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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  December 9, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm GMT

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at six — christmas parties, downing street renovations and england's plan b. the prime ministerfaces yet more accusations, an investigation into government christmas parties during covid restrictions last year widens amidst claims there were others. and now, more questions over whether the prime minister misled an investigation into how the downing street flat refurbishments were paid for, as the conservative party is fined almost £18,000. what we need now is a bit of grip from no 10. it's no good having these stories dragged out by the media. the government needs to make a clean breast of it, get everything out into the open, transparency is always the best policy. also on the programme tonight... england's plan b covid restrictions in the run—up to christmas — hospitality businesses fear a collapse in demand at their busiest time of year.
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the impact of covid continues — the number of people now waiting for routine treatment in england is now almost 6 million. and there's not much good news from down under, either, as england's dismal start in the ashes continues. and coming up on the bbc news channel... new covid measures mean football fans in england will need to be double—jabbed or have a negative test to get into games with a crowd of more than 10,000. good evening and welcome to bbc news at six. the prime minister is facing yet more scrutiny today over claims of other christmas parties and now fresh questions over whether he misled an investigation into how refurbishments to his downing street flat were paid for. the conservative party has been
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fined nearly £18,000 for failing to keep accurate records of a donation. it comes as the investigation by the cabinet secretary into a party in downing street last december is being widened to look at two other gatherings. labour has called for the prime minister to resign if he is found to have misled mps about the parties. here's our political editor, laura kuenssberg, and a warning, laura's report contains flashing images. nightmares on downing street. behind every window, a different dilemma. what is the truth about last year's christmas party in the building? who paid for thejohnson is�* expensive interior design upstairs? can they control another surge in the pandemic? can they keep their own party under control? when the johnsons moved in upstairs, they had thousands of pounds of renovations. when the lavish expenses emerged, this was the prime minister's claim. who initially pay for the
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redecoration of the downing street flat? ., , ., ~ ., redecoration of the downing street flat? ., ~ ., ., flat? you should know that i paid for downing _ flat? you should know that i paid for downing street _ flat? you should know that i paid| for downing street refurbishment personally, mr speaker. yet for downing street refurbishment personally, mr speaker.- personally, mr speaker. yet the tories have _ personally, mr speaker. yet the tories have been _ personally, mr speaker. yet the tories have been fined - personally, mr speaker. yet the l tories have been fined thousands personally, mr speaker. yet the - tories have been fined thousands for breaking spending rules after a wealthy businessman tried to set up a special trust to pay for doing up the flat. the real tangle is whether borisjohnson has been straight about what happened. he told a previous investigation he hadn't known exactly where the cash came from until february this year. but today's report showed he sent a wealthy donor a whatsapp about the cash several months before. downing street defence? it suggested he knew this wealthy donor was overseeing the money, but not that he was directly providing the cash himself. borisjohnson is taking the british public for full rules. he borisjohnson is taking the british public forfull rules. he has not only broken the law but made a mockery of the standards we expect. even though there has been tears, and a resignation, no 10s's hardly
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recovered from denials about parties under its roof. 1 recovered from denials about parties under its roof-— under its roof. i am truly sorry. was there _ under its roof. i am truly sorry. was there a — under its roof. i am truly sorry. was there a party _ under its roof. i am truly sorry. was there a party in _ under its roof. i am truly sorry. was there a party in downing i under its roof. i am truly sorry. - was there a party in downing street? are you _ was there a party in downing street? are you planning _ was there a party in downing street? are you planning to _ was there a party in downing street? are you planning to resign? - was there a party in downing street? are you planning to resign? other. are you planning to resign? other staff caught _ are you planning to resign? other staff caught joking _ are you planning to resign? other staff caught joking about - are you planning to resign? staff caught joking about what staff caughtjoking about what happened are still trying to move fast enough to hang on. willa formal investigation catch up with what really happened, at not one, not two, but three, what the government is still calling, gatherings. fix, government is still calling, gatherinqs-_ government is still calling, unatherins. . ., , government is still calling, ”atherins, ., ., , q“, gatherings. a gathering at number 10 downin: gatherings. a gathering at number 10 downing street _ gatherings. a gathering at number 10 downing street on _ gatherings. a gathering at number 10 downing street on 27 _ gatherings. a gathering at number 10 downing street on 27 november- gatherings. a gathering at number 10. downing street on 27 november 2020, a gathering at the department for education on 10th december 2020 and allegations made of a gathering at number 10 downing street on 18th december 2020. but number 10 downing street on 18th december 2020.— december 2020. but it is the emptying _ december 2020. but it is the emptying of _ december 2020. but it is the emptying of offices _ december 2020. but it is the emptying of offices next - december 2020. but it is the i emptying of offices next week, december 2020. but it is the - emptying of offices next week, the return of tighter covid restrictions, vaccine passports to get into venues, that is starring strong feelings. dozens of tory mps have already vowed to vote against the plans next week, and this is all
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provoking private questions about the prime minister's future, with a warning from the past. the the prime minister's future, with a warning from the past.— the prime minister's future, with a warning from the past. the mood in the conservative _ warning from the past. the mood in the conservative party _ warning from the past. the mood in the conservative party is _ warning from the past. the mood in the conservative party is a - the conservative party is a sulphurous, and what we need now is a bit of grip from no 10. it is no good having the stories dragged out by the media. the government needs to make a clean breast of it. the conservative party history is littered with ruthlessness on these occasions, but i am confident that boris will get a grip there is exasperation within the tory party about what has been happening and near universal agreement that someone, somehow, has to take control of what's happening here. but a universal belief that that will certainly happen? that is a different matter. downing street will soon be home for a new baby girl, born happy and healthy to the johnsons this morning. but what many conservatives also want to see is rigour and clear logic in residence behind that famous door. and sophie, as one senior mp said to today,
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suggesting, if things don't change, then there is going to be a big problem, it isjust then there is going to be a big problem, it is just a then there is going to be a big problem, it isjust a question of when. anger is so deep in the tory party, this has been such a frenzied and fractious few weeks that there really are many mps now starting to contemplate what life might look like after borisjohnson as their leader. now, ithink like after borisjohnson as their leader. now, i think it is far too soon to suggest that there is going to be any kind of immediate action, chatter that mps might try to get rid of him soon i think tonight seems really far—fetched. but he's got problems on many fronts, with his policies, with the way that he runs downing street, and with how mps see that he is actually getting on with the things that they want him to do, the priorities that they hoped the public would be able to see the conservative party focusing on. and there is certainly, sophie, a huge amount of pressure on boris johnson to sharpen up. laura kuenssberg with the latest from westminster, thank you. some of england's new covid restrictions begin tomorrow.
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hospitality businesses say they are facing a collapse in demand at their busiest time of the year, calling it a body blow to pubs, restaurants and entertainment venues which are already struggling. from tomorrow, face coverings will be required again in most indoor public venues including theatres and cinemas but not pubs or restaurants. from monday, you should work from home, if you can. from next wednesday, an nhs covid pass will be needed to get into large venues like nightclubs, though a negative lateral flow test will also be accepted. and daily testing will replace self—isolation for people who come into contact with someone infected. our business correspondent emma simpson reports from birmingham. a city with a festive feel, busy, too. many in good spirits, despite the latest restrictions. i too. many in good spirits, despite the latest restrictions.— the latest restrictions. i think if it is going _ the latest restrictions. i think if it is going to — the latest restrictions. i think if it is going to help, _ the latest restrictions. i think if it is going to help, it's - the latest restrictions. i think if it is going to help, it's fine. - the latest restrictions. i think if it is going to help, it's fine. i i it is going to help, it's fine. i will do whatever, as long as people are safe. it will do whatever, as long as people are safe. , , , , ,
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are safe. it is sensible. it is still frightening. _ are safe. it is sensible. it is still frightening. if- are safe. it is sensible. it is still frightening. if they - are safe. it is sensible. it is still frightening. if they can | still frightening. if they can .a l still frightening. if they can party. so — still frightening. if they can party. so can _ still frightening. if they can party, so can we. - still frightening. if they can party, so can we. this - still frightening. if they can party, so can we. this cafe| still frightening. if they can - party, so can we. this cafe relies on office staff, _ party, so can we. this cafe relies on office staff, back— party, so can we. this cafe relies on office staff, back to _ party, so can we. this cafe relies on office staff, back to working l on office staff, back to working from home again next week. it is from home again next week. it is auoin to from home again next week. it is going to be _ from home again next week. it 3 going to be tough, to be honest, it has been almost two years, rob lee more than two years, isn't it? just being sat and wanting to get back to normal life and it all gets shut down again. it normal life and it all gets shut down again-— normal life and it all gets shut down again. it is very uncertain what is going — down again. it is very uncertain what is going to _ down again. it is very uncertain what is going to happen, - down again. it is very uncertain what is going to happen, you . down again. it is very uncertain . what is going to happen, you don't know— what is going to happen, you don't know if— what is going to happen, you don't know if it _ what is going to happen, you don't know if it is — what is going to happen, you don't know if it is going to get better or worse _ know if it is going to get better or worse. do— know if it is going to get better or worse. y ., know if it is going to get better or worse. ,, ~ know if it is going to get better or worse. i. ~ ., worse. do you feel like going backwards? _ worse. do you feel like going backwards? i— worse. do you feel like going backwards? ifeel_ worse. do you feel like going backwards? i feel like - worse. do you feel like going backwards? i feel like going l backwards? i feel like going backwards. _ backwards? i feel like going backwards, absolutely. - backwards? i feel like going backwards, absolutely. the| backwards? i feel like going - backwards, absolutely. the timing could not backwards, absolutely. the timing could rrot be _ backwards, absolutely. the timing could not be worse _ backwards, absolutely. the timing could not be worse for— backwards, absolutely. the timing could not be worse for this - could not be worse for this business. could not be worse for this business-— could not be worse for this business. ~ , ., ., ., business. we were starting to gain momentum _ business. we were starting to gain momentum and _ business. we were starting to gain momentum and we _ business. we were starting to gain momentum and we were _ business. we were starting to gain momentum and we were really - business. we were starting to gain - momentum and we were really excited and now to have this, we are back into that worrying what is going to happen territory. find into that worrying what is going to happen territory-— happen territory. and here is another big _ happen territory. and here is another big change, - happen territory. and here is another big change, a - happen territory. and here is another big change, a covidl happen territory. and here is - another big change, a covid pass. to get one, you will have to be fully vaccinated for at least a fortnight, or show a negative test in the last 48 hours. you can download the nhs covid pass on your phone. and it is going to be mandate to all
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nightclubs and large events. this nightclubs and large events. this nightclub owner says it is another big blow for the industry. i nightclub owner says it is another big blow for the industry.- big blow for the industry. i have had to bring _ big blow for the industry. i have had to bring in _ big blow for the industry. i have had to bring in extra _ big blow for the industry. i have had to bring in extra staff, - had to bring in extra staff, policies, procedures, logistical arrangements, and we really don't know what to expect when we open our doors next week. for know what to expect when we open our doors next week.— doors next week. for the economy, thins doors next week. for the economy, things aren't _ doors next week. for the economy, things aren't nearly _ doors next week. for the economy, things aren't nearly as _ doors next week. for the economy, things aren't nearly as bad - doors next week. for the economy, things aren't nearly as bad as - things aren't nearly as bad as another lockdown, but one retail veteran says city centres are vulnerable, if restrictions go on for too long. vulnerable, if restrictions go on fortoo long-— vulnerable, if restrictions go on for too long. once we get beyond christmas. _ for too long. once we get beyond christmas, we _ for too long. once we get beyond christmas, we are _ for too long. once we get beyond christmas, we are going - for too long. once we get beyond christmas, we are going to - for too long. once we get beyond christmas, we are going to find i christmas, we are going to find that city centres go back to where they were right at the beginning of the covid problem, and so, the infrastructure which supports the whole of the office life will not be there to support the people when they eventually go back to work. it they eventually go back to work. it is not the news business wanted for christmas. how this story ends depends on whether consumers will continue to go out and spend. emma
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simpson, bbc news, birmingham. public health scotland has tonight urged people to call off their christmas parties due to the rising number of cases of the omicron variant. many of the restrictions announced in england are already in place in other uk nations. in a moment we will be hearing from our correspondent james shaw moment we will be hearing from our correspondentjames shaw in glasgow and from emma vardy in northern ireland. hywel griffith takes us through the restrictions already in place in wales. england's plan b looks a lot like wales' planai. facemasks have remained mandatory in public spaces. the advice to work from home was never removed. covid pass is work introduced here almost two months ago. initially in nightclubs and venues, theatres and cinemas, so what has the impact been? concerns about large queues have largely dissipated. in fact the complaint now is that parties are often seen but not scanned. covid case numbers in wales have been falling over the
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last two months, but the rates have remained above those in england, which calls into question how effective these measures have been. there has been no recent change in the rules in scotland. face coverings are required in all indoors public spaces, in public transport and in pubs and restaurants if people are moving around. you need a vaccine certificate if you want to go to a nightclub or to a larger live event. and to get one, you need to be fully vaccinated or to have a recent negative lateral flow test. recently, the first minister, nicola sturgeon, has been emphasising the importance of working from home if possible. that is a change of stress, not a change in the rules, but that could still happen in the days ahead. northern ireland returned to its work from home if you can advise nearly a month ago, and here, mask wearing has never been relaxed since it was first
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introduced, so, face coverings are still mandatory in pubs and restaurants if you're not sat down and on public transport. you also now have to show a vaccine passport here to get into pubs and restaurants and other venues. there has been a couple of demonstrations here opposing them, and hospitality venues don't particularly like having to enforce those vaccine passports on the door. as for the omicron variant, there is only a small number of cases so far detected here in northern ireland, but today, the first minister said they are expecting it to become a challenge and are planning fresh measures in the new year to prepare for that. measures in the new year to prepare forthat. emma measures in the new year to prepare for that. emma vardy there. the latest coronavirus figures for the uk show there were nearly 51,000 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, an 8% increase over the past week, bringing the average number of cases reported per day in the past seven days to over 48,000. the number of people in hospital with covid remains steady — yesterday, there were 7,347. 161 deaths were recorded, of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test.
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on average in the past week, 122 covid—related deaths were recorded every day. the number of new omicron cases has almost doubled in a day, with 249 recorded in the past 24 hours. it means more than 800 have now been identified in the uk. 0ur medical wditor, fergus walsh, reports. last christmas, the alpha variant put huge pressure on the nhs as it swept through a largely unvaccinated population. so, what will omicron do? within a couple of weeks, suspected omicron cases from pcr swabs have gone from zero to more than 6% of those tested. the doubling time for omicron is every 2—3 days, than 6% of those tested. the doubling time for omicron is every 2—3 days, suggesting than 6% of those tested. the doubling time for omicron is every 2—3 days, suggesting it than 6% of those tested. the doubling time for omicron is every 2—3 days, suggesting it is than 6% of those tested. the doubling time for omicron is every 2—3 days, suggesting it is highly transmissible. if that trend continues, then it could become the dominant variant within a couple of weeks, and cases saw. even if most
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people have a mild infection, in part due to vaccine protection, it could still cause problems for the nhs. the government advisory group sage say that without interventions, it is highly likely to lead to more than 1000-2000 it is highly likely to lead to more than 1000—2000 daily hospital admissions, compared to around 700 now, with delta. back injanuary, the alpha wave was causing around 4000 daily hospital admissions. mast 4000 daily hospital admissions. most --eole 4000 daily hospital admissions. most eo - le will 4000 daily hospital admissions. most people will get _ 4000 daily hospital admissions. ill-inst people will get mild illness but some people will be seriously ill and some people will be hospitalised. the case numbers rise substantially above where they are at the moment, then that small proportion being hospitalised could still put substantial pressure on the health service.— still put substantial pressure on the health service. sage scientists say working _ the health service. sage scientists say working from _ the health service. sage scientists say working from home _ the health service. sage scientists say working from home will - the health service. sage scientists say working from home will have l the health service. sage scientists l say working from home will have the biggest impact within plan b and limiting viral spread. but there are still huge uncertainties about
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omicron. ., ., , omicron. how it will transmit in the uk, in the — omicron. how it will transmit in the uk, in the presence _ omicron. how it will transmit in the uk, in the presence of _ omicron. how it will transmit in the uk, in the presence of delta, - omicron. how it will transmit in the uk, in the presence of delta, and l uk, in the presence of delta, and second, _ uk, in the presence of delta, and second, how serious the disease is, particularly — second, how serious the disease is, particularly in a well vaccinated population. we have to wait until those _ population. we have to wait until those people with infection have gone _ those people with infection have gone through the whole course of disease _ gone through the whole course of disease before we can really work that one — disease before we can really work that one out. disease before we can really work that one out-— disease before we can really work that one out. , that one out. there is some positive news. 10,000 _ that one out. there is some positive news. 10,000 patients _ that one out. there is some positive news. 10,000 patients at _ that one out. there is some positive news. 10,000 patients at high - that one out. there is some positive news. 10,000 patients at high risk. news. 10,000 patients at high risk from covid are to test a life—saving antiviral pill to take at home after testing positive. it cuts the risk of hospitalisation or death by around a third. fergus walsh, bbc news. our top story this evening... the prime ministerfaces more scrutiny today over claims of other christmas parties and whether he misled an investigation into how refurbishments to his downing street flat were paid for. and coming up... jockey robbie dunne has been found guilty of "bullying and harassing" his fellow rider bryony frost. coming up in sportsday on the bbc news channel...
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the aussies are in control after another disappointing day for england at the ashes. travis head getting an unbeaten century, as australia pile on the runs in brisbane. the 0micron variant and the efforts involved in stepping up the booster jabs is piling yet more pressure onto the nhs. but even before that impact becomes clear, the number of people waiting for non—urgent medical treatment in england has hit its highest level since records began. almost six million people were waiting to start treatment at the end of october, and more than 10,500 people had to wait more than 12 hours in a&e before a bed was found last month. but ambulance response times have improved slightly. our health editor, hugh pym, reports from newcastle's royal victoria infirmary. is she quite sick? does she need any respiratory support? the pressure rarely eases. it's all the running around we do. record numbers of patients
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are coming through the doors. here, they believe there's been a fundamental change in people's health needs. i think it's the pent—up demand in health care that has exploded, and our system isjust being overwhelmed at every point. yeah, it was a bit concerning, sitting waiting. tricia had to wait two hours for an ambulance. she's had heart attacks before, and feared she was having another one, but doctors reassured her. i've come in and been sorted. i can't complain, honestly. no waiting around or anything. yeah. the aim is to ensure that patients like tricia are seen quickly unless urgent cases are directed to other parts of the hospital. those arriving at a&e are expected to answer questions about their condition on touch screens. some could be asked to see a gp. it's made the system more efficient, but the pressure is still intense. and all of this is before any impact
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from the new variant. the message is that hospitals are at full stretch now, and any marked rise in covid patients could create significant strain. it must have been very frustrating. lorraine and other patients like her have had long waits for operations postponed last year because of the pandemic. the pain just gets worse and worse. i have no feeling in my legs or my feet, so i'm tripping a lot. but now she's been called in to have her spinal surgery. i'll be pleased today anyway, get this done now and i could be dancing in a couple of weeks' time! she said, hopefully! this hospital is trying to get through the backlog, but surgeons say that'll be a mammoth task. you can put as much money as you want, but we need infrastructure. so to do more surgery, we need more theatres. to staff more theatres, we need more staff. that's a huge number of staff across all the specialties, and staff don't grow on trees.
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finding beds is a problem for most hospitals. nhs england says one in ten patients who are fit to leave can't do so because of problems with social care. winter hasn't fully set in. the covid picture is highly uncertain, but already alarm bells are ringing. hugh pym, bbc news, newcastle. and the bbc has launched an nhs tracker to allow you to find out how your local services are coping in england, wales and scotland. it'll run through the winter. you can find out more at bbc.co.uk/nhstracker. thejockey robbie dunne has been found guilty of "bullying and harassing" his fellow rider bryony frost, and won't be able to compete for 15 months. an independent disciplinary panel heard evidence about horse racing's so called weighing room culture. 0ur sports correspondent laura scott
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is outside the british horseracing authority in central london. how significant is this ruling? it is hugely significant on a number of levels. for robbie dunne, he's been banned today for 18 months, three of which are suspended after a panel found him guilty of distasteful targeting of bryony frost, and at times dangerous bullying. he was found guilty, but his solicitor said the outcome was deeply disappointing and an appeal is high on the agenda. it is of course significant for bryony frost too. she said she has felt isolated since she spoke out more than a year ago, and she thanked those who have supported her. but this goes beyond the jockeys. supported her. but this goes beyond thejockeys. it's raised wider questions about the culture within the sport, the conduct in the weighing room by which i mean the dressing room environment. british
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horseracing authority's case was that the culture that would robbie dunne's behaviour acceptable had a rancid culture, the panel said the behaviour was deep—rooted and coercive, but tonight the jockeys association said that was wholly unfair and a group of female jockeys said the bha had failed them. the chief executive of the bha said tonight we have a long way to go. laura scott with the latest, thank you. the scottish government delivered its budget this afternoon, setting out financial plans for the year to come. it is the first budget since the scottish national party and the greens entered a co—operation agreement following elections earlier this year. the announcement saw pledges on health and social care, child poverty, and green investment. this report from scotland correspondent james cook contains flash photography. as budget day dawned, and era ended. this was scotland's last coal fired
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power station, the largest in europe. it crashed to the ground as the snp and the greens outlined how they would bring down both emissions and poverty. they would bring down both emissions and ove . ., , , they would bring down both emissions and ove . ., , and poverty. today's budget is a buduet and poverty. today's budget is a bud . et of and poverty. today's budget is a budget of choices, _ and poverty. today's budget is a budget of choices, and - and poverty. today's budget is a budget of choices, and we - and poverty. today's budget is a budget of choices, and we have | budget of choices, and we have chosen to tackle child poverty, to invest in the transition to net to zero, and to boost economic prosperity. it delivers on our manifesto promises. more teachers, more funding for police and record investment in our health and social care service. as we stand united against the impact of covid—19. health and social care swallows a record chunk of this budget, £18 billion, but doctors leaders are worried. the bma says the nhs is close to breaking point and scottish ministers must admit it is not currently capable of delivering all they are asking of it. but what about support for business? the payment of rates, suspended during the pandemic for key sectors, will
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be phased in again. at this sock firm, founded in lockdown, business is booming despite labour, inflation and supply chain challenges. the best thin and supply chain challenges. tie: best thing the and supply chain challenges. tte: best thing the scottish and supply chain challenges. t"t2 best thing the scottish government can do is create an environment where people feel confident in investing. where people feel confident in investinu. ., , ., investing. scotland is full of talented people _ investing. scotland is full of talented people and - investing. scotland is full of i talented people and beautiful products are produced, i think it is supporting — products are produced, i think it is supporting the people on the ground and the _ supporting the people on the ground and the businesses as they grow. elsewhere, a council tax freeze is over, but for most people in scotland income tax rates remain unchanged. the tories say the finance secretary should say thank you to them for the funding. t am you to them for the funding. i am absolutely _ you to them for the funding. i am absolutely astonished _ you to them for the funding. t —n absolutely astonished that for this budget she has not been able to at least acknowledge that she has at her disposal record block grant funding from rishi sunak and the uk government. up by 10.6% improving the benefits of scotland being part
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of a strong united kingdom. essen of a strong united kingdom. even before the pandemic, _ of a strong united kingdom. even before the pandemic, the snp was facing criticism of its record on health, education and drugs deaths, and this budget underlines that covid-19 has and this budget underlines that covid—19 has sharpened all of those challenges with a deadly virus now looming over every decision. james cook, bbc news. christmas can be expensive. people are being warned to be careful when borrowing money to pay for it. the organisation stop loan sharks says the pressure to spend means the festive period is when illegal money lenders often prey most on their victims. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith has been speaking to one mother about her experience of living under the threat of a loan shark. we've changed some details to protect her identity. i couldn't get away from it. i was stuck in that house from, like, four o'clock, in the dark, on my own, just listening to people shouting stuff through my window. i did have the windows put through. it all started for this mum of three when she borrowed 50 quid.
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we'll call her michelle. she was new to the area and she met another parent in the school playground. she was a woman and she was a mother, quite persistent, so we did spark up a bit of a friendship and start to chat and she said, oh, i help people around here, and, you know, i can always help you. michelle's hours had been cut at work and she'd struggled to cover the cost of her son's birthday party. it was very easy then because i knew the option was there. to borrow more? to borrow more, yeah, yeah. but that was, you know, a loan that was double the payback. you know, iwas paying, like, bits off, but to pay that back, again, that's twice as much money out of my pocket the next month. so then it was just a cycle, basically. she couldn't keep up with the demands and eventually her home was broken into and ransacked. what was left was either destroyed or, you know,
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there was things that were urinated on, so the children's beds and carpets had been urinated on, and i had to throw a lot of stuff away that was left. you know, some of the stuff that was taken, it's just stuff, isn't it, but there was stuff taken there that i'll never get back. really sentimental things and all for the sake of borrowing a few quid. after months of being hounded, threatened and abused, in person and online, for cash she couldn't pay back, it all got too much for michelle. i couldn't take it any more, couldn't sleep at night, i didn't want to go back. you know, i was so depressed. i just got whatever i could that was left, and the kids, and we left. we just got up and left. what mother makes her kids homeless? i did, i made that choice. well, i say i made that choice.
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i didn't really have another choice, but i took those children away from what they knew and left them with nothing. during the last year, the family was able to move from temporary accommodation to a permanent home and michelle decided to ring the stop loan sharks helpline to report what had happened. ifelt i could breathe again because i felt somebody really understood. i am a good person. i made a mistake because i was desperate and i'm not a bad parent, but, you know, now i'm not that person, you know. i'm not scared any more. how do you feel this christmas as opposed to this time last year? last year i had nothing to celebrate. and it's not even about stuff, do you know what, it's a home. that's what we've got this year. we've got a happy, settled home and a lovely life and my children are happy. that was colletta smith with that story. if you've been affected by any of those issues, you can find help and support on the bbc action line website at bbc.co.uk/actionline.
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the first ashes test is going very much australia's way. they lead england by nearly 200 runs in brisbane going into day three. here's our sports correspondentjoe wilson. various scenarios are still possible in brisbane, but they all basically look the same. classic australia — ashes take—over. for a moment, ben stokes had dismissed david warner cheaply. the replays showed he'd overstepped — a no—ball, a not out, a big deal — because warner was free to leap onjack leach's bowling to build australia's lead, to ride his luck. england dropped this gift. rory burns the guilty fielder, sadly. rory burns! marnus labuschagne, who made 74, batted with warner, and through much of the seconds play they demoralised england. of the second day's play they demoralised england. but david warner's fortune finally ran out on 94, caught by stokes, and ollie robinson struck again
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with his next ball. cameron green, golden duck. but by the close, england's bowlers seemed exhausted, injured orjust incapable of stopping travis head. look at that for a cricket shot — bang! while ben stokes nursed a painful knee, head overwhelmed an england side which had been unable to prepare adequately for the series. travis head's first ashes hundred, he'd seized the second day. australia have a 196—run lead and as much time as they need. joe wilson, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here's louise lear. and she is going to bring some sunshine at last!— sunshine at last! let's not talk cricket or— sunshine at last! let's not talk cricket or rain, _ sunshine at last! let's not talk cricket or rain, let's _ sunshine at last! let's not talk cricket or rain, let's look - sunshine at last! let's not talk cricket or rain, let's look at. sunshine at last! let's not talk l cricket or rain, let's look at this. the yorkshire dales this afternoon was the place to be, absolutely glorious. there was some rain in the forecast though, and it is spreading steadily eastwards as we speak. some
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of it is fairly light and patchy as it moves across england and wales but there are heavier burst through scotland and yes, some sleet and snow. that frontal system will continue to move eastwards, then a north—westerly wind will kick in during the early hours. it is getting milder but we have one more chilly day to come, so a chilly start with temperatures down to freezing in rural parts of scotland. that north—westerly wind feeding in the showers early on, and some of them quite a wintry mix. some of those showers will run down across northern ireland through the irish sea but there will be a good slice of sunshine. central and southern england dry, settled and sunny. not too one, for 28 degrees largely —— four to eight degrees largely. these weather fronts will be responsible
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