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tv   Sportsday  BBC News  December 14, 2021 6:30pm-7:01pm GMT

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good evening. we've seen all the stuff happening right now but at least one thing we won't have to worry an awful lot about over the coming days as the weather. it's going to be settled, certainly no storms on the horizon and in the run—up to christmas this high—pressure will establish itself across the uk with a jet stream wrapping around in the shape of the greek letter 0 mega if you can see that coming in from here around the high pressure and back down in the mediterranean and when we see the patterns, the ohmic shape is assigned to meteorologist at the high pressure is here to stay and we've not reached the top yet with a high pressure as we have little pieces of rain to deal with and south—western scotland in northern ireland but generally speaking the weather tomorrow will be dry with variable amounts of cloud and basically the cloudier skies, the further west you are with the
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onshore winds of the atlantic and here is the high pressure at which is building across the uk, pushing away all of the wind and weather fronts to the north and once the high pressure sits on top of the uk, it will not budge for a considerable amount of time so we will be looking at wind directions and when the wind comes from off the atlantic that is where we will have the claudia skies so the best chance of sunshine will be in aberdeen, edinburgh and norwich but it will always be cloudy and night we are likely to have fog and night we are likely to have fog and also what tends to happen with the blocking high—pressure is temperatures tend to call off but on the whole it looks fine and it could be worse. that is it from us. time tojoin that is it from us. time to join the news team is where you are.
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you are watching bbc news with me, shawn lay. mps have begun voting on the government's new covered restrictions tonight. the government is expected to win a showdown with its own backbenchers, but predictions of more than 70 of them could rebel. labour up backing the plan, so even though that number would effectively wipe out the prime minister's opposition, the prime minister's opposition, the prime minister's majority, if all other parties voted against him he could be comfortable that his measures will go there. he described them as balanced and preparation in the light of the new omicron variant and
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the impact it has already made. there will be four separate votes in the course of the next half hour or so. let's speak now to our political correspondent. before we do, let's speak about the two most controversial proposals. the covid pass for entering large venues to prove whether or not someone�*s been fully vaccinated or has every cent lateral flow test and the plans for compulsory vaccination for front line staff in england. there are also votes on the new rules on facemasks in england which came in last week making them compulsory in most indoor settings and daily lateral flow tests that were required for seven days and of isolating for fully vaccinated people when they come in contact with someone who has covid. that last one is pretty much uncontroversial. 0ur political correspondent is there in the house of commons. nick, it's that kind of strange period where no one really knows what's going on. you are the nearest to knowing what's going on. give us the latest. mi? nearest to knowing what's going on. give us the latest.— give us the latest. mp started
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votin: give us the latest. mp started voting on _ give us the latest. mp started voting on the _ give us the latest. mp started voting on the the _ give us the latest. mp started voting on the the imposition l give us the latest. mp started| voting on the the imposition of facemasks in certain settings in england, one of the plan b measures that the prime minister announced that the prime minister announced that he was introducing. these boats could take a while, actually. i think they are going to be spaced out slightly because there's been a bit of an outbreak of covid in the house of commons and the last few days, so they are taking their time with these thoughts so that mps aren't all packed into the lobbies over the next hour or so. but it is that boat uncovered certification that boat uncovered certification thatis that boat uncovered certification that is going to be the most controversial one. he mentioned there that we have compiled less of that fast statement last few days how many tory rebels there may be. my how many tory rebels there may be. my sense is that that list might be dwindling slightly this evening. brycejohnson has spent the day trying to persuade tory mps. he's been at the 1922 committee of backbenchers, and after that meeting, they seem to be pretty positive sounds coming from senior
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ministers that they thought that maybe the rebellion wouldn't be as big uncovered passports as we'd initially thought. we will know more about that in about an hour's time. the figure to watch out for is if it does more than 18, it would potentially eat into brycejohnson�*s majority, as you point out, most labour mps are going to back it. it will definitely pass, but it's that question, isn't that? about bryce johnson's authority and what this means for the prime minister if he needs to potentially introduce more restrictions in the coming days. in terms of what this would mean for the government, we have said that mps are probably going to let these measures through because labour stepped in and is saying it is support the government. it's not a good look for the pie minister i suppose when his authority has already been undermined by recent events. conversely, is that a good
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look for mps that they are seen to vote against the prime minister when they know it's going to go through anyway? i they know it's going to go through an a ? ~ ,., ., they know it's going to go through an a? ., ., anyway? i think both are fair oints. anyway? i think both are fair points- one _ anyway? i think both are fair points. one of— anyway? i think both are fair points. one of the _ anyway? i think both are fair points. one of the things - anyway? i think both are fair| points. one of the things that anyway? i think both are fair- points. one of the things that seems to have changed in the last few weeks is that the prime minister used to be able to cajole some of his mps into doing things that, frankly, they often didn't want to do. speaking to mps today, i think there is a sense that that has changed slightly over the past three weeks, some of the damage that has been done to the prime minister's authority has impacted his ability to twist arms. we will find out exactly how much that's been impacted over the next hour or so. there is also that question, i suppose, about what this means for the prime minister's authority going forward as well. i was speaking to one of the key rebels in the last votes, they know they are going to lose, they know they are going to lose, they know they are going to lose comfortably in all of these boats tonight, but this is about putting a shot across the bow of the government, because one of the other
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things that borisjohnson was asked about when he was appearing before his backbenchers about an hour ago was what would happen if things do get worse? if there is a continued rise in the number of omicron cases and potentially england starts to consider something similar to what we saw from nicola sturgeon today, limiting household mixing, urging people not to meet with more than three households and bringing back social distancing in certain public settings. now the prime minister didn't get into any of the detail of that. he did say that he would consult mps if that was going to happen, but one of the things that has been certainly part of the conversation in parliament today between mps is that concern that this isn't the end of it when it comes to restrictions in england, that covid passports, people have criticisms that two jabs will get you into a venue when many experts are warning two jabs are not enough to get the protection against the
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new variants. but there is that concern that may be then the scientist and the politicians will recommend going further in the next few days and potentially the next few days and potentially the next few weeks as well. so there is a question there about how much of his party borisjohnson will be able to take with him if that happens. tonight's vote really does matter in terms of his authority over the party, but i suspect there will be a lot of people voting tonight to have half and i on what could be coming as well. in half and i on what could be coming as well. , ., ., ., , as well. in terms of the regulations themselves. _ as well. in terms of the regulations themselves, it's _ as well. in terms of the regulations themselves, it's very _ as well. in terms of the regulations themselves, it's very interesting i themselves, it's very interesting politically, even in scotland, where they have arguably been imposing more restrictions for a longer period of time, the scottish government has been reluctant to make the new restrictions mandatory. is there some sense now have almost the law of diminishing returns applying that you keep ratcheting up their some of the resistance increases in the political damage increases in the political damage increases whilst the health benefits becomes less. i
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increases whilst the health benefits becomes less.— becomes less. i think that's right. s-ueakin becomes less. i think that's right. speaking to _ becomes less. i think that's right. speaking to people _ becomes less. i think that's right. speaking to people in _ becomes less. i think that's right. speaking to people in the - becomes less. i think that's right. j speaking to people in the scottish government today, i think there was a very conscious decision to make this recommendation rather than a legal requirement when it comes to the restrictions on household mixing and scotland. that is not going to counter for christmas day and and scotland. that is not going to counterfor christmas day and boxing day as well as things stand, that is part of a plan which the scottish government hopes will allow people to have a fairly normal christmas in the circumstances. there is also a question when it comes to the decisions the scottish government made today. one of the things i've been hearing for ministers in scotland is that they may have actually gone further in certain respects when it came to, for example, hospitality orfurther example, hospitality or further restrictions example, hospitality orfurther restrictions in certain settings, but they didn't have the funding to do it. we don't have the furlough scheme any more. we don't have some of the other schemes that were funded by the treasury, which were bound down a few months ago. one of
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the arguments the scottish government has made is that it may do more if that was in place. look, i think that things are certainly in a different place from how they were last year the vaccine has certainly changed that, but i think there is also a fear in government that other things have changed, people's willingness to abide by strict laws on mixing. there is absolutely a lot at play there. the on mixing. there is absolutely a lot at play there-— on mixing. there is absolutely a lot at play there. the government chief whi and at play there. the government chief whip and his — at play there. the government chief whip and his speech _ at play there. the government chief whip and his speech later— at play there. the government chief whip and his speech later in - at play there. the government chief whip and his speech later in the - whip and his speech later in the debate was saying to colleagues, please send a message to the government, we know we are not going to defeat you, but we want you to think more carefully about the next you bring them forward. that's just a message i think about getting through to the division lobby by the sound of it. it's taking about 12 minutes per boat, we are seeing the
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bench estella. do you think they have been persuaded by the lip to sit on their hands, to set out the vote, ratherthan sit on their hands, to set out the vote, rather than have a record against it?— vote, rather than have a record auainst it? ,, ., , against it? the less we have been compiling dash — against it? the less we have been compiling dash the _ against it? the less we have been compiling dash the lists _ against it? the less we have been compiling dash the lists we - compiling dash the lists we have been compiling over the last two days with rebels is getting a bit short over the last few hours. so there are two things to watch for in these boats, not voting against the government and put their hands up and said do not agree with what brycejohnson is doing, but also the abstentions as well. it's always a complicated cat dash process, because there been quite a few covid cases in parliament and last two days which have kept people away from here. ithink days which have kept people away from here. i think you are absolutely right. the message that some of the key rebels, the acrid squad if you like remaking pass pr as as this is sending a message to the government but what could potentially happen over the next few days and weeks. but it's also worth pointing out, you mention mark
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harper, you mention people like steve baker, the conservative mps who have been known for rebelling over covid restrictions, it's not just stand, and when i have been chatting to mps today, what is really interesting as they are from different parts of the party that isentress as well. we had the former deputy minister on, he was a senior minister under teresa mae saying that he didn't agree with the scottish conservatives have completely opposed covid passports given the experience that they say they have had with apparently not claiming working north of the border. so this isn'tjust one part of the conservative party, there can significant concerns across different wings of the party. the question, i suppose, different wings of the party. the question, isuppose, is different wings of the party. the question, i suppose, is whether some of that opposition will be reduced this evening because, one of the messages from the prime minister,
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because the republicans are in the real concern from the scientists we have seen over how quickly i'm a spread from a professor clay chris whitty the chief medical officer briefed a number of mps this afternoon about some of the concerns that he has about how quickly the virus is spreading, and another thing i've been told this afternoon is that may well have convinced some of the rebels either to sit on their hands are potentially to vote with the government this evening. we will find out exactly, sean, and probably about an hour's time.— about an hour's time. nick, it is caettin about an hour's time. nick, it is getting very _ about an hour's time. nick, it is getting very busy _ about an hour's time. nick, it is getting very busy now. - about an hour's time. nick, it is getting very busy now. i - about an hour's time. nick, it is getting very busy now. i think. about an hour's time. nick, it is. getting very busy now. i think we are about to get the announcement coming up any moment now. the whips are lining up to deliver it. here we come. ., are lining up to deliver it. here we come-_ the - are lining up to deliver it. here we come-_ the ayes - are lining up to deliver it. here we come._ the ayes to l are lining up to deliver it. here we l
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come._ the ayes to the come. order, order. the ayes to the riaht, come. order, order. the ayes to the right. 441. — come. order, order. the ayes to the right. 441. the _ come. order, order. the ayes to the right, 441. the notice _ come. order, order. the ayes to the right, 441. the notice to _ come. order, order. the ayes to the right, 441. the notice to the - come. order, order. the ayes to the right, 441. the notice to the left, . right, 441. the notice to the left, 41. right, 441. the notice to the left, 4t -- _ right, 441. the notice to the left, 4t -- the — right, 441. the notice to the left, 4t -- the noes_ right, 441. the notice to the left, 41. —— the noes to— right, 441. the notice to the left, 41. —— the noes to the _ right, 441. the notice to the left, 41. —— the noes to the left, - right, 441. the notice to the left, 41. —— the noes to the left, 41. i 41. —— the noes to the left, 41. that— 41. —— the noes to the left, 41. that is— 41. —— the noes to the left, 41. that is the _ 41. —— the noes to the left, 41. that is the first _ 41. —— the noes to the left, 41. that is the first boat, - 41. —— the noes to the left, 41. that is the first boat, nick, - 41. —— the noes to the left, 41. i that is the first boat, nick, this is the first, this is the deputy speaker. is the first, this is the deputy seaker. , ., , ., ' speaker. they noes to the left, 41. so the ayes _ speaker. they noes to the left, 41. so the ayes have _ speaker. they noes to the left, 41. so the ayes have it, _ speaker. they noes to the left, 41. so the ayes have it, the _ speaker. they noes to the left, 41. so the ayes have it, the eyes - speaker. they noes to the left, 41. so the ayes have it, the eyes have | so the ayes have it, the eyes have it. so the ayes have it, the eyes have it unlock — so the ayes have it, the eyes have it- unlock-— it. unlock. nick, though wearing facemask has _ it. unlock. nick, though wearing facemask has gone _ it. unlock. nick, though wearing facemask has gone through - it. unlock. nick, though wearing facemask has gone through veryj facemask has gone through very comfortably. i facemask has gone through very comfortably-— facemask has gone through very comfortably. i think we expected that. the face _ comfortably. i think we expected that. the face coverings - comfortably. i think we expected that. the face coverings vote - comfortably. i think we expected | that. the face coverings vote was not going to be one of the most controversial. there are number of mps, controversial. there are number of mp5, for example who have concerns about covid certification who are more than relaxed about extending compulsory wearing of facemasks. i think what this one, there is not even going to be a vote on the next it may well be that we get straight through to the final votes. that second vote, by the way, was about
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daily tasks instead of self isolation for close contacts of omicron cases. that was basically a relaxation of the rules, actually, so that goes through without a vote. let's have a listen in. there is going to be about now and covid certification. so this is the one we have been watching out for her. this is the one where the size of the conservative rebellion will matter. nick, ifeel we will conservative rebellion will matter. nick, i feel we will be lucky to get this vote before seven o'clock if we are onlyjust beginning division, but we remain optimistic. looking at the figures, 441, that is including all the opposition from most of the opposition mps presumably voting for that measure. 41 against. that is not a number that would wearing the prime minister, but presumably the whips will be watching very closely though is mps who may be just sat on their hands during that first division who are now weaving their way towards which lobby and are they going to be able to corral them into
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the s lobby, or are they going to have to accept they are going into the no lobby where they might feel a bit more comfortable than they would do crowding into a lobby with labour mps and other opposition parties. i think that is right. 41 mps voting against extending face coverings to other settings in england is probably not something that is going to cause borisjohnson to many concerns. i'm not sure we can read all of that much into the number of mps who didn't vote until we see the lists of who exactly abstained. i will be interested to see the list of who voted against the government there as well. look, this is one that was always going to pass ready comfortably. the vote now on covid certification is the one that will cause borisjohnson a few nerves, because we have seen over the last few days, really quite quickly expanding number of tory mps raising their concerns. the two things to
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watch out for when we get this resolved are going to be how many mps are prepared to actually mark their card and say i absolutely don't agree with covid certification at all. the sense over the past couple of hours is that list might be slightly lower than we had originally thought, but if it is over 60, it would be the biggest rebellion that borisjohnson has faced as prime minister. he have to go back to before the general election to get anywhere near that figure.
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——before borisjohnson at his majority. the other thing to watch out for is going to be the list of abstentions, you know what's, that's afternoon, sitting around parliament, chatting to mps who some of whom have concerns in this, there are many who basically have decided not to be in parliament tonight, because they don't think they can endorse (05) the headlines on bbc news... there will be a (00v) good few abstentions on the tray benches. my understanding is that some of them will include farmer senior cabinet ministers who used to be quite close to the prime minister and use to be very supportive of his covid strategy. look, as we were just saying, this isn'tjust about one section of the party that is annoyed at the prime minister. we have, you know, and acrid squad of tory mps who have been really reluctant to back new restrictions for some time. this includes different wings of the party, centrists, people who used to be quite close to theresa may, people who have traditionally backed the government when it comes to some of those more controversial decisions on covid regulations that have been taken. it will be interesting to see how many of them follow through with
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voting against the government, and then, the analysis can move quite quickly from that on to what this means for the government going forward. what it means for the prime minister if he decides, as many have been speculating over the last few hours in parliament, and i confirmed, absolutely not confirmed, something the government doesn't want to do. if the prime minister felt that more restrictions are neededin felt that more restrictions are needed in response to the spread of omicron. . ~ needed in response to the spread of omicron. w' ., , needed in response to the spread of omicron. w ., , ., , _ ., omicron. nick early in the lobby of the house of _ omicron. nick early in the lobby of the house of commons. we - omicron. nick early in the lobby of. the house of commons. we believe omicron. nick early in the lobby of- the house of commons. we believe you now if i may, perhaps we will have a chance to talk to again just before seven o'clock. you will be routed to that spot for hours to come. looks like the search has been on for drivers in remote villages of the constituency for people not to be there, but quite a few mps are there, but quite a few mps are there, and it will be interesting to see how many people stuck to their guns on this. savage job see how many people stuck to their guns on this. savagejob —— sajid javid gave this update on how omicron is spreading. the javid gave this update on how omicron is spreading. the first thin . omicron is spreading. the first thin his omicron is spreading. the first thing his these _ omicron is spreading. the first thing his these are _ omicron is spreading. the first thing his these are things - omicron is spreading. the first thing his these are things that | omicron is spreading. the first i thing his these are things that we know certainly is a fast—moving situation. in the past week, we have
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been able to determine these things with a high degree of confidence. first, that it is more transmissible, omicron is more transmissible, omicron is more transmissible than the doubt variant. we can see the growth and omicron cases here in the uk is now mirroring the rapid increase that we are seeing in south africa, and the current observed doubling time is around every two days. although yesterday, we reported that there were 4713 confirmed cases of omicron in the uk. the uk hsa estimate that for the number of daily infections was 42 times higher at 200,000. scientists have never seen, never seen a covid—19 variant that's capable of spreading so rapidly. so we have to look at what we can do to slow omicron's advance stop at the newly promoted labour shadow health secretary speaks for the party and all the subjects. he told us the nhs were locked in a race against time to protect people from the virus and today's new restrictions will help
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slow the spread of omicron, explaining to nick early why labour would be supporting the government tonight. would be supporting the government toniaht. , ~ ., tonight. first like mask wearing, madam deputv _ tonight. first like mask wearing, madam deputy speaker, - tonight. first like mask wearing, madam deputy speaker, no i tonight. first like mask wearing, madam deputy speaker, no one | tonight. first like mask wearing, i madam deputy speaker, no one enjoys wearing _ madam deputy speaker, no one enjoys wearing a _ madam deputy speaker, no one enjoys wearing a mask. i certainly don't. but it— wearing a mask. i certainly don't. but it is— wearing a mask. i certainly don't. but it is nothing that the cost of martha — but it is nothing that the cost of martha draconian restrictions have in our— martha draconian restrictions have in our lives, — martha draconian restrictions have in our lives, livelihoods and liberties _ in our lives, livelihoods and liberties. masks are simply a price worth— liberties. masks are simply a price worth paying for our freedom to go out and _ worth paying for our freedom to go out and live — worth paying for our freedom to go out and live our lives during this pandemic — out and live our lives during this pandemic. they are proven to be effective — pandemic. they are proven to be effective and not only that, but in times— effective and not only that, but in times of— effective and not only that, but in times of rising infections, when people — times of rising infections, when people are feeling increasingly cautious— people are feeling increasingly cautious and it is vital to our economy— cautious and it is vital to our economy that people feel safe boarding a busy boss or entering a crowded _ boarding a busy boss or entering a crowded theatre. in our view, the government should never have gotten rid of the _ government should never have gotten rid of the requirement to wear masks in these _ rid of the requirement to wear masks in these settings. we know why they did. in these settings. we know why they did we _ in these settings. we know why they did. we have counted in recent weeks honourable _ did. we have counted in recent weeks honourable members opposite not wearing _ honourable members opposite not wearing masks, i'm glad to see that compiiance — wearing masks, i'm glad to see that compliance has risen somewhat considerably. we know the prime
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minister— considerably. we know the prime minister no longer has the authority to lead his — minister no longer has the authority to lead his own party, but i am grateful— to lead his own party, but i am grateful that members opposite to have at _ grateful that members opposite to have at least listen to their health secretarv — have at least listen to their health secreta . ., ., , have at least listen to their health secreta . ., , , .,~ ., secretary. you was speaking to the house of commons, _ secretary. you was speaking to the house of commons, i _ secretary. you was speaking to the house of commons, i said - secretary. you was speaking to the l house of commons, i said knitterrdly to because he had been earlier. and so we are now. ijust to because he had been earlier. and so we are now. i just wanted to because he had been earlier. and so we are now. ijust wanted to, we only have a few minutes left, and we may not get the second division, just for clarity on this, why is that that this particular boat, the one coming up eminently as the one the opposition for the conservative party seems to focus on. this when she discovered _ party seems to focus on. this when she discovered separate occasion . party seems to focus on. this when l she discovered separate occasion and in a number of venues in england. —— cultivated passports. so you have some on the right of the party, libertarians who basically think it's an infringement on civil liberties, you have scottish conservatives who say that covid passports didn't work in scotland, and they don't think they will work in england. you have some other
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tories at the centre of the party who don't think this will work because two tabs don't necessarily give people a protection against omicron, but they do give you a covid passports, and one thing i have heard from a number of mps across the board today within the conservative party is that they basically think this is a sign of the government doing something to be seen doing something. now, boris johnson would argue that is not the case, he hasjust been johnson would argue that is not the case, he has just been telling johnson would argue that is not the case, he hasjust been telling his mps over the last few hours, that the government absolutely needs to act because there is so much uncertainty over how serious omicron might be. this matters because it's about the size of the rebellion, it's about a sign that the tory mps who are worried about restrictions are sending the prime minister and raises all these questions as well after the turbulence of the last ten days or so in downing street, these questions about the premise or�*s authority, his ability to persuade
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his mps to do things that they may not be completely comfortable with. the conservative lips are still a bit nervous. 0ne the conservative lips are still a bit nervous. one of these tactics that they will note from the teresa daney is on they didn't have a majority that people kind of, they arrange to be very close at hand but not visible and then they suddenly all return in a matter of minutes and go straight into the division, presumably that is a kind of trick that given mark harper use to be chief leapt, he's well practised that if he wanted to turn this into a major statement of opposition to the prime minister. i a major statement of opposition to the prime minister.— the prime minister. i suspect that is probably _ the prime minister. i suspect that is probably right, _ the prime minister. i suspect that is probably right, and _ the prime minister. i suspect that is probably right, and i _ the prime minister. i suspect that is probably right, and i suspect i is probably right, and i suspect that over the next hour or so, we will have a number of tory mps coming out and telling us exactly why they voted against the government. you can see the conservative benches telling up in the commons again, the reason that half of those benches on the other side are not full is because the snp are not taking part in this vote because it's in england on the measure. so that will make the
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majority for them even bigger. ih majority for them even bigger. in terms of the practicalities of this, the measures come through pretty much immediately, don't they? the big question now is what happens between now and thursday when the house rises for the christmas break? the political, the prime ministers not out of the political woods yet, is he? ~ , ,., , not out of the political woods yet, is he? absolutely not. we have p&g is he? absolutely not. we have p&g is tomorrow — is he? absolutely not. we have p&g is tomorrow which _ is he? absolutely not. we have p&g is tomorrow which i _ is he? absolutely not. we have p&g is tomorrow which i suspect - is he? absolutely not. we have p&g is tomorrow which i suspect will i is he? absolutely not. we have p&g is tomorrow which i suspect will be l is tomorrow which i suspect will be a pretty ride for the prime minister. 0pposition parties will be asking about those christmas parties last year and whether the prime minister has told the full story of everything he knows about what happened in downing street last christmas, love, there is that question as well that some mps have been asking today, asking on air, on bbc news about whether these measures will be enough, or f actually, you may end up with a situation similar to scotland where the experts, the scientists are saying maybe we need to go further to try and limit things a bit more.
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one thing that borisjohnson was telling the 1922 committee of backbench areas earlier this evening is if that happens, he will consult them. if he does need to go further, he will consult them, but the government absolutely at the moment cannot rule out taking further measures for the simple reason, sean, that they don't know exactly what is going to happen in the next few weeks. , few weeks. knitterrdly in the lobby ofthe few weeks. knitterrdly in the lobby of the house _ few weeks. knitterrdly in the lobby of the house of _ few weeks. knitterrdly in the lobby of the house of commons. - few weeks. knitterrdly in the lobby of the house of commons. thank l few weeks. knitterrdly in the lobby i of the house of commons. thank you very much. returning to pick cherries of mps sitting around waiting for the division. as nick was saying, this is the critical division tonight. don't worry, as i vanish off air, as if by magic, ross atkins will be in another chair and anotherstudio, ready atkins will be in another chair and another studio, ready to carry on coverage of this vote. don't forget, always continuous coverage of live events on the bbc parliament channel in terms of broadcasting parliamentary coverage. if you want to follow it rock, as it were, you can always find it there. in terms of what we know, we have had one
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vote already, 441 mps back the government and a requirement for the wearing of facemasks and most enclosed spaces with only 41 against, and we now have two more divisions. 0ne against, and we now have two more divisions. one of the divisions was withdrawn. that was on daily tests for covid contacts to avoid isolation, hardly controversial. most people would rather have daily lateral flow tests than actually have a fall period of isolation, so the key one is coming up now. let me bring you one final bit of news that we have had in the last couple of minutes, and that is if you are sitting in a hotel because you are stuck in quarantine because you came into a country from the red list, get your stuff packed, you are free to go. no restrictions, you can leave. please turn off the television set, though, if you don't mind, so it's not too noisy for the people next—door. the rules have been abolished with immediate effect, there is now no red list, all the countries that were on the red list have been removed with immediate effect. that is the
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situation in the house of commons tonight, as we prepared to find out how big a number of rebellion tory mps there have been. you are watching bbc news. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is 0utside source. the first motes was passed with a big majority. these are the pictures live in the house of commons at the moment. mps are voting on a covid—19 class designed to encourage vaccinations. dozens of conservatives are saying they will both —— vote against the measure is. this could be the biggest rebellion against borisjohnson and then send it to power in 2019. we will hear how evidence has emerged that omicron is causing less severe
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illness than previous variants but

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