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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 13, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. every adult in england will be offered a covid booster by the end of the month— as the health secretary promises to "throw everything" at beating omicron. what we have now that we didn't have before with any of the other variants when they started is that we have vaccines. now, we know that two don't work. we know that three do. that's why it's eminently sensible, absolutely the right thing to take this action. the target will mean up to a million jabs a day, but there's concern over the scale of the task for an already stretched nhs. a hong kong court sentences hong kong businessmanjimmy lai and seven others for taking part in a vigil to marking the 1989 tiananmen massacre.
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a federal disaster is declared in kentucky — after the largest outbreak of tornadoes in american history leaves at least 90 dead, across six states. a bbc investigation finds networks of breeders are offering to mutilate puppies, to follow a social media trend. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the nhs is offering every adult in england a covid boosterjab by the end of the month, to fight what the uk prime minister has described as a "tidal wave" of omicron infections. in a televised address, borisjohnson urged everyone to get their booster as soon as possible to "protect our nhs, our freedoms and our way of life".
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the uk's covid alert level has also been raised to level four, which means a high, or rising level of transmission. the booster target means people aged 18 and over in england will be able to get their third jabs from this week, as long as it has been three months since their second dose. those aged 30 and over can already book an appointment online. the prime minister said more than a0 teams from the miltary will be deployed to help with the vaccination effort. mobile units will be established and clinics�* opening hours will be extended with more appointments on offer. thousands more volunteer vaccinators are also going to be trained. but, nhs providers — which represents hospitals and community services, has warned the service is already "beyond full stretch" and the intensified booster campaign will have an impact on other care provided.
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with some appointments postponed. from today, the government's work—from—home guidance for people in england has been re—introduced. our first report is from our political correspondent, chris mason. the countdown to the new year might look rather like this. queueing for a booster. the prime minister wants to massively accelerate the delivery of vaccine shots, because... i'm afraid we are now facing an emergency in our battle with the new variant omicron. and we must urgently reinforce our wall of vaccine protection to keep our friends and loved ones safe. here's a sense of the scale of what he's hoping to achieve. to offer everyone aged 18 and over a booster by the end of the month means giving one million doses a day, every day, until the end of the year. at the moment, around half a million doses are being given a day. to achieve this doubling, will come at a cost.
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with other non—covid related health care being put off. this will require an extraordinary effort, and as we focus on boosters, and make this new target achievable, it will mean some other appointments will need to be postponed until the new year. but if we don't do this now, the wave of omicron could be so big that cancellations and disruptions like the loss of cancer appointments will be even greater next year. and behind this door, his conclusion was simple and stark. so, let's do it. let's get boosted now. get boosted now for yourself, for your friends and your family. get boosted now to protectjobs and livelihoods across this country. get boosted now to protect our nhs, our freedoms and our way of life. get boosted now. national addresses like this
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from a prime minister are pretty rare and they have two consequences. firstly, they grab attention. but secondly, they remove the opportunity for scrutiny and questions. is the plan realistic? will it mean more restrictions are coming? labour are, for now, at least, backing the government. this has got to be a big national effort, all of us have got a part to play. and it's crucial that, you know, despite people's anger and frustration with the prime minister, justifiable anger and frustration with the prime minister, we put that to one side in the efforts to get the vaccine booster roll—out and to make it a success. tomorrow, the prime minister will seek and secure parliamentary approval for the introduction of so—called plan b in england, the already announced step up of measures to try to reduce the spread of the virus. the question now is how soon there might be talk of a plan c. chris mason, bbc news.
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i've been getting analysis from our chief political correspondent in westminster, adam fleming. whenever the prime minister does one of these televised addresses, one—to—one between him and the audience, it feels very dramatic. they don't happen very often. they are saved for when they want to make a big impact. his critics would say it is also a way of evading scrutiny, because if you don't do a press conference then you don't get questions from journalists, if you don't do a statement in parliament, you don't get questions from hostile mps, sometimes they have been on the prime minister's own side. the reason they are going big on the booster campaign is because scientific data tells them that they need to. that is how the health secretary, sajid javid, explained this morning. we have seen what covid is capable of. we have seen what covid is capable of we _ we have seen what covid is capable of we have — we have seen what covid is capable of. we have seen with the previous variance. _ of. we have seen with the previous variance, starting with the wuhan
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variant, _ variance, starting with the wuhan variant, the — variance, starting with the wuhan variant, the alpha variant, the delta — variant, the alpha variant, the delta variant, how it works. you start _ delta variant, how it works. you start seeing a rise in cases, people -et start seeing a rise in cases, people get ill, _ start seeing a rise in cases, people get ill, some enter hospital, some, sadly. _ get ill, some enter hospital, some, sadly. die. — get ill, some enter hospital, some, sadly. die. it— get ill, some enter hospital, some, sadly, die. it is much better to act early~ _ sadly, die. it is much better to act early~ what— sadly, die. it is much better to act early. what we have now that we did not have _ early. what we have now that we did not have before with the other variants. — not have before with the other variants, when they started, is that we have _ variants, when they started, is that we have vaccines. we know that two don't _ we have vaccines. we know that two don't work. — we have vaccines. we know that two don't work, we know that three do, and that— don't work, we know that three do, and that is— don't work, we know that three do, and that is why it is eminently sensible — and that is why it is eminently sensible and the right thing to take this acti0h~ — while the vaccine programme is ramping up on one hand, on the other hand, conservative mps concerned about plan b, and the latest measures in england, that is ramping up too. particularly around the issue of covid passes, where you have to prove you have had the vaccine, or tested negative, to get into a nightclub, or large events indoors and outdoors. that will be subject to a parliamentary vote tomorrow. an increasing number of conservative backbenchers say they will vote against it or not support the government in that vote.
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however, legislation will go through, because labour have promised to support it, just like they are the expansion of the booster programme. here is the shadow foreign secretary david lammy. the labour party will always put the national interest first. - this is a health emergency. a public health emergency. this is not the time to play politics. - i we took the view that we should i never have abandoned the wearing of masks in the first place. and for all of that reasons, - we were calling for plan b sooner than the prime minister brought it into place _ in terms of things to look out for over the next few days, there are a few. logistical problems with the vaccine roll—out, delivering 1millionjabs a day, further tells more than the record—breaking day so far, already you can see big queues outside walk in centres all over the country. also, there will be a knock—on cost to the nhs of appointments and operations, and procedures being cancelled, as the nhs swings round to focus on the vaccine programme. how does that start to feel in the next few days?
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thirdly, you can see in the documents from the scientific advisers and the modellers, they are talking about the potential need for more stringent measures to control the virus. they don't spell out what those measures could be. but it is something that scientists are talking about more and more. however, it is not something that ministers have discussed or thought about at the moment. i just wonder if the volume on that will get turned up as the number of cases of the omicron variant shoot up in the next few days. extra support has been promised to speed up the vaccine drive in scotland, wales and northern ireland. like england, scotland is aiming to offer all adults a booster by the end of the year — while wales has set a target for the end of januray. in northern ireland, people over the age of 30 are currently being offered third doses, with plans to
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step up the roll—out. earlier i spoke to saffron cordery, deputy chief executive of nhs providers. she said that offering every adult in england a boosterjab by the end of the month will be incredibly challenging the nhs is incredibly skilled at rising to the challenges, and are happy many of them recently, that are thrown its way. but we have to understand that this is a massive logistical challenge, because we have been stepping up and stepping down these vaccines, the vaccine capacity, over the last year also. we know that demand for services is higher than it has ever been. so, to step up the vaccine campaign as well adds an extra pressure there.
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but we do know that, because this has been made a priority, i think the prime minister rightly recognised that this is an emergency. and all focus will be on stepping up the booster campaign. so there is that following wind that should help us deliver that. but it's going to be incredibly challenging. presumably, the government is deploying 42 military planning teams, training more volunteers, opening more walk—in centres. presumably all of these measures will help. of course they will help. and i think the only way that this can be delivered is if everyone plays their part and extra support is called in. because it is a huge, huge effort required in order to meet this. what we are basically doing is saying let's meet this target in three weeks, instead of seven weeks. which is effectively cutting the time by around a month. yes, it is a big challenge.
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those offers of help from the military and others will be incredibly useful, particularly to help with the logistics of this. but what we have to remember is that this is going to be taking front line staff to focus on vaccines, where they would ordinarily have been focusing on routine care, both in hospitals, mental health community services and also in primary care. and we know that there are pressures across the whole of the nhs waterfront at the moment. i want to ask you about this, what will this mean? tell us in more detail, what will this mean for the nhs when it comes to the services? well, i think that this is the pinch point, really. what we are likely to see is delays and cancellations across other bits of the nhs, and people waiting longer for the treatment and services
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that they need over this period, as the booster vaccine is rolled out. so, it is likely to mean that some people may have routine appointments cancelled. it is likely to mean that some may have operations cancelled that were planned in. and we know that is incredibly difficult for people that have been waiting a very long time already for their treatment. it's also possible that it means longer waits in accident and emergency departments. i think another factor that we have to put into the mix here is the incredible pressure that social care is under. and without effective social care, it's really difficult to discharge people from hospital, because they rely on that care in order to help them do that. and the booster campaign is really important in making sure that everyone who needs a vaccine gets one, and has that extra third jab of protection, so that they can continue to work.
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so if we have the front line social care staff affected by omicron, they won't be able to work, which of course puts huge pressure on. so it is complex, it is a big, logistical challenge. it really needs everyone to play their part, including the public coming forward for their boosters, and also showing even more understanding than they have shown to date about if they have to wait longer or have a procedure rescheduled. saffron cordery, deputy chief executive of nhs providers. an exclusive bbc investigation has revealed a notorious nigerian crime mafia has links to more than 10 countries around the world. black axe, which has been accused of brutal murders, rapes and torture across nigeria, is connected to global organised crime involving multi—million dollar internet fraud. peter macjob has spent the last 12 months investigating the gang for the bbc africa eye investigation team. a warning, there are disressing
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images in his report. one of nigeria's largest slums. we are going to a black axe ceremony, called the gyration. this place is incredible. we are travelling across raw sewage, but it is the only way we can access the black axe cult. members are forced to swear an oath of secrecy. they are punished if they break the rules. cult of violence in nigeria is responsible of for the deaths of hundreds of innocent people. black axe has connections in more than ten countries, in europe, africa, north america and asia. but who are they?
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and who is behind them? this morning. _ and who is behind them? this morning, several— and who is behind them? ti 3 morning, several bodies were found with their heads decapitated and genitals cut off, they were littered around. , , �* , , around. this is benin city, the hub land of the — around. this is benin city, the hub land of the black _ around. this is benin city, the hub land of the black axe _ around. this is benin city, the hub land of the black axe mafia. - it was here that black axe emerged 40 it was here that black axe emerged a0 years ago. it was once about peace, but has grown into one of the most feared crime syndicates in the world. in your days as a member, what was your role? i in your days as a member, what was our role? . , in your days as a member, what was our role? .,, ., , . in your days as a member, what was your role?_ what - in your days as a member, what was| your role?_ what was your role? i was a butcher. what was that “ob? your role? i was a butcher. what was that job? to — your role? i was a butcher. what was that job? to eliminate. _ your role? i was a butcher. what was that job? to eliminate. dr— your role? i was a butcher. what was that job? to eliminate. dr stone, - that “ob? to eliminate. dr stone, now that job? to eliminate. dr stone, now working _ that job? to eliminate. dr stone, now working to — that job? to eliminate. dr stone, now working to end _
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that job? to eliminate. dr stone, now working to end cult - that job? to eliminate. dr stone, j now working to end cult violence, says they have infiltrated all aspects of society. b, says they have infiltrated all aspects of society.— aspects of society. a lot of members. _ aspects of society. a lot of members, the _ aspects of society. a lot of members, the executive, l aspects of society. a lot of i members, the executive, the aspects of society. a lot of - members, the executive, the air force. they have them in the judiciary. we have people that our pastors. judiciary. we have people that our astors. �* �* . , judiciary. we have people that our astors. �* �* .,, , pastors. the bbc has been given thousands of _ pastors. the bbc has been given thousands of documents - pastors. the bbc has been given l thousands of documents appearing pastors. the bbc has been given - thousands of documents appearing to backing up allegations politicians are involved. this is a member of the ruling party in nigeria. the evidence suggests he was once the head of black axe, orchestrated millions of dollars of fraud. he is the head of— millions of dollars of fraud. he is the head of a _ millions of dollars of fraud. he is the head of a criminal _ millions of dollars of fraud. he is the head of a criminal organisation, that is— the head of a criminal organisation, that is a _ the head of a criminal organisation, that is a scandal— the head of a criminal organisation, that is a scandal that _ the head of a criminal organisation, that is a scandal that a _ the head of a criminal organisation, that is a scandal that a head - the head of a criminal organisation, that is a scandal that a head of- the head of a criminal organisation, that is a scandal that a head of a i that is a scandal that a head of a criminai— that is a scandal that a head of a criminal organisation— that is a scandal that a head of a criminal organisation can - that is a scandal that a head of a criminal organisation can run - that is a scandal that a head of a criminal organisation can run for| criminal organisation can run for politics — criminal organisation can run for olitics. , ., , . ., politics. this man is the source of the data, he _ politics. this man is the source of the data, he hides _ politics. this man is the source of the data, he hides his _ politics. this man is the source of the data, he hides his identity - politics. this man is the source of the data, he hides his identity for| the data, he hides his identity for safety. in the data, he hides his identity for safe . ., , ., ., , ,-,:::: safety. in one year, i have seen 300 death threats. _ safety. in one year, i have seen 300 death threats. these _ safety. in one year, i have seen 300 death threats. these people - safety. in one year, i have seen 300 death threats. these people are - death threats. these people are capable — death threats. these people are capable of— death threats. these people are capable of the _ death threats. these people are capable of the most _ death threats. these people are capable of the most horrific- death threats. these people are - capable of the most horrific crimes.
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the fbi arrested more than 35 black axe members in the us and south africa, charged with multi—million dollar internet fraud. you black axe are no longerjust a nigerian gang. the criminal organisation has gone global. jimmy lai — the owner of what used to be hong kong's most prominent pro—democracy newspaper, has been sentenced to another 13 months injailfollowing his conviction for unlawful assembly. mr lai was sentenced alongside seven others who defied a ban last year to attend an annual vigil for democracy protesters killed by chinese troops in the 1989 tiananmen square massacre. he said that if commemorating the victims was a crime, then he wanted to be punished so that he might share their burden and glory. our correspondent, martin yip, was outside the courts in hong kong after the sentencing.
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jimmy lai has received a further 13 months ofjail time for inciting people to join an unauthorised assembly. he has already starting a 20 month jail term for other charges that we are yet to know how the courts will do the maths to add up these jail terms. so whether he will serve his 30 months concurrently or separately, we are yet to hear from the court. and among other defenders, the former legislator as the heart of the now disbanded alliance, which organised that annual vigil marking the tiananmen square crackdown has received a0 months, the heaviest amongst all. voters in north shropshire go to the polls in a by—election on thursday. that's the constituency previously held by owen paterson. we'll be speaking to candidates throughout the day. earlier we heard from labour's ben wood.
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i'm joined now by the leader of reform uk — formerly the brexit party — richard tice. very good morning to you. very good mornin: to very good morning to you. very good morning to you. _ very good morning to you. very good morning to you, thank— very good morning to you. very good morning to you, thank you _ very good morning to you. very good morning to you, thank you for - very good morning to you. very good morning to you, thank you for having | morning to you, thank you for having me on. . , , morning to you, thank you for having me on. ., , , . ., morning to you, thank you for having meon. ., , , . ., me on. can i 'ust be clear, so viewers are me on. can ijust be clear, so viewers are clearer— me on. can ijust be clear, so viewers are clearer as - me on. can ijust be clear, so viewers are clearer as well, l me on. can ijust be clear, so l viewers are clearer as well, you me on. can ijust be clear, so - viewers are clearer as well, you are not actually standing in the constituency, your candidate, kirsty walmsley is standing, but she is not welcome is that right?— welcome is that right? that's correct. welcome is that right? that's correct- i— welcome is that right? that's correct. i am _ welcome is that right? that's correct. i am the _ welcome is that right? that's correct. i am the leader - welcome is that right? that's correct. i am the leader of i welcome is that right? that's i correct. i am the leader of reform uk, kirsty walmsley, who lives in the constituency, born and bred there, her children go to school there, her children go to school there, very well known locally, is our candidate and has been doing a greatjob campaigning. i can actually say that, having been slightly unwell, she has tested this morning positive for covid. so obviously she will be remaining at home, and we are following all government guidance and protocols, removing the campaign team that were with her. but i'm pleased to say
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that we have got new activists that have not been a new bid north shropshire and can therefore come to the county and continue the positive campaign that she has been running, which has been around that we need to send a message to westminster, borisjohnson, the prime minister, is now viewed as a liability on the doorstep. we are campaigning, people in secure borders, they want cheaper energy, they want to save our boilers and not get rid of them. we know we can get down to zero waiting lists with reforms to the nhs, and we should be cutting taxes, not raising them, to grow out of the economic crisis following covid. that is what we are campaigning on and it was a conservative seat, and now it is essentially a a—way marginal between the conservatives, reform uk, labourand marginal between the conservatives, reform uk, labour and the lib dems. and of course everybody is going to be campaigning hard. who knows which way it will fall? let be campaigning hard. who knows which way it will fall?— way it will fall? let me pick you up on one of those _ way it will fall? let me pick you up on one of those points. _ way it will fall? let me pick you up on one of those points. it - way it will fall? let me pick you up on one of those points. it was i way it will fall? let me pick you up on one of those points. it was a i on one of those points. it was a safe conservative seat. your
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candidate, kirsty walmsley, is a former conservative councillor. i'm not clear why people would vote reform, therefore, when they can have a conservative candidate? it’s have a conservative candidate? it's very clear. — have a conservative candidate? it's very clear. i _ have a conservative candidate? it�*s very clear, i coined the expression, socialist, the conservative party now represents the highest taxes for 70 years, higher regulations and authoritarian nanny state. that is actually socialism. we, our campaign of cutting taxes, smart regulation, cheaper energy, smart energy policies, those are traditional, what i'd call real conservative values. that is why she has been getting with her great team, a fantastic response on the doorstep. but they are not local issues, are they? are you telling me the local people that she has been talking to are not really interested in local issues? ., , ., issues? people are interested in a combination _ issues? people are interested in a combination of _ issues? people are interested in a combination of local _ issues? people are interested in a combination of local issues, i issues? people are interested in a combination of local issues, but . combination of local issues, but let's remember, this is a national representative that goes to parliament and talks about national issues. that is why people are very
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interested. they want to send a big message to westminster that we want some smart energy policies, not a stupid energy policies, and lower taxes, a conservative message that conservatives around the country expected boris johnson conservatives around the country expected borisjohnson and his covenant to stand for. they don't any more, and that is why people are looking positively at reform uk and we are blowing up in the polls, literally every week. this we are blowing up in the polls, literally every week.— literally every week. this is a rural community, _ literally every week. this is a rural community, and - literally every week. this is a rural community, and of i literally every week. this is a i rural community, and of course, as we have said, reform is the former brexit party, this is part of the country that voted to leave in the eu referendum. iwanted country that voted to leave in the eu referendum. i wanted to ask about the response you are receiving from farmers, we know that many feel that brexit has not delivered the trade deals that farmers in particular were hoping for.— deals that farmers in particular were hoping for. thing completely the opposite. _ were hoping for. thing completely the opposite, completely - were hoping for. thing completely the opposite, completely the i the opposite, completely the opposite. many farmers voted for brexit, many farmers realised brexit is a great opportunity. has brexit, many farmers realised brexit is a great opportunity.— is a great opportunity. has it delivered? _ is a great opportunity. has it delivered? well, _ is a great opportunity. has it delivered? well, delivery- is a great opportunity. has it i delivered? well, delivery happens over a period _ delivered? well, delivery happens over a period of _ delivered? well, delivery happens over a period of time. _ delivered? well, delivery happens over a period of time. there i delivered? well, delivery happens over a period of time. there are l over a period of time. there are trade deals being done all over the
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world. literally every month, every quarter. you know, people recognise that, but also there is opportunity is here to produce more food for us to consume in the uk. for example, a0 years ago we used to produce 80% of the food we consume. that's dropped below 60% and many farmers see that as a great opportunity to boost that and use technology to invest in more productive, more efficient farming in the uk. that is a great thing. and we push that positive message.— a great thing. and we push that positive message. sorry to interrupt ou, but positive message. sorry to interrupt you. but we — positive message. sorry to interrupt you. but we are _ positive message. sorry to interrupt you, but we are tight _ positive message. sorry to interrupt you, but we are tight for— positive message. sorry to interrupt you, but we are tight for time i positive message. sorry to interrupt you, but we are tight for time and l positive message. sorry to interrupt you, but we are tight for time and i | you, but we are tight for time and i want to ask one final question, if you don't mind. if kirsty walmsley was elected, would she take a second job in addition to being the mp for north shropshire? i am job in addition to being the mp for north shropshire?— north shropshire? i am quite sure she would focus _ north shropshire? i am quite sure she would focus 11096 _ north shropshire? i am quite sure she would focus 11096 solely i north shropshire? i am quite sure she would focus 11096 solely on i she would focus 110% solely on representing the constituents of north shropshire. and that is a busy, full timejob and north shropshire. and that is a busy, full time job and she would do it brilliantly. busy, full time “0b and she would do it brilliantly.— it brilliantly. that is definitely
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no? she would _ it brilliantly. that is definitely no? she would definitely i it brilliantly. that is definitely | no? she would definitely focus it brilliantly. that is definitely i no? she would definitely focus 11096 on her full-time _ no? she would definitely focus 11096 on her full-time job, _ no? she would definitely focus 11096 on her full-time job, which - no? she would definitely focus 11096 on her full-time job, which is i no? she would definitely focus 11096 on her full-time job, which is one i on herfull—timejob, which is one job, being mp for the constituents of shropshire. yes, she does need a second or third job. although she is a very busy mum, and a brilliant mother at that. we a very busy mum, and a brilliant mother at that.— mother at that. we will leave it there, mother at that. we will leave it there. and _ mother at that. we will leave it there, and we _ mother at that. we will leave it there, and we wish _ mother at that. we will leave it there, and we wish her- mother at that. we will leave it there, and we wish her well- mother at that. we will leave it there, and we wish her well in l mother at that. we will leave it i there, and we wish her well in her recovery from covid. we will be speaking to a number of the candidates throughout the day. there's a total of 1a candidates standing in the north shropshire by—election. let's take a look at the full list of them now... and you can find more details about the by—election on our website — bbc.co.uk/news. at least seven people have died, including a pregnant woman, and a number of others are missing after a four—storey building collapsed in a gas explosion on the italian island of sicily the blast happened in
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the southwestern town of ravanusa on saturday, destroying three other buildings. rescue workers are continuing to search for survivors and some have been pulled from the rubble alive. a desperate search for survivors is under way in six us states devastated by powerful tornadoes. in kentucky, there were suggestions that the death toll could pass 100 — although it's now hoped that figure could be lower. let's talk to the cbs correspondent laura podesta in kentucky. what's the latest? good morning, rebecca. iam in downtown, a thriving business district, it is now decimated behind me. this is rubble and the dense debris, that search and rescue crews are going through, trying to find survivors. there is a nearby candle
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making factory, where there are still eight people missing. eight people have already been confirmed dead, who were working in that factory. but they are still hoping that the eight missing, some of them will come out of there alive. ijust want to walk you through what we are seeing here on the ground. it's just amazing, the amount of devastation. this is a siding from office buildings. this is someone's jacket, with frost on it. it is incredibly cold here, nearfreezing cold here, near freezing temperatures. cold here, nearfreezing temperatures. this is the sort of stuff, when a tornado comes through, it is thrown into the air and is picked up, and you find it miles later. miles away, excuse me. if we could pan over here, photographer gary is going to show the fire station that was also hit by this twister. this particular tornado tore through 200 miles of kentucky land. but there were several other
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tornadoes that tore through parts of the midwest, and we are looking at a climbing death toll. it was initially thought that 100 people had died in kentucky alone. now we are learning it might be a smaller number, that is because so many people were not able to reach their loved ones, family, friends and authorities to tell them they were safe because of the lack of power and the lack of cell service following the storm. and the lack of cell service followin: the storm. ., . following the storm. thanks so much for that update. _ following the storm. thanks so much for that update. good _ following the storm. thanks so much for that update. good to _ following the storm. thanks so much for that update. good to talk- following the storm. thanks so much for that update. good to talk to i for that update. good to talk to you. the israeli prime minister naftali bennett has arrived in the united arab emirates — the first visit of its kind. it comes after the two countries established diplomatic ties last year. mr bennett is due to meet the crown prince of abu dhabi, it is the first ever public meeting between a israeli leader and a uae de facto ruler.
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it's a first, and i think you could see in the body language between the israeli leader, naftali bennett, and the brother of the crown prince, abdullah bin zayed, the foreign minister in abu dhabi, as mr bennett came off the plane that the two showed all the signs of very, very close friendship. they were holding each other by both hands. and i think a symbol of the warm embrace that these two nations are now in, after those accords, brokered by president trump, were signed last year. the so—called abraham accords. it is notjust the uae, of course, but also bahrain, sudan, morocco, that then followed suit. mr bennett described all of this as in its first year, showing extraordinary potential, and said this was all just the beginning. let's update you with the headlines. every adult in england will be offered a covid booster
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by the end of the month — as the health secretary promises to "throw everything" at beating omicron. what we have now that we didn't have before with any of the other variants when they started is that we have vaccines. now, we know that two don't work. we know that three do. that's why it's eminently sensible, absolutely the right thing to take this action. the target will mean up to a million jabs a day, but there's concern over the scale of the task for an already—stretched nhs. home lateral flow test kits are currently unavailable on the uk government website — a day after the government changed its testing strategy. a hong kong court sentences hong kong businessmanjimmy lai and seven others for taking part in a vigil marking the 1989 tiananmen massacre. a federal disaster is declared in kentucky — after the largest outbreak of tornadoes in american history leaves at least 90 dead, across six states. a bbc investigation finds networks of breeders are offering
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to mutilate puppies, to follow a social media trend. let's get more now on the plan by borisjohnson to offer every adult in england a covid boosterjab — or an appointment for a booster — by the end of the month. in a televised address, borisjohnson urged everyone to get their booster as soon as possible, which, he said, would "protect our freedoms and our way of life". the uk's covid alert level has been raised to level a, which means a high or rising level of transmission. earlier i spoke to the royal college of nursing's director for england, patricia marquis. i asked her if she supported the prime ministers's extension of the booster programme. absolutely it is the right announcement but it does come at a time when i think
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we are all aware that the nhs is under immense pressure so while we need to do what we can to protect it from the worst impacts of covid it also will bring more pressure for them to deliver at such a scale and pace. do you think the targets are achievable? it has never been done before. what i know is that all nhs staff, managers or front—line staff, will pull out all of the stops to do what they can and i am sure more of the public and volunteers will come forward so i think people will give it a really good go but it will inevitably come at a price both for some individuals working harder and longer than they are already doing, which is already more than they should in many cases, and it will impact on other health services, which willjust have to step back for a short while while this gets achieved. let's take those two points in turn.
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for nurses, tell us about the kinds of pressures they are facing now. it might be useful to know how they compare to this time last year. this time last year we were obviously going into wave two or three depending how you define the waves and things were really ramping up and it was a lot of pressure, of people with covid, on the services across health and social care. the difference this year is that the pressure is partly from covid and the impact of covid social distancing measures, ppe, the impact all of that has had on social care, which means the health service has not got places to discharge people to, so there is lots of impacts of covid but it is a different sort of pressure. the big pressure now is the normal health service pressure of winter plus all of the catch up from the last 18 months and now with a fear that the pressure
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of covid is going to rise as well. it is very different to last year but it is also a continuation of what for most health and social care staff has been the situation since march when all of this started. to pick up on your other point about the impact on patients, patients who are not suffering from covid, what will it mean for your members when it comes to other services and those patients who are having their routine appointments cancelled? very sadly it is likely to mean that some of those routine appointments may have to be postponed and delayed. it may mean that some of those gp appointments, some of those hospital, outpatients and surgery etc, does need to be delayed to enable the service to have enough capacity to do what it needs to do to protect it from being overwhelmed by people with covid.
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it is going to no doubt have an impact on some patients and that will break the hearts of most health and social care staff who will absolutely be wanting to do everything but we just realistically cannot. patricia marcquis from the royal college of nursing. dozens of cases of the omicron variant have been identified in india. more than half of india's adult population is fully vaccinated, but there are warnings that the country is still at risk of being overwhelmed quickly if a third covid wave hits. our india correspondent yogita limaye reports. a warning — yogita's report contains some distressing images. seven months since covid ripped through this country, these moments of relief now appear temporary. the virus's newest form has arrived in india. and this is where the early cases of omicron were found.
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we've been given rare access to india's leading genome sequencing facility. they are testing five times more samples since omicron appeared, as the government tries to contain it. here, they are isolating the virus. then it's fed to a machine. i am able to tell if the sample is having delta variant or omicron variant. so, it's here, basically, that we can determine what form the coronavirus is going to take. the information from labs like these will aid policy makers to make decisions that can mitigate the impact. and, at the end of the day, can help save lives. during the second wave, india was criticised for not alerting the world quickly enough about the delta variant. has anything changed ? i asked this institute's head. we have learned a lot from our experience of earlier in the year, and i think we would be much more,
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you know, prepared. this is the trauma india lived through. people were left to fight the pandemic on their own. outside a hospital in delhi, a woman tried hard to revive her brother. he died minutes later, before a doctor could see him. inside hospitals, doctors and nurses worked day and night as the sick kept coming. they squeezed in extra patients, even into intensive care. here, between looking at his patients, we saw dr sumit ray frantically trying to get oxygen supplies for his hospital. we are running out of oxygen. the whole country is running out of oxygen, ok? hi, dr ray. it's so good to see you. i met him for the first time since then. it was the worst, ever in my life, as a medical professional. the obvious feeling is that sense
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of dread and anxiety building up. we are just starting to see an uptick in the number of patients. these are double vaccinated people, starting to get infection again. so, time to be very, very careful here. travel restrictions and testing at airports has been reintroduced. but that's not enough, says dr swapneil parikh. if we are to get hit by a third wave, fuelled by the omicron variant, preparation for that needed to start yesterday. not tomorrow, not day after. in this country, we have played pandemic roulette, where we took a wait and watch approach for the second wave. and we lived it, we saw what happened. so let's try and do the opposite this time. let's over prepare. half of the country's adult population is fully vaccinated. but hundreds of millions are still vulnerable. if the virus spreads rapidly in any country, it can mutate further. that puts the whole world at threat.
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the south african president cyril ramaphosa has tested positive for covid—19. mr ramaphosa, who's fully vaccinated, started feeling unwell after leaving a memorial service on sunday. he is said to be receiving treatment for mild coronavirus symptoms and would stay in isolation for the time being. mr ramaphosa said his infection served as a warning to all south africans of the importance of getting vaccinated and being vigilant against the virus. with the unprecedented surge in demand for dogs during lockdown, a bbc investigation has found networks of breeders are offering to arrange cutting or mutilation of the ears of puppies for purely cosmetic reasons. the cropping of dogs' ears is illegal in the uk from bbc wales investigates has found that unlicensed breeders were offering to sell fraudulent foreign pet passports, to hide the identity
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of illegally—mutilated dogs. wyre davies reports. good boy, you have been such a good boy. lockdown has been boomtime for the dogs business, especially so—called designer breeds like these american bullies. these are what are known as micro bullies. the whole purpose of the breed is to try and make them as small and stocky as possible. charities are taking on more animals, often confiscated from criminals cashing in on the trade in dogs. these dogs belong to one such breeder. christopher may like to show off and advertise his dogs online. he was recentlyjailed for breeding without a license, and illegally importing dogs. he was also convicted of another crime, cutting off their ears. sadly, there is a demand for dogs with years mutilated. they cut the floppy bit off.
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this is what he should look like. it is purely aesthetic, to achieve a look that some people think is attractive. it is illegal to cut dog ears like this in the uk. at the moment, you can import one when they have already been cropped. there are laws in place to protect animals, and we found plenty of backyard breeders who are staying one step ahead of the authorities to make some serious cash. some breeders seem keen on dogs with clipped ears. we went undercover and spoke to one breeder who offered us a puppy for a £13,000. he describes what could be done to her ears.
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you can have them off. if it ever comes back to us we are going to say it was present when you collected it, nothing to do with us. the breeder denied doing anything illegal. we showed our evidence to an expert. they are breaching the animal welfare act. he is advocating an illegal painful unnecessary mutilation. it is all for status. no health benefit to the dogs. there is a loophole that allows the importation of these dogs and that is acting as a smoke screen for it happening in the uk. the uk government says planned changes to the law would restrict importation of dogs with cropped ears and puppies under six months old. we got hold of a blank foreign pet passport with all the necessary vaccination stamps. this is what allows some breeders to claim they have imported a dog with cropped ears to hide illegal activity here.
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an activity which can generate huge profits but in which designer dogs are often made to suffer. wyre davies, bbc news. you can watch the full investigation — the hidden world of designer dog breeding — at 7.35pm tonight on bbc one wales and on iplayer. un member states are meeting in geneva this week to discuss possible rules over the use of lethal autonomous weapons — sometimes called killer robots. the meeting is the culmination of years of negotiations. everyone agrees autonomous weapons are likely to radically change how we wage war, but human rights groups claim they also raise serious moral questions about accountability, and who exactly takes the decision to kill. imogen foulkes reports from geneva. drones are standard weapons nowadays. they have no pilot but ultimately a human is still in charge.
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with fully autonomous weapons human control is gone. preprogrammed long in advance, they can use algorithms orfacial recognition to find and kill their targets. the question of whether we are leaving, effectively, life—and—death decisions to machine processes, to sensors, algorithms and machines, the icrc and many in civil society are concerned that it is really not the right way to go. to explain its concerns, the icrc, the guardian of the geneva conventions, has produced this video calling for a ban on killer robots that target people or are unpredictable and a treaty to govern the rest. but despite years of discussions leading up to this week's meeting an agreement seems unlikely. there isn't a common definition, even after five years of talks, on what we mean when we say lethal autonomous weapons systems. and without a definition you can't really start drafting
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legally—binding treaties. and some military powers, among them the united states, are not keen on a legally—binding treaty whatever the definition. campaigners fear that weapons development is racing ahead of the snail�*s—pace diplomacy. an arms race is going on at the moment. this isn't a future problem. states are investing billions in the development of all of the little bits of technology and all of the ai that goes in and ultimately would end up with machines being able to make the decision to select and target and killa human being. it is the ultimate in digital dehumanisation. at least 30 countries do support a treaty on killer robots but without the big military powers it cannot be meaningful. these negotiations could go on for yet more years. meanwhile weapons which can decide life or death are already a reality.
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imogen foulkes, bbc news, geneva. more than half a billion pounds of new funding has been announced by the governmment to help crack down on benefit fraud. the cash injection will go towards hiring hundreds of officials to check properties, bank accounts and wages. our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports. an early—morning raid of a suspected benefit fraudster in birmingham earlier this month. police, can you come to the door? the person they are after is accused of being a member of a criminal gang that stole £a million in fraudulent claims for universal credit. benefit officials say they are determined to recover as much money as they can, and there's a lot to reclaim. a record £8.a billion was lost due to fraud and error last year. in response, the government is now going to spend £510 million tackling the problem. among other things, the money will be spent hiring almost 2000 fraud investigators.
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it is about developing the prevention techniques upfront. we've certainly learned a lot during the pandemic, but there are other elements at the moment where we are going through all of the claims that were made that we potentially tagged at the time as being fraudulent or where we didn't have evidence and we are going back over those. having a look at your statement, because you have had two payments go in from your wages, haven't you? the pandemic led to benefit rules being relaxed to allow record numbers of claimants to be paid quickly. but criminal gangs exploited the system, stealing identities and making bogus claims. ministers hope this new investment will deter more scammers, and help them catch those who have already stolen taxpayers' money. michael buchanan, bbc news. you may have thought that the hottest place in the solar system is the sun. well, not any more — as it's actually on an industrial estate in the south of england. or at least it is every time a nuclearfusion reactor there is fired up.
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fusion reactions power the sun and scientists have been trying for decades to recreate them here on earth to try to generate low—carbon electricity. our climate editor justin rowlatt reports. in this non—descript warehouse building they have constructed a state—of—the—art reactor, designed to recreate the fusion forces that power the sun itself. nuclear fusion is the holy grail of low—carbon energy because it has the potential to generate so much power. industrial—scale fusion would crack the energy challenge. we could solve climate change and transform the world economy. but harnessing the sun's power here on earth is not easy. it involves fusing atoms of hydrogen to fuse together, creating helium along with huge amounts of energy. it means heating hydrogen to incredible temperatures while using superpowerful magnets
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to hold the reaction in place. the technology is improving and investment money is pouring into private fusion projects like this all around the world. so when i press this button, we arm and fire the reaction. ok, here we go. arm and fire. sg—ao arming. the machine will pulse 1a0,000 amps of electricity into the gas. firing in three, two, one... it takes the temperature of the hydrogen to 50 million degrees centigrade, three times as hot as the heart of the sun. it's not a question of if, it is a question of when. we will crack it. the answer is out there right now with mother nature as we speak. what we have to do is find that key and unlock the safe to that solution. it will be found. he expects the first commercial
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reactors to be operational by early 2030 and says we could be making tea using electricity generated from fusion reactions here in the uk by the end of that decade. that would be a huge development for humanity. creating our own galaxy of tiny suns here on earth holds out the prospect of a virtually unlimited supply of clean, secure and very cheap energy. so here's hoping that the team in its didcot industrial estate helps solve this incredible challenge. justin rowlatt, bbc news, oxfordshire. what is the metaverse? well, it's a bit of virtual reality and a little bit of augmented reality and it's been touted as the next big thing in tech. companies like meta, formally known as facebook, and microsoft have been investing in it.
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even south korea's capital seoul is looking to enter this digital universe. and as our asia business correspondent mariko oi reports, private sectors there are already at the forefront. imagine soul in the matter verse their swagger digital self can shop, eat, meet up with friends in the digital version of the city. the seoul government has invested $35 billion into making it a reality. translation:— billion into making it a reality. translation: , ., ., ., ., translation: instead of having to visit a city hall _ translation: instead of having to visit a city hall and _ translation: instead of having to visit a city hall and ai _ translation: instead of having to visit a city hall and ai public- visit a city hall and ai public service will help residents and people can ask questions in the real world and solve problems. it can enjoy festivals without worrying about covid—19. enjoy festivals without worrying about covid-19.— about covid-19. some of this is already happening. _ about covid-19. some of this is already happening. in - about covid-19. some of this is already happening. in south i about covid-19. some of this is i already happening. in south korea digital humans populate gaming and shopping and some of them have become huge stars. recreating a
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virtual daughter to help a mother get over her daughter's death. translation: in get over her daughter's death. translation:— get over her daughter's death. translation: ., translation: in the next three to five ears translation: in the next three to five years virtual _ translation: in the next three to five years virtual influences - translation: in the next three to five years virtual influences will i five years virtual influences will create 3d five years virtual influences will create 30 based on al. as technology advances all those who have passed away can also be restored through this technology. the away can also be restored through this technology.— this technology. the potential is hu . e. this technology. the potential is huge- this _ this technology. the potential is huge. this was _ this technology. the potential is huge. this was once _ this technology. the potential is huge. this was once just - this technology. the potential is huge. this was once just three l this technology. the potential is i huge. this was once just three years ago and now has a quarter of a billion users. fashion has been a big draw with some creators becoming designers in the real world, making five or six figure incomes. it is still early days. the net versus just coming into the public consciousness and many others like me are taking our very first steps into digital existence and as with
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every new wave of technology control and regulations are bound to follow as risks and privacy concerns grow. what is really important is for the regulators to use this a lot more and be able to sort of understand what the actual pros and cons of it are and have a lot of dialogue but operators like us.— operators like us. here in south korea even _ operators like us. here in south korea even presidential - operators like us. here in south i korea even presidential candidates campaign on here so while it is still taking shape in bits and pieces it is really starting to have some real—world impact. one of mexico's most revered singers, vicente fernandez, has died at the age of eighty—one afterfour months in hospital following a fall at his ranch. thousands of people in mexico queued to pay their last respects to him. jatinder dhillon reports. help as mexico's king of traditional
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music, vicente fernandez recorded more than 300 songs and starred in numerous films during a successful career that spanned more than five decades. famous for his sombreros, heavily embroidered since, a black moustache and a rich tenor, he was known to give marathon performances, often singing songs of lost love and heartbreak, which became an essential part of mexican culture. he won four grammys and eight latin grammys and is also responsible for writing some of the biggest hit ballads in mexico. he was no overnight success. he started off singing in restaurants, making a living off tips before getting his break in 1966. after a gap was left
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in the folk music market. he attracted fans earned fame beyond the country's borders, earning a star in the hollywood walk of fame, and he even had a street named after him in chicago. mexico's president led the tributes. describing him as a symbol of music of our time. friends and fellow musicians from the latin music industry paid tributes including gloria estefan and ricky martin who said his heart was broken. in 2016 fernandez retired, having inspired a generation of performance including his son and grandson. the singer had beenin his son and grandson. the singer had been in hospital since august. in his home city after suffering from a fall at his ranch. fans had been
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gathering outside his home to celebrate him and remember his songs. the end of the week is looking calm but potentially foggy. the start of the week pretty windy especially across the far north of scotland. winds 70, 80 across the far north of scotland. winds 70,80 mph through the night. the wind easing but it has left cloud with outbreaks of rain across the central swathe of the uk. probably more rain than showing here across the north of england. south of that fairly cloudy with patchy rain or drizzle and north one or two sunny spells. the breeze easing down but temperatures closer to where we should be for the stage of december, seven or eight degrees, another mild day further south. the cloud and
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patchy rain across northern england and wales will move southwards turning lighter as it does so leaving some moisture on the ground, lighter winds. leaving some moisture on the ground, lighterwinds. it leaving some moisture on the ground, lighter winds. it could be a focus started tomorrow morning. for the midlands northwards a chillier start with a touch of frost around, the exception being across the highlands and islands which is closer to the set of weather fronts which will bring outbreaks of rain and strong winds throughout the day on tuesday. the further south you are high pressure in charge. mist and fog may take longer to shift. the cloud in the far south of england and wales could produce light rain or drizzle but the bulk of the damp weather for the north and may be parts of western scotland where it will be a milder day than today whereas parts of northern england, the midlands and wales a chilly day. where we should be for the stage in december. rain for a should be for the stage in december. rainfora time should be for the stage in december. rain for a time on wednesday and the rain shifts further southwards meaning more generally cloudy across
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scotland and northern ireland with patchy rain or drizzle. england and wales morning mist and fog patches are lingering for one or two. try for the vast majority and temperature starting to move up again, more widely in double figures as we go through the second half of wednesday. through to the end of the week an area of high pressure builds across the uk. around the centre we have the winds that her latest which means for most of us it means a greater chance of the mist and fog around as we go into the weekend. there could be some patchy frost and temperatures closer to where we should be at this stage in december. that is how it is looking. season. —— see you soon.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11am... home lateral flow test kits are currently unavailable on the uk government website — a day after the government changed its testing strategy. the problems have emerged as ministers launch a new push against omicron — with every adult in england offered a covid booster by the end of the year what we have now that we didn't have before with any of the other variants when they started is that we have vaccines. now, we know that two don't work. we know that three do. that is why it is eminently sensible and absolutely the right thing to take this action. the target will mean up to a million jabs a day, but there's concern over the scale of the task for an already stretched nhs. i'm martine croxall live
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in north shropshire, where people will head to the polls this thursday to elect an mp. it was triggered after the conservative mp owen paterson after he was found to have breached lobbying rules. a federal disaster is declared in kentucky — after the largest outbreak of tornadoes in american history leaves at least 90 dead, across six states. a bbc investigation finds networks of breeders are offering to mutilate puppies, to follow a social media trend. and coming up — why the uk's tv production industry is enjoying a golden age. people across the country appear to be struggling to order covid home testing kits from the government website. change in government guidance means
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that from tomorrow fully vaccinated people in england who are close contacts of covid cases will be told to take daily lateral flow tests for seven days from tomorrow. but when trying to order those tests online, people are currently greeted with an error message saying "there are no more home tests available" and to "try again later". it comes as the government says every adult in england will be offered a covid boosterjab by the end of the month, to fight what the prime minister has described as a "tidal wave" of omicron infections. in a televised address, borisjohnson urged everyone to get their booster as soon as possible to "protect our nhs, our freedoms and our way of life". the uk's covid alert level has also been raised to level a, which means a high, or rising level of transmission. the booster target means people aged 18 and over in england will be able to get their third jabs from this week, as long as it has been three months since their second dose. those aged 30 and over can already book an appointment online.
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the prime minister said more than a0 teams from the miltary will be deployed to help with the vaccination effort. mobile units will be established and clinics' opening hours will be extended with more appointments on offer. thousands more volunteer vaccinators are also going to be trained. but, nhs providers — which represents hospitals and community services, has warned the service is already "beyond full stretch" and the intensified booster campaign will have an impact on other care provided with some appointments postponed. from today, the government's work—from—home guidance for people in england has been re—introduced. our first report is from our political correspondent, chris mason. the countdown to the new year might look rather like this. queueing for a booster. the prime minister wants to massively accelerate the delivery of vaccine shots, because... i'm afraid we are now facing an emergency in our battle with the new variant omicron.
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and we must urgently reinforce our wall of vaccine protection to keep our friends and loved ones safe. here's a sense of the scale of what he's hoping to achieve. to offer everyone aged 18 and over a booster by the end of the month means giving 1 million doses a day, every day, until the end of the year. at the moment, around half a million doses are being given a day. to achieve this doubling, will come at a cost. with other non—covid related health care being put off. this will require an extraordinary effort, and as we focus on boosters, and make this new target achievable, it will mean some other appointments will need to be postponed until the new year. but if we don't do this now, the wave of omicron could be so big that cancellations and disruptions like the loss of cancer appointments will be even greater next year.
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and behind this door, his conclusion was simple and stark. so, let's do it. let's get boosted now. get boosted now for yourself, for your friends and your family. get boosted now to protectjobs and livelihoods across this country. get boosted now to protect our nhs, our freedoms and our way of life. get boosted now. national addresses like this from a prime minister are pretty rare and they have two consequences. firstly, they grab attention. but secondly, they remove the opportunity for scrutiny and questions. is the plan realistic? will it mean more restrictions are coming? labour are, for now, at least, backing the government. this has got to be a big national effort, all of us have got a part to play. and it's crucial that, you know, despite people's anger and frustration with the prime minister, justifiable anger and frustration with the prime minister,
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we put that to one side in the efforts to get the vaccine booster roll—out and to make it a success. tomorrow, the prime minister will seek and secure parliamentary approval for the introduction of so—called plan b in england, the already announced step up of measures to try to reduce the spread of the virus. the question now is how soon there might be talk of a plan c. chris mason, bbc news. extra support has been promised to speed up the vaccine drive in scotland, wales and northern ireland. like england, scotland is aiming to offer all adults a booster by the end of the year — while wales has set a target for the end of januray. in northern ireland, people over the age of 30 are currently being offered third doses, with plans to step up the rollout. with me is our health correspondentjim reed. the latest is people are having difficulty getting a lateral flow tests. the government's website says
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they are not available.— they are not available. there are a number of — they are not available. there are a number of different _ they are not available. there are a number of different ways - they are not available. there are a number of different ways to i they are not available. there are a number of different ways to get i they are not available. there are a i number of different ways to get hold of these tests. one is to go online and order one to get delivered to your door. we try to do it ourselves and it comes up with an error message saying it is not available. a spokesperson as saying they are looking at that problem and they say it is because of this change to the rules in england that was announced yesterday and comes into force tomorrow, where if you are a household contact of someone who has a covid, you are being asked to take a covid, you are being asked to take a daily lateral flow test for seven days. at the moment, that is not the case. at the moment, if it is confirmed the person in your house has omicron, you are being asked to self isolate. if it is not omicron, you are allowed to leave the house but are recommended to take a test. the department of health are seeing,
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you can go to a local pharmacy and you can go to a local pharmacy and you should be able to pick them up in england, this is. difficulty there as well. there are also shortages in pharmacies, we are hearing. you should download a qr code if you are going to a pharmacy to pick one up. it is not straight to pick one up. it is not straight to do in certain places. this is in england. we are hearing similar reports in scotland about people having difficulty getting the lateral flow tests as well. it is in demand. what are they saying about how long the supply issues can go on for? they are seeing there is plenty of stock. we go on for? they are seeing there is plenty of stock-— plenty of stock. we do not know at the moment- _ plenty of stock. we do not know at the moment. you _ plenty of stock. we do not know at the moment. you heard _ plenty of stock. we do not know at the moment. you heard from i plenty of stock. we do not know at the moment. you heard from the l plenty of stock. we do not know at i the moment. you heard from the prime minister at the weekend and the scientists are also seeing this. it could be the change in the testing regime, and also people being more concerned about the virus in general and trying to get hold of the tests.
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there will be more mixing over the christmas period and meeting more elderly relatives, that sort of thing. i suspect people are wanting to have these tests. department of health and the uk have security agency is saying they are looking into this at the moment. we do not know how long the shortage is likely to last four. it could be a temporary thing or they could be more of a problem in the medium term. ~ . more of a problem in the medium term. . ., ., more of a problem in the medium term. ~ ., ., ., ., ., term. what about the roll out of the bicester programme? _ term. what about the roll out of the bicester programme? it _ term. what about the roll out of the bicester programme? it was - term. what about the roll out of the bicester programme? it was going l term. what about the roll out of the | bicester programme? it was going to be a huge demand for that as well. we are also hearing problems about people trying to pick their appointments online. 100,000 people have tried to pick on line this morning. that is causing the website in certain cases to come up with an error message. people are being cut in a loop where they are being of appointments injanuary, when they should be offered them in december.
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there is obviously something going on there. what the department of health will say is that there are going to be teething problems after the announcement. there is a different way in england, at least, that you can get a booster shot, that you can get a booster shot, thatis that you can get a booster shot, that is to go along to a walk—in centre. you go online and enter vic a walking appointment in a search engine and it should show you the nearest site where you do not need an appointment. those walk—in centres should be available to everyone now over the age of 18 from today. we are hearing reports of people going to the walk—in centre and people saying there's too much demand and we cannot offer it. it might not be straightforward but there are different ways to access there are different ways to access the appointment. to go through what other nations of the uk are doing.
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scotland has confirmed to everyone we should get a booster by the end of the year. that is being offered from 30 to 39—year—olds from today. in wales they may move to this december deadline, but have not decided yet. in northern ireland, everyone over 30 should currently be offered a booster to stop you can go to a walk—in centre in northern ireland. they have not made it clear in northern ireland how they are going to get through to those younger groups under 30. thank you very much- — the south african president cyril ramaphosa has tested positive for covid nineteen. mr ramaphosa, who's fully vaccinated, started feeling unwell after leaving a memorial service on sunday. he is said to be receiving treatment for mild coronavirus symptoms and would stay in isolation for the time being. mr ramaphosa said his infection served as a warning to all south africans of the importance of getting vaccinated and being vigilant against the virus. scientists in south africa are still analyising data from the new omircon variant,
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but early results suggest it cause a lower rate of serious illness and death than previous of the vius. we can speak now to the shabir madhi, professor of vaccinology at the university of the witwatersrand. thank you forjoining us. what is the latest in south africa in terms of the transmissibility of omicron and how serious it is? so of the transmissibility of omicron and how serious it is? 50 it of the transmissibility of omicron and how serious it is?— of the transmissibility of omicron and how serious it is? so it is much more transmissible _ and how serious it is? so it is much more transmissible than _ and how serious it is? so it is much more transmissible than anything l and how serious it is? so it is much i more transmissible than anything we have experienced in the past. the rate of infections is much higher, and we are also observing is a rise of infections in people who have not been vaccinated, as well as people who have been previously infected. it is consistent with what has been shown over the last few days, but at
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the same time what we are seeing is an uncoupling of the cases in the community and in hospitals. what we are experiencing is a lower hospitalisation rate and death rate, by one tenth of what it was before, at a time of the number of cases transpiring in the community. it is not necessarily that the virus is less transmissible, but how it is involved in the community. it is based on a survey in south africa that was concluded about one week ago. individuals who have not been vaccinated, 73% of them were testing positive for antibody, indicating they have immunity, which usually prevents the progression of severe disease. among those who have been
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vaccinated, 97% of them we are testing antibodies. 50 vaccinated, 97% of them we are testing antibodies.— testing antibodies. so you are seeinu testing antibodies. so you are seeing then — testing antibodies. so you are seeing then the _ testing antibodies. so you are seeing then the picture - testing antibodies. so you are seeing then the picture has i testing antibodies. so you are - seeing then the picture has changed. is it difficult then to unpick whether this variant is less strong, causes mild symptoms, or if it is because of the changed background when people have the increased immunity?— when people have the increased immuni , . ., immunity? absolutely. the absence of showina immunity? absolutely. the absence of showing such — immunity? absolutely. the absence of showing such high _ immunity? absolutely. the absence of showing such high rates _ immunity? absolutely. the absence of showing such high rates of _ showing such high rates of hospitalisation and death, it is because of what i would term at the interference of the population immunity which is... i do believe it will transpire the same in other countries that have high levels of immunity, whether through vaccination or through past infection. vaccination or through past infection-—
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vaccination or through past infection. . , infection. there have been some re orts infection. there have been some reports that _ infection. there have been some reports that the _ infection. there have been some reports that the cases _ infection. there have been some reports that the cases may - infection. there have been some reports that the cases may have | reports that the cases may have peaked in south africa. what is the latest on the current trajectory? yes, certainly not across the whole country. in the epicentre, the cases have peaked and are plateauing over the last few days. in other parts of the last few days. in other parts of the country and other provinces, it is different. we will see an increase in the number of cases as the omicron creates more infection and other provinces and that will probably be be between the next three to four weeks. we probably will come on a downward trajectory in a period of the next one to two weeks in the epicentre. in in a period of the next one to two weeks in the epicentre.— weeks in the epicentre. in this count , weeks in the epicentre. in this country. the — weeks in the epicentre. in this country, the government - weeks in the epicentre. in this country, the government and l weeks in the epicentre. in this i country, the government and the weeks in the epicentre. in this - country, the government and the nhs are looking at we are potentially cases go, some projections saying they could be i cases go, some projections saying they could bei million cases go, some projections saying they could be i million cases cases go, some projections saying they could bei million cases by christmas. when you talk in south africa of that uncoupling between the spread of the virus and the
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severe illness and hospitalisation, you said it is one tenth of what it was before, can you put some figures on that, what that looks like when you are looking at a spread in the population? you are looking at a spread in the p°pulati°"'-’_ population? sure. he dealt it variant is— population? sure. he dealt it variant is an _ population? sure. he dealt it variant is an example - population? sure. he dealt it variant is an example during | population? sure. he dealt it. variant is an example during the course of the third wave we were experiencing thousands of cases in south africa, 250 and 300 people dying of covid. currently we are reporting 20,000 cases of the omicron variant, we are reporting 25 and 50 people dying at this time. there might be some lag when it comes to death and things may change slightly over the next one to two weeks. i would slightly over the next one to two weeks. iwould be slightly over the next one to two weeks. i would be highly surprised if it comes anywhere close to what we have experienced in the past. it is important to recognise south africa has about 13 times less testing capacity than the uk. when we test these cases a day, it is an
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excess of 100,000 per day, given the low rate of testing. relative to what is done in the uk. the uk certainly will reach1 what is done in the uk. the uk certainly will reach 1 million cases of omicron by december, because of the amount of testing you do, that does not necessarily translate into additional hospitalisations and deaths, compared with what occurred with the delta variant.— with the delta variant. thank you very much _ with the delta variant. thank you very much for— with the delta variant. thank you very much forjoining _ with the delta variant. thank you very much forjoining us. - the health secretary sajid javid said the government would �*throw everything' at offering a boosterjab to everyone over the age of 18 in the uk by the end of the year. we have seen what covid is capable of. we have seen, with the previous variants, starting with the wuhan variant, the alpha variant, the delta variant, how it works. that you start seeing a rise in cases. people get ill, some into hospital, some, sadly, die. it is much better to act early.
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and what we have now, that we didn't have before with any of the other variants, when they started, is that we have vaccines. now, we know that two don't work. we know that three do. and that's why it's eminently sensible, absolutely the right thing to take that action. there are some estimates that up to 70 conservative mps are likely to rebel against the prime minister when it comes to a vote on the introduction of covid passes for entry into night clubs and large events. one of those who is considering rebelling is the conservative mp, marcus fysh. thank you forjoining us. will definitely repel and why? i will, certainl , definitely repel and why? i will, certainly. yes- _ definitely repel and why? i will, certainly, yes. i— definitely repel and why? i will, certainly, yes. i am _ definitely repel and why? i will, certainly, yes. i am in - definitely repel and why? i will, certainly, yes. i am in favour i definitely repel and why? i will, certainly, yes. i am in favour of| certainly, yes. iam in favour of vaccines, i am certainly, yes. iam in favour of vaccines, iam in certainly, yes. iam in favour of vaccines, i am in favour of the booster programme that has been announced. i don't think it is the right thing to do to introduce vaccine passports, in particular. i am ok with being a bit more cautious while wejust sort am ok with being a bit more cautious while we just sort of continue to analyse what happens with this
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omicron wave. but it was really encouraging to hear the doctor from south africa who was relating that generalised immunity, which we should have in the uk because 95 plus percent of the uk population has had the vaccines or had a prior infection at this point, at least the adult population, that should mean that we hopefully follow a similar trajectory as south africa and seeing a lot less hospitalisation and severe problems. hopefully, this could be the beginning of the end of the pandemic if we get more transmissible but much milder variants coming through. why are you so opposed to vaccine passports? why are you so opposed to vaccine --assorts? �* u, , why are you so opposed to vaccine passports?— why are you so opposed to vaccine ”assorts? �* , ., , . , passports? because of the principle of in this country _ passports? because of the principle of in this country having _ passports? because of the principle of in this country having freedoms l of in this country having freedoms of in this country having freedoms of association, freedom is of autonomy over one's own body and if
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you think about it what the government is worried about is whether the vaccines prevent transmission effectively, just because you have been vaccinated does not mean if you are any large crowd you are going to be less likely to transmit it anyway, until people have had the boosterjab. i think it is a misstep in terms of what would be an appropriate response to this. i do not think it will have any effect anyway. why alter the principles of the way society operates, relationship between individual and state, on that basis when the evidence really does not suggest that there is some, you know, colossal emergency where one might think whether that is a goodidea one might think whether that is a good idea or not, perhaps a bit more seriously? in good idea or not, perhaps a bit more seriousl ? , ., , . ., , seriously? in terms of restrictions on freedoms. _ seriously? in terms of restrictions on freedoms. we _ seriously? in terms of restrictions on freedoms, we are _ seriously? in terms of restrictions on freedoms, we are at _ seriously? in terms of restrictions on freedoms, we are at the i seriously? in terms of restrictions on freedoms, we are at the startl seriously? in terms of restrictions. on freedoms, we are at the start of
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the spread of omicron. as we have been discussing, it is not clear exactly where it goes and the picture we are hearing from south africa is encouraging, in terms of containing it at this stage and if that means measures to make sure people who are in larger gatherings neither have proof of a negative test a vaccine, does that not protect civil liberty is potentially going forward in terms of ending up in the territory where we might need greater restrictions and shutdowns? i don't think it will be very effective anyway because the vaccines, as the government have said, do not prevent the spread. they are pointless in terms of preventing spread. i would hope that, as we have heard from south africa, this should not end up being the danger that the government seems to be frightened of, even though we
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have literally the best coverage of general immunity possibly in the world through our vaccination programme. it has been a tremendous success. if we do the booster programme right, there is less reason to be fearful. we need to be at a point where we take proportionate and balanced decisions with regards to our public health. i do fear we are of any nep braille state where that not happening. and we are going to get variants of this virus, that may or may not be more or less serious over coming years, possibly for ever. we cannotjust, you know, make these kneejerk reactions on the basis of something that may or may not happen. we get new variants of flu most years before covid came along, some of
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which really have caused a lot of deaths. we cannot run society on the basis of being fearful. that, i think, is a really important principle not to give up. thank you very much- — and we'll be putting all your questions on the omicron variant and the booster campaign to the experts in your questions answered. you can get in touch on twitter using the hashtag bbcyourquestions, or email at yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. that will be atjust after 11.30 this morning. if we do not get to put the questions that you want, there will be another one coming up. to get in touch if you would like to have your questions answered. voters in north shropshire go to the polls in a by—election on thursday. that's the constituency previously held by owen paterson. martine croxall is there
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for us in oswestry. over to you. thank you. welcome to oswestry. we are getting wet, but do not mind. lots of local issues at play here. also, what has been happening at downing street and those investigations into the trismus parties last year. these issues are important on the doorstep. i'm joined now by martin daubney — a former brexit party mep, now standing for the reclaim party and andrea allen, the candidate for the uk independence party. in the past, martin, you have been a brexit mep, you say you have voted labour, liberal democrats and the women's equality party. how can you overturn the majority? i women's equality party. how can you overturn the majority?— overturn the ma'ority? i think we are auoin overturn the ma'ority? i think we going to — overturn the majority? i think we are going to see _ overturn the majority? i think we are going to see a _ overturn the majority? i think we are going to see a huge - overturn the majority? i think we are going to see a huge upset i overturn the majority? i think we are going to see a huge upset in | overturn the majority? i think we i are going to see a huge upset in the seat because people are fed up, and a safe conservative seat that never should have fallen, people are turning it into a referendum of this government because my competence,
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borisjohnson, a referendum on taxation, immigration and on green taxes that nobody wants. my position is this, lots and lots of people feel politically homeless and the voting with people and issues are not tied to the same parties. i think that is a healthy thing. hagar think that is a healthy thing. how much of an _ think that is a healthy thing. how much of an affinity _ think that is a healthy thing. how much of an affinity you have with north shropshire? what do you know about the area? i north shropshire? what do you know about the area?— about the area? i was voted in as the mep here _ about the area? i was voted in as the mep here in _ about the area? i was voted in as the mep here in 2019. _ about the area? i was voted in as the mep here in 2019. 6296 - about the area? i was voted in as the mep here in 2019. 6296 of - about the area? i was voted in as| the mep here in 2019. 6296 of the the mep here in 2019. 62% of the constituents put me through to brussels to get the job done and i did get thejob done. that brussels to get the job done and i did get the job done. that was an opposition from the liberal democrats. i am seeing people who are saying thank you and they know me here. my political experience, i only person on the ticket who has been elected before.— only person on the ticket who has been elected before. would you take a second job? _ been elected before. would you take a second job? i _ been elected before. would you take a second job? i would _ been elected before. would you take a second job? i would continue i been elected before. would you take a second job? i would continue of i been elected before. would you take a second job? i would continue of a l a second 'ob? i would continue of a media a second job? i would continue of a media company _ a second job? i would continue of a media company - _ a second job? i would continue of a media company - might _ a second job? i would continue of a media company - might continue . a second job? i would continue of a | media company - might continue as a second job? i would continue of a i media company - might continue as a media company — might continue as a director of a media company. yes, i
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would. ii director of a media company. yes, i would. , ., , ., , would. if the liberal democrats get in, said of would. if the liberal democrats get in. said of the _ would. if the liberal democrats get in, said of the conservatives, i would. if the liberal democrats get in, said of the conservatives, veryl in, said of the conservatives, very briefly, how good would that be for the constituency? it briefly, how good would that be for the constituency?— briefly, how good would that be for the constituency? it would be great because it was _ the constituency? it would be great because it was sent _ the constituency? it would be great because it was sent out _ the constituency? it would be great because it was sent out a _ the constituency? it would be great because it was sent out a message | the constituency? it would be great l because it was sent out a message to boris that they cannot take the conservative vote for granted. the liberal democrats are taking the remain vote and the tories are going to be squeezed out.— to be squeezed out. thank you very much. to be squeezed out. thank you very much- you — to be squeezed out. thank you very much- you are _ to be squeezed out. thank you very much. you are here _ to be squeezed out. thank you very much. you are here with _ to be squeezed out. thank you very much. you are here with the - to be squeezed out. thank you very| much. you are here with the mascot oscar, who is very patient. you are in local women. how important our local issues on the doorstep, compared with what we are hearing about the christmas parties? i think local issues — about the christmas parties? i think local issues are _ about the christmas parties? i think local issues are very _ about the christmas parties? i think local issues are very important i local issues are very important year. — local issues are very important year, particularly the ambulance waiting — year, particularly the ambulance waiting times. i have experienced long. _ waiting times. i have experienced long. long — waiting times. i have experienced long, long waiting times and it needs— long, long waiting times and it needs to — long, long waiting times and it needs to be sorted. gps need to see their patients. ambulances need to be able _ their patients. ambulances need to be able to— their patients. ambulances need to be able to discharge their patients into the _ be able to discharge their patients into the hospital. this is a widespread constituency and it is important — widespread constituency and it is important that we have the right
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facilities — important that we have the right facilities. , ., , , facilities. some people in this leave voting _ facilities. some people in this leave voting part _ facilities. some people in this leave voting part of _ facilities. some people in this leave voting part of the i facilities. some people in this leave voting part of the world | facilities. some people in this i leave voting part of the world feel a particularly farmers, feel brexit has not been delivered. how would you, if you were to be successful, make sure that brexit did deliver those trade deals that farmers were promised? those trade deals that farmers were romised? . , promised? that is quite right, it was not delivered. _ promised? that is quite right, it was not delivered. boris - promised? that is quite right, it was not delivered. boris was i promised? that is quite right, it. was not delivered. boris was given promised? that is quite right, it- was not delivered. boris was given a bil was not delivered. boris was given a big majority— was not delivered. boris was given a big majority and he has bodged it because — big majority and he has bodged it because we have borders in the middle — because we have borders in the middle of— because we have borders in the middle of the north sea. northern ireland _ middle of the north sea. northern ireland is— middle of the north sea. northern ireland is effectively cut off and still part — ireland is effectively cut off and still part of the eu.— ireland is effectively cut off and still part of the eu. how would you turn that around _ still part of the eu. how would you turn that around as _ still part of the eu. how would you turn that around as a _ still part of the eu. how would you turn that around as a lone - still part of the eu. how would you turn that around as a lone voice i turn that around as alone voice in parliament? mi turn that around as a lone voice in parliament?— parliament? all i can do is speak u - , parliament? all i can do is speak up. speak— parliament? all i can do is speak up. speak the — parliament? all i can do is speak up, speak the truth _ parliament? all i can do is speak up, speak the truth unto - parliament? all i can do is speak up, speak the truth unto power, | parliament? all i can do is speak l up, speak the truth unto power, as they say _ up, speak the truth unto power, as they say. the longestjourney up, speak the truth unto power, as they say. the longest journey starts with the _ they say. the longest journey starts with the first step. if we do have a good _ with the first step. if we do have a good turnout and they do have a turnaround, then they need to vote for somebody different, somebody who will stand _ for somebody different, somebody who will stand up for north shropshire and understands north shropshire. would _ and understands north shropshire.
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would you — and understands north shropshire. would you take a second job? no would you take a second 'ob? no ex-mac would you take a second job? no ex—mac i think being an mp is a job. it needs— ex—mac i think being an mp is a job. it needs to _ ex—mac i think being an mp is a job. it needs to be people talking to you _ it needs to be people talking to you i_ it needs to be people talking to you i am — it needs to be people talking to you. i am a parish councillor. i meet — you. i am a parish councillor. i meet my— you. i am a parish councillor. i meet my parishioners and ask them what they— meet my parishioners and ask them what they want. we try, if we can, to deliver— what they want. we try, if we can, to deliver what they want. they want the street _ to deliver what they want. they want the street lights, they have got street— the street lights, they have got street lights. it is important you connect — street lights. it is important you connect from the people and you are not remote _ connect from the people and you are not remote from them. and you have to live _ not remote from them. and you have to live here? — not remote from them. and you have to live here? | not remote from them. and you have to live here?— to live here? i live here. thank you both forjoining _ to live here? i live here. thank you both forjoining us _ to live here? i live here. thank you both forjoining us this _ to live here? i live here. thank you both forjoining us this morning. i to live here? i live here. thank you| both forjoining us this morning. we are here throughout the morning, one of the five market towns in this rural constituency. we will be speaking to the other candidates and the voters who get to cast a ballot on thursday. thanks, martine. there's a total of 111 candidates standing in the north shropshire by—election. let's take a look at the full list of them now... and you can find more details about the by—election
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on our website — bbc.co.uk/news. police investigating the case of missing nursing assistant petra srncova say initial inquiries "suggest the circumstances are not suspicious". a body found in a park in south—east london yesterday has yet to be formally identified, but is believed to be that of the 32 year old. she had been missing since late last month. her family in the czech republic has been informed. a desperate search for survivors is under way in six us states devastated by powerful tornadoes. in kentucky, there were suggestions that the death toll could pass 100 — although it's now hoped that figure could be lower . laura podesta from cbs news is in mayfield, kentukey to see the devation the storm has left.
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iam in i am in downfield kentucky, once a thriving business district. it is decimated behind me here. this is a rubble and debris that search and rescue crews are going through to find survivors. there is a nearby candle making factory where there are still eight people missing. eight people have been confirmed dead who were working in the factory but they are still hoping that some of them will come out of there alive. i want to walk you through what we are seeing on the ground. it is just amazing the amount of devastation. this is the sides of an office building. this is someone's jacket with frost on it. it is incredibly cold here, nearfreezing temperatures. this is the sort of stuff that when a tornado comes through is thrown into the air and is picked up and you find it miles later. miles away, excuse me. if you
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could pan over here, our photographer gary will show us the fire station that was hit by the twister. this tornado tore through two miles of kentucky land. there were several other tornadoes that tore through parts of the midwest and we are looking at a climbing death toll. it was initially thought that 100 people had died in kentucky alone. now we are learning it could be a smaller number and that is because so many people weren't able to reach their loved ones and authority to tell them they were safe because of the lack of power and sail service following the storm. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello, across northern scotland, the winds continue to moderate down after that wilder and windy night, still a blustery day across scotland and northern ireland. sunshine for many, but showers still around across the north and the west, a bit wintry over the higher ground. probably a bit more rain across northern england here, but rather wet
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for here and north and west wales through the day, a slow—moving weather front will sit in place. to the south of it, cloudy, patchy rain or drizzle, or the odd brighter break. and if you do get a brighter break in those south—west winds, we could see temperatures 13 or 111, temperatures closer to the mid december average across scotland and northern ireland at seven or eight. now, that weather front across central areas through monday evening gives quite a bit of rain, but then fizzles out as it pushes its way southwards. a cloudy, damp start to tomorrow morning in the southern counties of england, wales, some mist and fog across north and north wales, the midlands and northern parts of england, which could linger and could be a bit of frost around first thing. but through the coming days, outbreaks of rain, gusty winds in the north of scotland, but most places can be dry later in the week for some overnight mist and fog. hello this is bbc news with joanna gosling.
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home lateral flow test kits are currently unavailable on the uk government website — a day after the government changed its testing strategy. every adult in england will be offered a covid booster by the end of the month— as the health secretary promises to "throw everything" at beating omicron. the target will mean up to a million jabs a day, but there's concern over the scale of the task for an already stretched nhs. a federal disaster is declared in kentucky — after the largest outbreak of tornadoes in american history leaves at least 90 dead, across six states. a bbc investigation finds networks of breeders are offering to mutilate puppies, to follow a social media trend. and coming up — why the uk's tv production industry is enjoying a golden age. sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre. the draw for the last 16 of the
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champions league has been made... and it was the final tie out of the hat that's provided the most glamorous match. manchester united will play psg... here's the draw in full... both manchester clubs taking on the other�*s proponents. —— group opponents. brentford manager thomas frank expects their premier league match with manchester united tomorrow night to go ahead despite a number of positive covid cases in the united squad... frank has admitted he's a bit confused about when there are enough to postpone a game.
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tottenham have had their last two matches called off because of eight postives. while united had to send home a small number of players on the morning after their win over norwich. aston villa... who norwich play this week... have reported one positive. it was a dramatic conclusion to what has been described as the sport's most exciting season... but there are concerns that the controversial way max verstappen won the world title might cause formula one some long—term damage. mercedes had two protests rejected after the abu dhabi grand prix and would well appeal against one of those decisions. their driver lewis hamilton appeared to be crusing to an eighth world title. only for the safety car to come out following a crash with five laps to go. that bunched the field and the race director then controversially allowed some but not all of the lapped cars between hamilton and verstappen to pass through, and it left verstappen on fresher tyres, able to strike on the final lap. there needs to be clarity going forward, we cannot have debates and stewards looking at this several
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hours after the chequered flag has fallen, it is unsavoury overall after a fantastic racing championship. both drivers deserve the title, they have been exceptional, better than the rest, sadly someone had to lose out but the manner in which it happened on the manner in which it happened on the very last lap will leave many disillusioned. australian fast bowler josh hazlewood has been ruled out of the second ashes test against england — he's suffering from a rib injury he picked up in last week's first test. the second test starts in adelaide on thursday, it's a day—nighter. .. with both stuart broad and james anderson expected to return in more favourable conditions. former england full—back danielle waterman has launched a new players' union for women in the premier 155 league. the women's rugby association will provide legal, medical and welfare support for members. waterman said it was important to look after players on and off the field. professional players could alreadyjoin the rugby players' association...
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but this wasn't an option for the semi—professionls and amateurs in premier 155. now you might have heard of a no—look pass. well, there's also a no—look pot... luca brecel of belgium is the new scottish open snooker champion and he won it in cheeky style. brecel was looking over his shoulder at the audience as he potted the final black to beat four—time world championjohn higgins. brecel won by eight frames to five. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website, europa and conference league draws, as well as find out who the nominees are for this year's bbc sports personality of the year award. that's bbc.co.uk/sport... now it's time for your questions answered.
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now on bbc news, it's time for your questions answered on the expansion of the booster in the uk. everyone over the age of 18 will be offered a boosterjab by the end of the year. with me isjeremy brown, professor of respiratory infection at university college london and member of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. and professorjonathan ball, a virologist at nottingham university. some breaking news just some breaking newsjust through some breaking news just through from borisjohnson, who has said at least one patient has been confirmed to have died with the omicron variant of coronavirus. we are now hearing the prime minister has confirmed at least one patient has been confirmed
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to have died with the omicron variant of coronavirus. more on that when we get it. now those questions. and says, my booster was due at the end of november. i caught covid, the appointment is not tilljanuary eight. is it true the antibodies after having covert are as protective as the vaccine? there has not been much testing in terms _ there has not been much testing in terms of— there has not been much testing in terms of boosting the immunity but some _ terms of boosting the immunity but some of— terms of boosting the immunity but some of the early data to come from south _ some of the early data to come from south africa, they have compared the levels _ south africa, they have compared the levels of _ south africa, they have compared the levels of antibodies, not protective
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t cells, _ levels of antibodies, not protective t cells, just antibodies, if they compare — t cells, just antibodies, if they compare the level of someone double vaccinated _ compare the level of someone double vaccinated versus someone with two vaccines _ vaccinated versus someone with two vaccines plus natural infection, the level— vaccines plus natural infection, the level of— vaccines plus natural infection, the level of antibodies in the natural infection— level of antibodies in the natural infection was much higher. in that small— infection was much higher. in that small study, the antibodies would offer similar levels of protection as two— offer similar levels of protection as two doses of vaccine against the original— as two doses of vaccine against the original virus was that it is good newsr _ original virus was that it is good news, it— original virus was that it is good news, it has boosted new levels of immunity— news, it has boosted new levels of immunity and would expect it to boost _ immunity and would expect it to boost your— immunity and would expect it to boost your t cell immunity as well. whether— boost your t cell immunity as well. whether it — boost your t cell immunity as well. whether it is as good as a booster, a different— whether it is as good as a booster, a different question and i would advise _ a different question and i would advise you when your poster appointment comes along injanuary to -o appointment comes along injanuary to go and _ appointment comes along injanuary to go and get even more immunity. why is— to go and get even more immunity. why is it _ to go and get even more immunity. why is it a — to go and get even more immunity. why is it a booster would have merits even beyond someone already having been double vaccinated and
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had the immunity from an infection. we do not know at what point we hit the immunity ceiling, there may well be a the immunity ceiling, there may well he a point _ the immunity ceiling, there may well he a point in — the immunity ceiling, there may well be a point in which continuing to rive be a point in which continuing to give a _ be a point in which continuing to give a vaccine or exposure does not increase _ give a vaccine or exposure does not increase your overall levels of immunity _ increase your overall levels of immunity. but what we know from lots of data _ immunity. but what we know from lots of data is _ immunity. but what we know from lots of data is that if you get multiple exposures to a virus or a vaccine, not only— exposures to a virus or a vaccine, not only does it increase the levels of memory— not only does it increase the levels of memory immunity that you have but it also— of memory immunity that you have but it also increases the breadth of that immunity meaning your immunity can deal— that immunity meaning your immunity can deal with variants more easily and that— can deal with variants more easily and that is— can deal with variants more easily and that is an unseen and often of vaccination, — and that is an unseen and often of vaccination, it is notjust increasing your immunity,... the
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questions — increasing your immunity,... the questions are _ increasing your immunity,... iia: questions are pertinent increasing your immunity,... tia: questions are pertinent now increasing your immunity,... ti2 questions are pertinent now with the gap being reduced to three months... we do not have particularly good data. i think the bottom line is that protection against severe disease will be maintained to a relatively high degree but protection against mild infection where you feel miserable for a few days and it goes away is probably going to wear off. actually the chance of catching omicron after having two doses a few months ago is pretty high but normally it would only cause a mild rather than severe infection compared to somebody unvaccinated.— infection compared to somebody unvaccinated. ~ ., ., ., , unvaccinated. what do your thoughts on the confirmation _ unvaccinated. what do your thoughts on the confirmation that _ unvaccinated. what do your thoughts on the confirmation that at _ unvaccinated. what do your thoughts on the confirmation that at least i on the confirmation that at least one patient has been confirmed to have died with omicron? than one patient has been confirmed to have died with omicron? an important and sad development _ have died with omicron? an important and sad development because - have died with omicron? an important and sad development because it i and sad development because it demonstrates definitely this is not a mild virus, it can cause a severe
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enough disease to kill people and some people are saying we should not worry about it because it will cause a mild disease from the south african data is just wrong, essentially. it might cause milder disease or be less likely to cause severe disease than the existing delta virus, we do not know, we need clarity in time, but even if it causes severe disease in 50% of the people compared to delta virus, half as likely as someone who has not been vaccinated, it will cause a lot of people have severe disease, so it is still a problem.— is still a problem. jonathan, madge and oakley asks, _ is still a problem. jonathan, madge and oakley asks, do _ is still a problem. jonathan, madge and oakley asks, do we _ is still a problem. jonathan, madge and oakley asks, do we need i is still a problem. jonathan, madge and oakley asks, do we need to i is still a problem. jonathan, madge. and oakley asks, do we need to wait for an invitation before booking an appointment for a boosterjab? you appointment for a booster 'ab? you do not have — appointment for a booster 'ab? you do not have to h appointment for a boosterjab? you do not have to wait for an invitation— do not have to wait for an invitation to book your appointment, as long _ invitation to book your appointment, as long as— invitation to book your appointment,
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as long as it is three months since your— as long as it is three months since your last _ as long as it is three months since your last dose of vaccine you can have _ your last dose of vaccine you can have your — your last dose of vaccine you can have your booster and, in fact, you can hook _ have your booster and, in fact, you can book that appointment one month earlier~ _ can book that appointment one month earlier~ if_ can book that appointment one month earlier~ if it _ can book that appointment one month earlier. if it is more than two months — earlier. if it is more than two months since your last jab, you can book— months since your last jab, you can book your— months since your last jab, you can book your appointment and have your 'ab book your appointment and have your iah three _ book your appointment and have your jab three months after. that is for anyone _ jab three months after. that is for anyone over— jab three months after. that is for anyone over the age of 30 and also younger— anyone over the age of 30 and also younger people in more vulnerable clinical— younger people in more vulnerable clinical groups. younger people in more vulnerable clinical groups-— clinical groups. debbie says, will there be an _ clinical groups. debbie says, will there be an alternative _ clinical groups. debbie says, will there be an alternative to - clinical groups. debbie says, will. there be an alternative to needles for a vaccine, i am needle phobic. there has been some work on developing a spray in the nose or mouth vaccine but that is not available, iam mouth vaccine but that is not available, i am afraid it is needles are necessary. available, i am afraid it is needles are necessary-— are necessary. jonathan, roger in hertfordshire. _ are necessary. jonathan, roger in hertfordshire, is _ are necessary. jonathan, roger in hertfordshire, isl— are necessary. jonathan, roger in hertfordshire, is 1 million - are necessary. jonathan, roger in hertfordshire, is1 millionjobs- are necessary. jonathan, roger in j hertfordshire, is1 millionjobs per hertfordshire, is1millionjobs per day really achievable considering there are 111 days left in the year?
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i would not claim to be an expert in vaccine _ i would not claim to be an expert in vaccine roll—out logistics but it seems — vaccine roll—out logistics but it seems incredibly optimistic we can do that _ seems incredibly optimistic we can do that. they will throw everything at this _ do that. they will throw everything at this we — do that. they will throw everything at this. we know how important the booster— at this. we know how important the booster programme is because whilst this virus— booster programme is because whilst this virus does seem to have the ability— this virus does seem to have the ability to— this virus does seem to have the ability to potentially escape from at least — ability to potentially escape from at least some of the immunity we haver _ at least some of the immunity we have, mainly antibodies, we know the additional— have, mainly antibodies, we know the additional boost has a big impact in reinstating — additional boost has a big impact in reinstating and restoring that level of protection. of course, asjeremy pointed _ of protection. of course, asjeremy pointed out, — of protection. of course, asjeremy pointed out, in terms of protection from _ pointed out, in terms of protection from serious disease we think that even _ from serious disease we think that even two _ from serious disease we think that even two doses may give you a level of protection but certainly the trooster— of protection but certainly the booster will give you the added levet _ booster will give you the added levet it — booster will give you the added levet it is _ booster will give you the added level. it is going to have to roll out and — level. it is going to have to roll out and have a great deal of effort. fingers— out and have a great deal of effort. fingers crossed, we can achieve it. jeremy, _
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fingers crossed, we can achieve it. jeremy, ellie and walsall asks, like lots of our reviewers, i am getting problems having a home visit for a booster for my housebound father, how do housebound people received a booster? i how do housebound people received a booster? . . . how do housebound people received a booster? ., ., ., ., ., ., , booster? i am afraid i am not really the best person _ booster? i am afraid i am not really the best person to _ booster? i am afraid i am not really the best person to ask _ booster? i am afraid i am not really the best person to ask because i booster? i am afraid i am not reallyj the best person to ask because that is about delivery and have to be organised by gp district nurses services where the person lives, i cannot give better advice than that, the gp is the point of contract. jonathan, james says i recently had covid on the 29th of november, do i still have to wait? i covid on the 29th of november, do i still have to wait?— still have to wait? i have checked the latest guidance, _ still have to wait? i have checked the latest guidance, it _ still have to wait? i have checked the latest guidance, it still- still have to wait? i have checked the latest guidance, it still does. the latest guidance, it still does have _ the latest guidance, it still does have the — the latest guidance, it still does have the 28 day rule. the main reason — have the 28 day rule. the main reason is, _ have the 28 day rule. the main reason is, when you become infected your immunity, your immune system deals— your immunity, your immune system deals with _ your immunity, your immune system deals with that infection and fights it off _
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deals with that infection and fights it off and — deals with that infection and fights it off. and so unfortunately if you ret it off. and so unfortunately if you get vaccinated as well at the same point, _ get vaccinated as well at the same point, some of the potential benefit of that— point, some of the potential benefit of that vaccine might be lost because _ of that vaccine might be lost because it is essentially, you get rid of— because it is essentially, you get rid of it— because it is essentially, you get rid of it through your normal immune response _ rid of it through your normal immune response was the waiting that period allows— response was the waiting that period allows you _ response was the waiting that period allows you to allow your immunity to settle _ allows you to allow your immunity to settle down again and when you get the additional antigenic exposure, the additional antigenic exposure, the additional antigenic exposure, the additionaljab, that gives your immune _ the additionaljab, that gives your immune system a further kick, you generate _ immune system a further kick, you generate even more memory cells and that is— generate even more memory cells and that is really— generate even more memory cells and that is really what we are reliant upon _ that is really what we are reliant upon on — that is really what we are reliant upon on future to protect us not so much — upon on future to protect us not so much from _ upon on future to protect us not so much from infection but from serious disease _ much from infection but from serious disease it— much from infection but from serious disease. , ., ., , disease. it is not it would be harmful to — disease. it is not it would be harmful to have _ disease. it is not it would be harmful to have it _ disease. it is not it would be harmful to have it sooner. disease. it is not it would be i harmful to have it sooner than 28 days, it is to make sure it is the maximum benefit?— days, it is to make sure it is the maximum benefit? yes, there is alwa s a maximum benefit? yes, there is always a slight — maximum benefit? yes, there is always a slight concern - maximum benefit? yes, there is always a slight concern about i maximum benefit? yes, there is. always a slight concern about what we call _ always a slight concern about what we call antigenic overload, giving too much, — we call antigenic overload, giving too much, your immune system is incredibly— too much, your immune system is incredibly good at dealing with the antigens. — incredibly good at dealing with the antigens, foreign objects, it does it every— antigens, foreign objects, it does it every day. it is more to do with
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ensuring — it every day. it is more to do with ensuring you _ it every day. it is more to do with ensuring you have maximum benefit from the _ ensuring you have maximum benefit from the second jab. for ensuring you have maximum benefit from the second jab.— from the second 'ab. for those who cannot have — from the second jab. for those who cannot have mrna _ from the second jab. for those who cannot have mrna vaccines - from the second jab. for those who cannot have mrna vaccines due i from the second jab. for those who cannot have mrna vaccines due to | cannot have mrna vaccines due to medical conditions, what arrangements are being made for boosters? . , ., .., arrangements are being made for boosters? a ., , , boosters? astrazeneca is still available in — boosters? astrazeneca is still available in a _ boosters? astrazeneca is still available in a booster- boosters? astrazeneca is still available in a booster but i boosters? astrazeneca is still available in a booster but it . boosters? astrazeneca is still available in a booster but it is boosters? astrazeneca is still- available in a booster but it is the logistical difficulty essentially of having astrazeneca available for the very rare people that need that instead of the pfizer or maternal, 99% plus of the boosters will be of those types —— moderna. i expect the gps to work out how someone can get astrazeneca. gps to work out how someone can get astrazeneca-— astrazeneca. lastly, from david, is it aood to astrazeneca. lastly, from david, is it good to have _ astrazeneca. lastly, from david, is it good to have a _ astrazeneca. lastly, from david, is it good to have a different - astrazeneca. lastly, from david, is it good to have a different vaccine l it good to have a different vaccine for your booster? the it good to have a different vaccine for your booster?—
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for your booster? the data where they compared — for your booster? the data where they compared different - for your booster? the data where they compared different types i for your booster? the data where they compared different types of| they compared different types of booster— they compared different types of booster that was recently published was very— booster that was recently published was very clear, the mrna vaccine, moderna, — was very clear, the mrna vaccine, moderna, pfizer in particular, boosted — moderna, pfizer in particular, boosted the immunity very effectively. even if you had two verses — effectively. even if you had two verses of— effectively. even if you had two verses of an mrna vaccine the additional one gave you a boost. anyone — additional one gave you a boost. anyone who does have to have the astrazeneca as their booster, there was a _ astrazeneca as their booster, there was a clear— astrazeneca as their booster, there was a clear effect of having three doses— was a clear effect of having three doses of— was a clear effect of having three doses of astrazeneca but the good thing _ doses of astrazeneca but the good thing of— doses of astrazeneca but the good thing of the study, it also looked at the _ thing of the study, it also looked at the protective t cells, they were elevated _ at the protective t cells, they were elevated throughout. mrna vaccines provided _ elevated throughout. mrna vaccines provided the best boost. thank elevated throughout. mrna vaccines provided the best boost.— provided the best boost. thank you, nrofessors provided the best boost. thank you, professors jeremy —
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provided the best boost. thank you, professors jeremy brown. _ no specifics on the age of the patient who died of the omicron variant. borisjohnson also said omicron represents about 110% of coronavirus cases in london and said tomorrow it will be the majority of the cases in the capital. he says the cases in the capital. he says the risk is plainly there, we can see omicron spiking now in london and other parts of the country. here in the capital it probably represents about 110% of the cases and by tomorrow it will be the majority of the cases and it will be increasingly whole time. we have been trying to get the clip of him speaking, we will bring it to you as
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soon as we can. with the unprecedented surge in demand for dogs during lockdown, a bbc investigation has found networks of breeders are offering to arrange cutting or mutilation of the ears of puppies for purely cosmetic reasons. the cropping of dogs ears is illegal in the uk but a team from "bbc wales investigates" has found that unlicensed breeders were offering to sell fraudulent foreign pet passports, to hide the identity of illegally mutilated dogs. wyre davies reports. good boy, you have been such a good boy. lockdown has been boomtime for the dogs business, especially so—called designer breeds like these american bullies. these are what are known as micro bullies. the whole purpose of the breed is to try and make them as small and stocky as possible. charities are taking on more animals, often confiscated from criminals cashing in on the trade in dogs. these dogs belong
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to one such breeder. christopher liked to show off and advertise his dogs online. he was recentlyjailed for breeding without a license, and illegally importing dogs. he was also convicted of another crime, cutting off their ears. sadly, there is a demand for dogs with years mutilated. with ears mutilated. they cut the floppy bit off. this is what he should look like. it is purely aesthetic, to achieve a look that some people think is attractive. it is illegal to cut dog ears like this in the uk. at the moment, you can import one when they have already been cropped. there are laws in place to protect animals, and we found plenty of backyard breeders who are staying one step ahead of the authorities to make some serious cash. social media is a watch —— awash. we
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went undercover. we went undercover and spoke to one breeder who offered us a puppy for a £13,000. he describes what could be done to her ears. you can have them off. if it ever comes back to us we are going to say it was present when you collected it, nothing to do with us. the breeder denied doing anything illegal. we showed our evidence to an expert. they are breaching the animal welfare act. he is advocating an illegal, painful unnecessary mutilation. it is all for status. no health benefit to the dogs. there is a loophole that allows the importation of these dogs and that is acting as a smoke screen for it happening in the uk. the uk government says planned changes to the law would restrict
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importation of dogs with cropped ears and puppies under six months old. we got hold of a blank foreign pet passport with all the necessary vaccination stamps. this is what allows some breeders to claim they have imported a dog with cropped ears to hide illegal activity here. an activity which can generate huge profits but in which designer dogs are often made to suffer. wyre davies, bbc news. you can watch the full investigation — the hidden world of designer dog breeding — at 7.35pm tonight on bbc one wales and on the iplayer. if you've binge—watched any of the big international tv dramas of the past few years, chances are, the uk will have played a role in bringing the story to the screen. the industry is enjoying a golden age here, with spending on drama production almost double what it was before the pandemic. here's our media correspondent, david sillito.
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this is bad wolf in cardiff. it's where dramas such as his dark materials are filmed. are you from this world? no. - neitheram i. and it's just one of a number of new studio complexes that have been set up over the last few years in south wales. and it's notjust here. all of this is happening at a time when the tv industry in britain as a whole is booming — a fourfold increase in drama production over the last seven or eight years. and also, the cost of these productions is leaping up. bridgerton, a netflix series made in the uk. what happened to your hand? boxing. an absurdity that passes for entertainment amongst men. the company says it's spending around $1 billion on productions in britain. in 2013, the amount spent on high end tv drama in the uk was around £400 million. this year, it's topped four billion. and driving this ten—fold increase are those tv giants netflix, hbo, disney and amazon.
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there are now more jobs in tv drama than steel and coal. i spoke to the boss of bad wolf, jane tranter. she feels the moment that changed everything was the decision to film game of thrones in northern ireland. the amount of drama production in the uk, it's exploded, hasn't it? it has. and i think that the success of game of thrones, and the success of what that show gave to belfast and the region, was probably very influential. she's a fine woman, your sister. this is generating quite a fewjobs? it's generating an enormous number ofjobs. i mean, just in wales, i think in the first five years, so bad wolf has been going for about six years, i think we counted the number ofjobs generated in wales alone in the first five years as something like over 2,200.
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and it's growing and it's growing and it's growing. when bad wolf first started in wales, it was quite empty. you know, there was bad wolf and we're kind of, "we're here, come on, everyonejoin us." and now, you know, you can't get a spot in the car park. and the growth looks set to continue. amazon is moving production of the lord of the rings tv series from new zealand to the uk. britain's studios are reaping the benefits from a multi—billion—dollar battle between streaming giants. david sillito, bbc news, cardiff. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. hello, across northern scotland, the winds continue to moderate down after that wilder and windy night, still a blustery day across scotland and northern ireland. sunshine for many, but showers still around across the north and the west, a bit wintry over the higher ground. probably a bit more rain across northern england ensuring here, but rather wet
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for here and north and west wales through the day, a slow—moving weather front will sit in place. to the south of it, cloudy, patchy rain or drizzle, or the odd brighter break. and if you do get a brighter break in those south—west winds, we could see temperatures 13 or 111, temperatures closer to the mid december average across scotland and northern ireland at seven or eight. now, that weather front across central areas through monday evening gives quite a bit of rain, but then fizzles out as it pushes its way southwards. a cloudy, damp start to tomorrow morning in the southern counties of england, wales, some mist and fog across north and north wales, the midlands and northern parts of england, which could linger and could be a bit of frost around first thing. but through the coming days, outbreaks of rain, gusty winds in the north of scotland, but most places can be dry later in the week for some overnight mist and fog.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... home lateral flow test kits are currently unavailable on the uk government website — a day after the government changed its testing strategy. every adult in england will be offered a covid booster by the end of the month — as the health secretary promises to "throw everything" at beating omicron. the target will mean up to a million jabs a day, but already the website for booking boosters in england has been overwhelmed — and there's concern over the scale of the task for an already stretched nhs. the prime minister says at least one patient has been confirmed to have died with the omicron variant. i'm martine croxall live in north shropshire, where people will head to the polls this thursday to elect an mp. we are hearing about the issues that
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matter on the doorstep and whether this will remain a conservative safe seat. a federal disaster is declared in kentucky — after the largest outbreak of tornadoes in american history leaves at least 90 dead, across six states. a bbc investigation finds networks of breeders are offering to mutilate puppies, to follow a social media trend. and coming up — why the uk's tv production industry is enjoying a golden age. this the this prime minister says at least one person in the uk has died with the omicron variant of coronavirus. people across the country struggle to order home testing kits from the government website. change in guidance means that from tomorrow, fully vaccinated people in england who are close contacts of covid cases will be told
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to take the daily lateral flow tests every day, for a week. but people are being met with error messages when trying to order those tests online. the government says every adult in england will be offered a covid boosterjab by the end of the month, to fight what the prime minister has described as a "tidal wave" of omicron infections. the target means people aged 18 and over in england will be able to get their third jabs from this week, as long as it has been three months since their second dose. those aged 30 and over can already book an appointment online. but the nhs has tweeted to say its booster booking system is "currently facing extremely high demand". nhs providers — which represents hospitals and community services, has warned that some other appointments will have to be postponed as the booster programme is ramped up. here is our political correspondent chris mason.
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the countdown to the new year might look rather like this. queueing for a booster. the prime minister wants to massively accelerate the delivery of vaccine shots, because... i'm afraid we are now facing an emergency in our battle with the new variant omicron. and we must urgently reinforce our wall of vaccine protection to keep our friends and loved ones safe. here's a sense of the scale of what he's hoping to achieve. to offer everyone aged 18 and over a booster by the end of the month means giving 1 million doses a day, every day, until the end of the year. at the moment, around half a million doses are being given a day. to achieve this doubling, will come at a cost. with other non—covid related health care being put off. this will require an extraordinary effort, and as we focus on boosters, and make this new target achievable, it will mean some other appointments will need to be postponed until the new year. but if we don't do this now, the wave of omicron could be so big that cancellations and disruptions like the loss of cancer appointments
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will be even greater next year. and behind this door, his conclusion was simple and stark. so, let's do it. let's get boosted now. get boosted now for yourself, for your friends and your family. get boosted now to protectjobs and livelihoods across this country. get boosted now to protect our nhs, our freedoms and our way of life. get boosted now. national addresses like this from a prime minister are pretty rare and they have two consequences. firstly, they grab attention. but secondly, they remove the opportunity for scrutiny and questions. is the plan realistic? will it mean more restrictions are coming? labour are, for now, at least,
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backing the government. this has got to be a big national effort, all of us have got a part to play. and it's crucial that, you know, despite people's anger and frustration with the prime minister, justifiable anger and frustration with the prime minister, we put that to one side booster roll—out and to make it a success. tomorrow, the prime minister will seek and secure parliamentary approval for the introduction of so—called plan b in england, the already announced step up of measures to try to reduce the spread of the virus. the question now is how soon there might be talk of a plan c. chris mason, bbc news. let us bring you up—to—date with the shortage of covid tests. people are seeing the message online that there are no tests available through the
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online ordering. people say —— boris johnson is saying you can get tests. there have been reports of supply issues with pharmacies, too. boris johnson is saying this morning we have ample supplies. we will keep you updated with that. extra support has been promised to speed up the vaccine drive in scotland, wales and northern ireland. like england, scotland is aiming to offer all adults a booster by the end of the year — while wales has set a target for the end of januray. in northern ireland, people over the age of 30 are currently being offered third doses, with plans to step up the rollout. with me is our health correspondentjim reed. another significant development this morning from the prime minister is the first patient has been confirmed to have died with the omicron variant. �* ., , to have died with the omicron variant. 1, _ ., .,, to have died with the omicron variant. ,, variant. boris johnson was speaking at a vaccination _
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variant. boris johnson was speaking at a vaccination centre _ variant. boris johnson was speaking at a vaccination centre in _ at a vaccination centre in paddington this morning. he said sadly omicron is producing hospitalisations and one person is sadly believed to have died with omicron. he says this might be a milder version of the virus, that is something we need to sit on one side and recognise the sheer pace at which it is accelerating throughout the population. people need to sign up the population. people need to sign up for boosterjabs, he says. we do not know if this person died because they contracted the virus or maybe they contracted the virus or maybe they were sent to hospital with a different condition and tested positive while in hospital. hence the with omicron. we do not know if the with omicron. we do not know if the virus caused, sadly, this person to lose their life or the tested positive and had another condition. what is the latest on supplies of lateral flow tests. we have been reporting issues of people getting them and borisjohnson has been saying we have ample and people will
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get them. the saying we have ample and people will aet them. , ., , , saying we have ample and people will aet them. , .,, , ., ., get them. the problem is relating to the distribution _ get them. the problem is relating to the distribution of— get them. the problem is relating to the distribution of these _ get them. the problem is relating to the distribution of these tests, i the distribution of these tests, getting them out to people, according to the government. government sources say they have got a lot more of these tests in stock and we understand this problem should be resolved, we are told, in a matter of hours. as you have been reporting, if you go on the website it is coming up saying they are unavailable. you can go to a a pharmacy to get one, which is what the prime minister was talking about earlier on. you can try to go and pick one up. as you have said, we have been hearing anecdotal reports of stock running out in pharmacies this morning as well. that of stock running out in pharmacies this morning as well.— of stock running out in pharmacies this morning as well. that is one to watch through _ this morning as well. that is one to watch through the _ this morning as well. that is one to watch through the day. _ this morning as well. that is one to watch through the day. the - this morning as well. that is one to watch through the day. the roll- this morning as well. that is one to watch through the day. the roll outj watch through the day. the roll out of the booster programme. what is the latest on that? also issues of booking online. this the latest on that? also issues of booking online.— the latest on that? also issues of booking online. this morning, the government _ booking online. this morning, the government said _ booking online. this morning, the government said 100,000 - booking online. this morning, the government said 100,000 people j booking online. this morning, the i government said 100,000 people were trying to pick their boosterjab through the appointment system. that
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has caused some problems. some people seem to be going round in a circle when they are offered appointments forjanuary and it is going round in circles. there is a different way to get your booster jabs. in england it varies in different parts of the uk but in england you can book it online or go to a walk in centre. some of the walk in centres should be open to everyone over 18 who is three months past their second dose. we are hearing reports of people turning up to the work in centres and they are just being reserved for appointments because demand is so high. it is a different way of getting yourjab, potentially, in england. fix, different way of getting your 'ab, potentially, in england.�* potentially, in england. a quick final point. _ potentially, in england. a quick final point, currently _ potentially, in england. a quick final point, currently when - potentially, in england. a quick i final point, currently when people have no jab they have to wait for 15 minutes. . . . ~ minutes. that might change? we understand _ minutes. that might change? we understand gps _ minutes. that might change? we understand gps are _ minutes. that might change? we understand gps are going - minutes. that might change? we understand gps are going to - minutes. that might change? we understand gps are going to be l minutes. that might change? we i understand gps are going to be told by the nhs and government they might not need to wait people — might make
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people wait for the 15 minute period. that is important because thatis period. that is important because that is one potential bottleneck in the system. you can only fit so many people in a gps surgery and if you have to have people waiting for 15 minutes, it starts people going in. they could be a tweak to that system later on today and that observation period is removed.— period is removed. thank you very much. paul hunter is a professor of medicine at the university of east anglia. the news that one person has died with the omicron variant in hospital. what is your reaction to that news? it hospital. what is your reaction to that news?— that news? it was going to be inevitable _ that news? it was going to be inevitable at _ that news? it was going to be inevitable at some _ that news? it was going to be inevitable at some point. - that news? it was going to bej inevitable at some point. this that news? it was going to be - inevitable at some point. this isn't yetjust inevitable at some point. this isn't yet just another cause of the common cold. it still causes severe disease. we are hopefully —— hopefully less severe than was with the delta variant. as was pointed
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out, we do not know at all this was because of the omicron variant are because of the omicron variant are because this person died with the omicron variant. that is a big and important distinction. before we know that, it is difficult to attribute this death to omicron at the moment. i5 attribute this death to omicron at the moment-— attribute this death to omicron at the moment. is the roll out of the booster programme _ the moment. is the roll out of the booster programme going - the moment. is the roll out of the booster programme going to - the moment. is the roll out of the booster programme going to be . the moment. is the roll out of the - booster programme going to be enough to basically protect us from further stringent measures in terms of social distancing and whatever. i hope so. it is still not possible to be absolutely certain how things are going to go over the coming weeks. the booster campaign does have within it the potentialfor protecting our health service more than perhaps any other individual measure. but it does depend on how rapidly these cases increase and spread, with or without the booster dose. if we can achieve what the
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prime minister has set out last night, then that will certainly go a long way to protecting the health service. and reducing the probability of the restrictions. i spoke to a professor of vax analogy from south africa earlier and he was talking about the uncoupling of the severity of hospitalisations with the number of cases in south africa and pointing very much to the background of immunityjust being out there now, three infection and vaccination. is that where we are here? i vaccination. is that where we are here? ., vaccination. is that where we are here? ~' ,., vaccination. is that where we are here? ~ , , vaccination. is that where we are here? ~' , , ~ vaccination. is that where we are here? ~ , , . ., ., here? i think so, yes. we have not had as many _ here? i think so, yes. we have not had as many infections _ here? i think so, yes. we have not had as many infections per- here? i think so, yes. we have not had as many infections per head i here? i think so, yes. we have not| had as many infections per head as population but more than our neighbouring countries. we have had a pretty impressive vaccine coverage, even with just the first two doses. now we are one of the leading countries in ruling out to booster vaccines. we have
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substantial immunity here, both from the initial doses, plus the booster and of course natural infection. and there is a reasonably good evidence that if you have had a natural infection and you have had the two dose vaccine, that also provide pretty strong protection against reinfection and against severe disease. i think we are in as good a position as we could hope, given what we know about the spread and the rate of spread of the omicron variant. , , , , the rate of spread of the omicron variant. . , , , ., , i. variant. just briefly, what is your view of vaccination _ variant. just briefly, what is your view of vaccination passports? i variant. just briefly, what is your - view of vaccination passports? there is going to be the vote in the commons and there will be a tory rebellion on it. we spoke to one tory mp who said it will not make much of difference.— much of difference. yes, i think there is substantial _ much of difference. yes, i think there is substantial uncertainty| much of difference. yes, i think - there is substantial uncertainty how impactful vaccine passports will be. evenif impactful vaccine passports will be. even if you have been vaccinated, it does not mean you are not at risk of
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catching the infection and spreading it on, even if you are less of severe disease. there will be —— they will be of some value but whether that is enough to really make a difference is uncertain at the moment. make a difference is uncertain at the moment-— make a difference is uncertain at the moment. ., ~ , ., , . the moment. thank you very much, professor paul— the moment. thank you very much, professor paul hunter. _ the moment. thank you very much, professor paul hunter. you - the moment. thank you very much, professor paul hunter. you are - professor paul hunter. you are watching bbc news. just saying goodbye to viewers on bbc two. i was just checking they had gone. the prime minister has been speaking. it is 12 days now before christmas and people are very worried about what you said last night. worried about what you said last niuht. . , worried about what you said last niiht. .,, , ., worried about what you said last niuht. .,, , ., i. worried about what you said last niuht. , ., . night. last year you cancelled christmas _ night. last year you cancelled christmas on _ night. last year you cancelled christmas on december- night. last year you cancelled christmas on december the i night. last year you cancelled . christmas on december the 19th. night. last year you cancelled - christmas on december the 19th. can you promise people today that that will not happen again before christmas and they will be no further restrictions?- christmas and they will be no further restrictions? what i can definitely tell _ further restrictions? what i can definitely tell you, _ further restrictions? what i can definitely tell you, beth, -
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further restrictions? what i can definitely tell you, beth, is - further restrictions? what i can definitely tell you, beth, is the| definitely tell you, beth, is the best_ definitely tell you, beth, is the best thing we can do to protect ourselves, protect our country and make _ ourselves, protect our country and make sure — ourselves, protect our country and make sure we have as normal as christmas — make sure we have as normal as christmas as possible is to get a booster— christmas as possible is to get a boosterjab now. it is amazing to be here at _ boosterjab now. it is amazing to be here at this — boosterjab now. it is amazing to be here at this centre in london and seeing _ here at this centre in london and seeing a — here at this centre in london and seeing a huge number of people listening — seeing a huge number of people listening to the message and coming forward _ listening to the message and coming forward and the way the nhs is responding isjust inspiring. the gps: _ responding isjust inspiring. the gps, the — responding isjust inspiring. the gps, the volunteers, all of the nurses— gps, the volunteers, all of the nurses and _ gps, the volunteers, all of the nurses and doctors are pulling out all of _ nurses and doctors are pulling out all of the — nurses and doctors are pulling out all of the stops. we will ramp it up over the _ all of the stops. we will ramp it up over the next few days. it is a huge target _ over the next few days. it is a huge target we _ over the next few days. it is a huge target we have set ourselves. this is plainly _ target we have set ourselves. this is plainly that we can see omicron spiking _ is plainly that we can see omicron spiking in — is plainly that we can see omicron spiking in london and other parts of the country — spiking in london and other parts of the country. here in the capital, it represents— the country. here in the capital, it represents 50% of the cases. by tomorrow. — represents 50% of the cases. by tomorrow, it will be the majority of the cases— tomorrow, it will be the majority of the cases and it is increasingly whole — the cases and it is increasingly
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whole time. sadly, yes, omicron is producing _ whole time. sadly, yes, omicron is producing and sadly at least one patient — producing and sadly at least one patient has now been confirmed to have died — patient has now been confirmed to have died with omicron. i think the idea that _ have died with omicron. i think the idea that this is somehow a milder version _ idea that this is somehow a milder version of— idea that this is somehow a milder version of the virus, i think that is something we need to set on one side and _ is something we need to set on one side and recognise the sheer pace at which _ side and recognise the sheer pace at which it— side and recognise the sheer pace at which it accelerates through the population. the best thing we can all do _ population. the best thing we can all do is _ population. the best thing we can all do is get our boosterjabs. we are opening up centres across the country— are opening up centres across the country and — are opening up centres across the country and we are getting in the army— country and we are getting in the army to — country and we are getting in the army to help with the logistics, we are expanding in every possible way. what we _ are expanding in every possible way. what we need now is for the public to respond — what we need now is for the public to respond and to do what is necessary, get your boosterjab now. the question— necessary, get your boosterjab now. the question i asked was can you rule out new restrictions? you cannot rule out new restrictions before christmas? can cannot rule out new restrictions before christmas?— cannot rule out new restrictions before christmas? can i say on that,
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throu~hout before christmas? can i say on that, throughout the _ before christmas? can i say on that, throughout the pandemic, _ before christmas? can i say on that, throughout the pandemic, beth, - before christmas? can i say on that, throughout the pandemic, beth, i. throughout the pandemic, beth, i have been— throughout the pandemic, beth, i have been at great pains to stress to the _ have been at great pains to stress to the public we have to watch where the pandemic is going. we take whatever— the pandemic is going. we take whatever steps are necessary to protect _ whatever steps are necessary to protect public health. you whatever steps are necessary to protect public health.— whatever steps are necessary to protect public health. you have new data coming — protect public health. you have new data coming on _ protect public health. you have new data coming on saturday. _ protect public health. you have new data coming on saturday. we - protect public health. you have new data coming on saturday. we think| data coming on saturday. we think that the steps _ data coming on saturday. we think that the steps that _ data coming on saturday. we think that the steps that we _ data coming on saturday. we think that the steps that we are - data coming on saturday. we think that the steps that we are taking, l that the steps that we are taking, plan b. _ that the steps that we are taking, plan b, combined with a huge hugely ambitious _ plan b, combined with a huge hugely ambitious booster campaign, bringing forward _ ambitious booster campaign, bringing forward by— ambitious booster campaign, bringing forward by one month so we offer the booster— forward by one month so we offer the boosterjab— forward by one month so we offer the booster jab to forward by one month so we offer the boosterjab to every adult by the end of— boosterjab to every adult by the end of the — boosterjab to every adult by the end of the year. we think that is the right— end of the year. we think that is the right approach. i think the most important _ the right approach. i think the most important thing everybody can do is -et important thing everybody can do is get vaccinated now. on important thing everybody can do is get vaccinated now.— important thing everybody can do is get vaccinated now. on saturday, you are auoin get vaccinated now. on saturday, you are going to — get vaccinated now. on saturday, you are going to get _ get vaccinated now. on saturday, you are going to get new _ get vaccinated now. on saturday, you are going to get new data. _ get vaccinated now. on saturday, you are going to get new data. you - are going to get new data. you cannot tell me now aware that you might have to introduce further restrictions? i might have to introduce further restrictions?— restrictions? i can tell you that lookin: restrictions? i can tell you that looking at _ restrictions? i can tell you that looking at the _ restrictions? i can tell you that looking at the balance - restrictions? i can tell you that looking at the balance of - restrictions? i can tell you that looking at the balance of the i restrictions? i can tell you that - looking at the balance of the risks, the epidemiology, where we are with omicron, _ the epidemiology, where we are with omicron, and everything we know, there _ omicron, and everything we know, there are _ omicron, and everything we know, there are still some important things— there are still some important
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things we do not know about omicron, we think— things we do not know about omicron, we think this _ things we do not know about omicron, we think this is the best approach. a combination of plan b, some sensible — a combination of plan b, some sensible steps to slow the spread of the virus. _ sensible steps to slow the spread of the virus, to buy us some time and help to _ the virus, to buy us some time and help to reduce the mortality rate and infections, and combine that with rapidly building up our booster defences _ with rapidly building up our booster defences. the reason we are doing this is— defences. the reason we are doing this is because it became clear on friday— this is because it became clear on friday that — this is because it became clear on friday that two vaccination jabs were _ friday that two vaccination jabs were not— friday that two vaccination jabs were not enough. that was the key moment— were not enough. that was the key moment when we realised we had to accelerate _ moment when we realised we had to accelerate the booster roll out. three _ accelerate the booster roll out. three jabs plus —— to jabs plus a booster— three jabs plus —— to jabs plus a booster dose this year... do three jabs plus -- to jabs plus a booster dose this year... do you re . ret booster dose this year... do you regret not _ booster dose this year... do you regret not doing _ booster dose this year... do you regret not doing enough - booster dose this year... do you regret not doing enough earlier| booster dose this year... do you | regret not doing enough earlier in the year? the online system has
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crashed. , ., , ., , the year? the online system has crashed. , ., , , crashed. the people of this country should be very _ crashed. the people of this country should be very proud _ crashed. the people of this country should be very proud of _ crashed. the people of this country should be very proud of the - crashed. the people of this countryj should be very proud of the vaccine roll out _ should be very proud of the vaccine roll out this — should be very proud of the vaccine roll out. this is the fastest booster— roll out. this is the fastest booster rule out anywhere in europe. i think— booster rule out anywhere in europe. i think it _ booster rule out anywhere in europe. i think it is _ booster rule out anywhere in europe. i think it is almost double most european — i think it is almost double most european countries. we are going incredibly— european countries. we are going incredibly fast. yes, we now want to hit fast _ incredibly fast. yes, we now want to hit fast speed. we have to maintain a pace _ hit fast speed. we have to maintain a pace and — hit fast speed. we have to maintain a pace and a — hit fast speed. we have to maintain a pace and a number of daily booster doses— a pace and a number of daily booster doses that _ a pace and a number of daily booster doses that will exceed anything we have done — doses that will exceed anything we have done before. i have got no doubt _ have done before. i have got no doubt at — have done before. i have got no doubt at all that we have the people and the _ doubt at all that we have the people and the enthusiasm and the fundamental optimism about what we can do _ fundamental optimism about what we can do we _ fundamental optimism about what we can do. we can learn from the experience _ can do. we can learn from the experience of the last 18 months and i know— experience of the last 18 months and i know people are going to rise to this _ i know people are going to rise to this. ., ., ., , .,, i know people are going to rise to this. ., ., ., , ., i know people are going to rise to this. ., ., ., this. you are asking people to take dail tests this. you are asking people to take daily tests from _ this. you are asking people to take daily tests from tomorrow - this. you are asking people to take daily tests from tomorrow if - this. you are asking people to take daily tests from tomorrow if they i daily tests from tomorrow if they come into contact with somebody with covid. , .. ., ., ,
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come into contact with somebody with covid. ., ., , ., ~ covid. they cannot get any. thank ou, covid. they cannot get any. thank you. beth. — covid. they cannot get any. thank you. beth. they — covid. they cannot get any. thank you, beth. they can _ covid. they cannot get any. thank you, beth. they can get _ covid. they cannot get any. thank you, beth. they can get the - covid. they cannot get any. thank you, beth. they can get the test. | you, beth. they can get the test. the site _ you, beth. they can get the test. the site says there are not any left. ~ ., ., ., ., , the site says there are not any left. ., ., ., left. we do have a ready supply of lateral flow _ left. we do have a ready supply of lateral flow test. _ left. we do have a ready supply of lateral flow test. if _ left. we do have a ready supply of lateral flow test. if you _ left. we do have a ready supply of lateral flow test. if you cannot - left. we do have a ready supply of lateral flow test. if you cannot get them _ lateral flow test. if you cannot get them online, there are ample supplies— them online, there are ample supplies in the shops. if i may say so, what — supplies in the shops. if i may say so, what that also shows as people are doing _ so, what that also shows as people are doing the sensible thing and getting — are doing the sensible thing and getting tests as well. just are doing the sensible thing and getting tests as well.— are doing the sensible thing and getting tests as well. just in terms of, i have two more things - getting tests as well. just in terms of, i have two more things to - of, i have two more things to ask you which i believe a very important. in terms of the restrictions, which you see are very important that people adhere to the reels you are putting on tomorrow. up reels you are putting on tomorrow. up to 75 of your own mps say they will not support it. yes. that means you cannot even keep basic public health messaging and votes under your control and you are the prime minister. you have got to rely on the labour party. that is the desperate state of affairs. it is not sustainable, _ desperate state of affairs. it is not sustainable, is _ desperate state of affairs. it is not sustainable, is it? -
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desperate state of affairs. it is not sustainable, is it? i- desperate state of affairs. it is not sustainable, is it? i think everybody needs to recognise a couple — everybody needs to recognise a couple of — everybody needs to recognise a couple of things, omicron is a very serious _ couple of things, omicron is a very serious risk— couple of things, omicron is a very serious risk and it is spreading very— serious risk and it is spreading very fast _ serious risk and it is spreading very fast. there is no room for complacency. but we have the vaccines _ complacency. but we have the vaccines. our position remains better— vaccines. our position remains better than it was last year. i hope that people will also understand that people will also understand that the — that people will also understand that the measures we are putting in place _ that the measures we are putting in place are _ that the measures we are putting in place are balanced and proportionate and it— place are balanced and proportionate and it is— place are balanced and proportionate and it is because of the vaccine rule _ and it is because of the vaccine rule out — and it is because of the vaccine rule out it— and it is because of the vaccine rule out. it is what we have done that we _ rule out. it is what we have done that we have an economy and a society— that we have an economy and a society that is more open than virtually— society that is more open than virtually any other in europe. what we will— virtually any other in europe. what we will also — virtually any other in europe. what we will also do it now is greatly intensify — we will also do it now is greatly intensify and accelerate that vaccine, _ intensify and accelerate that vaccine, that booster rule out. it vaccine, that booster rule out. [i must vaccine, that booster rule out. must be vaccine, that booster rule out. it must be disappointing that you need to labour party votes to get this critical measure pass? i to labour party votes to get this critical measure pass?— to labour party votes to get this critical measure pass? i will make
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m case critical measure pass? i will make my case to _ critical measure pass? i will make my case to my _ critical measure pass? i will make my case to my friends _ critical measure pass? i will make my case to my friends at - critical measure pass? i will make i my case to my friends at everybody. what _ my case to my friends at everybody. what concerns me is public health. what _ what concerns me is public health. what i _ what concerns me is public health. what i think is obvious to everybody who studies the data is that if we can get— who studies the data is that if we can get blistered now, protect ourselves now then we will have a much, _ ourselves now then we will have a much, much — ourselves now then we will have a much, much better chance of having a protected _ much, much better chance of having a protected nhs going into next year -- get _ protected nhs going into next year -- get our— protected nhs going into next year —— get our boosterjabs now. we will not be _ —— get our boosterjabs now. we will not be overwhelmed and have the cancellations of other vital, vital medical— cancellations of other vital, vital medical needs so much next year because — medical needs so much next year because we have got our boosterjabs now. because we have got our boosterjabs now the _ because we have got our boosterjabs now. the other point is we will be protecting — now. the other point is we will be protecting our society and our livelihoods that allow ourselves to keep going in the way we have over the last— keep going in the way we have over the last few months. if keep going in the way we have over the last few months.— the last few months. if final question — the last few months. if final question on _ the last few months. if final question on christmas - the last few months. if final. question on christmas parties. the last few months. if final- question on christmas parties. there have been parties recorded in at number ten last year. now it emerges that you hosted a christmas party quiz with groups of people in
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various rooms in number ten, when such things were banned. have you asked simon case to investigate yourself? i asked simon case to investigate ourself? .., asked simon case to investigate ourself? .. , ., ., yourself? i can tell you that i broke no _ yourself? i can tell you that i broke no rules _ yourself? i can tell you that i broke no rules all— yourself? i can tell you that i broke no rules all of - yourself? i can tell you that i broke no rules all of that - yourself? i can tell you that i broke no rules all of that is i yourself? i can tell you that i - broke no rules all of that is being looked _ broke no rules all of that is being looked into. when you look dotted to all of that— looked into. when you look dotted to all of that will be properly looked into and — all of that will be properly looked into and you'll hearing about that. frankly. _ into and you'll hearing about that. frankly, when i am looking at what i am trying _ frankly, when i am looking at what i am trying to— frankly, when i am looking at what i am trying to do it now, the crucial thing _ am trying to do it now, the crucial thing is _ am trying to do it now, the crucial thing is that— am trying to do it now, the crucial thing is that people understand the challenge that is posed by omicron, but also _ challenge that is posed by omicron, but also understand this is a challenge that collectively we can meet _ challenge that collectively we can meet. we have the resources and the vaccines— meet. we have the resources and the vaccines and — meet. we have the resources and the vaccines and the vaccinate is. we are recruiting more and getting more people _ are recruiting more and getting more people to _ are recruiting more and getting more people to volunteer. we will be opening — people to volunteer. we will be opening up more and i hope the snowballing a big campaign. also, it
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a- ears snowballing a big campaign. also, it appears the — snowballing a big campaign. also, it appears the public — snowballing a big campaign. also, it appears the public here _ snowballing a big campaign. also, it appears the public here that - snowballing a big campaign. also, it appears the public here that you - appears the public here that you seemed to have participated in a social event at number ten when everybody else was told not to. i hear you. you will have seen staff members on zoom in groups. i am certain the — members on zoom in groups. i am certain the whole _ members on zoom in groups. i am certain the whole thing _ members on zoom in groups. i am certain the whole thing will be looked — certain the whole thing will be looked into by the cabinet secretary. what i am focused on is the vaccine — secretary. what i am focused on is the vaccine rule out — might roll out in _ the vaccine rule out — might roll out in the — the vaccine rule out — might roll out in the campaign to get everybody to understand how important it is to -et to understand how important it is to get vaccinated right now. you to understand how important it is to get vaccinated right now.— get vaccinated right now. you have asked simon _ get vaccinated right now. you have asked simon case _ get vaccinated right now. you have asked simon case to _ get vaccinated right now. you have asked simon case to look - get vaccinated right now. you have asked simon case to look at - get vaccinated right now. you have asked simon case to look at the i asked simon case to look at the december the 15th event? i5 asked simon case to look at the december the 15th event? is that the thin with december the 15th event? is that the thing with the — december the 15th event? is that the thing with the zoom _ december the 15th event? is that the thing with the zoom call? _ december the 15th event? is that the thing with the zoom call? yes. - thing with the zoom call? yes. frankly. — thing with the zoom call? yes. frankly, we will report back on all of that _ frankly, we will report back on all of that bo— frankly, we will report back on all of that. �* , ., , ~'
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of that. by the end of this week, i think. as soon _ of that. by the end of this week, i think. as soon as _ of that. by the end of this week, i think. as soon as we _ of that. by the end of this week, i think. as soon as we reasonably l of that. by the end of this week, i i think. as soon as we reasonably can. the key thing — think. as soon as we reasonably can. the key thing as _ think. as soon as we reasonably can. the key thing as that _ think. as soon as we reasonably can. the key thing as that we _ think. as soon as we reasonably can. the key thing as that we have - think. as soon as we reasonably can. the key thing as that we have a - the key thing as that we have a national— the key thing as that we have a national campaign, a national mission, _ national campaign, a national mission, and we need to get it done. we need _ mission, and we need to get it done. we need for— mission, and we need to get it done. we need for everybody to understand the importance of getting vaccinated now. the importance of getting vaccinated now it _ the importance of getting vaccinated now it is _ the importance of getting vaccinated now. it is humbling to see the numbers— now. it is humbling to see the numbers of people coming forward and the spirit _ numbers of people coming forward and the spirit in _ numbers of people coming forward and the spirit in which the people vaccinating people are responding. the prime — vaccinating people are responding. the prime ministers speaking this morning. we are going to be putting all of your questions on the omicron variant to some experts later this afternoon. you can get in touch on twitter. or you can e—mail your questions. it will be at 2:30pm this afternoon. voters in north shropshire go to the polls in a by—election on thursday. that's the constituency previously held by owen paterson.
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martine croxall is there for us in oswestry. thank you. welcome to one of the five market towns in this very rural constituency. as joanna five market towns in this very rural constituency. asjoanna said, it was a safe conservative seat, held by owen paterson, until he resigned after being found to be in breach of lobbying rules. there are seven candidates here. i'm joined now by elizabeth glinka, political editor, bbc midlands, and barryjones, a local farmer. welcome to both of you. elizabeth, how is the complexion of the campaign changed in the last few days with the examination of the christmas gatherings in downing street? i christmas gatherings in downing street? ., christmas gatherings in downing street? ~ ., , christmas gatherings in downing street? ~ . , ., , street? i think it has. it has intensified _ street? i think it has. it has intensified over _ street? i think it has. it has intensified over the - street? i think it has. it has intensified over the last - street? i think it has. it has i intensified over the last week. street? i think it has. it has - intensified over the last week. it was already an interesting campaign, given how it kicked off, this is a result of owen paterson having being
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forced to resign. he was quite a popular mp and people were quite upset when he had to resign. at that point, you felt the liberal democrats locally decided they were going to give this a big push. they felt we could get in there and appeal to a certain sense that you are getting in some of the shire counties now that these true blue tory areas have been left behind, they are not included in the government was much biggerfocus on levelling up. this area did not get any levelling up money. certainly, over the last week or so with some of the revelations of christmas parties, that has really started to intensify. the lib dems have had over 500 activists in this constituency over the weekend. they reckon they have knocked on $23,000 and there is a feeling now when you talk to some of the conservative activists that this is ever closer than they were expecting. it could come down to turnout and postal
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votes. with that, we do not know which way people went. a lot of those votes were made before a lot of the revelations came to light. it is not beyond the realms of possibility that that 23,000 majority could be overturned? it is ma'ority could be overturned? it is a majority could be overturned? it is a by-election- _ majority could be overturned? it 3 a by—election. that is conceivable. conventional wisdom would suggest it is more likely we see the conservatives hold onto it. it is looking increasingly likely it is going to be very, very close. and, you know, on the right day, right conditions, we could see a really shocking result here.— shocking result here. barry, listenin: shocking result here. barry, listening to _ shocking result here. barry, listening to elizabeth, - shocking result here. barry, j listening to elizabeth, which shocking result here. barry, - listening to elizabeth, which are theissues listening to elizabeth, which are the issues that matter to you, the national picture or local problems that are quite long—standing here? with my farming hat on, it is a local— with my farming hat on, it is a local issue. _ with my farming hat on, it is a local issue, five market towns in north _ local issue, five market towns in north shropshire all surrounded by a very productive agriculture and in this post —
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very productive agriculture and in this post brexit world we're living in, this post brexit world we're living in. with— this post brexit world we're living in, with things being so much up in the air, _ in, with things being so much up in the air, we— in, with things being so much up in the air, we just don't know how it is all— the air, we just don't know how it is all going — the air, we just don't know how it is all going to land. so we need an mp in— is all going to land. so we need an mp in this — is all going to land. so we need an mp in this area who is going to go and fight — mp in this area who is going to go and fight very hard for rural issues _ and fight very hard for rural issues. ~ . ., , , , and fight very hard for rural issues. ~ . . , , , ., ., issues. which rural issues and how im ortant issues. which rural issues and how important is _ issues. which rural issues and how important is it _ issues. which rural issues and how important is it that _ issues. which rural issues and how important is it that that _ issues. which rural issues and how important is it that that person - issues. which rural issues and how important is it that that person is i important is it that that person is a local person? idol important is it that that person is a local person?— important is it that that person is a local person? not 100% that it has not to a local person? not 10096 that it has not to be a a local person? not 10096 that it has got to be a local— a local person? not 10096 that it has got to be a local person. _ a local person? not 10096 that it has got to be a local person. it - a local person? not 10096 that it has got to be a local person. it has - a local person? not 10096 that it has got to be a local person. it has got i got to be a local person. it has got to be _ got to be a local person. it has got to be somebody who has a grasp of agriculture — to be somebody who has a grasp of agriculture and rural affairs. and we'll— agriculture and rural affairs. and we'll take — agriculture and rural affairs. and we'll take our arguments down to london _ we'll take our arguments down to london and enforce on our trade negotiators, who are doing trade deals— negotiators, who are doing trade deals throughout the world, how important it is that we get very fair deals— important it is that we get very fair deals for our british farmers that will— fair deals for our british farmers that will impact on north shropshire greatly _ that will impact on north shropshire ureatl . ., . . that will impact on north shropshire ireatl . ., . ., ., that will impact on north shropshire areatl. ., . ., ., greatly. how clear are you, i will not ask you _ greatly. how clear are you, i will not ask you who, _ greatly. how clear are you, i will not ask you who, as _ greatly. how clear are you, i will not ask you who, as to _ greatly. how clear are you, i will
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not ask you who, as to where . greatly. how clear are you, i will. not ask you who, as to where your vote will go this thursday? i not ask you who, as to where your vote will go this thursday?- vote will go this thursday? i think i have decided, _ vote will go this thursday? i think i have decided, yes. _ vote will go this thursday? i think i have decided, yes. and - vote will go this thursday? i think i have decided, yes. and it - vote will go this thursday? i think i have decided, yes. and it is - vote will go this thursday? i think i i have decided, yes. and it is based on? it _ i have decided, yes. and it is based on? it is _ i have decided, yes. and it is based on? it is based on who i think is going _ on? it is based on who i think is going to — on? it is based on who i think is going to do _ on? it is based on who i think is going to do the best for the rural constituency and particularly farmers _ constituency and particularly farmers. a change in brewing, do you think? _ farmers. a change in brewing, do you think? lets— farmers. a change in brewing, do you think? let's wait and see. let�*s think? let's wait and see. let's wait and see. _ think? let's wait and see. let's wait and see. you _ think? let's wait and see. let's wait and see. you don't - think? let's wait and see. let's wait and see. you don't want i think? let's wait and see. let's| wait and see. you don't want to think? let's wait and see. let�*s wait and see. you don't want to look at your crystal ball right now. thank you both forjoining us. we are here all day. i think the drizzle is starting to ease a little bit. we want to be too frizzy, hopefully. we will be talking to more voters and candidates. i hope the rain holds off for you. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. when across parts of northern scotland, continuing to tie some drizzle around, some more persistent rain affecting northern england and
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north wales. some showers and cooler air, fading away. light and patchy overnight, clearerskies, air, fading away. light and patchy overnight, clearer skies, fog forming. rain into the north west of scotland with wind picking up as well. for many cooler than last night, damp and drizzly weather across more southern parts of england. tomorrow, lots of cloud, the fog we have northern england, north wales, north midlands slow to left, cloudy weather. milder day for scotland and northern ireland. with the fog slow to lift especially in northern england it could be on the cool side.
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home lateral flow test kits are currently unavailable on the uk government website — a day after the government changed its testing strategy. every adult in england will be offered a covid booster by the end of the month— as the health secretary promises to "throw everything" at beating omicron. the target will mean up to a million jabs a day, but already the website for booking boosters in england has been overwhelmed — and there's concern over the scale of the task for an already stretched nhs. the prime minister says at least one patient has been confirmed to have died with the omicron variant. a federal disaster is declared in kentucky — after the largest outbreak of tornadoes in american history leaves at least 90 dead, across six states. a bbc investigation finds networks of breeders are offering to mutilate puppies, to follow a social media trend. and coming up — why the uk's tv production industry is enjoying a golden age.
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hello, i'm joanna gosling. figures from south africa, where the omicron coronavirus variant was first identified, suggest it causes a far lower rate of serious illness and death than previous waves of the pandemic. shabir madhi, a professor of vaccinology at the university of witwatersrand injohannesburg, spoke to me earlier. he's predicted that the number of people who end up in hospital would be nowhere near that of earlier stages of the outbreak. what we are experiencing is a lower hospitalisation rate and death rate, by one tenth of what it was before, at a time of the number of cases transpiring in the community. it is not necessarily that the virus is less transmissible, but how it is involved in the community.
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it is based on a survey in south africa that was concluded about one week ago. so it is much more transmissible than anything we have experienced in the past. the rate of infections is much higher, and we are also observing is a rise of infections in people who have not been vaccinated, as well as people who have been previously infected. it is consistent with what has been shown over the last few days, but at the same time what we are seeing is an uncoupling of the cases in the community and in hospitals. what we are experiencing is a lower hospitalisation rate and death rate, by one tenth of what it was before, at a time of the number of cases transpiring in the community. uncoupling is not necessarily that the virus is less transmissible, but how it is involved in the community, the immunity. it is based on a survey in south africa that was concluded about one week ago. individuals who have not been vaccinated, 73% of them were testing positive for antibody, indicating they have immunity, possibly t cell, which usually prevents the progression to severe disease. among those who have been vaccinated, 97% of them
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we are testing antibodies. so you are saying then the picture has changed. is it difficult then to unpick whether this variant is less strong, causes milder symptoms, or if it is because of the changed background when people have the increased immunity? absolutely. the absence of showing such high rates of hospitalisation and death, it is because of what i would term at the interference of the population immunity which is... i do believe it will transpire the same in other countries that have high levels of immunity, whether through vaccination
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or through past infection. there have been some reports that the cases may have peaked in south africa. what is the latest on the current trajectory? yes, certainly not across the whole country. in the epicentre, the cases have peaked and are plateauing over the last few days. it is an upward trend. we will see an increase in the number of cases as the omicron creates more infection and other provinces and that will probably be be between the next three to four weeks. we probably will come on a downward trajectory in a period of the next one to two weeks in the epicentre. in this country, the government and the nhs are looking at we are potentially cases go, some projections saying they could be1 million cases by christmas. when you talk in south africa of that uncoupling between the spread of the virus and the severe illness and hospitalisation, you said it is one tenth of what it was before, can you put some figures
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on that, what that looks like when you are looking at a spread in the population? sure. delta variant is an example during the course of the third wave we were experiencing thousands of cases in south africa, 250 and 300 people dying of covid then. currently we are reporting 20,000 cases of the omicron variant, we are reporting 25 and 50 people dying at this time. there might be some lag when it comes to death and things may change slightly over the next one to two weeks. i would be highly surprised if it comes anywhere close to what we have experienced in the past. it is important to recognise south africa has about 13 times less testing capacity than the uk. when we test these cases a day, it is an excess of 100,000 per day,
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given the low rate of testing. relative to what is done in the uk. the uk certainly will reach 1 million cases of omicron by december, because of the amount of testing you do, that does not necessarily translate into additional hospitalisations and deaths, compared with what occurred with the delta variant. thank you very much forjoining us. shabir madhi. the south african president cyril ramaphosa has tested positive for covid 19. mr ramaphosa, who's fully vaccinated, started feeling unwell after leaving a memorial service on sunday. he is said to be receiving treatment for mild coronavirus symptoms and would stay in isolation for the time being. mr ramaphosa said his infection served as a warning to all south africans of the importance of getting vaccinated and being vigilant against the virus. police investigating the case of missing nursing assistant petra srncova initial
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inquiries "suggest the circumstances are not suspicious". a body found formally identified, but is believed to be that of the 32—year—old. she had been missing since late last month. her family in the czech republic has been informed. a desperate search for survivors is under way in six us states devastated by powerful tornadoes. in kentucky, there were suggestions that the death toll could pass 100 — although it's now hoped that figure could be lower . laura podesta from cbs news is in mayfield, kentukey to see the devation the storm has left i am in downtown mayfield, kentucky, once a thriving business district. it is decimated behind me here. this is a rubble and debris that search and rescue crews are going through to find survivors. there is a nearby candle making factory where there are still eight people missing. eight people have been confirmed dead who were working in the factory but they are still hoping that some of them will come out of there alive. i want to walk you through what we are seeing on the ground.
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it is just amazing the amount of devastation. the amount of devastation is amazing. this is the sides of an office building. this is someone's jacket with frost on it. it is incredibly cold here, near freezing temperatures. this is the sort of stuff that when a tornado comes through is thrown into the air and is picked up and you find it miles later. miles away, excuse me. if you could pan over here, our photographer gary will show us the fire station that was hit by the twister. this tornado tore through 200 miles of kentucky land. there were several other tornadoes that tore through parts of the midwest and we are looking at a climbing death toll. it was initially thought that 100 people had died in kentucky alone. now we are learning it could be a smaller number and that is because so many people
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weren't able to reach their loved ones and authorities to tell them they were safe because of the lack of power and cell service following the storm. laura podesta. with the unprecedented surge in demand for dogs during lockdown, a bbc investigation has found networks of breeders are offering to arrange cutting or mutilation of the ears of puppies for purely cosmetic reasons. of the ears of puppies the cropping of dogs' ears is illegal in the uk but a team from "bbc wales investigates" has found that unlicensed breeders were offering to sell fraudulent foreign pet passports, to hide the identity of illegally mutilated dogs. wyre davies reports. good boy, you have been such a good boy. lockdown has been boomtime for the dogs business, especially so—called designer breeds like these american bullies. these are what are known as micro bullies. the whole purpose of the breed is to try and make them as small and stocky as possible.
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animal charities are taking in more animals, often confiscated from criminals cashing in on the trade in dogs. these dogs belong to one such breeder. christopher liked to show off and advertise his dogs online. he was recentlyjailed for breeding without a license, and illegally importing dogs. he was also convicted of another crime, cutting off their ears. sadly, there is a demand for dogs with ears mutilated. they cut the floppy bit off. this is what he should look like. it is purely aesthetic, to achieve a look that some people think is attractive. it is illegal to cut a dog's ears like this in the uk. at the moment, you can import one when they have already been cropped. there are laws in place to protect animals, but we found plenty
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of backyard breeders who are staying one step ahead of the authorities to make some serious cash. social media is awash with breeders, many legitimate. we went undercover and spoke to one breeder who offered us a puppy for a £13,000. he describes what could be done to her ears. you can have them off. if it ever comes back to us we are going to say it was present when you collected it, nothing to do with us. the breeder denied doing anything illegal. we showed our evidence to an expert. abhorrent. they are breaching the animal welfare act. he is advocating an illegal, painful unnecessary mutilation. it is all for status.
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no health benefit to the dogs. there is a loophole that allows the importation of these dogs and that is acting as a smoke screen for it happening in the uk. the uk government says planned changes to the law would restrict importation of dogs with cropped ears and puppies under six months old. we got hold of a blank foreign pet passport with all the necessary vaccination stamps. this is what allows some breeders to claim they have imported a dog with cropped ears to hide illegal activity here. an activity which can generate huge profits but in which designer dogs are often made to suffer. wyre davies, bbc news. joining me now is the head of policy and public affairs at battersea dogs home, mike webb. before we talk about the legality of this whole issue, what is it that is making dogs with cropped ears so
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popular that people are willing to pay £13,000 for them as we were hearing in our report? this pay £13,000 for them as we were hearing in our report?— hearing in our report? this is entirely fashion _ hearing in our report? this is entirely fashion driven. - hearing in our report? this is i entirely fashion driven. people hearing in our report? this is - entirely fashion driven. people have an idea in the mind of what they want their dog to look like and other like anything else some people by a dog and perceive it as an accessory orfashion by a dog and perceive it as an accessory or fashion item, by a dog and perceive it as an accessory orfashion item, that by a dog and perceive it as an accessory or fashion item, that can be amended in order to suit how they wanted to look rather than a living, breathing creature that feels pain every time you do something like this to it. that is why we find it abhorrent and why we are pleased the uk government is making steps to ban the import of these dogs who have suffered as well.— suffered as well. where are things on that? we _ suffered as well. where are things on that? we heard _ suffered as well. where are things on that? we heard there - suffered as well. where are things on that? we heard there is - suffered as well. where are things on that? we heard there is a - on that? we heard there is a loophole where they can be imported and it can be quite easily covered
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up. it and it can be quite easily covered u . _ , ., , and it can be quite easily covered up. it is as your report very successfully _ up. it is as your report very successfully uncovered, - up. it is as your report very - successfully uncovered, people advising owners, passing this off as advising owners, passing this off as a dog where this was done abroad and they will do it in the uk. that is making its way through the house of commons at present. i look forward to seeing it passed next year, however the change in law will not be enough if it is not enforced properly, more checks of animals coming in at the border then people will still bring illegally cropped puppies. will still bring illegally cropped -u- ies. ., will still bring illegally cropped muies_ ., ., , will still bring illegally cropped ---uies. ., ., will still bring illegally cropped muies. ., ., i. will still bring illegally cropped nuuies, ., ., i. , will still bring illegally cropped ---uies. ., . , ., puppies. how many are you seeing at battersea puppies. how many are you seeing at ltattersea dogs _ puppies. how many are you seeing at battersea dogs home. _ puppies. how many are you seeing at battersea dogs home. the _ puppies. how many are you seeing at battersea dogs home. the numbers. puppies. how many are you seeing at i battersea dogs home. the numbers are relatively small — battersea dogs home. the numbers are relatively small at _ battersea dogs home. the numbers are relatively small at the _ battersea dogs home. the numbers are relatively small at the moment. - battersea dogs home. the numbers are relatively small at the moment. we - relatively small at the moment. we only saw one in 2016. however, 2020, despite everything else going on, we saw 12, which obviously is a
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twelvefold increase in just four years. we are seeing more coming in all the time. at the moment, we are at the early stages of this. it is if you like a fashion trend among dog ownership. we want to try and get this message out before it gets so much worse, because it will left unchecked and people continue to do this. you only have to look at the amount of money the chap featured in your report was making to say there are breeders out there who will do do anything as long as they can sell it afterwards and we want to stop that. ., ., ., that. the figure quoted for that .u . . l that. the figure quoted for that puppy, £13,000. _ that. the figure quoted for that puppy, £13,000. when - that. the figure quoted for that puppy, £13,000. when the - that. the figure quoted for that. puppy, £13,000. when the dogs that. the figure quoted for that - puppy, £13,000. when the dogs are ending up at battersea dogs home. is it people who have paid that sort of money who then decide they cannot keep the dog?— money who then decide they cannot keethedou? . .,, ., keep the dog? people give animals to rescue centres _
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keep the dog? people give animals to rescue centres for _ keep the dog? people give animals to rescue centres for all _ keep the dog? people give animals to rescue centres for all sorts _ keep the dog? people give animals to rescue centres for all sorts of - rescue centres for all sorts of reasons. we encourage people that there are times where it is the responsible and right thing to do for the welfare of their animal. in the case of animals that have been cropped, often they will have behavioural difficulties. the dog does not have the means to communicate. and pain in areas of the dog exposed which should not be, normally hidden by the bit of the gear that has been removed. the dog will get defensive, for instance. sometimes pupils will feel unable to cope and give the dog up. does sometimes pupils will feel unable to cope and give the dog up.— cope and give the dog up. does it make them _ cope and give the dog up. does it make them difficult _ cope and give the dog up. does it make them difficult to _ cope and give the dog up. does it make them difficult to rehome i make them difficult to rehome safely? i make them difficult to rehome safel ? ., �* ~' �* , make them difficult to rehome safel ? ., �* ~ �*, ., , safely? i don't think there's any reason to _ safely? i don't think there's any reason to think _ safely? i don't think there's any reason to think that _ safely? i don't think there's any reason to think that we - safely? i don't think there's any | reason to think that we wouldn't safely? i don't think there's any - reason to think that we wouldn't be able to rehome a dog, it would
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depend on the individual dog. we have a skilled behavioural team and colleagues in other rescue organisations and we do everything we possibly can to give the dog the second chance it deserves.- second chance it deserves. thank ou, second chance it deserves. thank you. mike — second chance it deserves. thank you, mike webb, _ second chance it deserves. thank you, mike webb, from _ second chance it deserves. thank you, mike webb, from battersea| second chance it deserves. thank you, mike webb, from battersea dogs. breaking news, but first... you can watch the full investigation — the hidden world of designer dog breeding — at 7.35pm tonight on bbc one wales and on iplayer. the champions league, the last 16 draw will be conducted again after the software had a technical error. following a technical problem with an external service provider which instructs the systems which teams are eligible to play each other,
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there was a error on the run of 16, it will be declared void and entirely redone at 3pm. you may have thought that the hottest place in the solar system is the sun. well not anymore — as it's actually on an industrial estate in the south of england. or at least it is every time a nuclearfusion reactor there is fired up. fusion reactions power the sun and scientists have been trying for decades to recreate them here on earth to try to generate low carbon electricity. our climate editor justin rowlatt reports. in this non—descript warehouse building they have constructed a state—of—the—art reactor, designed to recreate the fusion forces that power the sun itself. nuclear fusion is the holy grail of low carbon energy because it has the potential to generate so much power. industrial scale fusion would crack the energy challenge. we could solve climate change and transform the world economy. but harnessing the sun's power here on earth is not easy. it involves fusing atoms
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of hydrogen to fuse together, creating helium along with huge amounts of energy. it means heating hydrogen to incredible temperatures while using superpowerful magnets to hold the reaction in place. the technology is improving and investment money is pouring into private fusion projects like this all around the world. so when i press this button, we arm and fire the reaction. ok, here we go. arm and fire. 56—40 arming. the machine will pulse 140,000 amps of electricity into the gas. firing in three, two, one... it takes the temperature of the hydrogen to 50 million degrees centigrade, three times
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as hot as the heart of the sun. it's not a question of if, it is a question of when. we will crack it. the answer is out there right now with mother nature as we speak. what we have to do is find that key and unlock the safe to that solution. it will be found. he expects the first commercial reactors to be operational by early 2030 and says we could be making tea using electricity generated from fusion reactions here in the uk by the end of that decade. that would be a huge development for humanity, creating our own galaxy of tiny suns here on earth holds out the prospect of a virtually unlimited supply of clean, secure and very cheap energy. so here's hoping that the team in its didcot industrial estate helps solve this incredible challenge. justin rowlatt, bbc
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news, oxfordshire. if you've binge—watched any of the big international tv dramas of the past few years, chances are, the uk will have played a role in bringing the story to the screen. the industry is enjoying a golden age here, with spending on drama production almost double what it was before the pandemic. here's our media correspondent, david sillito. this is bad wolf in cardiff. it's where dramas such as his dark materials are filmed. are you from this world? no. - neitheram i. and it's just one of a number of new studio complexes that have been set up over the last few years in south wales. and it's notjust here. all of this is happening at a time when the tv industry in britain as a whole is booming — a fourfold increase in drama production over the last seven or eight years. and also, the cost of these productions is leaping up. bridgerton, a netflix series made in the uk.
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what happened to your hand? boxing. an absurdity that passes for entertainment amongst men. the company says it's spending around $1 billion on productions in britain. and it's not alone. in 2013, the amount spent on high end tv drama in the uk was around £400 million. this year, it's topped four billion. and driving this ten—fold increase are those tv giants netflix, hbo, disney and amazon. there are now more jobs in tv drama than steel and coal. i spoke to the boss of bad wolf, jane tranter. she feels the moment that changed everything was the decision to film game of thrones in northern ireland. the amount of drama production in the uk, it's exploded, hasn't it? it has. and i think that the success of game of thrones, and the success of what that show gave to belfast and the region, was probably very influential. she's a fine woman, your sister.
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this is generating quite a fewjobs? it's generating an enormous number ofjobs. i mean, just in wales, i think in the first five years, so bad wolf has been going for about six years, i think we counted the number ofjobs generated in wales alone in the first five years as something like over 2,200. and it's growing and it's growing and it's growing. when bad wolf first started in wales, it was quite empty. you know, there was bad wolf and we're kind of, "we're here, come on, everyonejoin us." and now, you know, you can't get a spot in the car park. and the growth looks set to continue. amazon is moving production of the lord of the rings tv series from new zealand to the uk. britain's studios are reaping the benefits from a multi—billion—dollar battle between streaming giants. david sillito, bbc news, cardiff. now it's time for a look
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at the weather with darren bett. time magazine has named its person of the year for 2021, elon musk, second wealthiest person in the world, of tesla and spacex. the title has been awarded since 1927. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello there. the very windy weather that we had earlier this morning in the north—west of scotland has moved away. for many northern parts of the uk, we are seeing cooler aircoming in today. by contrast, we have still got this mild air from the tropics covering much of england and wales. in between those two different air masses, we have this zone of this thicker cloud. that has been producing outbreaks of rain. that rain still nudging into the far south of scotland. mainly affecting northern england and south wales.
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south we have cloud. a bit damp in places but it is mild. north of that belt of rain, we are into that cooler air and showers this evening. the showers will fade away. this band of rain moves southwards over night. the rain becomes a light and patchy. we see clearer skies following for a while, some more rain coming back into the north—west of scotland. for many parts of the uk, cooler than it was last night. we still have some mild air, with a cloudy damp weather across parts of southern england and wales. change coming into northern areas, though, on tuesday. this weather system draped across northern parts of scotland. it will bring milder atlantic air and stronger winds to scotland and northern ireland. a lot of cloud, that rain mainly for the highlands and islands and western parts of mainland scotland. some sunshine around aberdeenshire. not much sunshine around for england, northern ireland and wales. mist and fog, especially in northern england, will be quite slow to clear. many places will have a dry day and still mild in the south. milder across scotland and northern ireland. where we see that fog, especially northern england, north midlands, north wales,
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it will be quite a bit cooler. as we move our way into wednesday, that weather front still sitting across northern parts of the uk. more of a breeze though into wednesday. not as much mist and fog around. a lot of cloud for many parts of the country. this weather front not producing much rain. that should probably move away from northern ireland and move up to the central belt of scotland. we are all essentially in milder air on wednesday. those temperatures widely in double figures. that band is getting nudged away. it is getting nudged away by an area of high pressure. that is going to build in by the latter part of the week and really settle things down. not really any rain to speak of longer term, but a lot of cloud under the high pressure, but some mist and fog, particularly over the higher ground. there is a trend as we head into the weekend for temperatures to drop away by a few degrees.
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the first death in the uk from the omicron variant is announced — and the government says it's spreading at phenomenal speed. england and scotland offer all adults a covid boosterjab by the end of the month — ramping up the scale of vaccinations to combat omicron. the idea that this is somehow a milder version of the virus, i think that's something we need to set on one side, and just recognise the sheer pace at which it accelerates through the population. from today, people in england are being asked to work from home if they can — but businesses are worried it will hit the crucial christmas market. we'll be live with our medical editor with the latest data on the spread of the omicron variant. also this lunchtime... rescue teams search for survivors
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after the string of tornadoes

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