? that is the big question as we await the details. are we going to see the level of investment thatis going to see the level of investment that is going to take on board what caro black has said and also make up for all the cuts that had been made over the years? bud for all the cuts that had been made over the years?— over the years? and also it is something — over the years? and also it is something that _ over the years? and also it is something that the _ over the years? and also it is something that the former i over the years? and also it is - something that the formerjustice something that the formerjustice secretary ken clarke has been going on about four years. we have to focus on the rehab side of things. were you going to say something else? i were you going to say something else? . . were you going to say something else? ., , ., , , ., else? i was only interested in one asect of else? i was only interested in one aspect of the _ else? i was only interested in one aspect of the report _ else? i was only interested in one aspect of the report and - else? i was only interested in one aspect of the report and we - else? i was only interested in one aspect of the report and we will i aspect of the report and we will wait to see what happens, about
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consumption rules, where those who are addicted particularly to heroin can go and see if they take drugs under supervision. there is international evidence that these are effective. in scotland they want to pursue that strategy. the snp very keen to have drug consumption rooms in scotland. there is a question because actually the strategy covers the whole of the uk so there is a question as to whether or not scotland will be allowed to do that but there is actually quite an interesting split in terms of the strategy being pursued north of the border in scotland and in england and wales. . ~ border in scotland and in england and wales. ., ,, , ., border in scotland and in england and wales-— border in scotland and in england and wales. alex stevens is professor of criminaljustice at the university of kent, and a former member of the advisory council on the misuse of drugs. thanks for talking to us. what do you think of what we know so far?
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mark easton summarised it very well. there is the approach of threatening class a drug users with removing their driving licences and their passports. their driving licences and their passports-— their driving licences and their - passports-— given passports. critical approach? given boris passports. critical approach? given itoris johnson _ passports. critical approach? given boris johnson has _ passports. critical approach? given boris johnson has admitted - passports. critical approach? given boris johnson has admitted that. passports. critical approach? given boris johnson has admitted that hej borisjohnson has admitted that he used class a drugs in the past i wonder if he will be handing his driving licence and? the minister in charge said earlier they are going to spend £530 million on treatment which would be very welcome indeed. the money is urgently needed because cuts to treatment services since 2014 have been associated with dramatic increases in drug related deaths which have risen to record levels of year since 2012. in 2016 the advisory council recommended investment in evidence—based treatment like methadone maintenance
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but those cuts continued, so if we are seeing a turning point in investment, and effective drug treatment services, and i hope that makes all the announcements today about silly punitive stigmatising intervention rather irrelevant. almost 3000 people died last year from drugs misuse according to the home secretary. well the measures that we know so far registered number? ., , ., . number? no. there is no evidence that the punitive _ number? no. there is no evidence that the punitive measures - number? no. there is no evidence that the punitive measures that i number? no. there is no evidence i that the punitive measures that have been announced so far will do anything to reduce drug—related deaths or even druggists. the government knows this from a report in 2014 on international drug policy which showed there is no link between threats and sentences. decriminalisation, sorry criminalisation and punishing people for possessing or using drugs does
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not work in deterring or reducing druggists. in 2016 the advisory council recommended the decriminalisation of the possession of drugs for personal use to me the misuse of drugs act in line with the psychoactive substances act which does not include criminalisation of the substances it controls. that is why these measures they are putting in the press release for the drug strategy seem to be mere pr windowdressing rather than reducing drug related deaths. thank windowdressing rather than reducing drug related deaths.— drug related deaths. thank you for talkin: to drug related deaths. thank you for talking to us- _ drug related deaths. thank you for talking to us. we _ drug related deaths. thank you for talking to us. we will— drug related deaths. thank you for talking to us. we will get - drug related deaths. thank you for talking to us. we will get the - talking to us. we will get the strategy which will be published this afternoon. research carried out by bbc 5 live has found that there are huge variations in the time off from work which is offered to people who suffer miscarriages. 52 businesses were asked about their policy for employees who have miscarriages before the 24th week of pregnancy. only seven had a specific "miscarriage leave" policy. ten others said it would fall under bereavement leave.
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many said any leave granted would be put down as sick leave or compassionate leave. campaigners say this can leave people unclear about where they stand. let's speak now to anna and john malnutt. anna had three miscarriages in 2018. thank you for talking to us. i wonder if you can tell our audience a little bit about what happened in 2018. , a little bit about what happened in 2018. y ., ., ., 2018. sorry, we have our little one in the background _ 2018. sorry, we have our little one in the background as _ 2018. sorry, we have our little one in the background as well- 2018. sorry, we have our little one in the background as well so - 2018. sorry, we have our little one in the background as well so if- 2018. sorry, we have our little one in the background as well so if you j in the background as well so if you hear any noise it is him, not us. do not apologise, we love kids on the telly. he not apologise, we love kids on the tell . . . . not apologise, we love kids on the tell . . , , , ., not apologise, we love kids on the tell . ., , , ., ., not apologise, we love kids on the tell. , telly. he has 'ust brought a snack. great. in telly. he hasjust brought a snack. great. in 2018 — telly. he hasjust brought a snack. great. in 2018 we _ telly. he hasjust brought a snack. great. in 2018 we decided - telly. he hasjust brought a snack. great. in 2018 we decided that - telly. he hasjust brought a snack. great. in 2018 we decided that it l great. in 2018 we decided that it was time for _ great. in 2018 we decided that it was time for us _ great. in 2018 we decided that it was time for us to _ great. in 2018 we decided that it was time for us to start - great. in 2018 we decided that it was time for us to start trying i great. in 2018 we decided that it| was time for us to start trying for a baby so we got pregnant, we were really fortunate and got pregnant very quickly, but at six weeks i started miscarrying that baby and it
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was very natural at home, itjust happened, it was obviously heartbreaking and horrible, but we know miscarriage is quite common, although it is not spoken about much. we kind of put it down to experience and said ok, well, it happens, a lot of people have one, it will be ok next time. when we got pregnant again a few months later and that one was very quick, so about five weeks i started bleeding again and sadly we lost that one as well. then we went on to get pregnant again in the august and we went for a scan because i had a little bit of pain. i wasn't really worried but i was anxious after the last couple so we went for an early scan, we were fortunate the nhs did that for us, and they said you have a six week foetus with a healthy heart beat, as far as we're concerned everything is good. i said i am eight weeks pregnant so that is
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not good. they brought us back a week later and they said that the baby's heart had stopped beating so unfortunately that pregnancy was not going to work out. they then gave us a choice of waiting for it to happen, having some drugs to make it happen, having some drugs to make it happen, or having surgery, so went home to wait for it to happen but it got today three and we thought we could not keep waiting, went in for the surgery and then that was on the wednesday and on monday i was back to work as normal. iairui’hat wednesday and on monday i was back to work as normal.— to work as normal. what you have been through _ to work as normal. what you have been through and _ to work as normal. what you have been through and then _ to work as normal. what you have been through and then going - to work as normal. what you have been through and then going back to work as normal. what you have i been through and then going back to work on monday, what was the issue with returning to work? it work on monday, what was the issue with returning to work?— with returning to work? it was difficult. because _ with returning to work? it was difficult. because i _ with returning to work? it was difficult. because i had - with returning to work? it was difficult. because i had gone l with returning to work? it was l difficult. because i had gone on with returning to work? it was - difficult. because i had gone on for the first scan on a weekend i went back to work on them monday having had the scan knowing that everything probably was not going to be all right and i got to work and i
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thought, i cannot do that. i had a week off, at the second scan and did not go back to work until the surgery and i thought i have already had a week off before i have had this miscarriage so it feels unfair to stay off, so i felt like i needed to stay off, so i felt like i needed to go back. to stay off, so i felt like i needed to go back-— to go back. yeah, you felt guilty. absolutely- _ to go back. yeah, you felt guilty. absolutely. they _ to go back. yeah, you felt guilty. absolutely. they were _ to go back. yeah, you felt guilty. absolutely. they were really - absolutely. they were really supportive but i didn't feel like it was fair on them for me to keep staying at home. i felt like i was wasting their time.— staying at home. i felt like i was wasting their time. what about you? that last miscarriage _ wasting their time. what about you? that last miscarriage i _ wasting their time. what about you? that last miscarriage i had _ wasting their time. what about you? that last miscarriage i had just - that last miscarriage i had just started — that last miscarriage i had just started a — that last miscarriage i had just started a new role and on the day that and — started a new role and on the day that and i— started a new role and on the day that and i went in for the surgery i rot that and i went in for the surgery i got a _ that and i went in for the surgery i got a fairly— that and i went in for the surgery i got a fairly important meeting i was supposed _ got a fairly important meeting i was supposed to be going to end it is those _ supposed to be going to end it is those expectations around meeting new people and not necessarily knowing — new people and not necessarily knowing then that well and not wanting — knowing then that well and not wanting to share what was going on and sometimes i think for partners
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it feels— and sometimes i think for partners it feels like... for me it felt like it feels like... for me it felt like it was— it feels like... for me it felt like it was anna _ it feels like... for me it felt like it was anna who was going through it and so _ it was anna who was going through it and so she _ it was anna who was going through it and so she needed time off and i needed _ and so she needed time off and i needed to— and so she needed time off and i needed to going but obviously there is no need _ needed to going but obviously there is no need to grieve ourselves —— the need — is no need to grieve ourselves —— the need to— is no need to grieve ourselves —— the need to grieve ourselves and even _ the need to grieve ourselves and even though it is not happening to you you _ even though it is not happening to you you have to grieve and you have to be _ you you have to grieve and you have to be there — you you have to grieve and you have to be there for anna as well having the surgery. to be there for anna as well having the surgery-— the surgery. absolutely. do you think it is a _ the surgery. absolutely. do you think it is a good _ the surgery. absolutely. do you think it is a good idea _ the surgery. absolutely. do you think it is a good idea for- think it is a good idea for employers to have a specific miscarriage policy rather than it coming under bereavement leave or sick leave or compassionate leave? absolutely. we think it is essential. because we didn't know what to do. there were no policies, procedures, errant players didn't really know. john's employer didn't find out about it until much later so they could not be held to account for that because we never told them. if there had been a policy that said
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this is what you do in these circumstances we would have been able to say we know what to do so let's carry on and do that but because there was nothing to tell us, it is that permission to take that time to yourself. i was fortunate i almost had the self—awareness to say i cannot go to work. so many womenjust self—awareness to say i cannot go to work. so many women just go through it and go straight on to work while we are experiencing miscarriage and mentally horrendous and how people function while at work is just crazy to me. it is knowing who to talk to and who to ask— it is knowing who to talk to and who to ask for that time as well and if you know— to ask for that time as well and if you know you have that time there you know you have that time there you know — you know you have that time there you know it— you know you have that time there you know it is there and you can take _ you know it is there and you can take it — you know it is there and you can take it. �* , ., ., ., , take it. and your little one has been delightfully behaved. - take it. and your little one has| been delightfully behaved. how take it. and your little one has - been delightfully behaved. how old and what is the name? l is been delightfully behaved. how old and what is the name?— been delightfully behaved. how old and what is the name? l is and he is one and a half. _ and what is the name? l is and he is one and a half. we _ and what is the name? l is and he is one and a half. we were _ and what is the name? l is and he is one and a half. we were really - one and a half. we were really fortunate that when we got pregnant i had moved to a new employer because the pressure of everything i
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went through at the time with a previous employer and going back too soon meant that i was really unwell and i had such negative associations with the place that i had to leave the job because with the place that i had to leave thejob because it was not a good place for me and damaged relationships because of my behaviour because of grief. i had gone through all of those phases of grief and i was not myself. ijust could not be there anymore so we move jobs and when i could not be there anymore so we movejobs and when i got pregnant my and player were fantastic and the nhs were amazing. we had lots of extra scans and encouragement and support and reassurance and that made a massive difference to us. thank you so much for talking to us. we really appreciate it. if you live in wales, then the welsh government is planning to give you a free tree
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to plant to help tackle climate change. you'll have a choice of native species to plant in your garden or have one added to woodland on your behalf. the scheme will cost around two million pounds and aims to plant around 1.3 million trees. 0ur wales correspondent hywel griffiths reports. from these young seedlings, one day, entire forests may grow. the welsh government says it wants to see 86 million trees planted across wales by the end of the decade to capture carbon and combat climate change. that's why next year it will offer over a million native trees for free — either to be added to a woodland like this or for people to plant themselves at home. but at the cost of £2 million to the taxpayer, how likely is it that they'll survive and thrive? trees are tough, actually. you've got to treat them pretty badly to kill a tree. you know, just a bit of tender loving care and it will be fine. bit of space and plenty of water. to reach 86 million, many, many more will need to be planted.
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a national forest stretching across wales is planned. a similar scheme is happening in the midlands. but planting to capture carbon is the subject of scientific debate. it depends on the type of tree and its location. stopping deforestation is, for some, a bigger priority, as well as cutting emissions. whether wales's big tree giveaway can have a meaningful impact won't be clear for at least a generation. but ministers say it's a worthwhile investment in the nation's future. hywel griffith, bbc news. today across the board it is going to be cold and it is going to be windy. these are the two common denominators. we have some rain as well and some of us have seen some snow as we have gone through the course of this morning. all of this
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is courtesy of a weather front moving from the west towards the east and as you can see from the eyesit east and as you can see from the eyes it is going to be windy. the weather front we see a return to last three showers. the rain continuing to push steadily eastwards. the snow level rising. when she across higher ground especially in the north—west. cold with temperatures five to nine, maybe ten or 11. tonight we say goodbye to that rain. some of the charitable fate. still wintry in nature across the north west and under clear skies it is going to be a cold night with the risk of frost and ice untreated surfaces. by the end of the night storm barra will be showing its hand across ireland and this is where we are likely to see the biggest impacts on tuesday. here
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comes storm barra on tuesday. some rain, snow and also windy conditions. the wind will be a feature of the storm. destructive potentially damaging winds, widespread gales and also some snow across scotland and also northern england. we start on a cold frosty note with a fair bit of sunshine but as the storm is then you can see the rain coming our way. initially into northern ireland, wales and the south—west and then pushing steadily northwards. two to five centimetres of snow. we could see double that amount across the southern uplands and the highlands. at the strength of the wind and some of the higher rates we could have blizzards and drifting of the snow. temperatures between four and 11 but academic with everything else going on. as we had from tuesday into wednesday the storm centres across the uk. tightly packed isobars across the south—west. still looking at gales
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and there will be some rain and some showers some of which will be wintry but the winds will slowly ease part of the day and once again wherever you are it is going to feel cold.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the former myanmar leader aung san suu kyi — ousted in a military takeover — is sentenced to four years in prison for inciting unrest — the first in a series of verdicts that could see herjailed for the rest of her life. one of the creators of the oxford astrazeneca coronavirus vaccine urges the world to invest more to prepare forfuture pandemics — saying the next one could be even worse. if you take take drugs at the weekend — so—called �*recreational�* drug users — you could have your passport and driving license confiscated — as part of a government plan to reduce drug use in england and wales. we are putting a lot more investment, number one, into tackling the 300,000 problem drug users who drive about half of acquisitive crime and half of the homicides in this country.

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