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tv   The Papers  BBC News  December 12, 2021 10:30pm-11:01pm GMT

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police investigating the disappearance of a children's hospital worker in south london have found a body in a park. scotland yard say petra srncova's family are being kept informed, although the body has not yet been identified. the 32—year—old was last seen on the 28th of november and she was reported missing five days later. amidst an economic collapse in afghanistan, the country's drug trade seems to be booming. it's long been linked with the production of heroin and is now also a major producer of crystal meth. the taliban says for the moment it cannot ban drug production because there are no alternative sources of income to poor farmers. our correspondent secunder kermani and cameraman malik mud—assir report now from afghanistan. they are one of afghanistan's most lucrative exports, but these drugs are destroying lives here and abroad. there is heroin and increasingly
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now crystal meth. this, an exclusive look at where the meth is coming from. these drugs in southern afghanistan will be smuggled to countries as far away as australia. the amount in this room alone would sell there for around £2 million. this is how it is made. makeshift open—air labs in the desert under the noses of the taliban. these trucks are full of a key ingredient. traffickers here have discovered a common wild plant that can be used to produce meth cheaply. last week the taliban banned farmers from picking it, but they are not shutting down
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the meth labs. this man with links to the trade says crystal meth is booming. when the taliban announced their ban on this plant, he tells me, the wholesale price of meth doubled and there are still warehouses full of it. this is another dangerous drug, opium, from poppies like these, most commonly associated with afghanistan. around 80% of the world's heroin supply originates here. before the taliban takeover opiun traders paid off corrupt officials and sold the black paste secretly. now they have been allowed to open up stalls in markets. we are driving through a bazaar where opium is being sold openly. much of it is then going to be processed into heroin. the taliban are not stopping drug production, in fact they have been taxing it for years, but they don't want journalists
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seeing it being traded, that's why we are filming from inside a car. you call yourselves an islamic government and you are allowing drug production. isn't that hypocritical? translation: under the islamic emirate before 2001 the growing| and selling of opium dropped to zero. right now we are trying to find alternatives. we can't take this away from people without offering them something else. eradicating this is good for us in the international community, so the world should help too. for years poorfarmers have relied on opium to provide for their families. now, as afghanistan's economy collapses, without international support when water levels continue to drop, many see it as the safest crop to grow. opium destroys a lot of people's lives.
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if opium is banned, what will happen to you guys and your families? the taliban regularly haul these addicts off to rehab centres, but many end up straight back here. for now, more drugs look set to hit the streets both in afghanistan and across the world. secunder kermani, bbc news, afghanistan. max verstappen has been confirmed as the new formula one world champion after a thrilling and controversial end to the final race of the season in abu dhabi. the 24—year—old dutchman beat britain's lewis hamilton on the last lap to win his first title, denying hamilton a record eighth championship.
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the final result had been challenged by hamilton's mercedes team, but the result was upheld. our sports correspondent, natalie pirks reports from abu dhabi. it was billed as the decider in the desert, and in the afternoon heat of abu dhabi fans were split firmly into two camps. hamilton supporters were confident he was about to leave an indelible mark on the sport. there's no one else like lewis. if he beats max today and gets the title, he will definitely be the greatest of all time. but hamilton was up against an orange wall. what would it mean to you to have a dutch world champion? tea rs! red bull had the pole, but mercedes had the faster car. what a great start. a dream start, more like, but max verstappen was hot on his tail with a late lunge forcing hamilton wide. hamilton gained time. the steward said this was fair. by lap 13, verstappen�*s soft tyres
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were struggling, so he pitted, leaving his red bull team—mate to try and hold hamilton up. but then a virtual safety car allowed verstappen to swoop into the pits, and on fresh tyres he chased the gap. red bull knew it would be tough. we're going to need a miracle. or a huge controversy. another crash meant a safety car and yet more fresh tyres for the dutch man. but when the governing body ruled that some lapped cars would be allowed to overtake the safety car, it gave max verstappen one last lap, one last shot. ..verstappen, who takes the lead in the race! a controversial ending was always on the cards. both drivers were in tears for different reasons. max verstappen is champion! well, that was truly unbelievable. lewis hamilton has every reason to feel frustrated tonight, but red bull and verstappen absolutely nailed it. and he is the new world champion. it's unbelievable.
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i mean, throughout the whole race i kept fighting and then of course that opportunity in the last lap, it's insane. a big congratulations to max and to his team. in the last part of the season we gave it everything and never gave up and that is the most important thing. fans back home at silverstone were getting ready to celebrate, but were left disappointed. i'm shocked. i believe that win of lewis was stolen from him, and the championship shouldn't have been decided that way. i think it's meant to be lewis's. you can see he's the cleaner and better driver. but no sooner had the cork popped than two protests were lodged by mercedes. unlike var in football, this took hours... ..untilfinally red bull emerged victorious. he got a little bit lucky- with the safety car tonight, but he had to make it pay. and, you know, the strategy, | we didn't want it to end in the steward's room, we didn't take it into the steward's room. - but, you know, they've come to the right decision. - mercedes are appealing again, but verstappen is the champion. max, how do you feel?
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not too bad. ican�*t complain! typical dutch understatement of the biggest night of his life. natalie pirks, bbc news, abu dhabi. that's it. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel, but now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. hello there. it was noticeably mild today right across the country, but particularly so for england and wales. now we look to the northwest through this evening and overnight, this deep area of low pressure — small system, but very vigorous — passing through the northwest of the uk, will bring a spell of gales to northern ireland and in towards scotland as well. stormy conditions for the hebrides and the northern isles, perhaps severe gales for a time, some blustery showers. it will turn drier here by the end of the night, but for england and wales, it'll stay cloudy with outbreaks of rain certainly through wales and into the midlands. mild in the south — double figure values here, little bit cooler further north.
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and that's how things look into monday. we hold on to the cloud for large parts of england and wales. we'll continue with this persistent rain as well for parts of wales in the midlands, into northern england, some areas pretty wet all day. brightest weather will be across scotland and northern ireland. a few blustery showers, wintry on the hills, will be milder across the south, single figures across the north. that weather front for england and wales clears away into tuesday. high pressure begins to build in here. it stays unsettled over the northern half of the country, lots of isobars and weather fronts. windy for scotland and northern ireland and some rain, particularly for the north and west of scotland. england and wales, closer to that area of high pressure, should be largely dry, some cloud around but also some good spells of sunshine. those temperatures will be around orjust a little above the seasonal norm. as we head out of tuesday into wednesday, we continue with that area of high pressure across the south of the country, so settled with light winds. still quite windy across the northern half of the country with further outbreaks of rain thanks to that weather front. so, with some wet weather, northern ireland, certainly for northern and western scotland, maybe a little bit
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of brightness at times. stays windy here, lighter winds in the south. again, variable cloud, some good spells of sunshine, temperatures perhaps a little bit higher again — double figure values for most. nights will be much milder as well, frost—free for most of us. then, beyond wednesday, we see this area of high pressure start to really take its force across the uk. that'll push the weather fronts away from the north. it'll be sitting on top of the by friday and into the following weekend, so it means winds will turn very light. so, there's a chance it turns really great and gloomy by the end of the week, turning a bit colder as well as we head on into the new weekend, and we will see some problems with mist and fog.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the guardian's deputy political editor, jessica elgot, and martin bentham, who's home affairs editor at the evening standard. lovely to see you both. thanks very much forjoining us this evening. let's bring everybody up to date. i have to say, there's not a lot of variety. hardly surprising. most of the papers have the prime minister on their front page, and the telegraph is no exception. it says i million covid boosterjabs a day will be offered in an emergency programme to head off the risk of a new year lockdown. the guardian says borisjohnson is gambling on an unprecedented ramping up of vaccines to avoid imposing further restrictions, with the army to be deployed across the country. meanwhile, the sun describes tonight's address as a "sombre" broadcast to the nation. the �*i' reports the target to offer every adult a booster being brought forward from end of january to the 31st of december. the metro says more than half
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i million boosterjabs have been delivered on a single record—breaking day, as the country races to head off a "rapid rise" of the omicron variant. and in other news, the financial times reports ukraine's new defence minister has blamed germany for blocking the supply of weaponry to kyiv through nato, despite us warnings of a possible imminent invasion by russian forces. right, excuse me for getting sniffy. i'm not sniffy about the news tonight. jessica, i guess we're interrupting your evening. you're probably still very busy on the paper today. shall we begin with your paper, the guardian? you've given borisjohnson the whole front page, and it's quite a detailed story. page, and it's quite a detailed sto . . , ~ ., page, and it's quite a detailed sto. ,., story. yeah, it feels like a pretty significant _ story. yeah, it feels like a pretty significant moment. _ story. yeah, it feels like a pretty significant moment. what - story. yeah, it feels like a pretty significant moment. what we're | significant moment. what we're saying is the reason is boris
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johnson is gambling on this ramping up johnson is gambling on this ramping up of vaccinations, you would need to jab about i up of vaccinations, you would need to jab abouti million people a day. if you don't meet that target by the end of december, he calls it a title wave of omicron that could potentially get the uk, expecting it to become the dominant variant, but i think we heard there would be an announcement and thought what they were going to do and imposed further restrictions. he hasn't done that. what he is doing is saying how serious the situation is, and it does make you feel for a lot of the places like bars and restaurants. businesses that depend on the festive season which will make people very nervous. there is no financial support package for them because they're not actually imposed. because they're not actually imposed-— because they're not actually imosed. ., ., , ., ,
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imposed. you raise an interesting oint. imposed. you raise an interesting point. martin. _ imposed. you raise an interesting point. martin. i— imposed. you raise an interesting point. martin, iwonder_ imposed. you raise an interesting point. martin, i wonder given - imposed. you raise an interestingi point. martin, i wonder given that the national newspaper is focused on london in the southeast of england, with our big, big hospitality sector — whether it's restaurants, pubs, theatres, hotels — all those businesses who have had a have terrible year and a half. many of whom are banking on christmas. not worried about lockdown because it doesn't look like the prime minister has any desire before christmas, but one must be worried that all this will discourage bookings or leave people who have art he made them to cancel. . �* , people who have art he made them to cancel. . �*, ., , , people who have art he made them to cancel. . �*, , cancel. that's absolutely the case. talk about christmas _ cancel. that's absolutely the case. talk about christmas parties - cancel. that's absolutely the case. talk about christmas parties and l cancel. that's absolutely the case. l talk about christmas parties and the rules which— talk about christmas parties and the rules which allow christmas parties to continue, but i think the reality is anything — to continue, but i think the reality is anything that's been organised, very. _ is anything that's been organised, very. very— is anything that's been organised, very, very few of those will take
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place _ very, very few of those will take place because... but i'm quite sure that will_ place because... but i'm quite sure that will be — place because... but i'm quite sure that will be the case for many others as— that will be the case for many others as well. of course, all those businesses — others as well. of course, all those businesses in the hospitality sector relying _ businesses in the hospitality sector relying on— businesses in the hospitality sector relying on that, people coming into the city— relying on that, people coming into the city and staying, all of that will be — the city and staying, all of that will be massively hit over the coming — will be massively hit over the coming two weeks. yes, it's a desperate _ coming two weeks. yes, it's a desperate situation. jessica is right — desperate situation. jessica is right. they're not being closed down — right. they're not being closed down the _ right. they're not being closed down. the prime minister is absolutely desperate to avoid having to do exactly that, the alternative to do exactly that, the alternative to what _ to do exactly that, the alternative to what is — to do exactly that, the alternative to what is happening. they're all pretty— to what is happening. they're all pretty bleak. those are the only alternatives. it's all going to be fine for— alternatives. it's all going to be fine for those in businesses...
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clearly. — fine for those in businesses... clearly, they're not. take us to the mastro. —— the metro. it looks very impressive, but the but is quite a big one. you it looks very impressive, but the but is quite a big one.— but is quite a big one. you are calculating _ but is quite a big one. you are calculating earlier— but is quite a big one. you are calculating earlier on, - but is quite a big one. you are calculating earlier on, it's - but is quite a big one. you are calculating earlier on, it's1- calculating earlier on, it's! million _ calculating earlier on, it's! millionjabs a day. including christmas day and boxing day. and all the _ christmas day and boxing day. and all the other days when people may feel less _ all the other days when people may feel less inclined to push down on their— feel less inclined to push down on theiriabs — feel less inclined to push down on theirjabs. it's a tremendously big business — theirjabs. it's a tremendously big business to exercise. you would have to bet _ business to exercise. you would have to bet it _ business to exercise. you would have to bet it would be a big hit, although clearly, from a government point of— although clearly, from a government point of view, i'm sure it will still— point of view, i'm sure it will still be — point of view, i'm sure it will still be a _ point of view, i'm sure it will still be a massive improvement on the situation if a very large number of those _ the situation if a very large number of those are — the situation if a very large number of those are done. is clearly going to be _ of those are done. is clearly going to be a _ of those are done. is clearly going to be a effort. the army will be
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brought — to be a effort. the army will be brought in— to be a effort. the army will be brought in and so on, but there's a whole _ brought in and so on, but there's a whole adjustable exercise —— logistical— whole adjustable exercise —— logistical exercise. so, time is incredibly— logistical exercise. so, time is incredibly short to do it. that fi . ure is incredibly short to do it. that figure is 530,000, _ incredibly short to do it. that figure is 530,000, but - incredibly short to do it. trust figure is 530,000, but that's kind of a best day of performance. there's been a lot of concern from papers that the booster programme hasn't been as successful as the initial vaccination programme was. are you any clearer why that has been? i are you any clearer why that has been? ~ , ~ been? i think there is... i think one reason— been? ithink there is... ithink one reason it's _ been? ithink there is... ithink one reason it's been _ been? ithink there is... ithink one reason it's been slow- been? ithink there is... ithink one reason it's been slow is - been? i think there is... i think - one reason it's been slow is because people didn't necessarily hear the full arguments for booster. now it seems incredibly clear that two doses doesn't give the same amount of protections as we might hope against the omicron variant, but
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three doses does. therefore there is a big argument of going to get your booster, and also because people have gone back to normal when we were first offered the vaccine. it was our passport back to normality. we were in the middle of lockdown. in august and september, you will start to think about whether you're getting the booster. we have been living as we choose, pretty much, apart from a few extra testing requirements. therefore, it doesn't seem like a priority. i think now that the message is very much going through that people have to do this in order to avoid further restrictions, especially opening up to over—18s, meaning anyone can get it... they can going into walk—in centres from tomorrow. then it's going to make it make a big difference.—
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going to make it make a big difference. . . , ., difference. the challenge is how the do difference. the challenge is how they do it- _ difference. the challenge is how they do it. not _ difference. the challenge is how they do it. not least, _ difference. the challenge is how they do it. not least, martin, i difference. the challenge is how they do it. not least, martin, is| they do it. not least, martin, is that a suggestion that effectively, gps could find themselves doing nothing but administering these covid boosterjabs between now and the end of the year.— the end of the year. frankly, it shouldn't _ the end of the year. frankly, it shouldn't really _ the end of the year. frankly, it shouldn't really be _ the end of the year. frankly, it shouldn't really be down - the end of the year. frankly, it| shouldn't really be down to the the end of the year. frankly, it - shouldn't really be down to the gp. somebody— shouldn't really be down to the gp. somebody had to do it, and that will be necessary and a sense, but if you think about — be necessary and a sense, but if you think about where i live, two other counties _ think about where i live, two other counties are — think about where i live, two other counties are doing flu jabs. so, it doesn't _ counties are doing flu jabs. so, it doesn't have to be gps. i'm sure it will rely— doesn't have to be gps. i'm sure it will rely a — doesn't have to be gps. i'm sure it will rely a lot — doesn't have to be gps. i'm sure it will rely a lot on pharmacies and so on and _ will rely a lot on pharmacies and so on and other— will rely a lot on pharmacies and so on and other texting sites. i think trying to— on and other texting sites. i think trying to go— on and other texting sites. i think trying to go into gps, that can only be a relatively small part of the equation — be a relatively small part of the equation. it has to be elsewhere, i think _
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equation. it has to be elsewhere, i think you — equation. it has to be elsewhere, i think. you can clearly do covid jabs back to _ think. you can clearly do covid “abs back to. ~ . . ., , back to. watch out, maybe there will be a needle — back to. watch out, maybe there will be a needle and _ back to. watch out, maybe there will be a needle and the _ back to. watch out, maybe there will be a needle and the other hand. - be a needle and the other hand. while you're here, would you like your booster? borisjohnson was famously in favour, so if anyone can pull it off, it ought to be him. martin, to talk us through the story on the front of the ft. test and trace could run until 2025. this is not without controversy? lilo. this is not without controversy? no, and i this is not without controversy? no, and l sunpose _ this is not without controversy? no, and i suppose it's a fairly bleak prospects, but how effective it's ever— prospects, but how effective it's ever been _ prospects, but how effective it's ever been. what the benefit of it will be _ ever been. what the benefit of it will be because unfortunately, too often, _ will be because unfortunately, too often, the — will be because unfortunately, too often, the tracing perhaps inevitably, people thought it was the solution. the step —— for testing — the solution. the step —— for testing perhaps can't track down people _ testing perhaps can't track down
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people clicking in —— quickly unknot _ people clicking in —— quickly unknot if_ people clicking in —— quickly unknot. if it's very infectious, it doesn't — unknot. if it's very infectious, it doesn't need to be out and about for a leathery— doesn't need to be out and about for a leathery long time at all —— very long _ a leathery long time at all —— very long time — a leathery long time at all —— very long time it _ a leathery long time at all —— very long time. it may be a slight element _ long time. it may be a slight element of chasing their tail. it's probably— element of chasing their tail. it's probably about people responding to do the _ probably about people responding to do the first signs they have of any infections — do the first signs they have of any infections. which may have to continue — infections. which may have to continue year after year by the looks— continue year after year by the looks of— continue year after year by the looks of it _ continue year after year by the looks of it-_ looks of it. jessica, this very interesting _ looks of it. jessica, this very interesting story. _ looks of it. jessica, this very interesting story. i - looks of it. jessica, this very interesting story. i know- looks of it. jessica, this very interesting story. i know the guardian has reported a lot on test and trace, how it's performed, how dido harding performed. she was very... people thought her prospects were shredded by test and trace. what do you make of the ft�*s line? i
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what do you make of the ft's line? i think it's very interesting. it's particularly interesting that the companies listed in the ft story, it's about adding on these contracts with consultancies. test and straits is still every day — my test and trace. i was told it was a very large sums of money. this is more contracts. you'll find the other quite interesting thing i saw in the ft story, this stuff about travel restrictions going on. potentially for many more years, notjust test and trace. so, yes, it's upsetting in a way that they see this being necessary for so much longer, but also, i think i know rachel reeves
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talked a lot about how government should like to revisit a lot of these contracts and look at how much money is being spent on consultants. it strikes me that the government might find itself under attack. it’s might find itself under attack. it's interesting, the detail was in the front page, but it's in the story inside, it says the number of consultants has fallen over four months from two and a half thousand to about 1864. a budget of £37 billion, and we are talking hundreds of... even so, that is a substantial amount of public money. perhaps of its nature, you could argue that the cheques have not been effective as one might ideally hope. one of the
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other points that martin has come up with recently with the imposition of extra testing is a lot of people complaining labour included that a lot of pcr tests that people were taking from which you would use potentially from testing and recording infections, a lot of these tests weren't getting followed up. there wasn't a process that absolutely assured that if you had tested positive, you are actually isolating and all the rest of it. it's a tiny number of people to breakthrough. probably, it's less than— breakthrough. probably, it's less than that— breakthrough. probably, it's less than that with this variance because of the _ than that with this variance because of the infective nature of it. that was the — of the infective nature of it. that was the problem from the start. you only need _ was the problem from the start. you only need a — was the problem from the start. you only need a fairly small proportion of people — only need a fairly small proportion of people. a large number of infections doesn't take a lot to
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happen — infections doesn't take a lot to happen. and then they carry on spreading _ happen. and then they carry on spreading. you need to have a very high _ spreading. you need to have a very high 0t— spreading. you need to have a very high... of tracking people down in a very short _ high... of tracking people down in a very short time. clearly, that hasn't — very short time. clearly, that hasn't been the case. i don't think when _ hasn't been the case. i don't think when we _ hasn't been the case. i don't think when we look back at all this, it's really— when we look back at all this, it's really suppress the virus. it when we look back at all this, it's really suppress the virus.- really suppress the virus. it looks like this version _ really suppress the virus. it looks like this version of— really suppress the virus. it looks like this version of the _ really suppress the virus. it looks like this version of the virus - really suppress the virus. it looks| like this version of the virus might be impossible to restrict. given the pace of which it is progressing. looks like they fear they may be on... part of the reason to raise the alert. let's end on another story about the unintended consequent is of covid. learner drivers must be geared up
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for tests. , , ., �* ~' for tests. yes, if you're like me and failed _ for tests. yes, if you're like me and failed your— for tests. yes, if you're like me and failed your drivers - for tests. yes, if you're like me and failed your drivers test - for tests. yes, if you're like me i and failed your drivers test before passing, you might want to look away because they are saying there is such an enormous backlog in taking a test that you really, really shouldn't drive, giving it a go. it will take you an awfully long time to make sure you're ready.- to make sure you're ready. looks like ou to make sure you're ready. looks like you might — to make sure you're ready. looks like you might be _ to make sure you're ready. looks like you might be quicker - to make sure you're ready. looks like you might be quicker to - to make sure you're ready. looks like you might be quicker to do i to make sure you're ready. looks. like you might be quicker to do the knowledge of this to become a london taxi driver. convection is good for the soul. i only passed the third time — my confession. i would never call myself a natural driver. martin, overto call myself a natural driver. martin, over to you. call myself a natural driver. martin, overto you. i call myself a natural driver. martin, over to you.- call myself a natural driver. martin, over to you. i did pass the first time- — martin, over to you. i did pass the first time. good _ martin, over to you. i did pass the first time. good for _ martin, over to you. i did pass the first time. good for you! - martin, over to you. i did pass the first time. good for you! i - martin, over to you. i did pass the first time. good for you! i didn't . first time. good for you! i didn't have to do _ first time. good for you! i didn't have to do the _ first time. good for you! i didn't have to do the theory _ first time. good for you! i didn't have to do the theory bit. - first time. good for you! i didn't have to do the theory bit. it - first time. good for you! i didn'tj have to do the theory bit. it was
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much _ have to do the theory bit. it was much different. it's probably a bit of a miracle. much different. it's probably a bit of a miracle-— of a miracle. laughter. i do wonder— of a miracle. laughter. i do wonder if— of a miracle. laughter. i do wonder if the - of a miracle. laughter. i do wonder if the best i of a miracle. laughter. - i do wonder if the best thing might be to say if you put the test, takes months and months and months, if it's a month before and you think you're not ready for this, wouldn't it be good to have a system where you can cancel, not lose any money and the money is simply put against your test but next time you try? i must check what's happened. for my own daughter. she passed her theory be best. _ own daughter. she passed her theory be best. -- _ own daughter. she passed her theory be best, —— bit, and then had two more _ be best, —— bit, and then had two more years — be best, —— bit, and then had two more years. that time is going to run out — more years. that time is going to run out you _ more years. that time is going to run out. you should get on and book the thing _ run out. you should get on and book the thin. ., �* ., ., , ., the thing. you'll have to start the whole thing _ the thing. you'll have to start the whole thing again. _ the thing. you'll have to start the whole thing again. yeah, - the thing. you'll have to start the whole thing again. yeah, through the thing. you'll have to start the i whole thing again. yeah, through no fault of her because _ whole thing again. yeah, through no fault of her because other _ whole thing again. yeah, through no fault of her because other people . fault of her because other people are in— fault of her because other people are in the — fault of her because other people are in the same situation. you want to book— are in the same situation. you want
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to book it— are in the same situation. you want to book it when you feel ready. even if it's— to book it when you feel ready. even if it's outside the two year limit. that— if it's outside the two year limit. that might — if it's outside the two year limit. that might be another thing. definitely. it sounds like jessica and me need the way, you didn't. thank you all very much. that's me exposed for my failures years ago! i feel sorry for the driving instructor. you had a heck of a challenge. i'm still going, so thanks very much. we will be back at 11:30 pm. it was noticeably mild today across the country, but particularly for england and wales, although we had a lot of cloud limited sunshine. through this evening and overnight, the story will be this deep area of low pressure. that'll bring the swathe of gales. perhaps stormy for
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a time. for the western isles, it will be a clearer... some blustery showers. england and wales stay cloudy. particularly into wales, and it will be mild. that's the set up for monday. stays largely cloudy, further outbreaks of rain were wales. best of the brightness for scotland and northern ireland. it'll be breezy here. some of these wintry on the hills. as we move through the week, high pressure builds in. winds turned lighter, but it means the sky will be quite grey and gloomy. because the problems for mist and fog by the end of the week.
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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... a desperate search for survivors — in six us states devastated by powerful tornadoes. more than 90 people are now known to have been killed. my my mother still doesn't know the houseis my mother still doesn't know the house is gone. and were not going to tell her. it'lljust break her heart. we'll cross live to one of the worst—hit areas to talk to the head of the red cross in western kentucky. also on the programme... british prime minister, borisjohnson, warns that the uk faces an emergency, in the battle with the new omicron variant and calls for a massive increase in boosterjabs. there is a tidal wave of omicron coming, and i'm afraid it is now
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clear that two doses of vaccine are simply not enough.

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