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tv   The Papers  BBC News  December 12, 2021 11:30pm-11:46pm GMT

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hello, this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment. first, the headlines. the prime minister pledges every adult in england will be offered a coronavirus booster vaccine by the end of this month, in response to what he calls an emergency in tackling the virus. there is a tidal wave of omicron coming, and i'm afraid it is now clear that two doses of vaccine are simply not enough. it comes as the first people in the uk have been hospitalised with omicron. new cases of the variant are up 65% in the last 2a hours. meanwhile, the political pressure mounts on borisjohnson — he's facing a possible rebellion from his mps over covid rules, and fresh questions about christmas gatherings at downing street last year. in other news, emergency teams continue the search for survivors in six us states, after tornadoes leave more than 90 people dead
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max verstappen is confirmed as the 2021 formula one world champion, after stewards dismiss a protest by lewis hamilton's team, mercedes, following last—lap drama in abu dhabi. but they intend to appeal again. hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the guardian's deputy political editor, jessica elgot, and martin bentham, who's home affairs editor at the evening standard. most of the papers have the prime minister on their front page. the telegraph says a million covid boosterjabs a day will be offered in an emergency programme to head off the risk of a new year lockdown. the guardian says borisjohnson is gambling on an unprecedented ramping up of vaccines to avoid imposing further restrictions, with the army will be
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deployed across the country. the times points out that borisjohnson admitted that some nhs appointments and procedures would be cancelled, as doctors and nurses were re—deployed to the jab campaign. the i reports the target to offer every adult a booster is being brought forward from end of january to 31 december. while the daily mirror carries borisjonson�*s warning of a "tidal wave of omicron" potentially overwhelming the nhs. the metro says more than half a million boosterjabs have been delivered on a single record—breaking day — as the country races to head off a "rapid rise" of the omicron variant. as well as the booster campaign, the daily mail also reflects on lewis hamilton losing out to max verstyappen in the race to become formula one champion. and in other news, the financial times reports ukraine's new defence minister has blamed germany for blocking the supply of weaponry to kyiv through nato — despite us warnings of a possible imminent invasion by russian forces. so let's begin.
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do you want to kick us off with jessica's paper, the guardian. full front page devoted to this apart from a small box at the bottom about the death toll in kentucky which presented some amazing pictures. no doubt whatever was on the front pages was quickly ditched. yes. doubt whatever was on the front pages was quickly ditched. yes, it's unsurprising _ pages was quickly ditched. yes, it's unsurprising it's _ pages was quickly ditched. yes, it's unsurprising it's on _ pages was quickly ditched. yes, it's unsurprising it's on the _ pages was quickly ditched. yes, it's unsurprising it's on the front - pages was quickly ditched. yes, it's unsurprising it's on the front page, | unsurprising it's on the front page, it's unsurprising it's across the whole front page, such a striking announcement that the language was very, very stark, a state of emergency title wave, facing an emergency, a title wave of the omicron coming out us. some very bleak language by the prime minister, clearly trying to encourage everybody to getting down
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and getting the boosterjab if they haven't already been able to have it. ithink haven't already been able to have it. i think what was interesting about the guardian's pieces there is actually no sense in their net front page coverage, sure there is inside about any other controversy surrounding the prime minister and his conduct and md whether this particular wave has been handled correctly at this moment, that is no sense of that at all, i think that partly reflects just the seriousness of the moment that has just happened a couple of hours ago, broadcasted a nation at eight o'clock. it tells the story straight, and it's a very compelling and unfortunately rather worrying —— worrying story on the front page. i worrying -- worrying story on the front page-— worrying -- worrying story on the front nae. ., . ., ., front page. i noticed on the bottom of our front page. i noticed on the bottom of your article. _ front page. i noticed on the bottom of your article, the _ front page. i noticed on the bottom of your article, the government - front page. i noticed on the bottom of your article, the government is l of your article, the government is deploying 42 military planning teams, which i guess roughly equates to into every police and forest area in the country. presumably it is their logistics expertise that will
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be most useful to the government if it's going to meet this booster target. it's going to meet this booster tarret. ., �* , it's going to meet this booster tarret. . �* , , it's going to meet this booster tarret. . �*, , ., target. that's right. it is an absolutely _ target. that's right. it is an absolutely extraordinary i target. that's right. it is an - absolutely extraordinary challenge, one of— absolutely extraordinary challenge, one of the — absolutely extraordinary challenge, one of the things the government is saying _ one of the things the government is saying today, gps and other vaccinated as will be required to prioritise — vaccinated as will be required to prioritise jabs over non— urgent care _ prioritise jabs over non— urgent care and — prioritise jabs over non— urgent care and reduce the numbers of face—to—face interactions. that's something — face—to—face interactions. that's something that a lot of other papers have campaigned on. they are going to scrap— have campaigned on. they are going to scrap the — have campaigned on. they are going to scrap the 15 minute wait after you have — to scrap the 15 minute wait after you have had a vaccine, they usually keep you _ you have had a vaccine, they usually keep you there to make sure nothing has gone _ keep you there to make sure nothing has gone wrong. but they have to speed there is many people as possible. — speed there is many people as possible, some of those policies are ones that— possible, some of those policies are ones that might start to raise eyebrows a bit, but the priority is that to _ eyebrows a bit, but the priority is that to get — eyebrows a bit, but the priority is that to get through these as fast as possible _ that to get through these as fast as possible. you know, ithink it's worth— possible. you know, ithink it's worth saying that this massive announcement to try to increase to a million _ announcement to try to increase to a million a — announcement to try to increase to a million a day _ announcement to try to increase to a million a day is he doesn't really have _ million a day is he doesn't really have any— million a day is he doesn't really have any choices, he's facing a mutinous — have any choices, he's facing a mutinous tray party who are very
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much _ mutinous tray party who are very much against any further restrictions. —— tory party. voting against _ restrictions. —— tory party. voting against even _ restrictions. —— tory party. voting against even some minor ones on tuesday — against even some minor ones on tuesday. you know, a financial package — tuesday. you know, a financial package would be something that would _ package would be something that would be required to close more business — would be required to close more business is. he doesn't have an awful— business is. he doesn't have an awful lot — business is. he doesn't have an awful lot of— business is. he doesn't have an awful lot of with his own chance or to persuade him to pay for those things _ to persuade him to pay for those things so — to persuade him to pay for those things so i _ to persuade him to pay for those things. so i think although this is a massive — things. so i think although this is a massive story in and of itself, these _ a massive story in and of itself, these choices are being made because of a position— these choices are being made because of a position that bryce johnson finds— of a position that bryce johnson finds himself in and out as much to do with these parties. they are, unfortunately, quite closely linked. yes, talking of the parties, the front page of the times, jessica, investigation will include what is now called downing street quiz night, which sort of makes it sound like about their big event that downing street insists it was. it seemed that the prime minister popped in, did a quick round of the
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quiz and left everybody to it. it's fair comment, isn't it, for the conservatives to say, look, the photograph on the front of the mirror is no smoking gun, because it is not disproving what the prime minister said specifically about the event on the 18th. it's a different event, but presumably it muddies the water further, event, but presumably it muddies the waterfurther, doesn't event, but presumably it muddies the water further, doesn't take four i water further, doesn't take four i think what it does show is that the mirror— think what it does show is that the mirror had — think what it does show is that the mirror had sources saying people where _ mirror had sources saying people where playing huddled together in teams. _ where playing huddled together in teams, and the prime minister can't really— teams, and the prime minister can't really say— teams, and the prime minister can't really say that he is ignorant of that because he, you know, he is watching — that because he, you know, he is watching it. — that because he, you know, he is watching it, he's taking part in it, he knows — watching it, he's taking part in it, he knows the way that people are working. — he knows the way that people are working, and therefore, he can't really— working, and therefore, he can't really claim ignorance. so now it looks _ really claim ignorance. so now it looks as — really claim ignorance. so now it looks as if— really claim ignorance. so now it looks as if this investigation which we are _ looks as if this investigation which we are asked expecting to report relatively— we are asked expecting to report relatively quickly well look at this as well— relatively quickly well look at this as well as — relatively quickly well look at this as well as well as many of the other
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news _ as well as well as many of the other news coming from different papers but mainly the mirror over the past week _ but mainly the mirror over the past week. , , ., ~' but mainly the mirror over the past week. , , ., ~ ., week. just on the kind of consequences _ week. just on the kind of consequences of - week. just on the kind of consequences of all - week. just on the kind of consequences of all of i week. just on the kind of. consequences of all of this, week. just on the kind of- consequences of all of this, it's a by election week. two weeks ago it was a by election week, but it was a by election that passed without any attention, the seat for the lead cabinet minister who died in structured as rock—solid safe torres eat, but presumably the political dynamics that suddenly made it a lot more interesting, including a lot more interesting, including a lot more people from westminster making the journey up there.— the journey up there. asked me you wouldn't expect _ the journey up there. asked me you wouldn't expect it _ the journey up there. asked me you wouldn't expect it to _ the journey up there. asked me you wouldn't expect it to be _ wouldn't expect it to be particularly interesting one with the tory— particularly interesting one with the tory majority of 23,000. but the lib the tory majority of 23,000. but the lib dems _ the tory majority of 23,000. but the lib dems seem very confident. they say that— lib dems seem very confident. they say that their data probably created in order— say that their data probably created in order to — say that their data probably created in order to be leaked to journalists, showing that they are only i% _ journalists, showing that they are only 1% behind the torres, a vote for them — only 1% behind the torres, a vote for them is —
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only 1% behind the torres, a vote for them is one that can unite the anti- _ for them is one that can unite the anti- tory— for them is one that can unite the anti— tory votes. labour don't like that very— anti— tory votes. labour don't like that very much because they came second _ that very much because they came second in— that very much because they came second in 2019, the lib dems seem to be the _ second in 2019, the lib dems seem to be the ones _ second in 2019, the lib dems seem to be the ones who successfully convinced everyone that they are the real opposition over there, anyway. ithink— real opposition over there, anyway. i think a _ real opposition over there, anyway. i think a lib — real opposition over there, anyway. i think a lib danwei and is still unlikely, — i think a lib danwei and is still unlikely, but, you know, if you vote in chapter— unlikely, but, you know, if you vote in chapter and don't fancy going out in the _ in chapter and don't fancy going out in the freezing rain to vote for boris — in the freezing rain to vote for borisjohnson, i think you in the freezing rain to vote for boris johnson, i think you would in the freezing rain to vote for borisjohnson, i think you would be given— borisjohnson, i think you would be given an _ borisjohnson, i think you would be given an awful lot of ammunition for that this _ given an awful lot of ammunition for that this week. for given an awful lot of ammunition for that this week.— that this week. for the number that the want that this week. for the number that they want to — that this week. for the number that they want to go _ that this week. for the number that they want to go out _ that this week. for the number that they want to go out and _ that this week. for the number that they want to go out and give - that this week. for the number that they want to go out and give a - they want to go out and give a kicking, they also have the ammo. that's the problem, positive reasons to vote for tories have been a bit thin on the ground from in the circumstances of this by election hasn't helped, because it was a by election they didn't need to have. martin, what do you make of the investigation. it's notjust this investigation, because we also were led to believe over the weekend that lloyd gates was back in touch with downing street, seeking further clarification about the refurbishment of the flat. it’s
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clarification about the refurbishment of the flat. it's hard to keep track _ refurbishment of the flat. it's hard to keep track of _ refurbishment of the flat. it's hard to keep track of how _ refurbishment of the flat. it's hard to keep track of how many - to keep track of how many investigations they are and what they are all about, isn't it? none of it is good. it reflects a slightly slapdash approach inside or maybe not slightly but very slightly slap hand approach with the classic problem of getting divorced in your own bubble from what's actually happening outside in the world. in one sense, what's happened, given it is a video quiz and so on, albeit with people gathered round him, so it seems to different terminals and numbers, probably isn't quite as bad as a big gathering people altogether, but the prime ministers involved directly in us. all of them are not very helpful. itjust projects the wrong image, really, that everyone else had been forced to endure, and the timing is terrible because people have that prospect in front of them of similar things happening again, yet those who are telling him to do it are the
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most generous interpretation following the spirits of the rule, if not breaking them all together. all of which may explain the story on the front of the telegraph, martin. pm in talks with hard man to run number ten.— martin. pm in talks with hard man to run number ten. yes, but i have some sce ticism run number ten. yes, but i have some scepticism about _ run number ten. yes, but i have some scepticism about this, _ run number ten. yes, but i have some scepticism about this, because - run number ten. yes, but i have some scepticism about this, because we - scepticism about this, because we often get that's about the message, we need to communicate our message better, but if your actions are rubbish, frankly, doesn't matter how good the person communicating for you is, you got to actually do the core thing directly, haven't you? you will be familiar, if you are doing the right thing, try to finesse it in all sorts of ways, what actually really helps you, i don't know. the idea of simply directing borisjohnson, keeping him under control and planing them in the right direction, it seems... the expression — the right direction, it seems... the expression of _ the right direction, it seems... the expression of herding cats comes to mind. jessica, i'm interested in
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this because when i first encountered borisjohnson, i remember him as a backbencher conservative mp in oxfordshire when i first encountered him when conservative mp in oxfordshire when ifirst encountered him when i conservative mp in oxfordshire when i first encountered him when i was political editor in the region. i encountered them on a regular basis running for mayor of london. he had a former —— formidable chief of staff, one of the leaders of the london council. he followed him to downing street. now he is gone. is there a connexion here? is that the lack of a, you know, an older gray—headed man who can say to him, now, boris you are being foolish, let's not do this.— now, boris you are being foolish, let's not do this. yeah, they have been a series _ let's not do this. yeah, they have been a series of— let's not do this. yeah, they have been a series of people _ let's not do this. yeah, they have been a series of people who - let's not do this. yeah, they have . been a series of people who work for boris over the years. who been a series of people who work for boris over the years.— boris over the years. who worked in downin: boris over the years. who worked in downing street _ boris over the years. who worked in downing street with _ boris over the years. who worked in downing street with him _ boris over the years. who worked in downing street with him who - boris over the years. who worked in | downing street with him who trusted and could _ downing street with him who trusted and could get him the kind of talk, persuade _ and could get him the kind of talk, persuade him out of things, and one by one. _ persuade him out of things, and one by one. they— persuade him out of things, and one by one, they have gradually gone. this is— by one, they have gradually gone. this is a _ by one, they have gradually gone. this is a refrain that you hear guite — this is a refrain that you hear quite a — this is a refrain that you hear quite a lot— this is a refrain that you hear quite a lot from conservative mps,
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when _ quite a lot from conservative mps, when they— quite a lot from conservative mps, when they wanted to criticise boris johnson _ when they wanted to criticise boris johnson they would say things he is getting _ johnson they would say things he is getting the wrong advice, the old phrase, _ getting the wrong advice, the old phrase, desire is good but the advisers — phrase, desire is good but the advisers are wicked. and i think that's— advisers are wicked. and i think that's actually starting to change, particularly since the on patterson scandal. _ particularly since the on patterson scandal, that mps are starting to say to— scandal, that mps are starting to say to themselves we cannot convince ourselves _ say to themselves we cannot convince ourselves that it's the advisers any more _ ourselves that it's the advisers any more. that's owen paterson. the problem — more. that's owen paterson. the problem is — more. that's owen paterson. the problem is him, and that's a bit of a danger— problem is him, and that's a bit of a danger at — problem is him, and that's a bit of a danger at the moment. onlyr problem is him, and that's a bit of a danger at the moment.- a danger at the moment. only 30 seconds, a danger at the moment. only 30 seconds. i _ a danger at the moment. only 30 seconds, i name _ a danger at the moment. only 30 seconds, i name i _ a danger at the moment. only 30 seconds, i name i cannot - a danger at the moment. only 30 seconds, i name i cannot even i seconds, i name i cannot even pronounce who has a new title. he's gone for the house of lords and he's well—deserved at. right, a quick fire question for you both. martin, shed mercedes appeal again over next rest stop in's when, because they are threatening to do that. thea;r are threatening to do that. they robabl are threatening to do that. they probably cheated, _ are threatening to do that. they probably cheated, but _ are threatening to do that. tie: probably cheated, but the thing are threatening to do that. tierg probably cheated, but the thing has to be decided on the track and unfortunately they decided probably that that would be the wrong way. jessica? �* ., ., .,
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that that would be the wrong way. l jessica?_ laughter

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