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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  December 6, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

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at six: tackling illegal drug use in england and wales — the government unveils its long—term stategy. joining officers on a raid on merseyside, the prime minister vows to come down hard on drug dealers as well as recreational users. the drugs gangs are doing major damage to life chances of kids growing up in this country. i think it's a disgusting trade. the government has announced what it says is the largest ever investment in drug treatment. also on the programme: the omicron variant of covid spreads in britain — more than 330 cases now. the health secretary says it's not yet clear if it'll knock us off the road to recovery. the "tragic and horrific" death of six—year—old arthur labinjo—hughes — the education secretary says an investigation will begin
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immediately to find out what went wrong. the inquiry into the grenfell tower disaster is told that successive governments concealed risks to building safety, resulting in "one of the major scandals of our time". and lucky to be alive — the british teenager recovering in hospital after she was attacked by a crocodile while white water rafting in zambia. coming up on sportsday later in the coming up on sportsday later in the are on the bbc news channel: its neck and neck in the formula 1 title race between hamilton and verstappen, but will it be a clean fight in the final race of the season? coming up on sportsday in the next good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. the goverment will tonight set out a ten year strategy for dealing with drugs in england and wales.
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the prime minister says the focus will be on supporting the rehabiliation of drug addicts, doing more to discourage recreational users, and coming down hard on drug gangs. £780 million will be spent on improving treatment services over the next three years. £300m has been pledged to crack down on drug gangs. it's thought there are more than 260,000 heroin addicts in england. and almost a million people using cocaine every year in england and wales. many crimes are drug—related, including more than half of burglary and shoplifting offences, and costs around £20 billion a year in england alone. our home editor mark easton reports. this report contains some flashing images. as officers conducted raids against suspected drug dealers in liverpool this morning, the prime minister put on a police beanie, the
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visual message being that enforcement remains at the heart of his drugs strategy, getting tough with the estimated 300,000 heroin and cocaine addicts, but boris johnson also hinted at a huge financial announcement to come. we are financial announcement to come. - are going to do two things at once. we will be tougher on the county lines gangs, we'll be tougher on the criminals who are doing it, but you've also got to make sure that you've also got to make sure that you find those 300,000 people and you find those 300,000 people and you help them. you can't simply arrest them time after time and put them back in prison again and again, you've got to do rehab as well. the £780 million _ you've got to do rehab as well. the £780 million for treatment and recovery programmes in england will provide for more drugs workers, more residential rehab places and more job opportunities to help people stay off drugs, overall a far bigger settlement than expected. the last two dru: settlement than expected. the last two drug strategies _ settlement than expected. the last two drug strategies have _ settlement than expected. the last two drug strategies have been - two drug strategies have been accompanied with lots of promises but no _ accompanied with lots of promises but no cash, so it makes a welcome change _ but no cash, so it makes a welcome change to— but no cash, so it makes a welcome change to have a drugs strategy that
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is backed _ change to have a drugs strategy that is backed up with the cash needed to invest— is backed up with the cash needed to invest in_ is backed up with the cash needed to invest in effective drug treatments. essex _ invest in effective drug treatments. essex police recently conducted raids in southend and other towns in the county to disrupt the dealers, but despite decades of such activity, drug gangs still control in illicit business which costs billions £20 billion a year and reaches into almost every community. the government wants to demonstrate that it the government wants to demonstrate thatitis the government wants to demonstrate that it is taking on the dealers in the addicts who bring fear and misery to neighbourhoods like this, but those who work in the field say the key to reducing drug harms is to see the problem as a public health issue, not a criminaljustice one. on the estate a few years back, 0n the estate a few years back, there was quite a lot of drug use. marie started injecting heroin to escape the reality of a violent domestic life on this southend estate. in and out of prison, her children were taken into care. now, after treatment, she is clean and runs a charity helping other drug users in the city. if you were the prime minister, what would you do to solve britain's drugs problem. {buck
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solve britain's drugs problem. chuck a load of money _ solve britain's drugs problem. chuck a load of money into _ solve britain's drugs problem. chuck a load of money into treatment - a load of money into treatment facilities. 0pen a load of money into treatment facilities. open up the 30 odd treatment centres that have been closed down in the last ten years. i have stood had enough people's funerals in the last ten years watching little children bury their mothers and fathers. the government going to look like don't get to see that side of it.— going to look like don't get to see that side of it. to's announcement, thou~h, that side of it. to's announcement, though. goes _ that side of it. to's announcement, though. goes a _ that side of it. to's announcement, though, goes a long _ that side of it. to's announcement, though, goes a long way _ that side of it. to's announcement, though, goes a long way to - that side of it. to's announcement, i though, goes a long way to reversing the cup to treatment over the last decade. users that marie's southend service are hoping at least some of the money might help fund the work currently paid for from charity. coming here and connecting with all these _ coming here and connecting with all these people, it'sjust, i'm not alone — these people, it'sjust, i'm not alone i— these people, it'sjust, i'm not alone. i mean, ithought it these people, it'sjust, i'm not alone. i mean, i thought it wasjust me that _ alone. i mean, i thought it wasjust me that was — alone. i mean, i thought it wasjust me that wasjust alone. i mean, i thought it wasjust me that was just crackers. you know what _ me that was just crackers. you know what i _ me that was just crackers. you know what i mean — me that was just crackers. you know what i mean? — me that wasjust crackers. you know what i mean?— what i mean? dame carol black, who recently wrote _ what i mean? dame carol black, who recently wrote a _ what i mean? dame carol black, who recently wrote a review _ what i mean? dame carol black, who recently wrote a review of _ what i mean? dame carol black, who recently wrote a review of drugs - recently wrote a review of drugs policy for the government, joined the health secretary this afternoon at a needle exchange. she welcomes the focus on — at a needle exchange. she welcomes the focus on public _ at a needle exchange. she welcomes the focus on public health _ the focus on public health interventions. we do want county lines to disappear, but unless you give equal balance to treatment and
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recovery, we are really not going to move forward. the recovery, we are really not going to move forward-— move forward. the public may want reassurance — move forward. the public may want reassurance that _ move forward. the public may want reassurance that police _ move forward. the public may want reassurance that police and - move forward. the public may want reassurance that police and the - reassurance that police and the courts are dealing with the scourge of drug crime, but the evidence suggests it's a focus on treatment that will make the real difference. and mark is here now. you've been looking at the investment — how much difference could this make? this investment - how much difference could this make?— could this make? this is a significant _ could this make? this is a | significant announcement. could this make? this is a - significant announcement. dame could this make? this is a _ significant announcement. dame carol black, who we saw in the film, wrote a review for the government which came out in the summer, and she suggested we needed to spend pretty much £400 million on drug treatment services over the next three years. in fact, the government today announced a £780 million. there are many people in the drugs world who are really very pleasantly surprised by what has happened, because they say that this will go not the whole way but a very long way to make up for many of the cuts that we have seen to drug services across england, and england and wales over the last ten years. i do think that
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today actually could mark the start of a new chapter, a new era, perhaps, in drug treatment services in england. perhaps, in drug treatment services in encland. ~ ., perhaps, in drug treatment services in enland. ~' .,, ., ., ~' perhaps, in drug treatment services in enuland. ~' ., ., ~' 336 cases of the omicron variant of coronavirus have now been detected in england, scotland and wales. the health secretary sajid javid says some cases aren't related to travel, meaning it's now spreading in the community. scientists believe omicron could soon become the dominant variant in the uk. here's our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. this got to school, the first in the uk to be suspected of a omicron outbreak. parents were told last night to keep pupils away and switch to remote learning of the two classes and multiple teachers had to self isolate. this afternoon, the health secretary told mps omicron had now been reported in 52 countries around the world, and that in the uk there was community
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transmission in multiple regions. taste transmission in multiple regions. we don't transmission in multiple regions. - don't yet have a complete picture of whether omicron causes more severe disease, or indeed how it interacts with the vaccines, and so, we can't say for certain at this point whether omicron has the potential to knock us off our road to recovery. and labour responded, calling on ministers to commit to a framework of tighter controls for the future. given the likelihood of new variants. _ given the likelihood of new variants, will the government now introduced — variants, will the government now introduced as a standard response to new variants overseas, introducing stronger— new variants overseas, introducing stronger border controls, testing and contact tracing so the government isn't again accused of locking _ government isn't again accused of locking the door after the horse has bolted _ locking the door after the horse has bolted? _ locking the door after the horse has bolted? just locking the door after the horse has bolted? , ., .., . , ., bolted? just how concerned we should be about omicron _ bolted? just how concerned we should be about omicron is _ bolted? just how concerned we should be about omicron is the _ bolted? just how concerned we should be about omicron is the big _ bolted? just how concerned we should be about omicron is the big unknown. | be about omicron is the big unknown. scientists are working around the clock to test whether it can evade vaccines, but there is no lab test for whether it causes serious disease. that data will come from
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infected communities, and it may be many weeks before we have the answer. 0fficialfigures many weeks before we have the answer. official figures for the many weeks before we have the answer. 0fficialfigures for the uk put the number of omicron cases at over 300, put the number of omicron cases at over300, but put the number of omicron cases at over 300, but some believe the true figure may be more than 1000. the earl sins figure may be more than 1000. tue: early signs are figure may be more than 1000. tte: early signs are that figure may be more than 1000. t"te: early signs are that it figure may be more than 1000. t'te: early signs are that it will probably spread quite quickly, and probably spread quite quickly, and probably start out competing delta and become the dominant variant, probably within the next weeks or a month or so at least. the likelihood is, month or so at least. the likelihood is. therefore. _ month or so at least. the likelihood is, therefore, that _ month or so at least. the likelihood is, therefore, that by _ month or so at least. the likelihood is, therefore, that by christmas, . is, therefore, that by christmas, there will be a lot more omicron around, and perhaps by then we will have a slightly better understanding ofjust how have a slightly better understanding of just how this have a slightly better understanding ofjust how this new have a slightly better understanding of just how this new variant will affect us. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. the government's latest coronavirus figures show there were 51,459 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period — that's around 9,000 more than this time last week. on average, there were just over 47,000 new cases reported per day in the last week. the latest figures show
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there were 7,268 people this in hospital being treated for coronavirus on friday. 41 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test — only slightly higher than last monday. on average in the past week, 119 covid—related deaths were recorded every day. 0n vaccinations, more than 20.5 million people have now had a boosterjab. from tomorrow, all travellers arriving in the uk will have to have had a negative pcr or medically supervised lateral flow test before they arrive in the uk. nigeria has been added to the travel red list meaning arrivals must quarantine in a hotel here for 10 days. 0ur transport correspondent katy austin reports. beaches, scenery, and relaxation — thatis beaches, scenery, and relaxation — that is what lauren and her partner went to south africa for. then it
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went to south africa for. then it went on the red list. it took days to find a quarantine hotel room for their return to the uk. after eventually flying into london, they were taken there by bus. there was a problem. the were taken there by bus. there was a roblem. ., ., problem. the gentleman went with our --assorts problem. the gentleman went with our passports and — problem. the gentleman went with our passports and came — problem. the gentleman went with our passports and came back _ problem. the gentleman went with our passports and came back and - problem. the gentleman went with our passports and came back and said - problem. the gentleman went with our passports and came back and said the. passports and came back and said the hotel in fact wasn't ready for anyone today, and so it was cancelled today. they spent most of today on that bus without food or water while an alternative was found. i'm so exhausted. i've never felt stress and anxiety quite like i have in the past few days. in terms of how i feel about how it has been handled, i mean, disgraceful, utterly disgraceful. find handled, i mean, disgraceful, utterly disgraceful. and strengthen our measures... _ utterly disgraceful. and strengthen our measures... quarantine - utterly disgraceful. and strengthen our measures... quarantine hotell our measures... quarantine hotel caaci our measures... quarantine hotel capacity in — our measures... quarantine hotel capacity in the — our measures... quarantine hotel capacity in the uk _ our measures... quarantine hotel capacity in the uk is _ our measures... quarantine hotel capacity in the uk is under- capacity in the uk is under pressure, but the health secretary said today it is rapidly being expanded. nigeria alsojoined the red list today. for how then, who lives in nigeria, it has thrown her
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family's plans into doubt. three of her sons, all british citizens, are at school in the uk, and she is worried they won't be able to join herfor worried they won't be able to join her for christmas. worried they won't be able to join herfor christmas. tt worried they won't be able to 'oin her for christmasi her for christmas. if my children decide to follow _ her for christmas. if my children decide to follow the _ her for christmas. if my children decide to follow the emotional. her for christmas. if my children i decide to follow the emotional path and say, let them come home and we will deal with it later, fine, they come home, great, but how do they go back? my three children, of which one is autistic, cannot possibly stay ten days locked up in a hotel room. ,., �* , stay ten days locked up in a hotel room. �*, . , ., room. the uk government's decision has provoked — room. the uk government's decision has provoked anger— room. the uk government's decision has provoked anger in _ room. the uk government's decision has provoked anger in nigeria. - room. the uk government's decision has provoked anger in nigeria. the i has provoked anger in nigeria. the country's high commissioner to london said it was unjustified. ethic; london said it was un'ustified. only three cases _ london said it was un'ustified. only three cases have _ london said it was unjustified. only three cases have been identified within— three cases have been identified within nigeria, and you know that the omicron variant has been in other— the omicron variant has been in other non—african countries. either select— other non—african countries. either select a _ other non—african countries. either select a ban— other non—african countries. either select a ban on african countries? even _ select a ban on african countries? even if— select a ban on african countries? even if you — select a ban on african countries? even if you are not coming in from a red list country, more travel rules are on the way. from 4am tomorrow, everyone aged 12 and over must take
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a covid test within 48 hours of setting up of the uk, on top of the pcr test they also need to take within two days of arriving. ministers say fresh temporary restrictions on international travel are necessary because of the new variant. the travel industry fears a bleak winter ahead. this evening, lauren has finally arrived at a quarantine hotel, after a nightmare into what should have been a dream trip. katie austen, bbc news. the education secretary, nadhim zahawi, has said that the whole nation is distraught at the death of arthur labinjo—hughes and find it impossible to imagine how any adult could commit such evil acts against a child. arthur was tortured and killed by his father and step mother. mr zahawi said a national investigation into the 6 year old's death will begin immediately. our special correspondent lucy manning has more. now everybody, neighbours, politicians, social services think
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about arthur labinjo—hughes, but so few thought about him when he was alive. arthur, are you going to play for england? the boy who loved football and superheroes was tortured, abused and eventually killed by his father and stepmother. some did care. his grandmother and uncle contacted the police and social services. social workers went to his home. yet nothing was done. now inquiries launched, questions asked. the education secretary said that the whole nation was distraught. the public deserves to know why in this rare case things went horrifyingly wrong and what more could be done to prevent abuse such as this happening again in the future. labour said it was notjust a local problem with sully whole children's services. ——solihull children's services. for too long, this- government has tolerated failing children's services - and a failure to protect children. vulnerable children are being| failed, and that cannot go on. but too late for arthur. other children came before arthur.
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baby p, peter conley, and victoria. reviews were held, but the mix of evil parents, the missed warnings by social services and potentially in this case lock down where his extended family were kept away means more recommendations will be made, but will they help the children still at risk now? so a national review in to how thomas hughes and emma tustin were able to kill arthur and inspections into the response of the police, social services and education system. the mp4 solihull, where arthur died, made this emotional plea. at the very least, we owe it to arthur that every lesson from this horrific tragedy is learned and no town has its heart broken like solihull has had. and so they would never be another child who says no one loves me, no one's going to feed me. lucy manning, bbc news.
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the time is 6:15pm. our top story this evening: the prime minister says he will crack down on drug dealers and recreational users as the government unveils its 10 year strategy. coming up....the gift of a free tree for every household in wales to try to fight climate change. coming up on sportday in the next 15 minutes on the bbc news channel: just have a 24 out before the start of the ashes, we'll have the latest from australia and hear from the england captain, joe root. the grenfell tower inquiry has begun examining what successive governments knew about fire safety and building regulations in the years before the 2017 tragedy which claimed 72 lives. laywers have outlined several missed oportunities to change regulations. that includes not acting on tests more than a decade before the fire
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which showed cladding sheets made of the same materials as used on the grenfell refurbishment were highly flammable. here's our home affairs correspondent tom symonds. a fire in knowsley on merseyside in 1992. another one, irvine, north ayrshire, 1999. southwark, south london, 2009. early warnings of what was to happen on a much more devastating scale. today at the public enquiry, governments going back decades were accused of knowing there were safety concerns but not acting. the result is a prolonged period of concealment by government, which should properly be regarded as one of the major scandals of our time. in 2010, the new coalition government wanted to build more homes. but it was accused today of an unbridled passion for cutting red tape to make that happen, and putting lives at risk. former ministers are expected to give evidence here.
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it is in the interests of the enquiry's work and so in the public interest that these bodies fully embrace their obligations of candour and openness and face up to the stark reality is that they reveal. one question, why did government guidance, seemingly allow flammable cladding to be used on tall buildings for decades? it took this for change to happen. the government banned flammable materials on tall buildings after the grenfell tower fire, and the loss of 72 lives. another question, a coroner investigating the fatal lakanal house fire in 2009 recommended a review of the government guidance for tall building construction. why wasn't it complete, eight years later when grenfell happened ? and another.
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a cladding system failed a fire test similar to this one. today a source said it was identical or the same as the grenfell cladding but until the results were leaked to us this year, they were confidential. why? the evidence we've heard and the evidence we will hear points clearly to the fact that the government knew that their regulations were not fit for purpose, that they were being manipulated by companies, but they chose, rather than to do something about it, they chose to cover it up and i guess cross their fingers that nothing terrible would ever happen. the government is spending billions on attempting to resolve the crisis in building safety following grenfell. its opening statement is tomorrow. tom symonds, bbc news. residential care homes can be expensive. some people pay more than £1,000 a week for the support they need. many of the uk's care homes are run by big companies which have tens of thousands of beds. but some families are asking where the money actually goes. 0ur social affairs editor, alison holt has been investigating for bbc panorama.
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herfindings have prompted the former health secretary jeremy hunt to call for a closer look into the finances of big care home companies. it's just over a year since dale's father died and he has many questions about the care his dad received, and its cost. norman had dementia and was living in a care home near wigan. he wasn't there long before the family became concerned. sometimes he was dressed in clothes that weren't his. i once went in and he had a woman's blouse on. his dignity had been... gone a little bit. i was mortified when i looked at the bottom of his feet because they were as black as tarmac. i got an apology off the manager at the time. that was like a small snapshot, to me, of what was going on. the private equity—backed care home company says the home has a new senior team, but dale wants to know where the £1,000 a week his dad paid in fees went. he spent £125,000, paying a lot of money for his care. i was expecting a little
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bit more quality. private equity firms own some of the largest uk care home groups, and there are questions about whether too money leaks away from front line care, partly because of having complex structures with numerous companies, some in offshore tax havens. it should surely be the case that these structures should be transparent. they should either bring them onshore or they should be required to disclose the full finances of the entire group. in australia, jason ward works for an international tax justice group and has been looking at the accounts of the uk's largest private equity—owned care home company, hc—0ne. his report, given exclusively to panorama, shows in 2020 the company made a £4.8 million dividend payment two days after it sent a letter asking councils for more financial help during the pandemic. at the end of the day, they're begging for more
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money from cash—strapped local authorities. people are cashing in on the value of their homes to fund that care. it's pretty shocking and disturbing. hc—0ne says the dividend payment was to pay asset management fees and interest on a third—party loan and that its shareholders have taken no dividend since 2017. it also says it's since restructured and reduced its debt. more generally, jeremy hunt, the former health and social care secretary, thanks government reforms should include more checks on care company finances. there's a real opportunity, now, to lay down a long—term plan for the sector and to channel private sector investment in _ the way we want, and that could be a very positive thing. the government says it's up to councils to ensure providers offer good care and interest in services. alison holt, bbc news. and you can see more on panorama "crisis in care: follow
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the money" tonight at 7:30pm on bbc one. myanmar�*s military rulers are facing international condemnation, after the deposed civilian leader aung san suu kyi was given a four—year prison sentence. she was convicted of inciting unrest and violating covid restrictions during last year's election campaign. state media said her sentence was reduced from four to two years after a partial pardon by the head of the militaryjunta. although she still faces further charges. 0ur south east asia correspondentjonathan head joins me now. what does this mean for aung san suu kyi? what does this mean for aung san suu k i? ., , what does this mean for aung san suu kyi? ., , what does this mean for aung san suu k i? ., , ., what does this mean for aung san suu kyi? ., , what does this mean for aung san suu k i? ., , ., , kyi? the military government is t in: to kyi? the military government is trying to give — kyi? the military government is trying to give an _ kyi? the military government is trying to give an impression - kyi? the military government is trying to give an impression of i trying to give an impression of leniency by cutting the sentence but as human right groups pointed out, these trials, and she faces many of them, have little similarity to fair process. they've been secret committees had little access to her lawyers and has been kept in isolation since the day she was arrested when the military seized
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power. these processes are very politicised. she faces ten, 11 more serious charges that may result in a prison sentence up to 100 years and they may take many more months. in they may take many more months. in the meantime her country has descended into a catastrophic conflict because people who support aung san suu kyi, and she is very popular, initially started protesting and were gunned down by the military and they're beginning to take up arms. we are seeing conflict all over the country, the economy has collapsed and that will probably decide what happens to aung san suu kyi, when we see some resolution of that, rather than these sham trial processes and prison sentences.— two police officers who took pictures of two murdered sisters in a london park have been jailed for two years and nine months. pcs deninaffer and jamie lewis had been assigned to guard the scene where the bodies of nicole smallman and bibaa henry were discovered in wembley, but shared the images with friends and colleagues on whatsapp.
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they had previously pleaded guilty to misconduct in a public office. a british teenager who was attacked by a crocodile while on holiday in zambia is recovering in hospital in london. 18—year—old amelie 0sborn—smith said she is very, very lucky to be alive. she was white—water rafting with friends on the zambezi river near the victoria falls when the crocodile bit her leg and tried to drag her under the water. 0ur correspondent duncan kennedy has the details. it's not many people who can say they've escaped from a crocodile attack. but amelie 0sborn—smith has done that on a trip to zambia. she says her foot was in the croc�*s mouth. when the accident happened, i fully accepted the fact that i was going to lose my foot. 0k. i accepted that and i said to my friends it's fine, i've lost my foot. i'm still alive. crocodiles on the zambezi can grow to 18 feet long. amelie had been rafting with friends when she somehow ended up in the water.
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a number of people jumped into save her. people say that you see, like, your life flash before your eyes but you don't. you just think, "how do i get out of this situation?" and your brain just goes into overdrive and you just think how to get out. i was just very, very lucky. amelie's father, brett, told me the family are hugely relieved she's still alive and says she is now being treated in a london hospital. the boat had been hired from a company called bundu rafting. these some are of the shots from the website they use. in a statement they said "the group accompanying ms 0sborn—smith "responded and brought ms 0sborn—smith back into the raft. "what happened to ms 0sborn—smith is an unfortunate accident, "the first of its kind to occur with bundu rafting." amelie says she doesn't regret the trip. it sounds so cliche to live thinking i'm going to regret anything.
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i know i'm going to have a fulflled life. ijust think, just do all you can. an investigation is taking place into how it happened. amelie says she just wants to return to zambia to thank those who saved her. duncan kennedy, bbc news. a tree for free — that's what every household in wales is going to be offered as a way of tackling climate change. you can plant your tree in your own garden or have it planted in woodland. the welsh government says it hopes the £2 million project — which begins in march — will encourage families to continue planting more trees in the future. 0ur wales correspondent hywel griffith has the details. it's the original carbon capture technology. around the world, planting more trees has become a popular response to the climate emergency. the welsh government says giving awayjust over1 million trees is about engagement, not green—wash. they'll either be added to a woodland like this or people can
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choose to plant them at home. but they'll only be a fraction of the number needed to reach net zero. we can't wait for a perfect solution. we've got to try stuff and we've got to do it fast. we are going to plant 86 million trees, purely on carbon terms alone. the good thing with planting trees is, you don'tjust get a carbon benefit. you get a benefit for nature, a benefit for dealing with flooding, for tackling crime, for dealing with health. at this time of year, many of us are more focused on trees for tinsel. that one there, is it? rather than tackling crime. the government giveaway will cost £2 million. so, will people want to plant one? i think most people would be quite pleased to do that and i'm glad that the government is actually doing something to sort of help the environment. it will be more how these people look after the trees because when you plant a young tree, they take a look of looking after, to start with. so, it seems like a lot of money. the trees will be native species planted in people's gardens or they could be added to what will become a national forest for wales.
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how much difference can they really make? at the moment across europe, forests only absorb around 10% of greenhouse gases. a lot comes down to putting the right tree in the right place at the right time. in mass planting, around a third don't survive. we are essentially then disturbing the soil and putting more c02 into the atmosphere. so, we need to get this right, because otherwise we're actually going to be producing a net carbon loss as part of this tree planting initiative. the first free trees will be available in the spring but it will take decades before we know if they've really made wales a cleaner, greener nation. hywel griffith, bbc news. time for a look at the weather here's darren bett. another storm on the way? yes, all eyes are on storm barra. the wind is
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easing but they will build up again and there is a threat of snow on the northern hills. looking out at the satellite picture, this cloud is starting to take shape. that's the developing storm steaming in from the atlantic. had a bit, a lot of showers today. still quite a few. they will fade away overnight. skies clearing, widespread frost and maybe some icy patches. here comes storm barra. the first heavy rain into northern ireland, wales and the south—west and then the wind picks up south—west and then the wind picks up and then the strong wind moves east through the day as the wet weather pushes north and east. to be followed by showers in the south—west where it's milder. for much of the country, another cold day and with the wet weather coming into the cold air, there is likely to be some snow, especially on the hills, the peak district, the pennines and into the cumbrian fells. then into the highlands as the wet weather continues to push north tomorrow evening. the main rain band heading away to the east coast. again it stays very windy.

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