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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 16, 2021 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines. the queues forjabs continue — almost three quarters of a million people had their boosters yesterday — a record number hospital admissions are rising slowly but in london — where cases are rising the fastest — hospital staff in this icu are feeling the pressure the chancellor is cutting short his us trip and is held talks with leaders in the uk about the solution for hospitality and other affected sectors. �* ,., for hospitality and other affected sectors. ~ ., ., ., ' sectors. about a quarter of £1 billion of— sectors. about a quarter of £1 billion of cash _ sectors. about a quarter of £1 billion of cash sitting - sectors. about a quarter of £1 billion of cash sitting with - sectors. about a quarter of £1. billion of cash sitting with local authorities that is been provided by government to support those
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businesses who need it in my immediate to make sure that that money gets to those businesses as quickly as possible. the omicron wave has prompted france to shut its borders to most british travellers from saturday — halting christmas holidays and other news, the bank of england raises interest rates for the first time in more than three years amid warnings of inflation could hit 6% by april. and more people are signing up to learn sign language since the actress appeared on strictly come dancing who is deaf.
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good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. the number of new covid infections across the uk hasjumped again to a new record — more than 88 thousand cases in the past 2a hours — 10 thousand more than yesterday. as the omicron wave accelerates, the uk's chief medical adviser, professor chris whitty, told mps that he expects the peak to come "incredibly fast"— but subside more quickly than previous variants — because of the boosterjabs. more than 745,000 people had their booster yesterday — a new record — as the long queues continue. here's our medical editor, fergus walsh. the number of new covid infections across the uk hasjumped
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these people in newcastle were prepared to wait for hours for covid—19 vaccination bus. it was a record date for boosterjabs, but also covid—19 cases. it was a record day for booster jabs, but also covid cases. boosters offer the best protection against 0micron, but there is huge uncertainty whether they will blunt it enough to keep hospital admissions below last january's peak. even if it is milder, because it is concentrated over a short period of time, you could end up with a higher number going into hospital on a single day. that is certainly possible. the numbers of confirmed 0micron patients in hospital are still low for now. it will be weeks before we have hard evidence that we show how serious the 0micron wave will be. we need about 250 individuals in hospital before we can make an assessment compared to delta. and also a vaccine effectiveness assessment. the earliest we will have reliable data is the week between christmas
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and new year and probably early january. pregnant women have finally been made a priority group for vaccination after more evidence showing they are at high risk from covid. between may and october during the first six months of the delta variant more than 11100 pregnant women were admitted to hospital in the uk with covid. 96% of them were unvaccinated. 17 of those pregnant women died. four babies died in the first month of life from covid. it also increases the risk of having a premature birth. valerie is 32 weeks pregnant and had her booster in 0xfordshire on monday, but it meant a long queue. i had to wait for one and a half hours in a queue, which is painful because i have pelvic pain which makes it hard to stand or to walk. in addition, i was very nervous,
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as was everyone there in the queue. everyone is nervous because they thought the boosters might run out because it was a walk—in clinic. the prime minister was again banging the booster drum at a vaccination centre in kent. he urged the public to be careful when mixing with others this christmas. we do not want to make your choices for you about your social life, we are not closing things, but what we are saying is people should be cautious and they should think about their activities in the run—up to christmas. nobody wants to get 0micron and be unwell and be forced to isolate. and the queen is leading by example, cancelling a pre—christmas lunch for extended family due to take place at windsor castle. fergus walsh, bbc news.
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health officials say on average, one person with covid is now spreading it to between three and five other people. the uk's latest covid figures show there were 88,376 new cases in the latest 24—hour period. the average over the past week is now more than 63 thousand new cases every day. the number of people in hospital with covid is 7,579. 146 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test. 115 covid—related deaths were recorded on average every day in the past week. 0n vaccinations — just over 537 thousand people a day had boosters on average in the past 7 days. bringing the total to more than 25 point 4 million people. london is currently being hit hardest by the wave of new infections.
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case rates in the capital are the highest and rising the fastest. hospital admissions are also on rise too. with so many people becoming infected at the same time, there are concerns about staffing levels — not least in the nhs. 0ur health editor hugh pym reports from st george's hospital in tooting, south london. in intensive care staff know that a covid wave is coming their way again. patient numbers have already started creeping up and they have been warned to prepare for more in a few weeks' time. we have been told to try and plan for at least as bad as last winter, which was quite a massive pressure on our resources in terms ofjust the space we have and the staff we have. this is the non—covid part of intensive care. covid patients are in bays leading off this area. of eleven who are seriously ill here with the virus,
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the hospital says nine have not been vaccinated. tammy, who is a matron here, says it is difficult to be sympathetic to patients who have turned down the vaccine. it's really hard, the staff feel really let down when they are trying to look after patients who have not been vaccinated, so there is a degree of upset amongst the staff, definitely. it all adds to the strain which tammy and her colleagues are feeling. i am just so proud of all the nurses that work here, and doctors and our health professionals and all our support staff, because they have been absolutely incredible. and how are you feeling? hello, hi, lam doctor... there is brighter news elsewhere in the hospital with doctors calling patients about a new covid pill. we are offering patients the opportunity to receive medication to reduce the risk of hospitalisation from covid. the drug molnupiravir is being dispatched from the hospital pharmacy for the first time today to vulnerable patients who have tested positive.
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they will be able to take the pills at home. this is a serious challenge for the national health service this winter. the next possible step for managers is postponing routine operations. well, people waiting for treatment which is not life—saving but is really important for their quality of life may have to wait a bit longer, so that is quite likely to happen if the pressures keep on increasing. we want to minimise the impact of that, but that is a possibility. frontline staff are looking ahead to christmas with apprehension and concern about the possibility of another winter covid surge, so they are pleading with people to do their bit by getting the booster jab. hugh pym, bbc news. let's speak to dr leon danon, associate professor of infectious disease modelling and data analytics at the unversity of bristol.
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thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. so, looking at today's figures, many people raise their eyebrows at that figure. what do you make of it, the new cases and i'll just remind you, it's 88,003 to 76. and it's kind of what is expected with today's after a couple weeks now, these numbers are in line with what we were expecting for a few days. the number of hospitalisations is going up as people were saying just now and so, those cases are translating into more serious cases meeting hospitalisations and so, entirely online. the meeting hospitalisations and so, entirely online.— entirely online. the figure may actually be _ entirely online. the figure may actually be a — entirely online. the figure may actually be a lot _ entirely online. the figure may actually be a lot higher, - entirely online. the figure may actually be a lot higher, why i entirely online. the figure may actually be a lot higher, why isj actually be a lot higher, why is that? it actually be a lot higher, why is that? , ~ , ., actually be a lot higher, why is that? , ~ , c, c, actually be a lot higher, why is that? , ~ , ._, a, , that? it is likely to of an number of occasions _
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that? it is likely to of an number of occasions that _ that? it is likely to of an number of occasions that he _ that? it is likely to of an number of occasions that he make - that? it is likely to of an number of occasions that he make it - that? it is likely to of an number i of occasions that he make it cases do to asymptomatic people not getting tested because they are unaware. and a potential reason why this is an underestimate of the number of cases a this is an underestimate of the number of case- this is an underestimate of the number of case . , , number of cases a number between three to five. _ number of cases a number between three to five, what _ number of cases a number between three to five, what are _ number of cases a number between three to five, what are your - number of cases a number between three to five, what are your models j three to five, what are your models telling you about how that's going to go? it telling you about how that's going to no? , ., telling you about how that's going to to? , ., ., telling you about how that's going to no? , ., ., ., telling you about how that's going toao? , ., ., ., ,., to go? it is going to go up and the doubfinu to go? it is going to go up and the doubling time _ to go? it is going to go up and the doubling time is _ to go? it is going to go up and the doubling time is around _ to go? it is going to go up and the doubling time is around two - to go? it is going to go up and the doubling time is around two days | doubling time is around two days so it is likely to double in the next two days to well over 200,000, probably by the end of the weekend. and so, it's going to continue doubling until we reach a peak. haifa doubling untilwe reach a peak. how are we looking _ doubling untilwe reach a peak. how are we looking at _ doubling until we reach a peak. how are we looking at this point compared to last year? it’s compared to last year? it's definitely _ compared to last year? it's definitely faster. _ compared to last year? it�*s definitely faster. we have not seen the speed of spread yet at any point with covid—19 and so it is not like giving we seen so far and it is a
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concern. it is a very sharp rise and how do the — concern. it is a very sharp rise and how do the delta _ concern. it is a very sharp rise and how do the delta and omicron admissions look in terms of the break down and at what point is omicron, is omicron going to take over delta transmissions? abs, omicron, is omicron going to take over delta transmissions? a devey look like it's _ over delta transmissions? a devey look like it's going _ over delta transmissions? a devey look like it's going to _ over delta transmissions? a devey look like it's going to do _ over delta transmissions? a devey look like it's going to do that - over delta transmissions? a devey look like it's going to do that in - look like it's going to do that in london and in other parts of the country, it is a little bit behind but we expected to overtake fairly quickly and it's definitely done that quickly in london.- quickly and it's definitely done that quickly in london. thank you very much _ that quickly in london. thank you very much indeed, _ that quickly in london. thank you very much indeed, thank- that quickly in london. thank you very much indeed, thank you. - the chancellor rishi sunak has cut short a work trip to california and is returning to the uk — as businesses call for more help to stay afloat during this omicron wave. rishi sunak has been holding online talks with business and hospitality bosses from america this afternoon — listening to their concerns. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon has demaned that the uk government provides more financial support to businesses
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saying it must not "sleep walk into an emergency". here's our business editor, simonjack. for hospitality the season to be jolly has suddenly taken a very unwelcome return. cautious customers are cancelling plans and businesses of all sizes are facing a bleak new year. with cancellations up to 40% we feel like it is pretty much a lockdown and it is impacting our business enormously. this is the last nail in the coffin and unfortunately thousands of businesses will collapse after the new year and hundreds of thousands ofjobs will be lost. until recently, there were fears that christmas demand will outstrip supply, but this burly wholesaler thinks having secured the stop the problem may now be exactly the opposite. last week people have been cancelling orders, especially christmas items, christmas preorders, so it is lines we will struggle
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to sell such as turkeys and pigs in blankets, christmas puddings, things we cannot sell all year round. we will have to sell that offer or dispose of it. once again it is hospitality first in the firing line in this, december, its most crucial month. these businesses are not being asked to close, but many feel with consumer confidence and commuter numbers evaporating in the face of rising infections, they might as well have been and they feel there is a mismatch between the policy, the economic reality and the government support that is currently on offer. the government's priority has to be as soon as possible, today, to make announcements that will give the reassurance required. anything that will improve the cash flow position of these businesses should be top of the list. specifically business groups want vat lower for longer and loan repair payments deferred.
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today, the prime minister said the government had supported business throughout the pandemic. we already have measures in place supporting businesses through business rate relief, through vat reductions, the loans i have described, all that is there, but what we are also saying is we want to keep businesses going, keep businesses open, as we have done for a long time now, through the vaccination programme. the best way to get back to normality is to get boosted now. it is notjust customer numbers dropping off. cast members are fully enclosed this production of the lion king for the next week. the chancellor is not here, he is in california, but industry leaders spoke to him in the last couple of hours of their fears and needs. attendees described him in listening mode, offering new no new promises to be their christmas saviour. well, the chancellor was mentioned at the end of simon's report. let's hearfrom him now, because he's been speaking this
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evening about those talks he's been holding with business leaders. the good news, i would say there is existing support measures in place to help the industry. for example, until spring of next year, most businesses and hospitality industry early paying the quarter of the business rates bill in their benefiting from a reduced rate of vat all the way through to next spring and thirdly, there is a quarter of £1 billion of cash sitting with local authorities that have been provided by government to support those businesses who needed in my immediate priority is to make sure that that money gets to those businesses as quickly as possible. simon emeny is the ceo of fullers, who run hundreds of pubs and hotels, and who employ over four thousand people. thank you forjoining us on bbc
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news. first off, the reaction from your sector, your business to what has happened in the last few days. i think it is a sense of bewilderment at the moment. the prime minister is announcement to work from home is coinciding with the prime minister, some incredibly conflicting advice to customers about what to do, whether to go to a party, not go to a party, go to a pub not go to a pub. and feeling insecure and uncertain and not coming out to city centres, they are deterred. the messaging _ centres, they are deterred. the messaging is — centres, they are deterred. the messaging is what is doing the real damage. and could this have prepared something that could've been put in place to reassure customers? this reminds me _ place to reassure customers? this reminds me greatly _ place to reassure customers? try 3 reminds me greatly of march 2021 for wii, the prime minister was telling people not to go to pubs but but the
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last clip, it was closing it down and at that time, we didn't have a furlough scheme, the prime minister introduced a furlough scheme and we were able to protect manyjobs and protect many livelihoods. we are not in that position now and with the amount of business that we've gotten in city centres, it is inevitable that across the sector, sites will be close left right and centre and that leads us with an enormous financial pressure. and also leaves us with an enormous problem but what to do with our colleagues and our staff. he to do with our colleagues and our staff. ., ,., ., . .,, , staff. he also mentioned closures, but are you — staff. he also mentioned closures, but are you estimating? _ staff. he also mentioned closures, but are you estimating? we - staff. he also mentioned closures, but are you estimating? we run i staff. he also mentioned closures, l but are you estimating? we run 400 ubs in the but are you estimating? we run 400 pubs in the situation _ but are you estimating? we run 400 pubs in the situation is _ but are you estimating? we run 400 pubs in the situation is moving - pubs in the situation is moving by day and some parts of our estate are maintaining a reasonable level of trade and sing 30 and 40% reduction
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in sales but in city centres, we had one polyp that is taking £82 all day and that is simply unsustainable and we will be able to keep that. i haste we will be able to keep that. i have to very quickly _ we will be able to keep that. i have to very quickly get _ we will be able to keep that. i have to very quickly get to _ we will be able to keep that. i have to very quickly get to my _ we will be able to keep that. i have to very quickly get to my last - to very quickly get to my last point. he said he would do whatever it takes to have the government support the livelihoods. but will it take? he support the livelihoods. but will it take? , ., , ., take? he brought it up with a furlou:h take? he brought it up with a furlough scheme _ take? he brought it up with a furlough scheme that - take? he brought it up with a furlough scheme that saved l take? he brought it up with a - furlough scheme that saved countless jobs and we need something like that. we have a number of families that. we have a number of families that need breadwinners to support their teams and ifjob go missing, i'm really worried as to how those people are going to survive. so we need a reintroduction of the furlough scheme. the chancellor is slowly misleading with you on the earlier quote when he said he will be providing financial support. there's very little financial support in the sector at the moment. thank you very much for your time.
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and we'll find out how this story, and many others, are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. 0ur guestsjoining me tonight arejohn stevens, who's the deputy political editor at the daily mail, and the author and journalist rachel shabi. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, good afternoon. the spread of the omicron covid variant is causing havoc with the premier league's fixtures. numerous clubs are reporting increased infections among players. leicester city's game with tottenham this evening, and manchester united's match with brighton on saturday were called off earlier today. saturday's games at southampton, watford and west ham have also been postponed. along with everton's match with leicester on sunday. liverpool's match against newcastle at anfield this evening is on. but liverpool players fabinho, curtisjones and virgil van dijk are missing after suspected positive tests. a total of nine premier league matches have been cancelled over the past week.
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so let's get a check on the latest from tonight's premier league games then. chelsea, missing four players due to covid. against everton at stamford bridge. the blues level on points with second placed liverpool. who are 1—0 down against newcastle, at anfield. jonjo shelvey with the goal for newcastle, against his former club. testing positive for covid—i9 after starting against them did not travel with the squad and is currently 1—0 in that game and you can see even to this are up one as well. juventus. a quarter of all players in the efl do not intend to get vaccinated, according to data released by the english football league, who've increased protocols at training grounds to limit the spread of the virus — five matches in the championship on saturday are now off. it again raises the issue of vaccine hesitancy within the professional game. that news comes on day
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when uefa president aleksander ceferin has urged players across europe to get vaccinated as soon as possible we should promote the vaccination and we will. we've already started to do it but we do not have the power to force anyone to be vaccinated. but the promotion today in the video by my modest opinion is very good because there are only doctors speaking in the video and from their point of view why vaccination is so important. let's return to football, and the draw has been made for next year's nations league — it's a complicated format, so let's just show you how the home nations came out. england v — that's the game that will be played behind closed doors at wembley because of the fan disorder at the euro2020 final. england will be hoping for an improved performance
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when the second ashes test resumes at 4am our time tomorrow morning. australia will start day two on 221 for two. marnus labuschagne is 95 not out, with steve smith — captaining the side in place of pat cummins — unbeaten on 18. england will be rueing several missed chances with wicket keeper jos buttler dropping two catches. anyone who has played this game who drops a catch, it's always disappointing. but he's a human being and stability being a goalkeeper, duke king do magnificent but if you drop a catch, it will be highlighted. but we will get around him and be philosophical about it as well. at the end of the day, were playing a game of that's all the sport for now. we'll have more for you on the bbc news channel later on. the education secretary for england, nadhim zahawi,
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has written to school and college leaders to say the government will try to boost the numbers of supply teachers by encouraging recently retired staff to consider a return to work. 0ur education editor branwenjeffreys had more details. the government says it is fully committed— the government says it is fully committed ., , ., , ~ the government says it is fully committed ., , ~ , committed and staying open. at its head teachers _ committed and staying open. at its head teachers who _ committed and staying open. at its head teachers who got _ committed and staying open. at its head teachers who got the - head teachers who got the responsibilities for making sure they got another adults on—site to safely supervise the children and put a teacher in front of every single class. at the moment, it's already looking difficult as we stagger through the last couple of days of terms with growing numbers of teachers suspected or confirmed case of covid—19. the big worries comejanuary, case of covid—19. the big worries come january, whatever case of covid—19. the big worries comejanuary, whatever the will is from head teachers, that they may not be able to keep all pupils in school if they cannot get cover for teachers who are off sick and in some areas, there have been very
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acute shortages of teachers. why? partly because some are reluctant to work going from school or school during the current climate and some have gone to work for the national tutoring programme which is the catcher programme. today, they will try to get more, but we do not know if they will answer the call. british tourists are being banned from france from saturday as the borders are closed to most travellers from the uk. business trips are being halted too. the french government says only people with "compelling reasons" can enter the country. it has meant thousands of people having to cancel their christmas holidays. 0ur transport correspondent katy austin has more thejones family had planned the trip of a lifetime. 11 of them, four generations, together at disneyland paris for christmas. now that trip is off.
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they are trying to get a hotel refund but don't expect to get back thousands they paid for a minibus and driver. it's devastating because as a family you want to spend christmas together, but, yes there is uncertainty, but when i booked this there was nowhere near as much uncertainty as there is now. my mum and dad are 85 and 86 so it would be nice to go. under the new rules from 11pm uk time tomorrow travellers will have to give a compelling reason for coming to france. they will have to provide a negative covid test result less than 24 hours old and isolate for at least two days upon arrival until they receive a second negative result. the move is being blamed on the uk's high number of 0micron cases. tourism businesses were already worried that the uk's travel testing requirements were making some customers rethink their winter plans. many people will have been preparing to go to france for christmas, including on the eurostar from london st pancras, so the announcement by france comes at a really bad time for the travel industry. we have had something like a third
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of the usual volume of passengers for the last two years. we really needed the boost of a good christmas season to carry us through into 2022, which has to be our comeback year. so this is a big hammer blow for us as a business. for french hoteliers, cancelled city breaks and ski trips are hard to swallow. we had a lot of cancellations since this morning. almost 80% of the guests from england had cancelled their booking, so it's a very big change for us and quite dramatic economically. flights and ferries are expected to be busy tomorrow as passengers who can try to beat the friday night deadline. for others, long awaited festivities just lost their sparkle. katy austin, bbc news. department for transport and our political correspondent is reporting
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that the department has apologised after it was revealed that members of staff had held a gathering in december last year during covid—19 restrictions and a spokesman has set the gathering had been an appropriate but insisted it was socially distanced in the daily mirror reported staff at the department held that party on the 16th of december, although spokesperson confirming the transport secretary was not involved in fewer than a dozen staff working in fewer than a dozen staff working in the office at a low—key socially distanced gathering in large open plan office after work on the 16th of december were food and drink was consumed and we recognised this was an appropriate and apologised for the error ofjudgment and an apology from the department for transport for something else out on the of december. and more as we get it in speaking to political correspondence and the next hour.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. it's been another grey, gloomy day for many. the best of the sunshine was across eastern england, parts of scotland, too. but for friday and, indeed, into the weekend, it'll stay largely cloudy for most of us — dry with limited spells of sunshine. fog will be a problem across eastern england through tonight, and really dense patches in places. elsewhere, a of cloud around, more of breeze across the south — elsewhere, a lot of cloud around, more of breeze across the south — so here, temperatures will fall much below 4—7 celsius, but a touch of frost across eastern areas under those clear skies where we have the fog. high pressure continues to dominate through friday and into the weekend. very little change to the map on friday, most places will hold onto the cloud. probably the best of any brightness again across scotland and northeast england. temperatures perhaps a little bit lower on friday than we had on thursday — single figures for most, but double figures across the south and the west. into the weekend, it stays mostly cloudy, generally dry, and it starts to turned
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colder by sunday. hello, this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines: a new record number of confirmed covid cases in the uk, more than 88,000 in the past 24 hours. the queues forjabs continue. almost three quarters of a million people had their boosters yesterday, a record number. the record number of cases
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raise real concerns for the nhs and the impact on hospital admissions. the chancellor is cutting short his us trip and has held talks with business leaders here about the solution for hospitality and other affected sectors. the 0micron wave has prompted france to shut its borders to most british travellers from saturday, halting christmas holidays. the bank of england has announced an unexpected increase in its main interest rate, to a quarter of 1%. the move surprised many economists and will add to the costs of homeowners with tracker or standard variable rate mortgages. here's our economics correspondent, andy verity. with gas bills up by 28%, inflation is catching fire. electricity bills up 19%, petrol at a record high and goods
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prices rising faster than they have in 30 years, up 6.5%. the bank of england has decided it is time to act to try to stop inflation getting out of control. since the monetary policy committee first slashed interest rates to emergency lows in the wake of the financial crisis, they have had well over 100 meetings and they've only raised interest rates in three of them. they are doing it now because they are predicting inflation will get up to 6%, the highest it has been since 1992. one big reason why is we are seeing further upward pressure on wholesale gas prices, so they went up a lot obviously post,august, came off a bit, they are going up a bit. this is directly related to some of the tensions we are seeing on the border between russia and ukraine, where a lot of europe's gas supply comes through, and that will feed
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through when the next price cap is set for all of us as domestic customers. we have to take the action we think will do the job to address and tackle inflationary pressure particularly in the medium term. we just have to do that, i'm afraid. for the vast majority of households, more than 90%, the rate rise will not cost them anything for now. they are either renting, have paid off their mortgage or their interest rate is fixed, but two million have tracker or variable rate mortgages. the rise means a borrower on an average tracker mortgage will pay £10 a month extra, and on a standard variable rate, they will pay an extra £15 a month. if inflation continues to rise, which is what the bank of england expects, then wages are going to be squeezed further. that suggests there is going to be a strain on people's living standards, they will not be able to buy as much as they could have done a year ago.
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their salaries will not stretch as far as they used to. it will not be the last interest rate rise. in the city, they are expecting two more in the new year. andy verity, bbc news. let's get the thoughts ofjonathan portes, professor of economics and king college london. thank you for joining us, professor, on bbc news. first off, this rice took many people by surprise. why do you think it was done now? i people by surprise. why do you think it was done now?— it was done now? i think the bank has been slightly _ it was done now? i think the bank has been slightly spooked - it was done now? i think the bank has been slightly spooked by - it was done now? i think the bank has been slightly spooked by the| has been slightly spooked by the fact that inflation has gone up even faster than it thought it would. as we saw in the figures earlier this week. there also hearing from their contacts in business that there is significant cost pressures down the line stuff so what this really means is that they are worried that this inflation spike we are seeing now
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isn't necessarily going to be purely transitory — that is to say, they were hoping it would be a one—off as we reopen from after the pandemic and that after that, things will go back to normal without them having to do very much. they are not convinced, they are still hoping that might happen, but they are a bit more worried inflation might become entranced, and hence they want to send a signal to the financial markets and to you, me and everybody else that they won't let in —— that happened. but everybody else that they won't let in -- that happened.— in -- that happened. but do you think that _ in -- that happened. but do you think that is — in -- that happened. but do you think that is the _ in -- that happened. but do you think that is the message - in -- that happened. but do you think that is the message that i in -- that happened. but do you l think that is the message that has got through? when we talk about business confidence, that is really key, is it not? uncertainty and a general ill feeling in society, in the economy, the message is critical? i the economy, the message is critical? ~' , ,., , critical? i think the message they are t in: critical? i think the message they are trying to _ critical? i think the message they are trying to give _ critical? i think the message they are trying to give here _ critical? i think the message they are trying to give here is - critical? i think the message they are trying to give here is very - critical? i think the message they l are trying to give here is very much that inflation is high now, but in two years, it's not going to be. and
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remember, that is their core mandate, that is what they are legally bound to do, hit their inflation targets. and in a sense, business confidence in the short—term is not necessarily their priority. that is really priority of the government post of and to be fair, let's be clear, if business is not feeling confident now, it is not because the bank of england has put up because the bank of england has put up interest rates by 0.15%, it is because the government has... it is because the government has... it is because of what is happening with the pandemic and what i think everyone would agree has been a somewhat chaotic and mixed messages from the government. iairti’heh somewhat chaotic and mixed messages from the government.— from the government. when you consider what _ from the government. when you consider what is _ from the government. when you consider what is going _ from the government. when you consider what is going on, - from the government. when you | consider what is going on, energy prices, thejob market — which many people are saying is looking all right at the moment — the growth forecast had been downgraded. is this move truly likely to make a
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significant impact on inflation? i think, as you said in, oras significant impact on inflation? i think, as you said in, or as eddie said in the report of this move in itself will affect very few people have almost no economic impact as all —— and he said. it is a signal an interest rate rises coming and thatis an interest rate rises coming and that is a signal they want to give. and the objective at least is to communicate to people making decisions, whether that is businesses or workers asking for pay rises, that, no, we're not going to let inflation become entrenched, this is just temporary, let inflation become entrenched, this isjust temporary, it is going to go away, so we are going to put up to go away, so we are going to put up interest rates to make sure it is going to go away. that is the signal they are trying to send. will that work? we don't know. i certainly don't know. but you are right about the more general gloomy economic picture, but i think the bank would quite reasonably say that if we are worried about people going hungry
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this christmas, if we're worried about people not being what to afford energy price rises, the government has the tools to do... if we are word about business is going bust, the government has the tools to deal with that, and the right way to deal with that, and the right way to deal with that, and the right way to deal with that is spending but not by enlightening inflation to become entrenched.— become entrenched. professor jonathan portes, _ become entrenched. professor jonathan portes, thank - become entrenched. professor jonathan portes, thank you. i back to covid. sajid javid has been speaking. back to covid. sa'id javid has been s-teakin. . . back to covid. sa'id javid has been s-teakin. ,, . ., back to covid. sa'id javid has been s-teakin, ,, . ., ., speaking. since we learned about this new variant, _ speaking. since we learned about this new variant, omicron, - speaking. since we learned about this new variant, omicron, our. this new variant, 0micron, our strategy has been to assess it and also build our defences, and vaccines still remain our best form of defence. we know now that two doses of the vaccine are not enough against but three doses provide excellent protection and is truly now a national mission, it is a race between the virus and the vaccine, and that is why i was particularly pleased to see yesterday we had our best booster date ever so far, seven
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and 40,000 booster doses throughout the uk, hitting a new total of 25 million —— 740. i want to think everybody involved in that, the nhs, the military personnel helping, all the military personnel helping, all the thousand volunteers, and everyone enthusiastically coming forward, because this really is our best form of defence. we can see it is working and we need more and more people to keep coming forward, take up their chance to get boosted by the end of this month, for all adults, and also really to know that if they answer that call from the nhs, they are protecting themselves, their protecting their loved ones and they are protecting their community. the chancellor, rishi sunak, has held what has been described as a "hastily convened call" with business leaders worried about the impact of rising cases. the hospitality and entertainment industries say they need more financial assistance because of rising cancellations and a decline in people going out. mr sunak is cutting short a visit to the us to help deal with the pandemic response.
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let's speak to craig hassall, ceo of the royal albert hall. thank you so much forjoining us on bbc news this evening. what sort of a hit are you taking? rslur bbc news this evening. what sort of a hit are you taking?— a hit are you taking? our christmas sales were — a hit are you taking? our christmas sales were doing _ a hit are you taking? our christmas sales were doing tremendously - a hit are you taking? our christmas| sales were doing tremendously well until a macron hit and then they plateaued and we are seeing a huge drop in sales —— until 0micron hit. i know the west and is suffering with covid, we have been 0k, touch wood, but the impact on sales is certainly being seen across the industry. certainly being seen across the indust . , , ., ., industry. equity, i understand, have written a letter _ industry. equity, i understand, have written a letter to _ industry. equity, i understand, have written a letter to rishi _ industry. equity, i understand, have written a letter to rishi sunak, - industry. equity, i understand, have written a letter to rishi sunak, and| written a letter to rishi sunak, and in that they said the government, they've asked the government, please don't abandon the workforce who fought to keep the industry alive. is that how the sector feels, that
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they are being abandoned, or could be? i they are being abandoned, or could be? ~ , they are being abandoned, or could be? ~' , . be? i think there is so much unknown- — be? i think there is so much unknown. we don't - be? i think there is so much unknown. we don't give - be? i think there is so much unknown. we don't give the| be? i think there is so much - unknown. we don't give the impact of this variance on people's lifestyles. at the moment, the government advice is causing people to not want to go out and see concerts and shows, and that is heading down a kidding us immediately. it would be a shame if the government investment is not followed through and it is too early to tell about the financial impact, but certainly the sales impact is being seen right now across the sector. ~ , ., , being seen right now across the sector. ~ i. , ., �* sector. when you said we 'ust don't know. what — sector. when you said we 'ust don't know, what would h sector. when you said we 'ust don't know, what would you _ sector. when you said we just don't know, what would you like - sector. when you said we just don't know, what would you like to - sector. when you said we just don't know, what would you like to know| know, what would you like to know from the government? what is missing? i from the government? what is missint ? ., ., from the government? what is missint? ., ., missing? i have to say, i feelthe advice has _ missing? i have to say, i feelthe advice has been _ missing? i have to say, i feelthe advice has been a _ missing? i have to say, i feelthe advice has been a little _ missing? i have to say, i feelthe advice has been a little bit - missing? i have to say, i feelthe| advice has been a little bit cloudy and a bit vague, in terms of the royal albert hall, we are not covered by plan b, and that we have asked people to wear masks and people are compliant and happy to do
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so, but i think a stronger government position would help people feel more comforted to come out to play select the royal albert hall where they can feel safe, and we know people will be safe in a place like ours, with our regimes, ventilation, protocols, but the government advice has been a bit muddy, i am sorry to say stop by the value of the theatre, of the arts, we have learned a lot about that over the last 18 months. butjust how critical is this period? for most places — how critical is this period? for most places like _ how critical is this period? fr?" most places like us, most theatre companies across the country, christmas is the absolute big earnings season. we rely on this, the royal albert hall, to fund education programmes, maintenance programmes, all sorts of things, so without a bumper christmas season, it is very bleak indeed. icraig it is very bleak indeed. craig hassall, ceo _ it is very bleak indeed. craig hassall, ceo of _ it is very bleak indeed. craig hassall, ceo of the - it is very bleak indeed. craig hassall, ceo of the royal. it is very bleak indeed. craig hassall, ceo of the royal albert hall, thank you for your time. as we were hearing in hugh pym's
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report earlier, the first at—home treatment of covid has been given to patients in the uk as part of the major national study. molnupiravir will be tested on 10,000 people at risk of serious illness in research led by university of oxford. last month, the uk became the first country in the world to approve its use — a move described as a "game—changer" by health secretary sajid javid. let's speak to glyn talling. he's a quantity surveyor from cornwall and he's been taking part in the trial. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. how was the trial going? trier? news. how was the trial going? very well. i news. how was the trial going? very well- i actually _ news. how was the trial going? - well. i actually finished my course of medication yesterday. it is a five day course. yeah, all very straightforward, and went very well indeed. , ., indeed. tell us about the medication. _ indeed. tell us about the medication. what - indeed. tell us about the medication. what can - indeed. tell us about the | medication. what can you indeed. tell us about the - medication. what can you tell us about it? it medication. what can you tell us about it? , , medication. what can you tell us aboutit? , , ., ., about it? it is 'ust normal medication _ about it? it isjust normal medication here. - about it? it isjust normal medication here. you - about it? it isjust normal- medication here. you can see the tenure down the container it came
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in. —— you can see the container. they look like run—of—the—mill capsules. just take them with water every 12 hours, twice a day, and, yeah, all very straightforward and very easy. yeah, all very straightforward and ve eas . ~ . . yeah, all very straightforward and ve eas .~ ., ., yeah, all very straightforward and ve eas. ., ., ., ., very easy. what made you want to take art very easy. what made you want to take part in _ very easy. what made you want to take part in the — very easy. what made you want to take part in the trial? _ very easy. what made you want to take part in the trial? i _ very easy. what made you want to take part in the trial? i tested - take part in the trial? i tested ositive take part in the trial? i tested positive last _ take part in the trial? i tested positive last thursday, - take part in the trial? i tested positive last thursday, got. take part in the trial? i tested positive last thursday, got a i positive last thursday, got a positive last thursday, got a positive pcr test result on friday morning, and on the same day, i got a call through from my local gp surgery and they asked if i would take part, and, yeah, ijust thought it was a great thing to be involved with, anything that can help fight the horrible virus that is out there at the moment. so, yeah, approached on the friday, by the following day, within less than 24 hours, we received a package with all the medication in and what have you and, yeah, i started taking on the saturday, five days of medication,
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and all went well.— and all went well. that's great news, and all went well. that's great news. isn't — and all went well. that's great news, isn't it? _ and all went well. that's great news, isn't it? what— and all went well. that's great news, isn't it? what exactly i and all went well. that's great i news, isn't it? what exactly does it treat? is it your lungs, is it respiratory? what do you know about it? what were you told?— it? what were you told? initially, when i it? what were you told? initially, when i was _ it? what were you told? initially, when i was contacted, _ it? what were you told? initially, when i was contacted, i - it? what were you told? initially, when i was contacted, i was - it? what were you told? initially, when i was contacted, i was told | it? what were you told? initially, l when i was contacted, i was told a little bit about it, not in massive amount of detail. as i understand it, it is an antiviral drug that tries to stem the severity, if you like, of the symptoms. i do not know how it works, but it is supposed to make symptoms less severe, so you can hopefully have less likely of ending up hopefully have less likely of ending up in being hospital, which is certainly for my point of view, my symptoms were actually quite not very bad at all, so i was of eastleigh quite lucky, and they were quite mild in my case. whether the
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drugs had anything to do with that, we don't know.— we don't know. glyn, that is fantastic _ we don't know. glyn, that is fantastic to _ we don't know. glyn, that is fantastic to hear, _ we don't know. glyn, that is fantastic to hear, and - we don't know. glyn, that is fantastic to hear, and i- we don't know. glyn, that isj fantastic to hear, and i hope we don't know. glyn, that is - fantastic to hear, and i hope your recovery continues. glyn talling, thank you very much indeed. thank you. two people are to be questioned over a christmas party held for the conservative conservative for london mayor shaun bailey last december, but there were no... a statement said that there was a spate of significant amount of material being provided. now, she's been one of the leading stars of strictly this year, and this weekend the eastenders actress rose ayling—ellis is in the final. whether or not she walks away with the glitterball trophy, rose — who is profoundly deaf — has already had a huge impact.
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yvonne cobb is the presenter of the bbc�*s programme for the deaf community see hear and she looks now at how rose's participation has raised awareness. saturday night is a big night in for maddie and her best friend molly. good luck, rose. applause dancing the waltz, _ rose ayling—ellis and giovanni... rose ayling—ellis, better known as frankie lewis on eastenders, made history by becoming strictly come dancing's first deaf competitor. i was watching rose and ijust thought it was so... it was the first show that they included sign language on the television and i thought, "oh, i'd love to learn sign language." molly wasn't alone. there's a saturday night bump on internet searches on learning sign language. one british sign language website said enrolments in some courses were 20 times higher last month
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compared with august. so you both felt inspired to learn sign language. so what signs would you like to know? if you tell me, i can give you the signs. what do you want to learn? we'd love to learn, "keep dancing". that's obviously the classic strictly catchphrase, so if you could teach us that, that'd be awesome. so hands like this, and it's the same sign that means "carry on"... and dancing. well done. 0h, here's one. what about the recent dance? so this is the argentine tango. in the uk, around 150,000 people use british sign language, most of them are deaf. that makes it our fourth indigenous language. paula garfield is the co—founder of deafinitely theatre, a stage school for the deaf community.
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well, rose actuallyjoined deafinitely youth theatre when she was 17 years old, so probably going back to 2012. she's such a lovely young girl, and she engaged so well with everybody. she was a really quick learner and it was easy to see her natural talent. so i actually feel really privileged to see the changes that have been made in the last 20 years. the number of deaf actors has grown year upon year, and the majority of them have really started from deafinitely theatre and their careers are now soaring. so with rose being in strictly come dancing, what do you feel the impact of that will be? to see rose doing so well and gaining brilliant results is amazing. it gave me goose bumps and it shows the hearing community that deaf people can be included. rose has definitely made a positive impact for me. she's inspired me so much. she's done so many things. the fact that she's part
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of deafinitely theatre just shows us that we can do anything no matter what is in our way. do you think rose will win strictly? deafinitely! good luck, rose. for the sixth year in a row, the number of children in care who are adopted has fallen in england. the government says there's a growing need to find and recruit families to adopt the rising number of children who remain in the care system. as of march this year, there were almost 81,000 children in care. in 2015, nearly 5,500 children were adopted from the care system. but this year, that number had dropped tojust under 3,000 children. adoption uk describes this as a tragedy and says "hard to place" children, who are often older, in sibling groups, from an ethnic minority or with disabilities,
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desperately need parents. jeremy cooke reports. adoption changes children's lives. just gets funnier, cuter. it rewrites their futures. really, really important in getting the children a forever family. but adoption numbers have fallen dramatically. we need to be doing much more to find homes for these children. when adoption goes well, it can look like this. sibling groups can be among the growing number of kids classed as hard to place. but kara and gordon were up for it. i think both of us felt a bond with them and they were our children. that's me and that's lucas. and that's daddy. the kids arrived eight years ago. they know their history. there are no secrets.
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it's when you have a family and sometimes you get taken away because sometimes they are mean or something and then you get in to a different family. hard to think that for lucas, this could have been his last chance to be adopted. if we hadn't adopted him, i think he was going to foster care. yeah, yeah. there's no shortage of parents ready to take on newborn babies. the problem is with the older kids. we still can't find families for those children who we know need adoption and are waiting longer. and those are the children that are older, part of sibling groups, children from black heritage and with additional complex needs. adoption agencies like west yorkshire 0ne are vital to make the system work. chloe is a family finder. every one of her computer profiles
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is a child that she's come to know and to care about. this one says a is a happy baby, always has a smile to share. got a lot of stability in terms of their homes and their finances... across the room, sophie and jenny working to recruit parents, looking for the perfect match — adoption a last but necessary resort. 0ur role is really important in getting those children a forever family and moving out and giving them a much better life chances than what they would do as a looked after child in the local authority care. ok, so let me help you, darling. of course, every family faces challenges, but children who are adopted have experienced trauma. and that can start even before they're born. they've got all this trauma that's been caused by these various different events which has impacted on them without a shadow of a doubt. for children who've lived through it, trauma has consequences and memories. you don't get fed at all. you get dirty nappies all the time.
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you just have a bad house and then you've got to live with that. for me, it was two years. meet bea and lee and their daughter, another example of a potentially hard to place child. we got an email. it was a grainy photo. that instant connection. we just both started crying. yeah, we just cried a lot. oh, my gosh. this is our daughter. yeah, they weren't sure if she'd ever talk. you guys were going to love her anyway. yeah. oh, yeah, absolutely. the hard fact is that the number of adoptions from care have been falling. every single one of those is a tragedy. those is a child that doesn't have a permanent family home. we should be very worried about this. we should be looking for the solutions. i'm starting again.
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it's hard to think of anything more fundamental, more vital, than providing a child with a secure and loving home. i can't imagine life without them. i really can't. jeremy cooke, bbc news. hello there. it's been another grey, gloomy day for most of us, but there were some lovely spells of sunshine across eastern england in particular, and also parts of scotland. here's a lovely sunset picture from one of our weather watchers in 0rkney — they did have a few showers there, as well. but for friday and, indeed, into the weekend, for most people, skies will look like this — it'll be rather grey and cloudy, but mainly dry, thanks to that blocking area of pressure. some dense fog likely to develop across the eastern side of england, where the skies will remain clear. could cause some problems through tomorrow morning, you can see the temperatures lower where we have the clear skies — otherwise elsewhere, with the cloud, the mist and the murk, no lower than around 5—7 celsius. 0ur area of high pressure then sticks by into the weekend, starts to migrate a bit further
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northwards, closer to iceland — that means they could see some cooler northeasterlies picking up certainly on sunday. for the short—term, though, for friday, we're still in the fairly mild air mass, another rather grey and gloomy day for most of us, limited sunshine, perhaps the best of it again across the northeast of the uk. temperatures a little bit lower across the north than what we had on thursday — double—figure values across the south and west, maybe a bit breezier here, too. friday night, we hold onto a lot of the cloud, clearer skies across scotland, parts of northern england — so it's here where we'll see the lowest temperatures, a touch of frost there, but further south, it will be milder with more of a cloud and more of a breeze. so for the weekend, we're onto a blocking area of high pressure — very little change, it stays cloudy and mostly dry, and it will be turning cooler, like i mentioned. saturday, probably the best of the sunshine will be across scotland, northern england, the higher ground poking out of the low cloud here, because it will be a rather grey, gloomy day further south. top temperatures, 10—11 celsius in the south, a little bit cooler further north.
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that cooler air filters slowly southwards on sunday — again, a lot of cloud, limited spells of brightness, probably the best of it again across scotland and northern england. those temperatures in single figures right across the board through sunday afternoon. and we start to see that cold air filter southwards, we think, next week during the run—up to christmas, could even see a few wintry showers mixed in, as well — you'll have to watch this space. there is signs some computer models want to try and push something more unsettled and milder into the southwest. we could become a bit of a battleground with the air masses. but at the moment, it's looking like staying on the cold side.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a new record number of confirmed covid cases in the uk — more than 88 thousand in the past 24 hours a record also for the number of boosterjabs — nearly three quarters of a million britons were jabbed in the last 24 hour period. 0micron continues to spread in europe — france says it will shut its borders to most british travellers from saturday. also ahead — the sex—trafficking trial of ghislaine maxwell enters a new phase — as the defence starts to outline its case — we'll have the latest live from new york. and — we hear from the only british woman to be convicted of travelling to syria to join islamic state — about how she now feels shame about what she did.
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know i remember feeling know i rememberfeeling really, like, ashamed of myself to some

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