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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 6, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 8pm. a ten year strategy for dealing with drug abuse in england and wales — the prime minister says he wants to come down hard on drugs gangs, but spend more on treatment for addicts. the drugs gangs are doing major damage to life chances of kids growing up in this country. i think it's a disgusting trade. the health secretary confirms a community spread of the omicron coronavirus variant — with 336 cases now confirmed in the uk. this includes cases with no links to international travel, - so we can conclude that there is now community transmission— across multiple regions of england. two met officers who took photos
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of two murdered sisters and shared the images on whatsapp groups have been jailed for two years and nine months each. a barrister for the victims of the grenfell tower fire tells the public inquiry into the disaster that governments' lack of openness should be regarded as "one of the major scandals of our time." and every household in wales will be offered a free tree to plant in an effort to help tackle climate change. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the goverment has set out a ten year strategy for dealing with drugs in england and wales. the prime minister says the focus will be on supporting the rehabiliation of drug addicts,
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doing more to discourage recreational users, and coming down hard on drug gangs. £780 million will be spent on improving treatment services over the next three years. £300m has been pledged to crack down on drug gangs. it's thought there are more than 260,000 heroin addicts in england and almost a million people using cocaine every year in england and wales. many crimes are drug related — including more than half of buglary and shoplifting offences — and costs around 20 billion pounds a year in england alone. our home editor mark easton�*s report contains some flashing images. police! as officers conducted raids against suspected drug dealers in liverpool this morning, the prime minister donned a police beanie. the visual message was that enforcement remains at the heart of his drugs strategy, getting tough with the estimated 300,000 heroin and cocaine addicts, but borisjohnson also hinted at a huge financial
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announcement to come. you've got to do two things at once. you've got be tougher on the county lines gangs, you've got to be tougher on the criminals who are doing it, but you've also got to make sure that you find those 300,000 people and you help them away. you can't simply arrest them time after time and put them back in prison again and again. you've got to do rehab as well. the £780 million for treatment and recovery programmes in england will provide for more drugs workers, more residential rehab places and morejob opportunities to help people stay off drugs. overall, a far bigger settlement than expected. the last two drugs strategies have been accompanied with lots of promises, but no cash. so, it makes a welcome change to have a drugs strategy that is backed up with the cash that is needed to invest in effective drug treatment services. essex police recently conducted raids in southend and other towns in the county to disrupt the dealers, but despite decades of such activity, drug gangs
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still control an illicit business which costs britain £20 billion a year and reaches into almost every community. the government wants to demonstrate it's taking on the dealers and the addicts who bring fear and misery to neighbourhoods like this, but those who work in the field say the key to reducing drug harms is to see the problem as a public health issue, not a criminaljustice one. 0n the estate a few years back, . there was quite a lot of drug use... marie started injecting heroin to escape the reality of a violent domestic life on this southend estate. in and out of prison, her children were taken into care. now, after treatment, she's clean and runs a charity helping other drug users in the city. if you were the prime minister, what would you do to solve britain's drugs problem? chuck a load of money into - treatment...treatment facilities. open up the 30—odd treatment centres that they've had closed down— in the last ten years. i've stood at enough people's
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funerals in the last ten yearsi watching little children - bury their mothers and fathers. the government don't get to see that side of it. - i came to recovery because of my drug usage... today's announcement, though, goes a long way to reversing the cuts to treatment over the last decade. and the users at marie's southend service are hoping that some of the money might help fund the work currently paid for from charity. coming here and connecting with all these people and all that, it'sjust, i'm not alone. i mean, i thought it wasjust me that wasjust crackers. but, you know what i mean, it ain't, though. dame carol black, who recently wrote a review of drugs policy for the government, joined the health secretary this afternoon at a needle exchange. she welcomes the focus on public health interventions. we do want county lines - to disappear, but unless you give equal balance to treatment. and recovery, we're really not going to move forward. the public may want reassurance that police and the courts are dealing with the scourge of drug crime, but the evidence suggests it's a focus on treatment that will make
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the real difference. mark easton, bbc news. with me is inspectorjason kew from the violence reduction unit with thames valley police. he led the development of both an adult and child drug diversion scheme that's now being used force—wide in the thames valley. and also i'm joined by paul hannaford. he almost lost his life after a heroin addiction. he's been clean for about 1k years and now educates children on the risks of gang crime and drug addiction. welcome and drug addiction. to you both. could she speak to welcome to you both. could she speak to you this evening. let me just ask you one very straightforward question first. more money for rehabilitation and treatment and for police enforcement. from where you sit, is that the right balance? yes. sit, is that the right balance? yes, definitel . sit, is that the right balance? yes, definitely. throughout _ sit, is that the right balance? yes, definitely. throughout my - sit, is that the right balance? ye: definitely. throughout my entire career, i have seen time and time again police activity enforcement
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have been very limited effect, actually, and reducing the size of the drug markets, and i think the whole system public health approach can better utilise that funding far more than what enforcement activity can produce alone. the whole system is greater than just public health and the nhs. this is communities, families, policing, the whole partnership coming together to reduce drug use through awareness, education and harm reduction. i firmly support this different dimension and funding. paul, i want to talk a bit— dimension and funding. paul, i want to talk a bit about _ dimension and funding. paul, i want to talk a bit about your— dimension and funding. paul, i want to talk a bit about your story - dimension and funding. paul, i want to talk a bit about your story in - dimension and funding. paul, i want to talk a bit about your story in a - to talk a bit about your story in a moment, but from your experience during your time as an addict meal where in and out of the youth custodial system as a youth offender, was there at any point where you are offered anything that you would call meaningful attempt to get you off date neck on track? it was a long process to get to rehab.
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addicts. _ was a long process to get to rehab. addicts, obviously, they are desperate, and you can say you don't want it. _ desperate, and you can say you don't want it. but_ desperate, and you can say you don't want it, but there is a three or four_ want it, but there is a three or four month _ want it, but there is a three or four month waiting list. you get lost in _ four month waiting list. you get lost in the — four month waiting list. you get lost in the system again, you are in and out— lost in the system again, you are in and out of— lost in the system again, you are in and out ofjail, some people it has been _ and out ofjail, some people it has been said — and out ofjail, some people it has been said on here, they die. this is great _ been said on here, they die. this is great news — been said on here, they die. this is great news that there will be money available, _ great news that there will be money available, it'sjust about how many addicts _ available, it'sjust about how many addicts are — available, it'sjust about how many addicts are really going to take it up. addicts are really going to take it up and — addicts are really going to take it up. and that successive people getting — up. and that successive people getting things done, i've done lots of stints _ getting things done, i've done lots of stints in — getting things done, i've done lots of stints in rehab, and i got clean. if of stints in rehab, and i got clean. if this _ of stints in rehab, and i got clean. if this money is going to be invested _ if this money is going to be invested wisely and save lives, why not? _ invested wisely and save lives, why not? ., , , ., ., ., ., ~ not? you spend a lot of time talking to youngsters _ not? you spend a lot of time talking to youngsters about _ not? you spend a lot of time talking to youngsters about what _ not? you spend a lot of time talking to youngsters about what you - not? you spend a lot of time talking to youngsters about what you went l to youngsters about what you went there, the hell you lived through trying to get them away from that. can you give us, time is limited, but can you give us a brief summary of what happened to you. i know that's a lot to say. i
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of what happened to you. i know that's a lot to say.— of what happened to you. i know that's a lot to say. i was a heroin user for 23 _ that's a lot to say. i was a heroin user for 23 years. _ that's a lot to say. i was a heroin user for 23 years. it _ that's a lot to say. i was a heroin user for 23 years. it started - user for 23 years. it started out with— user for 23 years. it started out with cannabis, the next thing i know. — with cannabis, the next thing i know. it — with cannabis, the next thing i know, it was in again. i got to the a-e know, it was in again. i got to the age of— know, it was in again. i got to the age of 21 — know, it was in again. i got to the age of 21 and thought my life is 'ust age of 21 and thought my life is just going to be socially taking drugs — just going to be socially taking drugs and committing crimes. then i -ot drugs and committing crimes. then i got off— drugs and committing crimes. then i got off heroin. at the new year taking — got off heroin. at the new year taking it — got off heroin. at the new year taking it i _ got off heroin. at the new year taking it i lost a lot of weight, i was injecting, you know, ended up with open— was injecting, you know, ended up with open wounds in my legs down to the bone _ with open wounds in my legs down to the bone. you know, yeah, i see a lot of— the bone. you know, yeah, i see a lot of misery, _ the bone. you know, yeah, i see a lot of misery, a lot of death, heroin— lot of misery, a lot of death, heroin is— lot of misery, a lot of death, heroin is the most harmful drug in our community, so we've got to look, for person— our community, so we've got to look, for person we — our community, so we've got to look, for person we get off heroin, and it's not— for person we get off heroin, and it's not easy, it takes time, hundreds— it's not easy, it takes time, hundreds of kids get on it in the first piece _ hundreds of kids get on it in the first place. still holes in my legs that bleed, i'm 15 years clean this month _ that bleed, i'm 15 years clean this month we — that bleed, i'm 15 years clean this month. i've had maggots put into my legs _ month. i've had maggots put into my legs i_ month. i've had maggots put into my legs iwas _ month. i've had maggots put into my legs. i was telling children in sunderland that, lots of schools and football _ sunderland that, lots of schools and football clubs, they had 89 and e10 at the _ football clubs, they had 89 and e10 at the stadium, and i showed these kids my—
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at the stadium, and i showed these kids my injuries to my talk about the prison— kids my injuries to my talk about the prison sentences i received from everything _ the prison sentences i received from everything i— the prison sentences i received from everything i did was related to drugs — everything i did was related to drugs. you look now anything, 0k, drugs. you look now anything, ok, the kids— drugs. you look now anything, ok, the kids are — drugs. you look now anything, ok, the kids are not given drug education? we have to get these people _ education? we have to get these people clean, but how many kids are going to _ people clean, but how many kids are going to come to the system and still have — going to come to the system and still have heroin available? we've -ot still have heroin available? we've got to— still have heroin available? we've got to stop the drugs coming into the country. let got to stop the drugs coming into the country-— got to stop the drugs coming into the country. let me put that point to the inspector. _ the country. let me put that point to the inspector. you _ the country. let me put that point to the inspector. you presumably| the country. let me put that point i to the inspector. you presumably do see regular faces coming to see particularly amongst the youngsters, because importuning tends to be youngsters who get caught, not necessarily the clients of the dealers, but the people the bottom of the tree. what options exist for you at the moment, and what would you at the moment, and what would you like to be different when you are policing this in the future? that's a great question. it's basically demonstrating the whole system in a capsule, almost. so, drug diversion, for instance, within the thames valley, this is a
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partnership approach, so without the need for an arrest, without the need for an interview or even the requirement of an admission of guilt, we can swiftly and a ball that person young person or adults, couege that person young person or adults, college student or a secondary school students, the opportunity to have an assessment of their use on that day or the day after command that's done not by a police officer, the community resolution that we use, it's still within the criminal framework, but leaves no criminal footprint whatsoever is passing the responsibility if you like over to the experts, and that expert then ss is that person use with that young person or without adult and whatever outcome is needed for that person in that person's situation. drug use is wide. we've mentioned in this example about dependent users, right at the top end of injecting heroin
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or crack six or seven times a day. paul is a remarkable life story who has been instrumental in changing's peoples lives and opinions. what he does most, i believe is challenging the stigma. how is a lovely man, he's a lovely man who took drugs. he spent their recovery. recovery a lifelong process. just spent their recovery. recovery a lifelong process.— lifelong process. just as it is for alcoholics _ lifelong process. just as it is for alcoholics and _ lifelong process. just as it is for alcoholics and perhaps - lifelong process. just as it is for alcoholics and perhaps we - lifelong process. just as it is for alcoholics and perhaps we are l lifelong process. just as it is for. alcoholics and perhaps we are bit more tolerant of acolytes and we are of drug users stop you like and give you a brief, sorry to interrupt you there, the briefest of examples there, the briefest of examples there i there, the briefest of examples ther , , ., " there, the briefest of examples ther , .,, there, the briefest of examples ther , ., there i spoke with, as paul quite riuhtl there i spoke with, as paul quite rightly does. _ there i spoke with, as paul quite rightly does. i — there i spoke with, as paul quite rightly does, i spent _ there i spoke with, as paul quite rightly does, i spent time - there i spoke with, as paul quite rightly does, i spent time with l rightly does, i spent time with university students not so long ago and they were ketamine and cocaine. we discussed about the most harmful of those drugs, they all sat around heroin or cocaine, not one of them said about alcohol. no alcohol is like this hidden enemy there, just buried beneath the drug use, but it causes so much more harm. it's that
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education that further awareness that helps people use safely but then stabilise use, use less, educate and perhaps stop using. it's quality information, quality education. quality information, quality education-— quality information, quality education. , ., education. am sorry to bring it to an end there. _ education. am sorry to bring it to an end there, if— education. am sorry to bring it to an end there, if i _ education. am sorry to bring it to an end there, if i who _ education. am sorry to bring it to an end there, if i who interrupted you not the other way around, my apologies for that. paul, you not the other way around, my apologies forthat. paul, i you not the other way around, my apologies for that. paul, i will give you the last word. we mentioned alcohol there and you have talked about that on your website. itdik about that on your website. i talk to kids about _ about that on your website. i talk to kids about alcohol, _ about that on your website. i talk to kids about alcohol, instagram, twitter. _ to kids about alcohol, instagram, twitter. i— to kids about alcohol, instagram, twitter, i am to kids about alcohol, instagram, twitter, lam in to kids about alcohol, instagram, twitter, i am in schools, to kids about alcohol, instagram, twitter, lam in schools, i'm in a twitter, iam in schools, i'm in a hotel— twitter, lam in schools, i'm in a hotel room — twitter, lam in schools, i'm in a hotel room tonight in somerset, i'm educating _ hotel room tonight in somerset, i'm educating 800 young people tomorrow taiking _ educating 800 young people tomorrow talking about alcoholism and addiction and the dark side of where you end _ addiction and the dark side of where you end up — addiction and the dark side of where you end up in it. right now, how many— you end up in it. right now, how many ten—year—olds are out there in this country— many ten—year—olds are out there in this country addicted to alcohol, heroin. — this country addicted to alcohol, heroin, crack cocaine. if there is any, _ heroin, crack cocaine. if there is any, 1,000,000, so why are we educating — any, 1,000,000, so why are we educating the generation of our young _ educating the generation of our young people with workshops, not 'ust young people with workshops, not just once, — young people with workshops, not just once, because at the age of
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ten, _ just once, because at the age of ten, when — just once, because at the age of ten, when they get to the age of 14 or 15, as _ ten, when they get to the age of 14 or 15, as we — ten, when they get to the age of 14 or 15, as we all know, the environment changes and there are drugs _ environment changes and there are drugs and _ environment changes and there are drugs and alcohol exposed to them. the problem is not of a ten—year—old will ever— the problem is not of a ten—year—old will ever get — the problem is not of a ten—year—old will ever get a workshop and won't -et will ever get a workshop and won't get it— will ever get a workshop and won't get it at— will ever get a workshop and won't get it at all. i know hundreds of heroin— get it at all. i know hundreds of heroin addicts who have died, and believe _ heroin addicts who have died, and believe me, 23 years of my life, and that one _ believe me, 23 years of my life, and that one has — believe me, 23 years of my life, and that one has had a workshop around the harms _ that one has had a workshop around the harms of drugs. so, we've got to start looking — the harms of drugs. so, we've got to start looking at the moral compass of the _ start looking at the moral compass of the people who work with children _ of the people who work with children. the subjects taught in school— children. the subjects taught in school does not stop kids from getting — school does not stop kids from getting involved.— school does not stop kids from getting involved. thank you both very much- _ getting involved. thank you both very much- i _ getting involved. thank you both very much. i wish _ getting involved. thank you both very much. i wish we _ getting involved. thank you both very much. i wish we had - getting involved. thank you both very much. i wish we had more | getting involved. thank you both - very much. i wish we had more time. appreciate your time. you connect take care, thank you very much. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers — our guestsjoining me tonight are broadcaster david davies and chief political correspondent at the daily mail, harriet line.
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dojoin us for that. do join us for that. right, dojoin us for that. right, that do join us for that. right, that has brought us almost a quarter past eight. the headlines on bbc news... a ten year strategy for dealing with drug abuse in england and wales — the prime minister says he wants to come down hard on drugs gangs, but spend more on treatment for addicts the health secretary confirms a community spread of the 0micron coronavirus variant — with 336 cases now confirmed in the uk. two met officers who took photos of two murdered sisters and shared the images on whatsapp groups have beenjailed for two years and nine months each. now we will pause and join our bbc sport centerfor all the sport center for all the very latest. as ever, plenty to talk about. how are you? i am very good. hoping ou are how are you? i am very good. hoping you are well — how are you? i am very good. hoping you are well yourself. _ how are you? i am very good. hoping you are well yourself. you _ how are you? i am very good. hoping you are well yourself. you are - you are well yourself. you are looking splendid as always. let's get into the spirit, shall be?
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it's been a difficult run for everton, they're winless in eight games, and tonight they're hosting arsenal, desperate for a win to help lift them away from the premier league's bottom—three. gunners manager mikel arteta returns to the club he once played for with his side knowing a win would lift them back to fifth. it is currently goalless with around 60 minutes played in the rain. it's quite definitely coming down. national league leaders chesterfield will travel to european champions chelsea in the third round of the fa cup. chesterfield were one of five non—league sides in the hat for the draw and will face last season's runners—up at stamford bridge. elsewhere liverpool will entertain league one shrewsbury. a great draw for swindon too — the league two side hosting manchester city. league one clubs morecambe and cambridge have lucrative ties, going to tottenham and newcastle respectively. and the holders leicester are drawn at home to watford. england cricket fans might not be able to travel to australia to watch the ashes series but there will be plenty staying awake throughout the night this week when the first test between england and australia starts in the early hours of wednesday morning. both squads have had to deal with controversy, quarantine and bad weather
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affecting their preparations for the first ashes test. joe root still has a few key decisions to make before the first bowl is balled and has admitted that this ashes series in australia could be the biggest challenge of his four years, so far, as captain. any series you look at, it's always the biggest challenge. any seriously look at his was the biggest challenge. and the big challenge, it brings a great opportunity and that is i'm looking at. and in many respects, we've got nothing to lose coming here. we have a great chance in the circumstances that we find ourselves and to do something very special and we should take great confidence going into it. staying with cricket where root has given his seal of approval to darren gough who is back at yorkshire as the interim managing director of cricket. the former england fast bowler replaces martyn moxon, who was one of 16 people to leave the club last week after former player, azeem rafiq was found to be
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a victim of "racial harassment and bullying" at the county. gough says he's aware of the "wider responsibilities" of taking on the position. gough spent 15 years at the county over two spells and will be the managing director until the end of the 2022 season. the united states has announced a diplomatic boycott of next year's winter olympics and paralympics in beijing. the move won't affect athletes who've qualified to compete with the white house saying no official delegation would be sent to the games because of concerns about china's human rights record. translation: without being invited, american politicians _ translation: without being invited, american politicians keep _ translation: without being invited, american politicians keep hyping - translation: without being invited, american politicians keep hyping the l american politicians keep hyping the so—called diplomatic boycott of the beijing winter olympics. which is purely wishful thinking and grandstanding. political middle of the elation is a blatant insult of the elation is a blatant insult of the spirit of the olympic charter and an outright political provocation. it seriously offends the 1.4 billion chinese people. it
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is the athletes from all countries that should be in the spotlight, not individual politicians. as for those politicians who hyped the boycott for political purposes, whether they come or not, no one would care, nor would it have any impact on the beijing winter olympic games. the danish golfer thorbjorn olesen has appeared in court today, accused of committing a number of offences, including sexual assault, on a flight between the us and london in 2019. a woman on the flight said the danish golfer had been unsteady on his feet, before he kissed her hand, nuzzled his head into the nape of her neck and then grabbed her breast. a member of the cabin crew said he appeared highly intoxicated. thejury was told mr olesn had no memory of his behaviour after drinking alcohol and taking sleeping pills. he denies the charges and the trial continues. when i said he looked splendid, i meant your scent trail elegance, it's always perfect.— it's always perfect. laughter thompson _ it's always perfect. laughter
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thompson -- _ it's always perfect. laughter thompson -- tolson, - it's always perfect. laughter thompson -- tolson, of- it's always perfect. laughter i thompson -- tolson, of course, it's always perfect. laughter - thompson -- tolson, of course, the thompson —— tolson, of course, the feeling is mutual. i'll complement greatly received, because he gets plenty of that, let's face it. let's move on to some of the other news,. a second woman who saysjeffrey epstein sexually abused her — has been testifying in the ghislaine maxwell trial in new york. live to our correspondent nada tawfik who's in new york. at the end of the week can do some fairly graphic descriptions of the things that the lien maxwell is alleged to have done in which she denies. what about today, because their excess weight complication about this whole question about the age of consent in the states and whether actions are criminal or not. —— ghislaine maxwell. whether actions are criminal or not. -- ghislaine maxwell.— -- ghislaine maxwell. that's absolutely — -- ghislaine maxwell. that's absolutely right. _ -- ghislaine maxwell. that's absolutely right. the - -- ghislaine maxwell. that's absolutely right. the women testifying into the city name kate was 18, so the judge testifying into the city name kate was 18, so thejudge instructed testifying into the city name kate was 18, so the judge instructed the jury was 18, so the judge instructed the jury that she could still testify as a witness, but she is not to be
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considered a victim under this indictment so that the six act that she's talking about are not illegal. this is a real point of contention between the prosecution and defence, but we did hear from kate between the prosecution and defence, but we did hearfrom kate her testimony did bolster this idea of ghislaine maxwell allegedly grooming young girls forjeffrey epstein. kate says she was invited to ghislaine maxwell's, in london when she was 17 years old. they immediately connected and had a friendship. she said she wanted to bejust like ghislaine friendship. she said she wanted to be just like ghislaine maxwell when she grew up and was really excited by the prospect of being friends. she said miss maxwell even said jeffrey epstein, her boyfriend, could help her with her music career. but she said when she went back and visited, miss maxwell asked her to give jeffrey back and visited, miss maxwell asked her to givejeffrey epstein on massage, she said she wasn't a masseuse and that quickly that massage turned into a sexual encounter. she said this is a pattern that lasted for a number of years, and she really did go into
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some looted details in terms of being asked to put on a girls schoolgirl uniform by miss maxwell, being told that she was cute, young, that she should invite other girls to come see mister epstein. now, of course, the defence, miss maxwell has pleaded not guilty, she denies all of these allegations command the defence really tried to discredit this woman as well, the same that they did but the first accuser. they really honed in on the fact that she abused alcohol and drugs when she was younger, and so they tried to say that that had distorted her memory. they also tried to claim that because she got money from the victims compensation fund for epstein's victims that she was after money. she also denied that she had any financial stake at all in this trial. _, , ,., trial. our correspondent in new york, trial. our correspondent in new york. thank _ trial. our correspondent in new york, thank you _ trial. our correspondent in new york, thank you very _ trial. our correspondent in new york, thank you very much. - 336 cases of the omicron variant of coronavirus have now been detected in england, scotland and wales. the health secretary sajid javid says some cases aren't related to travel meaning it's now spreading
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in the community. scientists believe omicron could soon become the dominant variant in the uk. here's our health correspondent sophie hutchinson. this scottish school, the first in the uk to be suspected of an omicron outbreak. parents were told last night to keep pupils away and switch to remote learning after two classes and multiple teachers had to self—isolate. this afternoon, the health secretary told mps omicron had now been reported in 52 countries around the world, and that in the uk, there was community transmission in multiple regions. we don't yet have a complete picture of whether omicron causes more severe disease or indeed how it interacts with the vaccines, and so we can't say for certain at this point whether omicron has the potential to knock us off our road to recovery. and labour responded,
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calling on ministers to commit to a framework of tighter controls for the future. but given the likelihood of new variants, will the government now introduced as a standard response to new variants overseas introducing stronger border controls, testing and contact tracing, so the government isn't again accused of locking the door after the horse has bolted? just how concerned we should be about omicron is the big unknown. scientists are working around the clock to test whether it can evade vaccines, but there is no lab test for whether it causes serious disease. that data will come from infected communities, and it may be many weeks before we have the answer. officialfigures for the uk put the number of omicron cases at over 300, but some believe the true figure may be more than 1000. the early signs are that it - will probably spread quite quickly and probably start out—competing
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delta and become the dominant. i variant probably within the next i weeks, or a month or so at least. the likelihood is, therefore, that by christmas, there'll be a lot more omicron around, and perhaps by then, we'll have a slightly better understanding ofjust how this new variant will affect us. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. joining us now is dr sarah pitt, a virologist from the university of brighton. thank you very much forjoining us, doctor, this evening. we are ten days and from the world health organisation calling this a variant of concern. do we know yet about omicron and how seriously we should be treating it? i omicron and how seriously we should be treating it?— be treating it? i think we know that it is very infectious, _ be treating it? i think we know that it is very infectious, more - it is very infectious, more infectious than delta, and it looks as though from the information that
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is coming out in the last couple of days that it might take a shorter time between being infected and starting to develop symptoms if you are going to. so, that has been, we have seen that with the variant that have already gone along, actually, that the original version of the wuhan strain, without being impatient time between being infected and showing system date neck symptoms was 14 days. this one may be a love that shorter than that. so that could explain, if it is more infectious and people are taking a shorter time to develop symptoms, that will explain why it is spreading so quickly. in a symptoms, that will explain why it is spreading so quickly. in a sense, that could also _ is spreading so quickly. in a sense, that could also be _ is spreading so quickly. in a sense, that could also be positive, - that could also be positive, presumably, couldn't take? one of the problems has been that because of the long gap between infection and sewing to the neck is showing symptoms, people who are infected go about their daily business for days and only then do they realise that they are l if they realise it all by
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which time they have been affected lots of other people.— lots of other people. absolutely. that has been _ lots of other people. absolutely. that has been a _ lots of other people. absolutely. that has been a problem - lots of other people. absolutely. that has been a problem all- lots of other people. absolutely. l that has been a problem all along. it is more likely that with the vaccine that you are, you know, you are less likely to show symptoms are less likely to show, or your symptoms will be quite mild and you will dismiss it as a bit of a cold, which is important for your review is to remember that if you do have a head cold, do at least do a lateral flow test and make sure it's not covid yes, because therefore you be infectious. just on the risk of hospitalisation, we are still at early stages of this, have we got anything yet, i mean south african southern african countries have a longer experience than us at the moment of this. initially doctors are saying, look, the symptoms appear to be are saying, look, the symptoms appearto be mild. are saying, look, the symptoms appear to be mild. has that changed at all because my presumably as time progresses, we should be seeing more serious infection and hospitalisation if indeed that is a risk of this variant.—
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hospitalisation if indeed that is a risk of this variant. what they have been reporting _ risk of this variant. what they have been reporting is _ risk of this variant. what they have been reporting is towards - risk of this variant. what they have been reporting is towards the - risk of this variant. what they have been reporting is towards the end | risk of this variant. what they have l been reporting is towards the end of last week some very young children in hospital with omicron variant which is in something we particularly have seen before. you know, delta was affecting children and some children have died from delta , . ., , and some children have died from delta , _, , , and some children have died from delta , , �*, delta even in this country, but it's not, it's delta even in this country, but it's not. it's not _ delta even in this country, but it's not, it's not been _ delta even in this country, but it's not, it's not been really _ delta even in this country, but it's not, it's not been really very - delta even in this country, but it's| not, it's not been really very young children, but not children as young as to who are getting into hospital, which is very worrying and suggests that the age profile is being shifted down to the younger age groups, but i don't think there's any particular reason to suspect that it would affect the older age groups are the more vulnerable age groups are the more vulnerable age groups and just the exact same way as all the other variants. it's actually worse rather than better, because we think it's very, very serious and doing whatever we can to try to stop it spreading at the moment. 50 try to stop it spreading at the moment. ., ., ., , . ,, ., moment. so we are at a percussion stare.
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moment. so we are at a percussion stage- from — moment. so we are at a percussion stage. from where _ moment. so we are at a percussion stage. from where you're - moment. so we are at a percussion stage. from where you're sitting i moment. so we are at a percussionl stage. from where you're sitting are we doing enough and how long before we doing enough and how long before we can have a much better idea of the impact of omicron?— we can have a much better idea of the impact of omicron? well, i mean i would the impact of omicron? well, i mean i would like — the impact of omicron? well, i mean i would like to _ the impact of omicron? well, i mean i would like to see _ the impact of omicron? well, i mean i would like to see a _ the impact of omicron? well, i mean i would like to see a little _ the impact of omicron? well, i mean i would like to see a little bit - i would like to see a little bit more in terms of... we really need to make sure that we are trying to spread it from person to person —— we are into trying to spread from person to person. working from home, i'm not saying don't have a christmas but do perhaps meet together in a much smaller groups than you are planning to do. just try and stop that. we are not really going to know, we are not really going to know, we are not really going to know whether omicron can outcompete delta, we are saying that there were just 300 confirmed cases, it might be 1,000. this 51 one half thousand new cases of coronavirus of some variation, most of them will be delta at the moment. so it's really too early to tell what will happen
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between the two of those. as we were saying earlier, since the time between infection and symptoms and therefore transmission is shorter, we might actually find out sooner rather than later, but it's far too early to tell anything, really, and we should take whatever version of the virus very, very seriously and try not to spread it around any more as far as we possibly can because we need to have the vaccine, the booster, please do that, people who have been not sure about whether to have the vaccine, on one dose yet should present themselves to have the vaccine because the vaccine will help. and there are also other things you can do, such as, you know, wearing a mask enclosed public spaces and taking it very gently. if you're going to be meeting who are not in your social bubble can i do have good ventilation in that room, and just take it gently, i would say. and 'ust take it gently, i would sa . ., and 'ust take it gently, i would sa. ., ., ~ and 'ust take it gently, i would sa. ., ., .
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say. doctor, thank you so much for s-ueakin say. doctor, thank you so much for speaking to — say. doctor, thank you so much for speaking to us _ say. doctor, thank you so much for speaking to us this _ say. doctor, thank you so much for speaking to us this evening. - say. doctor, thank you so much for speaking to us this evening. thank| speaking to us this evening. thank you. the government's latest coronavirus figures show there were 51,459 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period — that's around 9000 more than this time last week. on average, there were just over 47,000 new cases reported per day in the last week. the latest figures show there were 7,268 people in hospital being treated for coronavirus on friday. 41 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test — only slightly higher than last monday. on average in the past week, 119 covid—related deaths were recorded every day. on monday there is often a slight lag in reporting because of the weekend. on vaccinations, more than twenty and a half million people have now had a boosterjab. nightclubs in france are to be closed for the next 4 weeks as the country attempts to tackle rising coronavirus cases.
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the country's prime minister made the announcement which comes into effect on friday earlier this evening. the government has also extended maskwearing within schools meaning children will have to wear face coverings around schools and not just in the classroom. no christmas celebrations or new year's eve celebrations in nightclubs in france this year. around 1300 homes in north—east england are still without power, 10 days after they were cut off by storm arwen — and with a fresh storm on its way overnight. the business minister, greg hands, told the commons he'd been given assurances by the supplier, northern powergrid that all properties would be reconnected "in the next day". the company has apologised for the disruption. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. hello. weather conditions are set to deteriorate across the country as we go through tomorrow. out there, though, into the start of the new day, it will be fairly quiet.
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tonight, for instance, many of the showers fading away. some continue north and west, it's gotten wintry in places, but to start tuesday, it will be a sunny start but a very cold and frosty one — scotland, england, east wales especially. but as you can see, down to the southwest, the first signs of strom barra, strengthening winds around irish sea coasts could touch 80mph through the day with travel disruption. rain and snow on the hills for parts of ireland, wales, maybe the southwest through the morning rush hour. brightening up later, and then the gales with the rain and hill snow transfers its way northwards and eastwards across the rest of england and southern scotland into tuesday. the biggest impact from snow as it hits the cold air will be through the pennies and across parts of central—southern scotland. could be blizzards to take us through the start of the evening rush hourfor some. that will then become confined to the grampians through the night. but it's going to remain windy into wednesday. those widespread gales potentially causing some further issues. more warnings on the website.
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hello this is bbc news with shaun ley. the headlines. a ten year strategy for dealing with drug abuse in england and wales — the prime minister says he wants to come down hard on drugs gangs, but spend more on treatment for addicts the drugs gangs are doing major damage to life chances of kids growing up in this country. i think it's a disgusting trade. the health secretary confirms a community spread of the omicron coronavirus variant — with 336 cases now confirmed in the uk. this includes cases with no links to international travel, - so we can conclude that there is now community transmission— across multiple regions of england. two met officers who took photos of two murdered sisters and shared the images on whatsapp groups have beenjailed for two years and nine months each. a barrister for the victims of the grenfell tower fire tells the public inquiry into the disaster
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that governments' lack of openness should be regarded as "one of the major scandals of our time." the education secretary, nadhim zahawi, has said that the whole nation is distraught at the death of arthur labinjo—hughes with people finding it impossible to imagine how any adult could commit such evil acts against a child. arthur was tortured and killed by his father and step mother. mr zahawi said a national investigation into the 6 year old's death will begin immediately. our special correspondent lucy manning has more. now everybody, neighbours, politicians, social services think about arthur labinjo—hughes, but so few thought about him when he was alive. arthur, are you going to play for england? the boy who loved football and superheroes was tortured, abused and eventually killed by his father and stepmother. some did care. his grandmother and uncle contacted
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the police and social services. social workers went to his home. yet nothing was done. now inquiries launched, questions asked. the education secretary said the whole nation was distraught. the public deserve to know why in this rare case things went horrifyingly wrong and what more could be done to prevent abuse such as this happening again in the future. labour said it wasn'tjust a local problem with solihull children's services. for too long, this government has tolerated failing children's - services and a failure to protect children. l vulnerable children are being| failed, and that cannot go on. but too late for arthur. other children came before arthur — "baby p" peter connelly, and victoria climbie. reviews were held, but the mix of evil parents, the missed warnings by social services and potentially in this case lockdown,
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where his extended family were kept away, means more recommendations will be made, but will they help the children still at risk now? so, a national review into how thomas hughes and emma tustin were able to kill arthur and inspections into the response of the police, social services and education system. the mp for solihull, where arthur died, made this emotional plea. at the very least, we owe it to arthur that every lesson from this horrific tragedy is learned and no town has its heart broken like solihull has had. and so there will never be another child who says, "no—one loves me, no—one's going to feed me." lucy manning, bbc news. dr rayjones is emeritus professor of social work at kingston university and a registered social worker.
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good to speak to you again. you have seen what the government had to say, what did you make of it? i seen what the government had to say, what did you make of it?— what did you make of it? i heard the minister speaking _ what did you make of it? i heard the minister speaking this _ what did you make of it? i heard the minister speaking this afternoon - what did you make of it? i heard thej minister speaking this afternoon and the labour shadow minister responding and the thought that came to me is there is great elephant in the house of commons that no one saw, the elephant in the room was why has a god more difficult to protect children today than for example ten years ago? no one is facing up to that, the labour opposition was not facing up to it, the government was not accepting any responsibility. we have had ten years of cuts in public services, policing, fewer health visitors, social workers run ragged, trying to close were down to take new work on quickly and we know how to protect children well, we do know how to protect children but amongst the 400,000 children at any one time today or tomorrow that social workers know about, spotting those
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children who need particular attention urgently is very difficult if you do not have the time to do it. , ., , ., , , if you do not have the time to do it. time is obviously important, eo - le is it. time is obviously important, people is important _ it. time is obviously important, people is important as - it. time is obviously important, people is important as well, - it. time is obviously important, | people is important as well, has anything changed in the culture of child protection? we had several reports, you were involved in one, dealing with an older person in care who died down in cornwall but in terms of all the different reports, one of the big things is people talking to each other, notjust within council departments but other agencies, has that got more difficult? , , , agencies, has that got more difficult? , , ., ., difficult? yes, because you have to have the time _ difficult? yes, because you have to have the time to _ difficult? yes, because you have to have the time to do _ difficult? yes, because you have to have the time to do it _ difficult? yes, because you have to have the time to do it and - difficult? yes, because you have to have the time to do it and if- difficult? yes, because you have to have the time to do it and if you i have the time to do it and if you are rushing from family to family, concern to concern, referral to referral, then you do not have time, you do not have the time you need to actually stand back, think about what you are seen sometimes, think about what you do not know and think i have to find out more and time to speak to your colleagues and other agencies. the other difficulty here is notjust time, what we have now
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are policing services, children's social services, where the workforce in many areas is quite unstable. it is hard retaining experienced workers because of the stress and strain of the job and the fear that if something terrible happens to your child that you know, you will be in the frame for blame. we have lots of agency workers coming and going, we have vacancies, we have experience good workers but who need time to build up the experience quickly for some of those crucial decisions that have to be made. people plus time, it is a solution we do not have it. you people plus time, it is a solution we do not have it.— we do not have it. you obviously ho -e the we do not have it. you obviously hope the review— we do not have it. you obviously hope the review will— we do not have it. you obviously hope the review will address - we do not have it. you obviously l hope the review will address some we do not have it. you obviously - hope the review will address some of these issues, although the government is very keen that it should focus specifically on arthur's case and what may or may not have gone wrong there. one of the interesting things that came up during the court case was how effective, a terrible word to use,
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how effective his stepmother was in kind of hiding what she was doing to him and what her partner was doing to him, his father, and in creating an image of this child that he was disruptive, a troublemaker, that he caused injuries to himself and would not cooperate and being a parent was a nightmare when the evidence was quite the reverse. that is manipulative, how do you deal with that? ., ., _ ., that? you deal with it by having the confidence to _ that? you deal with it by having the confidence to challenge _ that? you deal with it by having the confidence to challenge parents, i that? you deal with it by having the l confidence to challenge parents, you do it by finding the space of the time and the means of speaking directly to the children without the parents of it. you do it by checking out with the school, very difficult during the lockdown because of the virus for example, but you do it by speaking to the school and you do it by going and seeing those family members and checking out what their concerns are and what are the basis for the concerns and you do it by
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going back to your team, your manager and reflecting with them about what you have heard, what you know, what you do not know that you still need to find out by building up still need to find out by building up that picture, and having that confidence to have confrontations with families when you need to have them. if we do that, we are more likely to be able to stop terrible events like this, but we will not stop them all and one of the other things that makes me angry, apart from the elephant in the room today not really being recognised, the other thing that makes me angry is the statement from politicians, that we have to stop it happening again. they may have the crystal ball that i do not have, they may be able to read the tea leaves, because amongst those 400,000 children known to social services, those 400,000 children known to socialservices, i those 400,000 children known to social services, i am those 400,000 children known to social services, iam not those 400,000 children known to social services, i am not saying that even with my experience, i would be able to spot every time the one that needs my particular attention. abs, one that needs my particular attention-— one that needs my particular attention. �* . , , ., attention. a final brief question, the government _ attention. a final brief question, the government describes - attention. a final brief question, the government describes this i attention. a final brief question, i the government describes this case is rare, how rare do you think it
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is? ~ , . is? well, there will be children in the circumstances _ is? well, there will be children in the circumstances tonight - is? well, there will be children in the circumstances tonight and - is? well, there will be children in | the circumstances tonight and this is one of the burdens, every social worker or health visitor carries, they know that it is happening somewhere tonight. i do not know where, but it is happening somewhere, it is rare but not unique and it is rare to the extent that about 70 children in england who are killed each year die each year as the consequence of abuse and neglect but we do not necessarily know who they are going to be next year because if we did we would be doing something about it. fine because if we did we would be doing something about it.— something about it. one brief final cuestion, something about it. one brief final question, prompted _ something about it. one brief final question, prompted by _ something about it. one brief final question, prompted by that, - something about it. one brief final question, prompted by that, what| question, prompted by that, what would you say tonight to anyone who is watching who has a worry, a doubt, and uncertainty about what is happening next door or the flat below or above or maybe to their grandchildren, two and a strange relative's child, to someone they know in their local school or youth group or wherever else it might be,
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perhaps itjust group or wherever else it might be, perhaps it just feels, group or wherever else it might be, perhaps itjust feels, i do not want to set an alarm bell running that is notjustified, i do not want to cause unnecessary trouble, perhaps i'm just being over sensitive or too much of a nosy parker. iteiii i'm just being over sensitive or too much of a nosy parker.— much of a nosy parker. i tell you what i much of a nosy parker. i tell you what i would _ much of a nosy parker. i tell you what i would do _ much of a nosy parker. i tell you what i would do and _ much of a nosy parker. i tell you what i would do and i _ much of a nosy parker. i tell you what i would do and i tell- much of a nosy parker. i tell you what i would do and i tell you i much of a nosy parker. i tell you i what i would do and i tell you what i would hope they would do, if i have got a concern, i would think really hard and if i thought it was a serious concern, i would do two things, i would contact the police, because child abuse and child neglect is a criminal offence, and i would contact the children social services for their responsibilities in terms of caring for children. if i thought nothing was happening as a consequence of that, i would do it again. and if still nothing seemed to be happening and i was really concerned and the evidence was building up for me, i would escalated, i will try to get to the manager or by local councillor or the mp. i would be determined to keep it going and following it through and hoping someone at some
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point in time would have the time and the capacity to give it the attention that i think it needed. doctor rayjones, thank you very much. more now on the news that borisjohnson says he wants to break the revolving cycle of punishing drug addicts with prison, by offering what he calls the "humane" option of rehabilitation. the plan is part of a ten—year strategy for tackling drugs in england and wales. let's speak now to steve rolles he's a senior policy analyst from transform which is drugs charity focussig on drug policy and law reform. steve, thank you, we did not hear anything about reforming the law, we heard about more enforcement of the law as it stands. we heard about more rehabilitation and we have heard something about cracking down on middle—class recreational drug users, having seen the statement now and i appreciate you have not read the whole strategy, there is a lot of detail, what do you make of it
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overall? ., ., overall? you have highlighted some ofthe overall? you have highlighted some of the different _ overall? you have highlighted some of the different elements _ overall? you have highlighted some of the different elements and i overall? you have highlighted some of the different elements and it i overall? you have highlighted some of the different elements and it is l of the different elements and it is quite a mixed bag. on the one hand, there are some very welcome announcements and it would be churlish not to acknowledge that, they have put forward considerable new resources for treatment of drug addictions which is very welcome, something in the region of eight or 900,000,000 over three years, 500,000,000 for treatment and drug services and money for helping people with drug problems in housing, money for rehabilitation of people who leave the prison with drug problems, money for helping people with drug problems into employment. they were all recommendations made by dame carol black's review and it seems like, she was only asked to look at really drug services but it seems like the home office has taken the recommendations on board and that is great. these evidence—based recommendations and they seem to be heeding them. at the same time,
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there is about twice as much money has been earmarked for enforcement and there is no evidence at all that that does anything positive at all. we have been doing the same kind of groundhog day enforcement, crackdowns and announcing some new technology or some new intelligence gathering or some new policing initiative that can grab headlines, but they simply do not work. we have been doing it for decades. these things do not work. every time you arrest a drug dealer, another one will replace him, if you break up a criminal gang, to criminal gangs fighting over the territory, if you roll up a county line as the government likes to say, another one will open the next day. by the prophets are there to be made, organised criminal gangs will exploit them. on the one hand you have these initiatives and the resources are welcome, but it has rather overshadowed, for a lot of
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critics, who have been scrutinising this, why this ongoing commitment, with the lion's share of the resources, who wanted war on drug style enforcement, and it does not work and according to the analysis in the report, not only does supply policing reduce availability of drugs, you can actually make things worse. it can increase violence between rival gangs fighting over territory that opens up following the initiative. it is a mixed bag. some good, some rather disappointing.— some good, some rather disappointing. some good, some rather disauointina. ., , . , disappointing. that sounds a bit like despair. — disappointing. that sounds a bit like despair, we _ disappointing. that sounds a bit like despair, we have _ disappointing. that sounds a bit like despair, we have had i disappointing. that sounds a bit like despair, we have had the i disappointing. that sounds a bit i like despair, we have had the misuse of drugs act, it came into force or got royal assent in 1971. 50 years. it is not a great anniversary tomorrow, we have not had a lot of success in the so—called war on drugs and to be fair that is an international thing, notjust
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drugs and to be fair that is an international thing, not just a drugs and to be fair that is an international thing, notjust a uk thing. what are you saying is the alternative? should we not bother with enforcement, should we liberalise, where does your charity stand on this? if you say the enforcement is not working, what else is there? surely it is carrots and sticks? ii else is there? surely it is carrots and sticks?— and sticks? if we think that drug oli and sticks? if we think that drug policy enforcement _ and sticks? if we think that drug policy enforcement is _ and sticks? if we think that drug policy enforcement is not - and sticks? if we think that drug policy enforcement is not going | and sticks? if we think that drug i policy enforcement is not going to work and we cannot get rid of drug markets, there we have an option, we either leave those markets in the hands of organised crime groups, or we legalise and regulate them and bring them within the control of the state and responsible state institutions. some people are uncomfortable with that idea, particularly for more risky drugs, but these drugs are here, people are using them, and we do not have a third option in which we can somehow magically wish them away. we either responsibly regulate them via state institutions to try and reduce the harms that they can cause and those
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drug markets can cause or we carry on with a 50 year failed programme, a war on drugs approach, which only serves to empower and enrich organised crime groups and all the chaos that brings. notjust in the uk, but across the world of the war on drugs, it has not worked in the uk or anywhere ever. this is a global policy failure and we do need a radical rethink. the idea of legalising cannabis, people have got their heads around it and lots of countries are doing that, like canada, the us, mexico, south africa and uruguay. canada, the us, mexico, south africa and uruguay-— and uruguay. that is a long way from sa in: and uruguay. that is a long way from saying legalise _ and uruguay. that is a long way from saying legalise the _ and uruguay. that is a long way from saying legalise the use _ and uruguay. that is a long way from saying legalise the use of— and uruguay. that is a long way from saying legalise the use of heroin i and uruguay. that is a long way from saying legalise the use of heroin or. saying legalise the use of heroin or crack cocaine. it is saying legalise the use of heroin or crack cocaine.— crack cocaine. it is not, we already have a system _ crack cocaine. it is not, we already have a system in _ crack cocaine. it is not, we already have a system in the _ crack cocaine. it is not, we already have a system in the uk _ crack cocaine. it is not, we already have a system in the uk were i crack cocaine. it is not, we already i have a system in the uk were people who are dependent on heroin can be prescribed it and get it in a clinic and some of them get to take it away as well. we do already have models for legal availability of heroin for people who are dependent. it is not
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actually that alien an idea. if you look at the outcomes of that, they are very positive. we see people who are very positive. we see people who are prescribed heroin, their health improves, they can live stable lives and getjobs and look after their families, all the things that we would like to say through giving legal heroin on prescription. it is not a particularly alien idea even for some of the more dangerous crops but you would not regulate heroin in the same way as cannabis and you would regulate other drugs like cocaine in different ways. those are the discussions we need to have, we cannot carry on with the failures of the drug war for eternity.— cannot carry on with the failures of the drug war for eternity. thank you ve much the drug war for eternity. thank you very much for— the drug war for eternity. thank you very much for talking _ the drug war for eternity. thank you very much for talking to _ the drug war for eternity. thank you very much for talking to us - the drug war for eternity. thank you very much for talking to us tonight. | two former police officers who took pictures of two murdered sisters in a park in north london — then shared them on whatsapp groups — have each beenjailed for nearly three years. pcs denizjaffer and jamie lewis had been assigned to guard the scene in wembley where the bodies of nicole smallman and bibaa henry were discovered.
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helena wilkinson sent this from the old bailey. thejudge the judge sentenced them to prison and in his sentencing remarks, he told the pair that their conduct was appalling and inexplicable. the officers at the time had been assigned to guard the crime scene where the sisters bodies were found, but instead they left the corton, they took photographs of the sisters bodies. lewis superimposed his face on one of the photographs in a selfie style and then they shared the photographs with colleagues and friends and sent derogatory messages about the two sisters. in the judge's sentencing remarks he said the two officers had not
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only violated the privacy of the women, they had also undermined the trust and faith in police officers that the public should be able to expect at times like this. inside court the mother of the sisters, mina smallman, was listening to the sentence being handed down and after the sentence happened, she spoke outside court. i think the judge really got it, and i think also the groundswell of the public feeling about this story and breach of conduct. so, iam pleased. the most important thing is, i think because of the sentencing, we are part of the change that's going to come in the culture of the police force. that was mina smallman, the sisters' mother, speaking outside court after the sentence was handed down the judge told lewis and jaffer
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that they were going to serve half of their sentence in custody and the rest of it on licence. we've had a statement also from the metropolitan police this evening who have said that the two men have been punished for their actions, which were utterly unprofessional, disrespectful and deeply insensitive. the statement from the met goes on to say, all of us in the met and wider policing are horrified by their shameful behaviour. the grenfell tower inquiry has begun examining what successive governments knew about fire safety and building regulations in the years before the 2017 tragedy which claimed 72 lives. laywers have outlined several missed oportunities to change regulations. that includes not acting on tests more than a decade before the fire here's our home affairs correspondent tom symonds.
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a fire in knowsley on merseyside in 1992. another one, irvine, north ayrshire, 1999. southwark, south london, 2009. that much more is what the grenfell enquiry will investigate in its final five months. enquiry will investigate in its finalfive months. this enquiry is not a game of cat and mouse, where core participants might hope that their witnesses will smuggle something past counsel to the enquiry or counsel to the enquiry might miss a trick.— might miss a trick. core participants _ might miss a trick. core participants including i might miss a trick. core l participants including the government and other industry bodies. a key question, why a fire classification known as class era remained in place for decades, cladding panels rated class era were allowed on tall buildings but class zero included materials that catch light easily and after rand fell all the cladding had to be removed. the
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grenfell disaster is predictable but unintended consequence of that combination of the laudable desire to reduce — combination of the laudable desire to reduce carbon emissions, coupled with an _ to reduce carbon emissions, coupled with an unbridled passion for deregulation. in particular, a desire — deregulation. in particular, a desire to _ deregulation. in particular, a desire to deregulate and boost the housing _ desire to deregulate and boost the housing and construction industry. ciadding _ housing and construction industry. cladding helps keep buildings warm, cutting carbon emissions and all recent governments have wanted to help home—builders build homes, but deregulating the safety of their industry created risks, the enquiry was told today, and the government kept them quiet, was claimed. the result is a prolonged period of concealment by government, which should _ concealment by government, which should properly be regarded as one of the _ should properly be regarded as one of the major scandals of our time. ministers— of the major scandals of our time. ministers and officials will give evidence in weeks to come, the final stage of the search for answers to the question, how could this happen? a tree for free — that's what every household in wales is going to be offered as a way
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of tackling climate change. you can plant your tree in your own garden or have it planted in woodland. the welsh government says it hopes the two million pound project — which begins in march — will encourage families to continue planting more trees in the future. our wales correspondent hywel griffith has the details. from these young seedlings, one day, entire forests may grow. the welsh government says it wants to see 86 million trees planted across wales by the end of the decade to capture carbon and combat climate change. that's why next year it will offer over a million native trees for free — either to be added to a woodland like this, or for people to plant themselves at home. but at the cost of £2 million to the taxpayer, how likely is it that they'll survive and thrive? trees are tough, actually. you've got to treat them pretty badly to kill a tree. you know, just a bit of tender loving care and it will be fine. bit of space and plenty of water.
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to reach 86 million, many, many more will need to be planted. a national forest stretching across wales is planned. a similar scheme is happening in the midlands. but planting to capture carbon is the subject of scientific debate. it depends on the type of tree and its location. stopping deforestation is, for some, a bigger priority, as well as cutting emissions. whether wales's big tree giveaway can have a meaningful impact won't be clear for at least a generation. but ministers say it's a worthwhile investment in the nation's future. hywel griffith, bbc news. not sure it will be t — michael tree—planting weather in the next few days. matt taylor has more. hello. weather conditions are set to deteriorate across the country
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as we go through tomorrow. out there, though, into the start of the new day, it will be fairly quiet. tonight, for instance, many of the showers fading away. some continue north and west, it's gotten wintry in places, but to start tuesday, it will be a sunny start but a very cold and frosty one — scotland, england, east wales especially. but as you can see, down to the southwest, the first signs of strom barra, strengthening winds around irish sea coasts could touch 80mph through the day with travel disruption. rain and snow on the hills for parts of ireland, wales, maybe the southwest through the morning rush hour. brightening up later, and then the gales with the rain and hill snow transfers its way northwards and eastwards across the rest of england and southern scotland into tuesday. the biggest impact from snow as it hits the cold air will be through the pennies and across parts of central—southern scotland. could be blizzards to take us through the start of the evening rush hourfor some. that will then become confined to the grampians through the night. but it's going to remain windy into wednesday. those widespread gales potentially causing some further issues. more warnings on the website.
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this is bbc news with me christian fraser. the covid restrictions are tightened around as the world as the omicron variant takes over. the nigerian ambassador to london says africa is being subjected to travel apartheid. in response the white house says it is reviewing daily the ban it has imposed on eight african nations. a new strategy to tackle illegal drug use in england and wales —the govenment warns casual drug users their may lose their driving licences or passports if they are caught. a second woman tells a court in manhattan that ghislaine maxwell lured her into a relationship in which she was sexually abused byjeffrey epsteen. and the girl who escaped the jaws of a crocodile. we'll hear from the british teenager who says she is lucky to be alive.

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