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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  December 7, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins. welcome to outside source. the leader of the us and the leader of russia have had... russia and the us hold a two—hour, high—stakes video call, with president biden warning of more tough sanctions if russia invades ukraine. breakthrough in the murder ofjournalistjamal khashoggi — french police arrest a saudi national suspected of involvement in the killing. a fire tears through an overcrowded prison in burundi, killing dozens of inmates. we'll update you on that. the government is denying claims of the whistle—blower at that its handling was chaotic and that its staff ignored thousands of requests for help. hopefully, that kind of criticism feels dislocated from the pressures
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and conditions that were the reality for all of us dealing with that situation. �* for all of us dealing with that situation-— for all of us dealing with that situation. �* , ., , ., situation. and the story of the downin: situation. and the story of the downing street _ situation. and the story of the downing street christmas - situation. and the story of the l downing street christmas party situation. and the story of the - downing street christmas party last december goes on. a video shows the staff at number tenjoking december goes on. a video shows the staff at number ten joking it about it. joe biden and vladimir putin have held an important video call, and it was dominated by discussions about ukraine. it also included are ron and ransomware. president biden warned president putin of strong economic sanctions if russia attempts to invade ukraine. president putin says he has no intention to do so. the kremlin released this footage of the call getting under way — both leaders greeted each other with a wave before getting to business. we are told the call went forjust over two hours, and we know that in the last hour, joe biden has called the leaders of the uk,
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france, germany and italy to update them personally on what was discussed. jon donnison in moscow and barbara plett usher in washington. let's start with you, barbara. what we know more about what the americans said about ukraine? we don't know very much == americans said about ukraine? we don't know very much— americans said about ukraine? we don't know very much -- in which it reaffirmed — don't know very much -- in which it reaffirmed what _ don't know very much -- in which it reaffirmed what we _ don't know very much -- in which it reaffirmed what we have _ don't know very much -- in which it reaffirmed what we have been - don't know very much -- in which it reaffirmed what we have been told | reaffirmed what we have been told earlier that president biden expressed concerns about the escalation of forces. he said the us was prepared to respond with tough economic and other measures, repeating support for ukraine's territorial integrity. in saying that all responses would continue to be coordinated with allies, which we saw before.
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the readout also said both sides task to their team to follow up, so it does seem there wasn't some sort of continuation or process after this meeting. john, let's bring you in from moscow. what were vladimir putin's priorities? moscow. what were vladimir putin's riorities? ~ , moscow. what were vladimir putin's riorities? , , ., , priorities? well, his priorities was that he wanted _ priorities? well, his priorities was that he wanted some _ priorities? well, his priorities was that he wanted some sort - priorities? well, his priorities was that he wanted some sort of - priorities? well, his priorities was that he wanted some sort of legal guarantee that ukraine would not be allowed _ guarantee that ukraine would not be allowed to _ guarantee that ukraine would not be allowed tojoin nato. that is something about he has been asking for quite _ something about he has been asking for quite some time, and the americans have been saying they don't _ americans have been saying they don't want — americans have been saying they don't want to give that guarantee, and there — don't want to give that guarantee, and there is no suggestion from this statement _ and there is no suggestion from this statement that barbara was talking about, _ statement that barbara was talking about, that they were going to offer it. so, _ about, that they were going to offer it so. i_ about, that they were going to offer it. so, ithink about, that they were going to offer it. so, i think the issue for president _ it. so, i think the issue for president putin is going to be, if you like. — president putin is going to be, if you like, how he was going to step back from — you like, how he was going to step back from that redlined. i have to say that_ back from that redlined. i have to say that in— back from that redlined. i have to say that in that statement from the americans. — say that in that statement from the
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americans, there wasn't really much encouragement, really, forthe encouragement, really, for the russians — encouragement, really, forthe russians. we've had no statement from _ russians. we've had no statement from the _ russians. we've had no statement from the kremlin. we're expecting one any— from the kremlin. we're expecting one any time now within the next few hours _ one any time now within the next few hours. nothing has yet, but the best you can _ hours. nothing has yet, but the best you can get — hours. nothing has yet, but the best you can get from the statement from the white _ you can get from the statement from the white house was that they were going _ the white house was that they were going to _ the white house was that they were going to agree to continue to get their— going to agree to continue to get their teams to keep working on this. barbara, let's bring you back in in washington, dc. how h ow ofte n how often were the american leaders and russian leaders speaking in this way? and russian leaders speaking in this wa ? , , , ., way? this is the second meeting that the have way? this is the second meeting that they have have. _ way? this is the second meeting that they have have, and _ way? this is the second meeting that they have have, and they had - way? this is the second meeting that they have have, and they had one - way? this is the second meeting that they have have, and they had one inl they have have, and they had one in june on the sidelines of geneva. after there had been a build—up of forces in ukraine. so, they don't speak... it's not rare, but is not frequent, shall we say, and it wasn't held in the situation room in the white house, which is a very secure room behind closed doors. we
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understand there were very few people that participated on the american side, so it did, this meeting, probably much more than the one injune, did have the sense of a crisis situation. the americans being very concerned very volubly and publicly beforehand that russia might be marching towards war and flagging this meeting ahead of time as a way for mr biden to press vladimir putin not to do so, and to layout consequences should he decide to take that step, harsh economic measures that would bring severe harm to the economy. if measures that would bring severe harm to the economy.— measures that would bring severe harm to the economy. if you can pick u . harm to the economy. if you can pick u- on the harm to the economy. if you can pick up on the point _ harm to the economy. if you can pick up on the point about _ harm to the economy. if you can pick up on the point about how _ harm to the economy. if you can pick up on the point about how public - harm to the economy. if you can pick up on the point about how public the | up on the point about how public the americans have been about their concern, jon, what about the russian government? has it also wanted to talk about its concerns about ukraine or has it been more low—key?
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i think it's been low—key, and it's certaihly— i think it's been low—key, and it's certainly rejected the idea that it's planning an invasion. but the narrative — it's planning an invasion. but the narrative is — it's planning an invasion. but the narrative is completely different. here, _ narrative is completely different. here, the — narrative is completely different. here, the narrative is that it is ukraine, — here, the narrative is that it is ukraine, it _ here, the narrative is that it is ukraine, it is the west, it is nato who is_ ukraine, it is the west, it is nato who is being provocative. it talks about _ who is being provocative. it talks about ukraine building up troops and nato operations in the black sea. just to— nato operations in the black sea. just to give you a flavour of some of the _ just to give you a flavour of some of the media coverage we've seen, you'll— of the media coverage we've seen, you'll get _ of the media coverage we've seen, you'll get a — of the media coverage we've seen, you'll get a sense of that. this was on state _ you'll get a sense of that. this was on state we — you'll get a sense of that. this was on state tv's channel one. spreading rumours _ on state tv's channel one. spreading rumours of— on state tv's channel one. spreading rumours of a — on state tv's channel one. spreading rumours of a russian threat. we then have on— rumours of a russian threat. we then have on st _ rumours of a russian threat. we then have on st. petersburg —based chahhel— have on st. petersburg —based channel 5, _ have on st. petersburg —based channel 5, western media bombarded their audiences with provocative materials — their audiences with provocative materials. then we had a commentator on the _ materials. then we had a commentator on the programme 60 minutes, the russian _ on the programme 60 minutes, the russian version, saying biden has to prove _ russian version, saying biden has to prove that— russian version, saying biden has to prove that he is no weakling. you're
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certainly _ prove that he is no weakling. you're certainly not — prove that he is no weakling. you're certainly not getting the same narrative _ certainly not getting the same narrative that you've been getting in those _ narrative that you've been getting in those briefings coming out of the united _ in those briefings coming out of the united states. xliter? in those briefings coming out of the united states.— united states. very useful. jon, thank you _ united states. very useful. jon, thank you. barbara, _ united states. very useful. jon, thank you. barbara, just - united states. very useful. jon, thank you. barbara, just about | united states. very useful. jon, i thank you. barbara, just about the channels of communications that exist between the americans and the russians, we know relations are tense, but outside of set piece discussions like this, how would the russians and americans communicate about their concerns and about their respective military positions? weill. respective military positions? well, the have respective military positions? well, they have established _ respective military positions? -ii they have established travels of communications. the secretary of state met the foreign minister last week, and their other channels, and thatis week, and their other channels, and that is what will be used. but i would say that on the ground in russia and here in the united states, the embassies are working in a very short—staffed way because of the downturn in diplomatic relations. they have limited the number of personnel that can stay at the embassies, and for the americans
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particularly in russia, and moscow, they say they are basically working at caretaker capacity because they have a lot of local staff, and the russians have for them to hire local staff. so, from the embassy level, they have been quite depleted, but with emergency situations that take place directly between ministries, there will be in channels and an emphasis put on this.— there will be in channels and an emphasis put on this. barbara in washington. _ emphasis put on this. barbara in washington, jon _ emphasis put on this. barbara in washington, jon donnison - emphasis put on this. barbara in washington, jon donnison in - washington, jon donnison in washington, jon donnison in washington, very good to have you on outside source. let me show you this feed coming into this white house because we are expecting a the press secretary and the national security advisor on this call amongst other things when it begins. french police have arrested a saudi national suspected
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of involvement in the murder of journalistjamal khashoggi in 2018. the man is suspected of being a member of the �*hit squad' that carried out the killing inside the saudi consulate in istanbul. mr khashoggi had written articles critical of the saudi government for the washington post and other publications. he was lured to the saudi consulate and then strangled. after the killing, turkish media named 15 saudi nationals suspected to have flown into istanbul to carry it out. french radio says the person arrested was the man in the grey top on the far right. it's a very grainy image, but he is named khalid alotaibi, a former member of saudi arabia's royal guard. more details of that on the bbc news website. hugh schofield is in paris. tell us more about the circumstances of this arrest. tell us more about the circumstances of this arrest-— of this arrest. well, the news broke a coule of this arrest. well, the news broke a coople of — of this arrest. well, the news broke a couple of hours _ of this arrest. well, the news broke
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a couple of hours ago, _ of this arrest. well, the news broke a couple of hours ago, and it - a couple of hours ago, and it appears that a man called khalid alotaibi was arrested this morning at the airport, boarding a flight from paris. the presumption was made that he was the same list issued by the turkish government. picked up on by the french border police, and they put him in custody. the initial time was slightly tempered by reports that maybe this is a case of mistaken identity. apparently, the saudi authorities have told off the record recordings of... maybe this is the case of mistaken identity. the french have said to us that they are checking the identity of the man, but i think we need to be cautious on that. we'll have to see. let's bring up a tweet by jamal
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khashoggi's fiance. shu, not forgetting the caveats that you've just added to the identity of this man, if this were the man, would france seek to try itself? == would france seek to try itself? -- huh. would france seek to try itself? -- hugh- no- — would france seek to try itself? » hugh. no. this man, if it's him, is one of many people who are allegedly part of the squad who arrived from saudion part of the squad who arrived from saudi on that night in istanbul and carried out the killing in the consulate. he's one of several people who are on that list, and under the terms of international law and policing, he's been arrested
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because of an arrest warrant issued by turkey. that will be put into effect, but if it's him, he may say he doesn't want to be extradited and fight this, in which case it becomes a legal battle here in france. in which he will say, "i can't go back." and judges will rule whether thatis back." and judges will rule whether that is applied or not. he would be presumed to be going back to turkey because that is the country that issued the initial warrant. thank ou ve issued the initial warrant. thank you very much- _ issued the initial warrant. thank you very much- l _ issued the initial warrant. thank you very much. i sound - issued the initial warrant. thank you very much. i sound like - issued the initial warrant. thank| you very much. i sound like we'll issued the initial warrant. thank- you very much. i sound like we'll be waiting for this confirmation. let's turn to a developing story connected to that christmas party in downing street.
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a video shows staffjoking about a party. helen cat is live with us. what do we see in the video? this is what appears _ what do we see in the video? this is what appears to _ what do we see in the video? this is what appears to be _ what do we see in the video? this is what appears to be a _ what do we see in the video? this is what appears to be a sort _ what do we see in the video? this is what appears to be a sort of- what appears to be a sort of practice press conference, a dry run if you like, for the woman who would been appointed the prime minister's �*s press secretary. she is in that briefing room. there are members of the staff pretending to be journalist and asking the sort of questions that journalists would journalist and asking the sort of questions thatjournalists would be likely to ask the press secretary. one questions asked by one of the aides in the audience is, "i've seen reports on twitter there was a downing street party on friday night. do you recognise there's reports?" she says she went home. she asked if the prime minister would condone this. she says what's
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the answer. would condone this. she says what's the answer-— the answer. this is a story that's not auoin the answer. this is a story that's rrot going away _ the answer. this is a story that's not going away for _ the answer. this is a story that's not going away for the _ the answer. this is a story that's i not going away for the government. the answer. this is a story that's - not going away for the government. i think we're eight days in.— think we're eight days in. yeah, and this is a pretend _ think we're eight days in. yeah, and this is a pretend fat _ think we're eight days in. yeah, and this is a pretend fat on _ think we're eight days in. yeah, and this is a pretend fat on my - think we're eight days in. yeah, and this is a pretend fat on my press - this is a pretend fat on my press conference, but the notable thing is that this happened on the 22nd of december —— this is a pretend press conference. this would have been the friday night before that, so the dates sort of match up. that's one of the issues that come out of the release of this video. the other thing is that the bbc spoke to somebody earlier this month who said they were at this party, and there had been drinks and food. there were several governed people there. there been people at a party —— several dozen. downing street denied covid rules were broken. they came out and
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said there was no christmas party. covid rules have been followed at all times. the bigger issue around all times. the bigger issue around all of this is parties at that time were banned. by, all of this is parties at that time were banned.— all of this is parties at that time were banned. �* , ,, , �*, were banned. a side issue, but it's worth pointing _ were banned. a side issue, but it's worth pointing out _ were banned. a side issue, but it's worth pointing out that _ were banned. a side issue, but it's worth pointing out that the - were banned. a side issue, but it's worth pointing out that the type i were banned. a side issue, but it's worth pointing out that the type of| worth pointing out that the type of briefing they were rehearsing for actually ended up not happening, ri . ht? ., , ., actually ended up not happening, riuht? ., , ., , , right? yeah, she had 'ust been appointed * right? yeah, she had 'ust been appointed press _ right? yeah, she hadjust been appointed press secretary - right? yeah, she hadjust been appointed press secretary and | right? yeah, she hadjust been i appointed press secretary and the idea was there was televised briefing. she then moved from that role a few months later to become the press secretary for the cop26 summit. the plan for those briefings never happened. summit. the plan for those briefings never happened-— never happened. helen, thanks for the update- — a whistle—blower in the british government says the foreign office's handling of the evacuation of kabul was dysfunctional, chaotic and arbitrary. you may remember scenes like this at kabul airport back in august. thousands tried to flee afghanistan as the taliban advanced on the city.
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raphael marshall worked in london on the uk's operation to get people out. he's since resigned, and in written evidence, he's described what happened with the evacuation scheme. we've voiced up some of his words. the uk airlifted 15,000 people out of afghanistan. for comparison, the us evacuated the highest number of people — 120,000. raphael marshall says the team he was part of in london, which was coordinating the airlift, didn't have enough staff.
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the uk's foreign secretary at the time was dominic raab. he's now the justice secretary and deputy prime minister. he's given his response to these accusations. the idea that we weren't looking at these _ the idea that we weren't looking at these cases with compassion and sensitivity, but also trying to make the right _ sensitivity, but also trying to make the right decisions, i think is at odds _ the right decisions, i think is at odds with _ the right decisions, i think is at odds. with the fact that we've got 15,000 _ odds. with the fact that we've got 15,000 people out injust two weeks, more _ 15,000 people out injust two weeks, more than _ 15,000 people out injust two weeks, more than any other country except the us _ more than any other country except the us i_ more than any other country except the us. ithink more than any other country except the us. i think the facts speak to themselves, and i certainly don't accept _ themselves, and i certainly don't accept the — themselves, and i certainly don't accept the case, having worked with so many _ accept the case, having worked with so many officials in the foreign
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office, — so many officials in the foreign office, in— so many officials in the foreign office, in the mod and the home office _ office, in the mod and the home office i— office, in the mod and the home office. i know how passionately they felt about _ office. i know how passionately they felt about this and how carefully everyone — felt about this and how carefully everyone was trying to get this right, — everyone was trying to get this right, and _ everyone was trying to get this right, and frankly, that criticism feels _ right, and frankly, that criticism feels rather dislocated from the operational pressures and conditions that were _ operational pressures and conditions that were the reality for all of us dealing — that were the reality for all of us dealing with that situation. it's worth considering the impact of afghans being unable to board those evacuation flights out of the country. secunder kermani has this from kabul. there's still lots of afghans who are desperate to try and get out the country. i've been speaking to one former british army interpreter who is yet to receive a response to his application from the uk. though he did say that a dozen other former interpreters he personally knows that have been meant to board evacuation flights back in august, but had been unable to get into the airport, had recently managed to arrive in britain. a former government a official who have been trying to leave for some time, said he has recently managed to get into
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pakistan and is now desperately trying to find any country that will accept them long—term. around 100 afghan journalists are already in that state of limbo in pakistan, looking for somewhere that they can travel onto. there is a sense of bitterness are among many of those who were left behind who feel that they were more deserving than some of those who manage to board them. the whistle—blower, raphael marshall, made direct accusations about the then—foreign secretary. he said dominic raab took "several hours" to respond to special cases and insisted they be "set out in a well—presented table" before he would make a decision. this was mr marshall's conclusion on that. as you may expect, dominic raab rejects those accusations. so, i don't accept that. this is... of course — so, i don't accept that. this is... of course we _ so, i don't accept that. this is... of course we needed to, with the
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volume _ of course we needed to, with the volume of— of course we needed to, with the volume of claims coming in, clear facts _ volume of claims coming in, clear facts to— volume of claims coming in, clear facts to be prevented. i think the criticism — facts to be prevented. i think the criticism that he made was that i was making decisions that took several— was making decisions that took several hours at —— be presented. another of whistle—blower raphael marshall's accusations relate to this man, pen farthing. he's the founder of a charity called nowzad working in afghanistan, which ran an animal clinic, dog and cat shelter and donkey sanctuary. during the evacuation, he campaigned for his staff and animals to be airlifted out of kabul. he tweeted on 31 august to say... pen farthing's 68 staff did later leave afghanistan, but this is what mr mashall wrote about the animal evacuation.
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here'sjessica elgot, chief political correspondent at the guardian reporting. and next, let's hear from dominic dyer, a wildlife campaigner who helped pen farthing pressure the government on getting the animals out. he's been speaking to the bbc. prime minister did prime ministerdid in prime minister did in for we had the industry— prime minister did in for we had the industry behind _ prime minister did in for we had the industry behind us. _ prime minister did in for we had the industry behind us. —— _ prime minister did in for we had the industry behind us. —— did - industry behind us. —— did intervene _ industry behind us. —— did intervene. awareness- industry behind us. —— did i intervene. awareness around industry behind us. —— did - intervene. awareness around the world, _ intervene. awareness around the world, speaking _ intervene. awareness around the world, speaking out— intervene. awareness around the world, speaking out every- intervene. awareness around the world, speaking out every day. intervene. awareness around the i world, speaking out every day about the tragedy — world, speaking out every day about the tragedy of — world, speaking out every day about the tragedy of evolving. _ world, speaking out every day about the tragedy of evolving. the - world, speaking out every day about the tragedy of evolving. the prime i the tragedy of evolving. the prime minister— the tragedy of evolving. the prime minister intervened _ the tragedy of evolving. the prime minister intervened because - the tragedy of evolving. the prime minister intervened because of- the tragedy of evolving. the prime i minister intervened because of that, and he _ minister intervened because of that, and he wasn't — minister intervened because of that, and he wasn't wrong _ minister intervened because of that, and he wasn't wrong to _ minister intervened because of that, and he wasn't wrong to do _ minister intervened because of that, and he wasn't wrong to do that. - and he wasn't wrong to do that. you're — and he wasn't wrong to do that. you're asking _ and he wasn't wrong to do that. you're asking me _ and he wasn't wrong to do that. you're asking me why— and he wasn't wrong to do that. you're asking me why he - and he wasn't wrong to do that. - you're asking me why he intervene, that's— you're asking me why he intervene, that's what— you're asking me why he intervene, that's what he — you're asking me why he intervene, that's what he did. _ borisjohnson has been asked if he intervened. this is what he said.
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no, that's nonsense, but what i can tell you _ no, that's nonsense, but what i can tell you is _ no, that's nonsense, but what i can tell you is i — no, that's nonsense, but what i can tell you is i think that the operation to airlift 15,000 people out of— operation to airlift 15,000 people out of kabul and the way that we did over the _ out of kabul and the way that we did overthe summer out of kabul and the way that we did over the summer was one of the outstanding military achievements of the last _ outstanding military achievements of the last 50 years or more. we can speak to james landale, our diplomatic correspondent. speak to lots of people in the office, how does this account match up office, how does this account match up with what you hear?— up with what you hear? well, as ever, up with what you hear? well, as ever. there _ up with what you hear? well, as ever, there is _ up with what you hear? well, as ever, there is a _ up with what you hear? well, as ever, there is a mix _ up with what you hear? well, as| ever, there is a mix of defences, but also acceptance that some of it rings true. and i think that what the impact of this report and evidence isjust in report and evidence is just in the sheer remorseless evidence that it provides. it paints a picture of a system that just wasn't working. basically, this system that was set up was what they called special cases, and a last minute thing. existing schemes,
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british national get them out. afghans who worked for the british government, there's a scheme existing to take them out. but for this other group of people, those people who have a connection to the uk, may be they've worked for british organisations, charities or media, how do we get those out? and i think the foreign office said, "lets appealfor i think the foreign office said, "lets appeal for requests." and were completely overwhelmed by thousands and thousands and thousands of emails, and they didn't have the system set up to handle it. also, some of the _ system set up to handle it. also, some of the allegations - system set up to handle it. also, some of the allegations look - system set up to handle it. also, some of the allegations look at l some of the allegations look at dominic raab's behaviour during this period specifically, the foreign office is a big place and it wouldn't be normalfor office is a big place and it wouldn't be normal for the office is a big place and it wouldn't be normalfor the foreign secretary to sign off lots of individual requests and cases, what it? i individual requests and cases, what it? 4' individual requests and cases, what it? ~ , individual requests and cases, what it? 4' , .., , ., it? i think in this case, it would be, not it? i think in this case, it would be. rrot on _ it? i think in this case, it would be, not on individuals, - it? i think in this case, it would be, not on individuals, but- it? i think in this case, it would be, not on individuals, but on | it? i think in this case, it would - be, not on individuals, but on broad swathes of groups of people and things like that, simply because these were big decisions.
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essentially, you have to choose between giving somebody freedom and somebody having to stay in a place where they're still in danger. and those are big decisions, and some of them did go up to mr raab, and he was criticised because he was his usual his self, too loyal. he likes to proceed on the basis of facts and building up a picture, and this is the criticism that was made. that's fine for some decision, but in circumstances of urgency and haste, sometimes you have to will make quicker decisions. his response to thatisit quicker decisions. his response to that is it was not the speed of decision—making that mattered, it was about verifying the identity of people and ensuring their safe passage to the airport. quickly, presumably. — passage to the airport. quickly, presumably, now— passage to the airport. quickly, presumably, now that - passage to the airport. quickly, presumably, now that the - passage to the airport. quickly, i presumably, now that the taliban passage to the airport. quickly, - presumably, now that the taliban is in power in most of the british have left, any opportunities to further help people in afghanistan are largely gone?— help people in afghanistan are largely gone? that's not entirely true. the british _ largely gone? that's not entirely true. the british government - largely gone? that's not entirely true. the british government is| largely gone? that's not entirely. true. the british government is in
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contact with the taliban, but officials based in the gulf to fly in and out every thorough often, and there was a case recently when two senior officials went in and sat down with the taliban, and they were able to bring out a british national who had beenjailed and able to bring out a british national who had been jailed and tortured able to bring out a british national who had beenjailed and tortured in the process of trying to get some other people out. so, there are connections and contacts, but ultimately, yes, there is a limit to what the british government can do if the taliban and do not let people through. what they can do is put more pressure and lobby neighbouring countries to allow more people in, particularly a country like pakistan.— particularly a country like pakistan. , ., ., ., pakistan. james, always great to have ou pakistan. james, always great to have you on _ pakistan. james, always great to have you on outside _ pakistan. james, always great to have you on outside source. - pakistan. james, always great to | have you on outside source. let's quickly recap the breaking news this hour. these are life pictures from downing street. i'm showing them to you because of a recording has emerged showing senior staffjoking about holding a party in number ten four days after the event took place
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in december last year. i'll see you in december last year. i'll see you in a couple of minutes' time. hello. it will remain pretty wild and windy for some of you as we go through into tonight. some of the strongest gusts today from storm barra have been across some western coasts. these are some of the daytime gusts we have seen. 86 mph into the evening at aberdaron in gwynedd. the storm itself is going to start to decay during the next 2a hours, but you can see what a potent feature this is. this hook of cloud is a telltale sign of a pretty deep and quite stormy low pressure system. bore the brunt across parts of southwest ireland, but it's going to slowly move eastwards as we go through the night and gradually start to weaken. but as we head into the end of the day, strongest of the winds, wales, parts of southwest england, through the channel islands and up towards the far northeast of scotland. blustery for time, but winds following lighter in scotland,
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northern england later. some slow—moving showers here, but you can see around that area of low pressure some batches of showers and longer spells of rain, particularly across parts of western wales. it'll feel cold enough for a bit of sleet and snow over the hills, but the big picture, storm barra, as we go into wednesday, there's a low pressure which has now ground to a halt across the uk, but slowly starting to weaken. strongest of the winds around the peripheries, so again, shetland, parts of wales and towards the southwest is where we see the strongest of the winds, widespread gales here. bit blustery elsewhere — lightest winds, northern england and across scotland. mixture of sunshine and showers for wednesday, but some longer spells of rain still possible across parts of wales and northern ireland, and a chilly day for all. those showers, longer spells of rain continue to revolve around what's left of storm barra as we go through into wednesday evening and overnight, but it decays further into thursday, and with those isobars starting to become less numerous, it means the winds will be lighter. it means a greater chance of frost and fog thursday morning. a lot of
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dry weather on thursday, some sunny spells and a bit of cloud across scotland, northern ireland. one or two showers, but turning wider. weakening weather front goes in. temperatures in single figures for most, and another cool day as we go through into friday. showers most prominent in the west, but by saturday, it looks like cloudy conditions will come in. rain in the north and west, and something milder, and that will gradually push northwards across most areas as we go into sunday. latest weather warnings for storm barra remain online.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the leader of the us and russia have held a two hour video call. president biden has warmed of smart tough sanctions if russia invades ukraine. russia says it has no plans to do so. i break there in the investigation into the murder of jamaal khashoggi. they say they arrested a saudi national with expected involvement in the killing. and of the development in the story of the downing street christmas party last year, a video showing staff at number tenjoking party last year, a video showing staff at number ten joking about it for days after the event had emerged. let's return now to our top story —
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joe biden and vladimir putin's video call — and take a look at the state of play in ukraine and why it's a concern for both leaders. in 2014, russia annexed crimea from ukraine — and russian troops began a military campaign into eastern ukraine to support ukrainian separatists — marked here. you might remember these pictures of vladimir putin arriving in crimea in 2014 for —— it infuriated the west. and in response, russia was booted out of the g8 group and hit by a number of sanctions. since then the fighting has continued in eastern ukraine and in recent months, russia has been building its presence along ukraine's eastern borders. this is a satellite image ofjust one russian military base in crimea — there's a large number of russian tanks, and military vehicles. this has heightened the threat of a russian invasion — and heightened the tensions between russia and the us. here's former us ambassador to ukraine.
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president putin has said over and over, very explicitly, that he doesn't see ukraine as a country — it's really only an extension of russia — and this, of course, is the pretence, ukrainians fear, for this invasion. russia claims that its movements are defensive ones, aimed at countering ukrainian and western escalation. and moscow has been clear about what it calls "red lines" on ukraine. first, the kremlin says that ukraine must notjoin nato under any circumstances. and its clear to see why that would be a red line. take a look at this map. the european nato members are in light blue. russia already shares a small part of it's border with nato countries — but ukrainejoining would more than double the military alliances neighbouring russia. the kremlin also wants assurances that ukraine won't try to regain any territories siezed by russia in 2014. andrey kortunov is head of the russia's council for international affairs.
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it's not about stocking the military operation in ukraine, if he really wanted to invade ukraine, he would have acted in a very different way, probably he would have opted for a hybrid operation rather than a kind of very than a kind of very explicit demonstrate of mountain of russia's troops along the border. my sense is that it's a signal, it's a signal to kiev, maybe it's a kind of deterrent signal to prevent kiev from keeping military force. a third key aspect of moscow's concern is the weaponry already provided to ukraine by western countries. that support has helped ukraine become a much stronger force than it was in 2014. here's our correspondent abdujalil abdurasulov in the port of odessa to explain. the countries like the united states have already provided military equipment worth millions
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of dollars in addition to these boats, the united states handed over their equipment and tactical equipment including lethal weapon such as javelin anti—tank missiles, and the united kingdom has also stepped up its military assistance lately. last year, the president of ukraine, volodymyr zelensky, and prime minister, borisjohnson signed a memorandum to enhance ukraine's naval capability, and as part of that deal, the united kingdom will build naval bases and attack military vessels for ukraine's navy, russia says that such military support only destabilises the situation in the region and feels tensions in eastern ukraine. ——fuels tensions in eastern ukraine. the growing tensions are big news in russia. and some television presenters have suggested that the west is clueless about the situation. here's one russian politician speaking on state tv. translation: as a citizen of russia, i have what - seems to me like a very legitimate question — what are we waiting for? we have thousands of soldiers
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at the border, we've got everything ready for an invasion. why wait until early next year? strong words from one russian presenter. but there is clearly concern in moscow about the west's military support of ukraine. and the west is just as nervous about russia invading ukraine. but with both sides showing their strength, many are asking if is it alljust for show. here's nina khrushcheva — she is the great—grand—daughter of former soviet leader nikita khrushchev — and a professor of international affairs. it is fresh out, but, of course, when you have such a build—up on both sides, the show can turn into an actual war very quickly, and we know that. that's why it's such a terrifying situation right now because even if putin doesn't mean to invade the way the last says he plans to invade, things can break out at any moment right there on the border, and when they do break out, you don't know how far each military
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will be willing to go. the you don't know how far each military will be willing to go.— will be willing to go. the white house is due _ will be willing to go. the white house is due to _ will be willing to go. the white house is due to give _ will be willing to go. the white house is due to give a - will be willing to go. the white house is due to give a press i house is due to give a press briefing, and we are expecting them to talk about that call between vladimir putin and joe biden, as and when it happens, you can see the press are all in place, we will watch it. next an outside source, we turn to botswana in southern africa, who has hit out at travel bans over the new covid—19 variant omicron. in an interview with the bbc, botswana's president masisi warned global restrictions are throttling his economy. have a listen. it's unfair, i mean, for the reason that we were among the first, if not the first to notify the world of the existence of this new variant, first we expected as a developing nation to be commended for brilliant scientific work in our scientists, and second, we expected to be commended for alerting everybody else so much earlier and third, we expected for there to be
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a responsible and conscientious action taken, obviously, to protect oneself and those in their countries, but not to undertake actions that have the net effect of penalising everything we did to do with omicron. botswana and south africa were the first among the world to report the new variant last month. for botswana's part —it�*s traced the origins to diplomats who entered the country on november 7th. four days later they tested positive for the virus. genetic sequencing confirmed on nov. 2a that they were carrying the new variant. by then — they'd returned home. and botswana's president is clear his country isn't the origin. it could not have because it was discovered among persons who had recently arrived and because of our very aggressive testing, it had not been picked up among the population that was here.
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it stands to logic that it may have come in, but where precisely it originates, i don't think anybody knows. there were four diplomats who came in from whom the variant was established and there was another workshop, and from among those in that workshop with people coming from various countries, european among them, but i don't know the specific european country to be precise, but there have been persons, at least one was from the us and there were some from european countries who had come and some we know the epicentre of the omicron variant is neighbouring south africa. scientists there are getting a better idea of how infectious — and dangerous — it is. early hospital data suggests that while the risk of reinfection with omicron is higher — symptoms appear to be milder. if we take gauteng — south africa's most populated province — as an example.
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dr angelique coetzee was the first doctor in south africa to spot omicron. she's told me what she's learnt since her discovery. what we have learned of this variant is it is highly transmissible. is it more than delta? that is still difficult to say, although we have a steep incline in numbers, meaning what we see, especially around families is that if one person in the household gets omicron, the rest, 99% of the family members will also have at. it's quite transmissible, more than delta, that still remains to be seen, but we do know that you can detect it on a pcr test and a swab test that you do, and you can also detect it on a rapid test. however, the rapid test cannot distinguish between delta and
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omicron. you have to use your clinical skills there, and the pcr can detect whether it's omicron or not because there is fallout. what else do we know? we know that currently up until today that the majority of cases are mild cases, and the mild cases especially in primary health this week at most. we have not seen people needing any oxygen even in those hospitalised cases which are omicron related. those people don't need action at this stage. the amount of people and oxygen in hospitals remains to be determined whether it's doubt or not. that is what we know. just determined whether it's doubt or not. that is what we know. just so i understand — not. that is what we know. just so i understand this, _ not. that is what we know. just so i understand this, are _ not. that is what we know. just so i understand this, are the _ not. that is what we know. just so i understand this, are the mild - understand this, are the mild symptoms you are describing because these people are younger, because
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they are vaccinated or because you think this variant in particular brings with it milder symptoms? this variant has brings with it milder symptoms? try 3 variant has milder symptoms. we have seen the whole spectrum. i myself have seen the whole spectrum. i have seen people who are vaccinated, i have seen people have covid—19 before, whether it was delta or bait out, and they were vaccinated, and they have infections. i have seen people infected who only had delta or beta before just reinfected and i have seen unvaccinated people, so you see the whole spectrum. but it's interesting however that it seems that the vaccines are at this stage still true to their word. we haven't seen any severe case on omicron or
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any omicron related deaths due to people who have been vaccinated. so the unvaccinated people, if you look at hospitalisation number is, slightly starting to increase, but it's mostly unvaccinated, 99% are unvaccinated, at any age group. let's turn to burundi now, and at least 38 people have died and at least 69 have been seriously injured in a fire in an overcrowded prison. the prison is in the political capital, gitega. it has capacity for 400 prisoners but more than 1,500 inmates were being held there at the time. these images show the aftermath. inmates said the fire began early in the morning and that prisoners shouted for help but police refused to open the cells. they also say it took firefighters two hours to reach the scene. here's one of them speaking to the bbc. it is really catastrophic.
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i'd say that almost 90% of sleeping holes are burnt because the remaining place is where less than 200 sleep, whereas here, we are more than 1,400. there are those who have died, but we can't count how many. it started at 4am. it is dark, there is no electricity, and the holes are still closed. we are still locked in here and the set up of things is bad, and you know how quick the beds and mattresses catch fire. burundi's vice president visited the scene — and gave this explanation for the fire. translation: there are those. who want to make small voltage outlets somewhere to charge a phone, i don't know, who want to have a small bolt of lightning, and this kind of additional installation can cause huge damage. it's the second time a fire has broken out in this prison — the first was in august — when there were no casualties.
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sabrina mahtani is human rights lawyer who researches prisons rights issues across africa. here's her reaction on the situation. the situation on the continent is really dire in terms of patent rights. ——of prison rights. i think this is an issue that is routinely left to the bottom of government agendas and sadly, it's only when a very tragic incident like what has happened in burundi happens that it gets to have some attention. we know that the majority of prisons on the continent are vastly overcrowded and many of them, actually, are holding prisoners who are not even sentenced. so i think about half of the african countries more than 40% of the prison population are in pretrial detention. and i think particularly with the covid—19 pandemic, we need to ask ourselves, do we need to have this number of people in prisons? the african commission, the un, the who have called on countries to make sure that prison populations are reduced in order to spread
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covid—19 happening in prisons. unfortunately, although we have seen some countries actually take such measures, it's not enough. the bbc�*s patience atuahaire is in kampala in neighbouring uganda. because the fire broke out in the middle _ because the fire broke out in the middle of— because the fire broke out in the middle of the _ because the fire broke out in the middle of the night _ because the fire broke out in the middle of the night at _ because the fire broke out in the middle of the night at about - because the fire broke out in the| middle of the night at about 4am local time. — middle of the night at about 4am local time, the _ middle of the night at about 4am local time, the facility— middle of the night at about 4am local time, the facility would - middle of the night at about 4am| local time, the facility would have been _ local time, the facility would have been locked — local time, the facility would have been locked down. _ local time, the facility would have been locked down. it _ local time, the facility would have been locked down. it would - local time, the facility would have been locked down. it would have. been locked down. it would have taken _ been locked down. it would have taken a — been locked down. it would have taken a while _ been locked down. it would have taken a while for _ been locked down. it would have taken a while for everybody - been locked down. it would have taken a while for everybody to i taken a while for everybody to organise — taken a while for everybody to organise them, _ taken a while for everybody to organise them, the _ taken a while for everybody to organise them, the first- taken a while for everybody to - organise them, the first responders to get— organise them, the first responders to get to _ organise them, the first responders to get to the — organise them, the first responders to get to the scene _ organise them, the first responders to get to the scene and _ organise them, the first responders to get to the scene and also - organise them, the first responders to get to the scene and also for - organise them, the first responders to get to the scene and also for the | to get to the scene and also for the facility— to get to the scene and also for the facility to— to get to the scene and also for the facility to be — to get to the scene and also for the facility to be open _ to get to the scene and also for the facility to be open so _ to get to the scene and also for the facility to be open so that - to get to the scene and also for the facility to be open so that people i facility to be open so that people could _ facility to be open so that people could get — facility to be open so that people could get to _ facility to be open so that people could get to safety. _ facility to be open so that people could get to safety. we - facility to be open so that people could get to safety. we are - facility to be open so that people . could get to safety. we are hearing reports _ could get to safety. we are hearing reports that — could get to safety. we are hearing reports that police, _ could get to safety. we are hearing reports that police, firefighters - reports that police, firefighters who wear— reports that police, firefighters who wear late _ reports that police, firefighters who wear late to _ reports that police, firefighters who wear late to get _ reports that police, firefighters who wear late to get to - reports that police, firefighters . who wear late to get to the scene, but also _ who wear late to get to the scene, but also that — who wear late to get to the scene, but also that the _ who wear late to get to the scene, but also that the facility— who wear late to get to the scene, but also that the facility that - who wear late to get to the scene, but also that the facility that the l but also that the facility that the prisoners — but also that the facility that the prisoners were _ but also that the facility that the prisoners were calling _ but also that the facility that the prisoners were calling for- but also that the facility that the prisoners were calling for help . but also that the facility that the . prisoners were calling for help for a while _ prisoners were calling for help for a while before _ prisoners were calling for help for a while before they _ prisoners were calling for help for a while before they were - a while before they were allowed outside — a while before they were allowed outside. although— a while before they were allowed outside. although we _ a while before they were allowed outside. although we have - a while before they were allowed outside. although we have not . outside. although we have not independently_ outside. although we have not independently verify _ outside. although we have not independently verify this - independently verify this information. _ independently verify this information.— independently verify this information. ., ., ., information. what reaction have we had from within _ information. what reaction have we had from within the _ information. what reaction have we had from within the area _ information. what reaction have we had from within the area to - information. what reaction have we had from within the area to this - had from within the area to this tragedy? had from within the area to this traced ? ., , ~' had from within the area to this traced ? ~ ., , had from within the area to this traed ? .,, ~' ., , , tragedy? people i think that this is very catastrophic. _ tragedy? people i think that this is very catastrophic. over _ tragedy? people i think that this is very catastrophic. over 30 - tragedy? people i think that this is very catastrophic. over 30 people | very catastrophic. over 30 people dead. _ very catastrophic. over 30 people dead. some — very catastrophic. over 30 people dead. some of— very catastrophic. over 30 people dead, some of them _ very catastrophic. over 30 people dead, some of them about- very catastrophic. over 30 people dead, some of them about 20 -
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very catastrophic. over 30 people dead, some of them about 20 of. very catastrophic. over 30 people - dead, some of them about 20 of them died from _ dead, some of them about 20 of them died from injuries, _ dead, some of them about 20 of them died from injuries, burns, _ dead, some of them about 20 of them died from injuries, burns, and- dead, some of them about 20 of them died from injuries, burns, and over- died from injuries, burns, and over a dozen _ died from injuries, burns, and over a dozen died — died from injuries, burns, and over a dozen died from _ died from injuries, burns, and over a dozen died from breathing - died from injuries, burns, and over a dozen died from breathing in - died from injuries, burns, and over a dozen died from breathing in the| a dozen died from breathing in the toxic— a dozen died from breathing in the toxic fumes — a dozen died from breathing in the toxic fumes that _ a dozen died from breathing in the toxic fumes that came _ a dozen died from breathing in the toxic fumes that came from - a dozen died from breathing in the toxic fumes that came from the i a dozen died from breathing in the l toxic fumes that came from the fire. the people _ toxic fumes that came from the fire. the people i— toxic fumes that came from the fire. the people i think— toxic fumes that came from the fire. the people i think this— toxic fumes that came from the fire. the people i think this is— toxic fumes that came from the fire. the people i think this is very- the people i think this is very tragic. — the people i think this is very tragic. first— the people i think this is very tragic, first of all— the people i think this is very tragic, first of all for- the people i think this is very tragic, first of all for the - tragic, first of all for the facility— tragic, first of all for the facility to— tragic, first of all for the facility to have - tragic, first of all for the facility to have been - tragic, first of all for thej facility to have been this overcrowded _ facility to have been this overcrowded and - facility to have been this overcrowded and the - facility to have been thisl overcrowded and the fact facility to have been this - overcrowded and the fact that facility to have been this _ overcrowded and the fact that people are claiming— overcrowded and the fact that people are claiming that _ overcrowded and the fact that people are claiming that health— overcrowded and the fact that people are claiming that health didn't - overcrowded and the fact that people are claiming that health didn't come. are claiming that health didn't come when _ are claiming that health didn't come when it— are claiming that health didn't come when it should — are claiming that health didn't come when it should have _ are claiming that health didn't come when it should have and _ are claiming that health didn't come when it should have and maybe - are claiming that health didn't come| when it should have and maybe lives would _ when it should have and maybe lives would have _ when it should have and maybe lives would have been— when it should have and maybe lives would have been saved. _ when it should have and maybe lives would have been saved. it's - when it should have and maybe lives would have been saved. it's very- would have been saved. it's very difficult — would have been saved. it's very difficult to — would have been saved. it's very difficult to get _ would have been saved. it's very difficult to get information - would have been saved. it's very difficult to get information out . would have been saved. it's very| difficult to get information out of this area — difficult to get information out of this area for _ difficult to get information out of this area for local— difficult to get information out of this area for local media - difficult to get information out of this area for local media who - difficult to get information out of this area for local media who are j this area for local media who are stopped — this area for local media who are stopped from _ this area for local media who are stopped from going _ this area for local media who are stopped from going to _ this area for local media who are stopped from going to the - this area for local media who are stopped from going to the scene j stopped from going to the scene earty— stopped from going to the scene early on — stopped from going to the scene early on for— stopped from going to the scene early on for international- stopped from going to the scene early on for international media i early on for international media it's even— early on for international media it's even harder— early on for international media it's even harder to— early on for international media it's even harder to get- early on for international media i it's even harder to get information out of— it's even harder to get information out of there — it's even harder to get information out of there. but _ it's even harder to get information out of there. but we _ it's even harder to get information out of there. but we understand . it's even harder to get information . out of there. but we understand that the fire _ out of there. but we understand that the fire began— out of there. but we understand that the fire began from _ out of there. but we understand that the fire began from an _ out of there. but we understand that the fire began from an electric- the fire began from an electric fault _ the fire began from an electric fault within _ the fire began from an electric fault within the _ the fire began from an electric fault within the facility- the fire began from an electric. fault within the facility according to the _ fault within the facility according to the police _ fault within the facility according to the police and _ fault within the facility according to the police and the _ fault within the facility according to the police and the local - fault within the facility according. to the police and the local people are saying — to the police and the local people are saying deficit— to the police and the local people are saying deficit to _ to the police and the local people are saying deficit to —— _ to the police and the local people are saying deficit to —— facility- are saying deficit to —— facility had _ are saying deficit to —— facility had been _ are saying deficit to —— facility had been functioning - are saying deficit to —— facility had been functioning the - are saying deficit to —— facility had been functioning the wayl are saying deficit to —— facility. had been functioning the way it should — had been functioning the way it should have. _ had been functioning the way it should have, lots _ had been functioning the way it should have, lots of _ had been functioning the way it should have, lots of lives - had been functioning the way it| should have, lots of lives might have _ should have, lots of lives might have been— should have, lots of lives might have been saved. _ stay with us on outside source — still to come... is part is the bbc�*s hundred women series from a hollywood actress speaks about weight loss and fighting her way to the top.
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hundreds of staff of an american companyjoined a zoom call with their boss, only to be told he was sacking them. vishal garg, chief executive of a mortgage firm called better.com blamed staff performance, productivity and market changes for the mass online dismissal of some 900 people. comments on social media said it was "cold", "harsh" and "a horrible move", especially in the run up to christmas — however it's raised questions about the appropriate way to dismiss workers during a pandemic, when many are working from home. lebo diseko reports. thank you forjoining. um... i come to you with not great news. an understatement if ever there was one. nearly 900 staff called to a zoom meeting by their boss to be told this. if you're on this call, you are... ..part of the unlucky group being laid off.
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your employment here is terminated, effective immediately. while his actions are legal in the us, where this took place, here in the uk, things are different. if we are talking about uk law, there is a very clear process that you need to follow, and there are also codes of practice and organisations will have their own policies and procedures as well. whenever you had to make people redundant, or whether you have to dismiss people, there is a right way of doing it, there is a human way of doing it. since the zoom sacking went viral, better.com has told the bbc that... woman: this is not real! oh, my god. i can't believe this! gut—wrenching too for those on the other side of this call. lebo diseko, bbc news.
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this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... joe biden and president putin have held talks, video calls to discuss a range of issues, including russia's military build—up close to ukraine. we will also be kept and is being developed through the our these are life pictures from downing street now. the video has emerged from a recording from last december showing senior staffjoking about holding a party and number ten for days after christmas party took place. the video was leaked to itv news and shows a mock press conference which allegra stratton, then press officer is asked about a downing street party the previous friday night and
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says i went home, it she then laughs, and an identified in place as it wasn't pretty, it was cheese and wine. the opposition labour leader has tweeted... well, let's hear once more from helen who i spoke to from westminster a few minutes ago. this video westminster a few minutes ago. try 3 video appears to be a sort of practice press conference, a driver and, if you like, for the women who had just been appointed the prime minister's press secretary. so is in that briefing room that we got used to seeing from the press conference at the start of blue and brown backstrap, and there in the audiences members of the number ten staff pretending to be journalists and asking the sort of questions that journalists would and asking the sort of questions thatjournalists would be likely to ask the press secretary. now, one of
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the questions that was asked by one of the prime minister's aids the audience here is i have seen reports on twitter that there was a downing street party on friday night. do you recognise those reports? allegra stratton laughs says i went home... hold on, hold on, she said with the prime minister cannot having a christmas party? she laughs again and says what's the answer? this is and says what's the answer? this is a story that — and says what's the answer? this is a story that is _ and says what's the answer? this is a story that is not _ and says what's the answer? this is a story that is not going _ and says what's the answer? this is a story that is not going away for. a story that is not going away for the government. we are eight days into it. . . the government. we are eight days into it. , , ., ,., , into it. yes, it is. the reason this video, into it. yes, it is. the reason this video. of— into it. yes, it is. the reason this video, of course _ into it. yes, it is. the reason this video, of course commits - into it. yes, it is. the reason this video, of course commits a - into it. yes, it is. the reason this i video, of course commits a fictional scenario, but it's a pretend press conference, but the notable things here is that this happened on the 22nd of december, tuesday the 22nd of december, this practice press conference, but the date that this party is said to have happened a number ten was the 18th of december, which would have been the friday night before that. so, the dates sort of matchup, so that is sort of one of the issues that's come out of
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the release of this video. the other thing is, you know, that bbc spoke to somebody earlier this month who said they were at this party, that there had been drinks and food, that there had been drinks and food, that there were several thousand people there. there have been people who have said they were at a party, downing street has consistently denied that any covert rules are broken. they've come back to us after the release of the city of this evening and again said there was no christmas party that covid rules have been... the bigger issue around the says parties at that time were banned. celebrating influential women and unsung heroes from across the globe — the bbc�*s 100 women season has kicked off, highlighting those who are leading change and making a difference. as part of the series this year, nomia iqbal has been talking to australian actor rebel wilson about her dramatic weight loss — and hollywood's changing attitude towards her.
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in 2019 — i had, like, four pretty successful movies come out and, like, had done all this amazing stuff career—wise but then in the next year, all i did was just lose 80 pounds. and, like, the attention that gets... it was insane. ..is way more than being in an academy award—nominated film and, like, producing my first movie and then doing all this stuff. can i — can i read you one headline? oh, yeah, sure. "rebel wilson has a bond girl moment in an incredible curve—hugging swimsuit." wow. how do you feel about those words? i never thought i'd be described anywhere near a bond girl! but how do you feel about those sorts of headlines about your weight loss? i've noticed that it's been getting a lot of attention and i go "so, is that what a woman has to do in the world is lose — just lose weight to, like, get attention?" for me, it was so much bigger. like, i know what it's like to be a woman who is essentially invisible to most people because of not being seen as, like, traditionally beautiful or whatever, so i know what it's like when nobody holds the door open for you or —
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or, you know, just looks that you almost like you can have no value because you're not seen as good looking to them, so i know what that's like. but i got a lot of pushback from my own team, actually, here in hollywood, when i said "ok, i'm gonna do this year of health. "i'm gonna — ifeel like i'm really going to physically transform and change my life" and they were like, "why? "why would you want to do that?" because i was earning millions of dollars being, you know, the funny fat girl, like, and being that person, and i go, "well, because even though i was still very confident being bigger and, you know, loved myself — you know, would rock a red carpet — and even though i was probably double the size, sometimes triple the weight of other actresses, but like, i still felt confident in that. but i knew deep down inside some of the emotional eating behaviours i was doing was not healthy. like, i did not need a tub of ice cream every night — that was me, you know,
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numbing emotions by using food, which wasn't the healthiest thing. things i hadn't kind of processed or dealt with in my life that — that was manifesting as emotional eating and then i was like "that's not the healthiest!" but what i try to do is share just enough that hopefully people can understand, like, some of the struggles i've been through and then, and like the reason why i share it is to hopefully help people. at the moment, lots ofjournalist sitting there, but it hasn't started. we think it will feature the white house press secretary along with jake solomon, the national security adviser, there are both appearing and thatjoe biden has been speaking with vladimir putin for over two hours and security was the dominant theme because of the focus on ukraine at the moment and of russian military build—up across the border inside russia. as and when that starts, we will see, but we've been waiting for an hour, so i
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can't say for sure when that will be. bye—bye. hello. it will remain pretty wild and windy for some of you as we go through into tonight. some of the strongest gusts today from storm barra have been across some western coasts. these are some of the daytime gusts we have seen. 86 mph into the evening at aberdaron in gwynedd. the storm itself is going to start to decay during the next 24 hours, but you can see what a potent feature this is. this hook of cloud is a telltale sign of a pretty deep and quite stormy low pressure system. bore the brunt across parts of southwest ireland, but it's going to slowly move eastwards as we go through the night and gradually start to weaken. but as we head into the end of the day, strongest of the winds, wales, parts of southwest england, through the channel islands and up towards the far northeast of scotland. blustery for a time, but winds falling lighter in scotland, northern england later. some slow—moving showers here, but you can see around that
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area of low pressure some batches of showers and longer spells of rain, particularly across parts of western wales. it'll feel cold enough for a bit of sleet and snow over the hills, plus if you get any clear skies for long enough, there could be frost or ice on the ground into the morning. but the big picture, storm barra, as we go into wednesday, is of low pressure which has now ground to a halt across the uk, but slowly starting to weaken. strongest of the winds around the peripheries, so again, shetland, parts of wales and towards the southwest is where we see the strongest of the winds, widespread gales here. bit blustery elsewhere — lightest winds, northern england and across scotland. mixture of sunshine and showers for wednesday, but some longer spells of rain still possible across parts of wales and northern ireland, and a chilly day for all. those showers, longer spells of rain continue to revolve around what's left of storm barra as we go through into wednesday evening and overnight, but it decays further into thursday, and with those isobars starting to become less numerous, it means the winds will be lighter. it means a greater chance of frost and fog thursday morning. a lot of dry weather
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on thursday, some sunny spells and a bit of cloud across scotland, northern ireland. one or two showers, but turning wider. weakening weather front goes in. temperatures in single figures for most, and another cool day as we go through into friday. showers most prominent in the west, but by saturday, it looks like cloudy conditions will come in. rain in the north and west, and something milder, and that will gradually push northwards across most areas as we go into sunday. latest weather warnings for storm barra remain online.
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this is bbc news, i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 8pm... pressure mounts on the prime minister after itv obtains footage appearing to show staff at number at ten joking about the downing street christmas party four days after the event. the prime minister condone typing a christmas party. the prime minister condone typing a christmas party-— the prime minister condone typing a christmas party. what's the answer? i don't christmas party. what's the answer? i don't know- — the christmas party happened when london was in tier three — restrictions banning social mixing indoors — the day before millons had their christmas plans cancelled.
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labour calls the latest revelations shameful.

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