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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 19, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with chris mason and nina warhurst. our headlines today: another blow for borisjohnson as the brexit minister, lord frost, resigns, saying he is concerned about the government's direction of travel. omicron cases continue to surge in the uk as a major incident is declared in london. the mayor of london says he is extremely concerned. he is warning that hospitals like this one face a difficult christmas. eastenders actor rose ayling—ellis dazzles on the dancefloor to become
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the first deaf contestant to win strictly. wickets for england as they look to stay in with a chance against australia. steve smith goes early for the aussies in the second ashes test, but england are still well behind in adelaide. good morning. it is a cold start to the day out there and we've got some mist and some dense fog patches around as well. some places will see around as well. some places will see a bit of sunshine later on. i'll have all the details here on bbc breakfast. it is sunday 19 december. our main story: the brexit minister, lord frost, has resigned because of his concerns about the current direction of the government, including its approach to tax and to covid restrictions. it is another setback for borisjohnson after by—election defeat in north shropshire and a conservative rebellion over plan b covid measues. here is our political correspondent damian grammaticas.
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lord frost's resignation is without doubt another blow to boris johnson, delivered right at the time the prime minister is at its weakest since coming to office. a one—time diplomat, david frost was brought in just days after borisjohnson became prime minister to negotiate a brexit deal. he helped mistjohnson when the backing of hardline brexit supporters in this party, advocating tough approach to brussels. the gap between us is _ tough approach to brussels. the gap between us is still _ tough approach to brussels. the gap between us is still quite _ between us is still quite significant.— between us is still quite significant. between us is still quite siunificant. , . , significant. here securing mist johnson's brexit _ significant. here securing mist johnson's brexit and _ significant. here securing mist johnson's brexit and his - significant. here securing mist johnson's brexit and his win i significant. here securing mist johnson's brexit and his win at significant. here securing mist - johnson's brexit and his win at the general election. in turn, the prime minister made him a lord and elevated him to the cabinet. at that table he has been arguing loudly against decisions. he was opposed to the recent re— imposition of covert restrictions and also to increasing national insurance to pay for social care. in his resignation letter to borisjohnson, he wrote: adding, he
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wanted the uk to become a lightly regulated, low tax country. saying on covid, he hoped the government would not be tempted by the kind of coercive measures we have seen elsewhere. he set out his beliefs in a recent speech. i elsewhere. he set out his beliefs in a recent speech.— a recent speech. i personally will arc ue as a recent speech. i personally will argue as strongly _ a recent speech. i personally will argue as strongly as _ a recent speech. i personally will argue as strongly as i _ a recent speech. i personally will argue as strongly as i can - a recent speech. i personally will argue as strongly as i can that i argue as strongly as i can that free—market capitalism, low taxes, free—market capitalism, low taxes, free speech and the maximum possible amount of economic and political freedom for individuals are the best choices we could make as a country. in reply, borisjohnson wrote he was very sorry given everything you have achieved and contributed to government. but the timing could hardly be worse for mrjohnson. right after the shock by—election defeat for the tories in northrop share. now, the liberal democrats have said lord frost's resignation shows the rats are fleeing boris johnson's sinking ship. labour said the government was in total chaos. the noes to the left, 126. boris johnson's _ the noes to the left, 126. boris johnson's authority _ the noes to the left, 126. boris johnson's authority in - the noes to the left, 126. boris johnson's authority in his -
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the noes to the left, 126. boris johnson's authority in his party| the noes to the left, 126. boris johnson's authority in his party was weakened after 100 of his own mps rebelled against him in parliament over the covid restrictions. now some are saying time is running out for him. he has lost a minister who was key to getting him into office and he looks more vulnerable than ever. germany will ban most travellers from britain from entering the country from 11:00pm tonight uk time as it tries to slow the spread of the 0micron variant of coronavirus. german citizens and residents will still be able to travel, but they'll need proof of a negative covid test and will then have to isolate at home for two weeks, regardless of whether they've been vaccinated. a month—long lockdown has come into force in the netherlands this morning. all but essential shops will shut until mid—january, as well as bars, restaurants and cinemas. schools and colleges will also remain closed. the dutch prime minister, mark rutte, said immediate action was needed to prevent hospitals form becoming unmanagable. there has been a significant rise in the number of 0micron cases in the uk, with 10,000 reported yesterday.
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it comes amid calls for tougher restrictions before the end of the year. in london the mayor, sadiq khan, has declared a major incident, warning the nhs in the capital was at risk of being overwhelmed. dan johnson reports. some vaccination centres are now open 2a hours a day as the arms race against 0micron hits new records, but the new variant is still doubling case numbers every two days. we doubling case numbers every two da s. ~ . doubling case numbers every two da 5. ~ . . , , doubling case numbers every two das. . . _ days. we are incredibly concerned by the hue days. we are incredibly concerned by the huge surge _ days. we are incredibly concerned by the huge surge in — days. we are incredibly concerned by the huge surge in the _ days. we are incredibly concerned by the huge surge in the omicron - the huge surge in the 0micron variant over the last 2a hours, we have had the largest number of new cases since this pandemic began, more than 26,000 hospital admissions are going up, but also staff absences are going up by massive levels. so i have taken the decision in consultation with our partners to declare a major incident. it in consultation with our partners to declare a major incident.— declare a ma'or incident. it means more declare a major incident. it means more co-ordination _ declare a major incident. it means more co-ordination between - declare a major incident. it means| more co-ordination between public more co—ordination between public services and more support from central government, but scientific
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advisers suggest without tougher rules we could see 2000 hospital admissions every day in england in a fortnight. the admissions every day in england in a fortniuht. ., ., ., , fortnight. the move towards some sorts of further _ fortnight. the move towards some sorts of further restrictions - fortnight. the move towards some sorts of further restrictions on - sorts of further restrictions on movement and mixing probably will come about because the problem, really, is how high this peak will go. if it goes very high then the health service will substantially come under pressure, and also if it carries on going at the rate it is, many people who have been working in other industries, in shops, in food outlets, in delivery, all that sort of thing, many of them will be having to self isolate because they have been positive. tiny;t having to self isolate because they have been positive.— have been positive. they say dela in: have been positive. they say delaying until— have been positive. they say delaying until next _ have been positive. they say delaying until next year - have been positive. they say| delaying until next year would greatly reduce the effectiveness of restrictions. we will get more data about 0micron in a week or so, but if the nhs is to cope with this wave through if the nhs is to cope with this wave throuthanuary, big, possibly through january, big, possibly difficult throuthanuary, big, possibly difficult decisions may need to be made before then.
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as we heard in that report, london has declared a major incident as 0micron cases surge. simonjones is outside a hospital in central london. simon, what pressures are nhs staff under right now? yes, the mayor of london is warning that hospitals like this one are going under massive pressure. now, he has been looking at the latest statistics that show that yesterday london recorded its highest ever number of covid—19 cases, currently around 1500 patients in london's hospitals who have covid—19. that is putting pressure on the staff caring for that number of patients, and also an increasing number of staff are having to come off work because they have developed covid—19 themselves. that is adding to this pressure. that is why the mayor has declared a major incident. what does that mean? well, it partly shows the
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seriousness of the situation, but it also means that the emergency services such as the nhs, the police, also the fire brigade, have to come together each and every day for a number of meetings to co—ordinate how best they can deal with this. what happens here in london is often reflected in other parts of the country in the following weeks. now, there is going to be a meeting today that is going to be a meeting today that is going to bring together michael gove and the leader of the devolved nations so they can all discuss theirjoint response to this. the mayor of london says the best thing people can do is get vaccinated, particularly booster vaccinations, so there are a number of pop—up centres that have been going up here in london and across the country this weekend, and that will continue in the coming days in the run—up to christmas. but overall, it is a worrying situation. some are calling on the government to go further and faster when it comes to restrictions. the current view from the government here, though, is they
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need time to see how effective plan b is in england and also the effectiveness of the booster campaign. they are watching and waiting, but some growing calls now for more action to be taken. thank ou, for more action to be taken. thank you. simon- _ the number of shoppers in london and other large city centres yesterday fell by between 8% and 15% compared with last weekend. retailers had been hoping for an increase in footfall and sales on the final saturday trading before christmas. our business correspondent caroline davies has the details. # peace on earth and mercy mild... it's the weekend before christmas, the crescendo of present shopping. will worries about 0micron dampen buying? mustapha's chocolates are selling, but not necessarily in the shop. the footfall is massively down, and online is kind of covering that. which is expected, in a way, really.
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but then obviously that increases expenses, your postage, your boxing, and all that kind of stuff. and also you lose the personal touch with people, which for me is absolutely crucial for my business. rather than peak trading, yesterday footfall at uk retail destinations was flat on last saturday. city centres, particularly london, dropped but local high streets did rise slightly. in central london, a tube strike might have made journeys to town more difficult, but some were still happy to hit the shops. it's not busy today at all, no. and we've only come down because we've just had covid, and so we're safe. it's fine, i'm not that... yeah, i'm not that wary of it. i mean, yeah, it's something to keep in mind but still do the christmas shopping, don't let it stop you, yeah. just keeping a mask on and using lots of hand sanitiser. _ there are plenty of people who are out and about shopping today, but retailers had pinned such high hopes on this pre—christmas run—up that they are concerned that this might not be enough, and that could have ramifications
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well into the new year. there are worries that some businesses might not recover if the government doesn't step in. the art school restaurant in liverpool has seen 25% of bookings cancelled. the liverpool has seen 25% of bookings cancelled. ., liverpool has seen 2596 of bookings cancelled. ., , cancelled. the rule of thumb obviously — cancelled. the rule of thumb obviously is _ cancelled. the rule of thumb obviously is if _ cancelled. the rule of thumb obviously is if you _ cancelled. the rule of thumb obviously is if you don't - cancelled. the rule of thumb obviously is if you don't have cancelled. the rule of thumb i obviously is if you don't have a good festive period in the following year can be a very difficult one, and having just climbed up the mountain, since may of the reopening, we are very concerned that without support and without some mechanism from the government, that we will be in a bad position once more and sliding back down to the bottom, so to speak. the chancellor — the bottom, so to speak. the chancellor spoke _ the bottom, so to speak. the chancellor spoke to _ the bottom, so to speak. the chancellor spoke to businesses and industry leaders yesterday afternoon, but isn't currently expected to introduce new measures and is instead directing businesses to existing loan and support
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schemes. for many in retail and hospitality, the build—up to christmas is not looking like the bright salvation they were hoping for. caroline davies, bbc news. blamey, chris, we need something to cheer us up, don't we? if you don't want to know who won the strictly come dancing final, mute your tv and look away now. i feel like i should ifeel like i should pause here while people find the remote control. hopefully you have hit the mute button right now. the eastenders star rose ayling—ellis has become the first deaf contestant to take home the glitterball trophy. rose and her partner, giovanni pernice, beat tv chef john whaite and johannes radebe in the final. 0ur media and arts correspondent david sillito has all the details. welcome to strictly come dancing. it is the grand final... iliiui’ith welcome to strictly come dancing. it is the grand final. . ._ is the grand final... with the tv presenter _ is the grand final... with the tv presenter having _ is the grand final... with the tv presenter having to _ is the grand final... with the tv presenter having to pull - is the grand final... with the tv presenter having to pull out - is the grand final... with the tv - presenter having to pull out because of injury, it was a straight head—to—head final between the first male same—sex couple, john waits and
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his partner... and strictly�*s first deaf contestant, rose ayling—ellis, and giovanni pernice, a partnership that in this little burst of silence brought one of the tv moments of the year. rose ayling—ellis went on the show, she said, to change perceptions about the deaf community. it perceptions about the deaf community-— perceptions about the deaf community. perceptions about the deaf communi . . ., ., ., ., community. it changed a lot of thins, community. it changed a lot of things. and — community. it changed a lot of things. and it _ community. it changed a lot of things, and it made _ community. it changed a lot of things, and it made me - community. it changed a lot of things, and it made me realise community. it changed a lot of - things, and it made me realise how powerful dance can be. it shared my messages with the deaf community, and for me and for giovanni, and how he adapted to my role, ijust feel
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like this was a dance that said everything about my strictly journey. everything about my strictly “ourne . �* , everything about my strictly “ourne . v . ~ everything about my strictly “ourne . �*, .,~ ., everything about my strictly “ourne. �*, ., everything about my strictly “ourne . �*, .,~ ., ., journey. let's take a look at the final leaderboard. .. _ journey. let's take a look at the final leaderboard. .. the - journey. let's take a look at the final leaderboard. .. the judges | final leaderboard... the judges couldn't separate them, but the audience vote... brute couldn't separate them, but the audience vote. . ._ couldn't separate them, but the audience vote... we can now reveal the strictly — audience vote... we can now reveal the strictly come _ audience vote... we can now reveal the strictly come dancing _ audience vote... we can now reveall the strictly come dancing champions 2021arom— the strictly come dancing champions 2021 are... rose and giovanni. the culmination — 2021 are... rose and giovanni. the culmination of _ 2021 are... rose and giovanni. the culmination of 13 _ 2021 are... rose and giovanni. tue: culmination of 13 weeks 2021 are... rose and giovanni. tte: culmination of 13 weeks of 2021 are... rose and giovanni. t"t2 culmination of 13 weeks of dancing that has provoked applause, a lot of tears and inspired thousands to learn some sign language. i'm trying to work out if there were more tears this year than have been in previous years. lats more tears this year than have been in previous years.— in previous years. lots of tears and the buildup — in previous years. lots of tears and the buildup as— in previous years. lots of tears and the buildup as well, _ in previous years. lots of tears and the buildup as well, and _ in previous years. lots of tears and the buildup as well, and i - in previous years. lots of tears and the buildup as well, and i thought l the buildup as well, and i thought to have rows when it, someone that is death, we have not seen something with that much diversity. essen; with that much diversity. every sinale with that much diversity. every single night. — with that much diversity. every single night, someone - with that much diversity. every single night, someone would l with that much diversity. everyl single night, someone would be with that much diversity. every single night, someone would be asked a question and would start tearing up, judges, dancers,...—
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a question and would start tearing up, judges, dancers,... you're not suggesting — up, judges, dancers,... you're not suggesting it _ up, judges, dancers,... you're not suggesting it wasn't _ up, judges, dancers,... you're not suggesting it wasn't genuine - up, judges, dancers,... you're not suggesting it wasn't genuine are i suggesting it wasn't genuine are you? suggesting it wasn't genuine are ou? �* ., , suggesting it wasn't genuine are ou? �* ., ._ ., suggesting it wasn't genuine are ou? �* ., ., ., suggesting it wasn't genuine are ou? ., ., ., ~ you? are not saying that all! all that stuff with _ you? are not saying that all! all that stuff with the _ you? are not saying that all! all that stuff with the pandemic, i you? are not saying that all! alll that stuff with the pandemic, the exuberance and positivity. tt that stuff with the pandemic, the exuberance and positivity.- exuberance and positivity. it was contagious. _ exuberance and positivity. it was contagious. l— exuberance and positivity. it was contagious, i love _ exuberance and positivity. it was contagious, i love it. _ exuberance and positivity. it was contagious, i love it. 15 - exuberance and positivity. it was contagious, i love it. 15 minutes| contagious, i love it. 15 minutes past six, otherwise known as quarter past six, otherwise known as quarter past six. let's take a look at the front pages. the mirror reports a warning from scientists that the 0micron variant could cause the worst wave of covid infections yet. however, the paper also reports that a record day for boosterjabs yesterday gives hope. the sunday telegraph reports that there is chaos inside number ten following the resignation of the brexit minister, lord frost, over coronavirus restrictions. it also reports that the prime minister is considering another national lockdown. and the times also leads on the resignation of boris johnson's key ally, reporting that lord frost resigned from his post because of concerns over the direction of the government. also featured on the front page are this year's
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strictly come dancing winners, rose and giovanni, who took home the glitterball trophy during last night's final. lots of pictures of the winning couple all over the sunday newspapers. nurses from jordan, syria and iraq who came to the uk as refugees are taking part in pilot project at hospitals in norfolk. while they work towards their uk nursing registration, the trust says their skills are incredibly valuable, especially when the nhs is struggling for staff. 0ur reporter nikki fox has been to meet them. a video taken by a nurse from his front door in syria.— a video taken by a nurse from his front door in syria. when we walked down the street, _ front door in syria. when we walked down the street, out _ front door in syria. when we walked down the street, out of— front door in syria. when we walked down the street, out of the - front door in syria. when we walked down the street, out of the blue, i down the street, out of the blue, you would see a person who was working right next to you lying down
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on the floor, bleeding from his head, and a dead body right next to you. you can't even imagine that. yes—men survive this massive explosion at the port in lebanon last year. bill explosion at the port in lebanon last ear. �* ., . , , last year. all of a sudden the bed “ust last year. all of a sudden the bed just moved. _ last year. all of a sudden the bed just moved. l— last year. all of a sudden the bed just moved, i thought _ last year. all of a sudden the bed just moved, i thought it - last year. all of a sudden the bed just moved, i thought it was - last year. all of a sudden the bed just moved, i thought it was an i just moved, i thought it was an earthquake, because i do not hear the blasted out yasmine. i went to volunteer at my university hospital in the er department, which is the emergency department, and it was chaotic. at such a young age, i was only 19. chaotic. at such a young age, i was only19. he chaotic. at such a young age, i was only 19. he is our patient, he is not feeling particularly well. the nhs has now — not feeling particularly well. the nhs has now offered their work at the norfolk foundation trust in great yarmouth. tt’s the norfolk foundation trust in great yarmouth.— the norfolk foundation trust in great yarmouth. it's like a win-win deal great yarmouth. it's like a win-win deal- they — great yarmouth. it's like a win-win deal. they need _ great yarmouth. it's like a win-win deal. they need me _ great yarmouth. it's like a win-win deal. they need me and _ great yarmouth. it's like a win-win deal. they need me and i - great yarmouth. it's like a win-win deal. they need me and i need - great yarmouth. it's like a win-win
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deal. they need me and i need thej deal. they need me and i need the safety, i need a betterfuture for myself. t safety, i need a better future for m self. ., myself. i am so, so, so, so grateful. — myself. i am so, so, so, so grateful. l _ myself. i am so, so, so, so grateful, i am _ myself. i am so, so, so, so grateful, i am working - myself. i am so, so, so, so grateful, i am working on l myself. i am so, so, so, so- grateful, i am working on mental health. _ grateful, i am working on mental health, because that everything i wanted _ health, because that everything i wanted to do back home but i couldn't _ wanted to do back home but i couldn't. you get to know the patients. _ couldn't. you get to know the patients, you work with them, talk to them. _ patients, you work with them, talk to them, you empathise with them, you connect— to them, you empathise with them, you connect to them, so that the best_ you connect to them, so that the besliob. — you connect to them, so that the bestjob, that's why i'm loving it. arriving _ bestjob, that's why i'm loving it. arriving in — bestjob, that's why i'm loving it. arriving in the uk with no support is not easy. have you bought any christmas cards? does my volunteers from a charity called reset have been paired with them, offering practical advice — that's why. you've got this halal shopping here, look at this most key if you want to go to bed, so they are showing us what to do and how to rent and staff. , , ., , ., what to do and how to rent and staff. ,, ., i. , , what to do and how to rent and staff. ,, ., i, staff. the issue for you guys as they don't _ staff. the issue for you guys as they don't accept _ staff. the issue for you guys as they don't accept anybody - staff. the issue for you guys as| they don't accept anybody under staff. the issue for you guys as - they don't accept anybody under the age of 25. that even show them around local events. tt’s age of 25. that even show them around local events.— age of 25. that even show them around local events. it's all about eace. around local events. it's all about peace- it's _ around local events. it's all about peace- it's all _ around local events. it's all about peace. it's all about _ around local events. it's all about peace. it's all about peace, - peace. it's all about peace, absolutely. _ peace. it's all about peace, absolutely. i— peace. it's all about peace, absolutely. i am _ peace. it's all about peace, i absolutely. i am overwhelmed peace. it's all about peace, - absolutely. i am overwhelmed by their ability— absolutely. i am overwhelmed by their ability to _ absolutely. i am overwhelmed by their ability to pick _ absolutely. i am overwhelmed by their ability to pick things - absolutely. i am overwhelmed by their ability to pick things up, - their ability to pick things up, their ability to pick things up, their courage, because they are only
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young, and they come here without any family support, and yet after the first couple of weeks, theyjust jumped in and got on with it. we are desperate for nurses, aren't we? it has to be of great benefit to us, surely. has to be of great benefit to us, surel . ,, . , has to be of great benefit to us, surel . ,, .,, ., ., ~ ., . surely. the nhs has a huge workforce shortaae. surely. the nhs has a huge workforce shortage- in — surely. the nhs has a huge workforce shortage. in some _ surely. the nhs has a huge workforce shortage. in some places _ surely. the nhs has a huge workforce shortage. in some places one - surely. the nhs has a huge workforce shortage. in some places one in - surely. the nhs has a huge workforce shortage. in some places one in five l shortage. in some places one in five nursing posts is unfelt. it's hoped people like khaled and yasmine will contribute to the healthcare system for years to come. tt contribute to the healthcare system for years to come.— contribute to the healthcare system for years to come. it makes me feel that i for years to come. it makes me feel that i want — for years to come. it makes me feel that i want to _ for years to come. it makes me feel that i want to get _ for years to come. it makes me feel that i want to get learning _ for years to come. it makes me feel that i want to get learning and - for years to come. it makes me feel that i want to get learning and i - that i want to get learning and i want to get this and this and this done, so sometimes it is really overwhelming, there are a lot of things to do! butjust take it in baby steps, yeah. t things to do! but “ust take it in baby steps. yeah?— things to do! but “ust take it in baby steps. yeah-j— things to do! but “ust take it in baby steps, yeah. ifeel like... i'm alive. gosh, beautiful. that report was by our correspondent nikki fox. time to check—in for sunday in the
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week ahead for the weather. good morning to you sarah. goad week ahead for the weather. good morning to you sarah. good morning to ou morning to you sarah. good morning to you chris — morning to you sarah. good morning to you chris and _ morning to you sarah. good morning to you chris and nina _ morning to you sarah. good morning to you chris and nina and _ morning to you sarah. good morning to you chris and nina and good - to you chris and nina and good morning to you at home. no great change in the weather, high—pressure driving things, so a very settled speu driving things, so a very settled spell of weather out there at the moment, a cold start of the morning and we have some fairly dense fog patches around as well but expect a bit of sunshine to break through, particularly in the north and the west but most of us will keep a fair amount of cloud, although largely dry conditions because high—pressure is still inside of our weather, it has been here for quite a few days now, we have a weak cold front pointing to the far north of scotland, that will introduce sunshine through shetland, and there will be sunshine here and therefore tuesday, but western scotland, into wales, brightest kaizen for northern ireland in south—west england we could see of blue sky as well but for central and eastern england in scotland, you will be hit with that low crowd de mist and fog lingering all day, and some drizzle coming out of that cloud on the east, so temperatures are most of us between
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4-9 , temperatures are most of us between 4—9 , we could just about see double figures in the south—west but cool sort of day, particularly when you stuck under the current cloud. it was they mostly try and cloudy, they will be some mist and fog developing but probably not quite as extensive as it has been over the past couple of nights and we will see the frost once again i'm a part of scotland but less cold elsewhere, last night we saw temperatures down to —8.2 degrees, and it won't be quite as cold this coming night. through the day tomorrow, high—pressure, still with us, so more of the same to come, largely dry with a fair amount of cloud but what you will notice is a more breaks in that cloud, particularly for central and eastern parts of england, have not really seen the sun sign for quite a while but there will be blue sky around, generally a fair amount of cloud across the uk, the best of the brightness across the north of scotland but it will feel quite chilly, a few degrees there in aberdeen, and we could just see double figures in the far south—west. the run—up to christmas,
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the week ahead, it looks like high—pressure, gradually starting to ease away towards the east and we will see a cold front for a time in from the north but it is almost to the atlantic from the middle of the week onwards thursday and friday, weather fronts trying to push on from the atlantic, so we have that battleground, cold air with us so much of the week, heading towards christmas eve, potentially something mild like working in from the south—west and as those weather ambassadors collide, we will start to see something more unsettled, so in the next few days largely dry an
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overnight fast and into the run up at christmas we will see things turning more unsettled by don't take these symbols too literally because we could well see perhaps some sleet and snow on the leading edge, potentially turning back to rain so all eyes on the forecast as we firm up all eyes on the forecast as we firm up on the festive forecast for the next few days. up on the festive forecast for the next few days-— next few days. two degrees in aberdeen! _ next few days. two degrees in aberdeen! blimey. _ the booster vaccination programme has seen nhs staff and volunteers working around the clock to deliver jabs to millions of people. in the most recent 24—hour period, 817,000 booster or third dose vaccines were administered, which brings the total number of booster jabs to more than 27 million. it comes as coronavirus cases continue to surge — yesterday the number of infections exceeded 90,000 for the second day running. we're joined now by one of our regular gps, doctor sarah jarvis. she is a gp in west london. good to see you. a major incident declared in the capital, meaning public services have to reconfigure and work together to work out how to manage the situation. what does that look like on the ground to you? tt’s
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look like on the ground to you? it's re look like on the ground to you? it's pretty scary stuff, an awful lot of people _ pretty scary stuff, an awful lot of people who are reporting having symptoms but perhaps most worryingly of all got _ symptoms but perhaps most worryingly of all got an awful lot of hospital and general practice staff. the hospitalisations have gone up, about 28~7%_ hospitalisations have gone up, about 287% in_ hospitalisations have gone up, about 28.7% in london compared to 8% nationally. — 28.7% in london compared to 8% nationally, and of course london is a week_ nationally, and of course london is a week or— nationally, and of course london is a week or two ahead of the rest of the country. — a week or two ahead of the rest of the country, so that gives an indication— the country, so that gives an indication of what the rest of the counlry— indication of what the rest of the country is — indication of what the rest of the country is coming to it in the next couple _ country is coming to it in the next couple of— country is coming to it in the next couple of weeks, and we have almost travelled _ couple of weeks, and we have almost travelled the number of staff across london _ travelled the number of staff across london who are off because they are self—isolating due to covid, that of 191%. _ self—isolating due to covid, that of 191%, almost three times what it was a week_ 191%, almost three times what it was a week ago — 191%, almost three times what it was a week ago. that is what really worries— a week ago. that is what really worries me, the double whammy, the combination— worries me, the double whammy, the combination of more people consulting the general practice than ever. _ consulting the general practice than ever. and _ consulting the general practice than ever, and asked trying to give all the vaccines at the same time, and hospitalisations going up, but also staff being off. is hospitalisations going up, but also staff being off-— staff being off. is there an argument _ staff being off. is there an argument that _ staff being off. is there an argument that says - staff being off. is there an argument that says it - staff being off. is there an argument that says it is i staff being off. is there an - argument that says it is worrying, the transmissibility of the 0micron variant but there are some indicators that say there is not quite as potent as delta. the very
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early evidence _ quite as potent as delta. the very early evidence is _ quite as potent as delta. the very early evidence is that _ quite as potent as delta. the very early evidence is that it _ quite as potent as delta. the very early evidence is that it is - quite as potent as delta. the very early evidence is that it is not, i early evidence is that it is not, and _ early evidence is that it is not, and there _ early evidence is that it is not, and there was a very recent report out recently — and there was a very recent report out recently which came from south africa _ out recently which came from south africa which is where this variant was first— africa which is where this variant was first discovered, it may not have _ was first discovered, it may not have started there but it was where it was _ have started there but it was where it was first — have started there but it was where it was first discovered, and it suggests— it was first discovered, and it suggests that it is about 29% less likely— suggests that it is about 29% less likely to _ suggests that it is about 29% less likely to cause hospitalisation, which — likely to cause hospitalisation, which sounds great, but if you have one third _ which sounds great, but if you have one third fewer hospitalisations by three _ one third fewer hospitalisations by three times as many people catching it, three times as many people catching it. then _ three times as many people catching it. then a _ three times as many people catching it, then a smaller percentage of a much _ it, then a smaller percentage of a much bigger number could still mean a very— much bigger number could still mean a very large _ much bigger number could still mean a very large number. what much bigger number could still mean a very large number.— a very large number. what you see the solution _ a very large number. what you see the solution is _ a very large number. what you see the solution is being _ a very large number. what you see the solution is being then? - a very large number. what you see the solution is being then? i - a very large number. what you see the solution is being then? i thinkl the solution is being then? i think i'm afraid that _ the solution is being then? i think i'm afraid that should _ the solution is being then? i think i'm afraid that should be - the solution is being then? i think i'm afraid that should be shutting | i'm afraid that should be shutting things— i'm afraid that should be shutting things down much more strictly now, the scientific kerry advisory group for emergency said three days ago there _ for emergency said three days ago there simply is not enough, this plan _ there simply is not enough, this plan is _ there simply is not enough, this plan is not — there simply is not enough, this plan is not enough, we need to be looking _ plan is not enough, we need to be looking at— plan is not enough, we need to be looking at what we were doing with
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step one _ looking at what we were doing with step one step two, where people were not to _ step one step two, where people were not to socialise indoors or if you were _ not to socialise indoors or if you were you — not to socialise indoors or if you were you had above all, one other household — were you had above all, one other household. i think i know it is difficult. _ household. i think i know it is difficult, and i of all people do not want — difficult, and i of all people do not want to be in this position, i cancelled — not want to be in this position, i cancelled as much as anyone and more than many— cancelled as much as anyone and more than many this christmas, but i did it ten— than many this christmas, but i did it ten days — than many this christmas, but i did it ten days ago, because this virus is doubling — it ten days ago, because this virus is doubling back everyone and one half days. — is doubling back everyone and one half days, and that means every two days we _ half days, and that means every two days we delay we have seven days until christmas, six days until christmas, but we could have a times the number— christmas, but we could have a times the number of infections by christmas if we do not do anything. you must _ christmas if we do not do anything. you must have seen after two years now, the wider impacts of when we have a lockdown on like social care and children disappear between two behind closed doors and it is your opinion that at this point is worth it? i opinion that at this point is worth it? 4' ., ., ., ., it? i think we have learned a lot from the original—
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it? i think we have learned a lot from the original stages, - it? i think we have learned a lot from the original stages, we - it? i think we have learned a lot i from the original stages, we have -ot from the original stages, we have got of— from the original stages, we have got of course people who were incredibly socially isolated during the first — incredibly socially isolated during the first lockdown because we did not know — the first lockdown because we did not know then and we just told people — not know then and we just told people to _ not know then and we just told people to lock themselves away and not be _ people to lock themselves away and not be in _ people to lock themselves away and not be in contact with anybody, and since _ not be in contact with anybody, and since then— not be in contact with anybody, and since then of course, there has been all the _ since then of course, there has been all the advice about bubbling because we have understood about people _ because we have understood about people 's _ because we have understood about people 's mental health but one of the things— people 's mental health but one of the things i am hearing from patients— the things i am hearing from patients is that they are worried about— patients is that they are worried about the — patients is that they are worried about the mental health of lockdown but much _ about the mental health of lockdown but much more worried that if we don't _ but much more worried that if we don't lockdown, they are being put at risk— don't lockdown, they are being put at risk by— don't lockdown, they are being put at risk by other people and are effectively having to completely isolate — effectively having to completely isolate themselves and they can't even _ isolate themselves and they can't even go _ isolate themselves and they can't even go out and about because they are so— even go out and about because they are so scared at the amount of infection— are so scared at the amount of infection out there.— are so scared at the amount of infection out there. doctor sarah jarvis, i infection out there. doctor sarah jarvis. i think — infection out there. doctor sarah jarvis, i think the _ infection out there. doctor sarah jarvis, i think the next _ infection out there. doctor sarah jarvis, i think the next week - i i jarvis, i think the next week — i hope the next week will go as well as it can do. have a lovely christmas. let's allow ourselves to imagine christmas... six days away now until christmas. from the mountain of wrapping paper on christmas morning, to your turkey dinner leftovers, the festive period can generate a huge amount of waste. more people are trying to do their bit
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for the planet, but how can you make your christmas the most sustainable time of the year? fiona lamdin has been finding out. christmas is often a time of excess and with top 20 expression our minds, many thinking about how to celebrate slightly differently does cop 26 -- cop 26. mum celebrate slightly differently does cop 26 —— cop 26. mum louise with 12—year—old eiler and ten—year—old male i want to have a greener christmas but aren't sure where to start. we have asked eco— expert sarah west to meet us here at york market for help. where do we start? it's a really expensive time of year both financially and in terms of the environment. if you are going to buy stuff, if you can try to buy stuff secondhand or pre— loved, that's fantastic, loads of amazing charity shops up another country but if you do need to buy something new, make
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sure it is good—quality and it lasts, and it will notjust love it away when the next fad comes along. what is the carbon cost of christmas? many of us don't know where to start. 20 miles away rebecca has one solution. when she realised last christmas 40 million crackers and up and —— end up in landfill. t crackers and up and -- end up in landfill. ., , crackers and up and -- end up in landfill. . , ., ., landfill. i had given my daughter a cracker that _ landfill. i had given my daughter a cracker that was _ landfill. i had given my daughter a cracker that was saved _ landfill. i had given my daughter a cracker that was saved from - landfill. i had given my daughter a cracker that was saved from her i cracker that was saved from her first christmas and she destroyed it in seconds. at the time i was selling something for her christmas present, i knew! selling something for her christmas present, i knew i needed to make something that would last a lot longer. 12 something that would last a lot loner. ' ., , ., something that would last a lot loner.’ ., ,., , ., something that would last a lot loner. ., , ., longer. 12 months on sea salt thousands — longer. 12 months on sea salt thousands and _ longer. 12 months on sea salt thousands and is _ longer. 12 months on sea salt thousands and is sending - longer. 12 months on sea salt l thousands and is sending these longer. 12 months on sea salt - thousands and is sending these all over the world. fiur thousands and is sending these all over the world.— thousands and is sending these all over the world. our crackers unwrap, the don't over the world. our crackers unwrap, they don't snap. _ over the world. our crackers unwrap, they don't snap, these _ over the world. our crackers unwrap, they don't snap, these were - over the world. our crackers unwrap, they don't snap, these were based i over the world. our crackers unwrap, | they don't snap, these were based on they don't snap, these were based on the very first crackers that were ever made, which were based on the french model. ever made, which were based on the french model-— french model. back at the christmas market, french model. back at the christmas market. mum _ french model. back at the christmas market, mum louise _ french model. back at the christmas market, mum louise loves _ french model. back at the christmas market, mum louise loves her- french model. back at the christmas | market, mum louise loves her festive market, mum louise loves herfestive eliminations. the market, mum louise loves her festive eliminations— eliminations. the key thing with like this try _ eliminations. the key thing with like this try to _ eliminations. the key thing with like this try to have _ eliminations. the key thing with like this try to have led - eliminations. the key thing with | like this try to have led because they are lower energy, and don't go
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overboard. don't go crazy weather, to have a time i may be so you don't have to have your lights on all the time. ~ ., ., ., ., , , time. what we do with our wrapping -a er? time. what we do with our wrapping paper? what — time. what we do with our wrapping paper? what you — time. what we do with our wrapping paper? what you need _ time. what we do with our wrapping paper? what you need to _ time. what we do with our wrapping paper? what you need to do - time. what we do with our wrapping paper? what you need to do with i time. what we do with our wrapping l paper? what you need to do with your wra tlnt paper? what you need to do with your wrapping paper— paper? what you need to do with your wrapping paper is _ paper? what you need to do with your wrapping paper is first _ paper? what you need to do with your wrapping paper is first of _ paper? what you need to do with your wrapping paper is first of all _ paper? what you need to do with your wrapping paper is first of all take - wrapping paper is first of all take off the sellotape because sellotape can't be recycled, and then you need to, crunch your wrapping paper, and if it stays scrunched up, that means you can recycle at. if you crunch it and it expands back out again that means it can't be recycled, so with that type of wrapping paper, save it for next year, you can use it again. she is not the only one wanting you to save and reuse next year. sarah has 200 and always bruises she rents out. , . , out. these all the trees in the field, out. these all the trees in the field. we _ out. these all the trees in the field, we have _ out. these all the trees in the field, we have them _ out. these all the trees in the field, we have them all- out. these all the trees in the field, we have them all in - out. these all the trees in the | field, we have them all in rows out. these all the trees in the i field, we have them all in rows in different sizes and when we get to neara different sizes and when we get to near a christmas tree pulled them out of holes on the ground on their parts and drag them up ready to take your customers for their holidays. three weeks later when christmas is
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over, she will collect them and replant them back in the field. aha, replant them back in the field. six foot three is probably ten years old and when you cut it down it emits 16 kilograms of carbon back into the environment which is not good for us, so when you keep a living tree alive itjust absorbs that carbon agrees that in and help so our quality. that carbon agrees that in and help so our quality-— so our quality. back in york, ireland so our quality. back in york, lreland and _ so our quality. back in york, ireland and her— so our quality. back in york, ireland and her family - so our quality. back in york, ireland and her family havel so our quality. back in york, - ireland and her family have made ireland and herfamily have made some progress. has it changed your shopping habits? t some progress. has it changed your shopping habits?— shopping habits? i think that this would be a _ shopping habits? i think that this would be a really _ shopping habits? i think that this would be a really good _ shopping habits? i think that this would be a really good present i shopping habits? i think that thisl would be a really good present for my nanna instead of a scarf. we're nott in: my nanna instead of a scarf. we're not trying to _ my nanna instead of a scarf. we're not trying to take _ my nanna instead of a scarf. we're not trying to take the _ my nanna instead of a scarf. we're not trying to take the sparkle - my nanna instead of a scarf. we're not trying to take the sparkle out l not trying to take the sparkle out of christmas, it's a really important overspending with our loved _ important overspending with our loved ones a time when you can take stock— loved ones a time when you can take stock and _ loved ones a time when you can take stock and make resolutions about being _ stock and make resolutions about being greener. stock and make resolutions about being greener-— stock and make resolutions about being greener. stock and make resolutions about bein: ureener. , , ., , ., ., being greener. they usually dream of a white christmas _ being greener. they usually dream of a white christmas but _ being greener. they usually dream of a white christmas but with _ being greener. they usually dream of a white christmas but with all- being greener. they usually dream of a white christmas but with all these l a white christmas but with all these tips, hopefully it will be a green one. what i like doing is you know if somebody buys your kids are present in one of those gift bags, just
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reuse that. t in one of those gift bags, “ust mi in one of those gift bags, “ust reuse that. ., , ,, , ., reuse that. i always think you can make a virtue _ reuse that. i always think you can make a virtue about _ reuse that. i always think you can make a virtue about not - reuse that. i always think you can make a virtue about not wrapping presents up, or say that you are thinking green.— presents up, or say that you are thinking green. your poor children. i have thinking green. your poor children. i have been — thinking green. your poor children. i have been doing _ thinking green. your poor children. i have been doing it _ thinking green. your poor children. i have been doing it for— thinking green. your poor children. i have been doing it for the - i have been doing it for the children, but the others can just get it in a carrier bag or whatever. although there is something lovely about tearing open the paper. tt about tearing open the paper. tit doesn't necessarily look quite as festive and in keeping with the season, but...— festive and in keeping with the season, but... what do you think, gabrielle? — season, but... what do you think, gabrielle? absolutely, _ season, but... what do you think, gabrielle? absolutely, you - season, but... what do you think, gabrielle? absolutely, you have i season, but... what do you think, i gabrielle? absolutely, you have got to no for gabrielle? absolutely, you have got to go for it- — gabrielle? absolutely, you have got to go for it. what, _ gabrielle? absolutely, you have got to go for it. what, the _ gabrielle? absolutely, you have got to go for it. what, the full— to go for it. what, the full wrapping? _ to go for it. what, the full wrapping? why _ to go for it. what, the full wrapping? why not? - to go for it. what, the full wrapping? why not? you| to go for it. what, the full. wrapping? why not? you can to go for it. what, the full- wrapping? why not? you can peel it rentl and wrapping? why not? you can peel it gently and reuse — wrapping? why not? you can peel it gently and reuse it _ wrapping? why not? you can peel it gently and reuse it next _ wrapping? why not? you can peel it gently and reuse it next year, - wrapping? why not? you can peel it gently and reuse it next year, how i gently and reuse it next year, how is that? t gently and reuse it next year, how is that? . , ~ gently and reuse it next year, how is that? ., , ,, ., �* ., is that? i am “ust thinking don't do it at all. i is that? i am “ust thinking don't do it at an. ram’— is that? i am just thinking don't do it at all. i am thinking _ is that? i am just thinking don't do it at all. i am thinking i _ is that? i am just thinking don't do it at all. i am thinking i will - is that? i am just thinking don't do it at all. i am thinking i will not. it at all. i am thinking i will not no to it at all. i am thinking i will not go to chris _ it at all. i am thinking i will not go to chris mason's _ it at all. i am thinking i will not go to chris mason's house - it at all. i am thinking i will not go to chris mason's house at i go to chris mason's house at christmas. and there is no tensor. it is good for children, for the rest of us i find there is a lot of fuss at christmas.—
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fuss at christmas. the child is alive and _ fuss at christmas. the child is alive and well— fuss at christmas. the child is alive and well in _ fuss at christmas. the child is alive and well in gavin, - fuss at christmas. the child is alive and well in gavin, at - fuss at christmas. the child is alive and well in gavin, at the| alive and well in gavin, at the tender age of 21.— alive and well in gavin, at the tender age of 21. alive and well in gavin, at the tender are of 21. , ., ., ., tender age of 21. getting on now, to be honest- — we have a lot going on this morning. england started well in the ashes, and took some early wickets against australia in adelaide. australia were 282 runs ahead after dominating the first three days, stuart broad getting opener marcus harris here. quickly after, james anderson removed michael neser, jos buttler with the suberb catch there. and he also caught australia captain steve smith, ollie robinson with the crucial wicket, smith going forjust six. so far so positive, but the formidable duo of marnus labuschagne and travis head are at the crease.
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it was an odd premier league saturday, with five games postponed because of covid, so it was up to to arsenal and leeds to be the sole entertainment. and it didn't disappoint, with five goals in total as the gunners comfortably won 4—1, gabriel martinelli getting the first two. england internationals bukayo saka and emile smith rowe also both got on the scoresheet as arsenal made it three league wins in a row. they're fourth, whilst leeds are struggling in 16th. celtic could secure the first trophy of the ange postecoglou era in today's scottish league cup final. hibernian are their opponents at hampden park, led by interim manager david gray after the sacking ofjack ross ten days ago. in the premiership, rangers have extended their lead at the top with a 1—0 win over covid—hit dundee united. james tavernier scored the only goal of the game from the penalty spot. all european rugby games involving british and french sides are off this weekend due to france's travel restrictions.
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three were played yesterday, with harlequins beating a cardiff side who were missing 42 players because of quarantine, injuries and suspensions. it was 17—17 at half—time, but quins ran away with it in the second half, joe marchant�*s try clinching the bonus point in their second straight win in the champions cup. and look at these pictures from a foggy scotstoun as glasgow beat exeter 22—7 to keep alive their hopes of reaching the last 16 of the champions cup. somewhere in the middle of all that isjohnny matthews. his late try made sure they won their pool a match. at least the celebrations were nice and clear. britain's derek chisora has been beaten by new zealand's joseph parker in a heavyweight classic at the ao arena in manchester. it was decided on points after a strong start from parker, who had chisora down taking a count in round four. chisora was down again in the seventh and eighth, but managed to continue and made it to the final bell. but parker took the victory as he looks to get back to world title level.
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andy murray says he is targeting strong runs in the biggest tournaments next year after an impressive route to the final of the exhbition world tennis championship in abu dhabi. having beaten rafa nadal to get there, murray lost in straight sets to andrey rublev, although he did take the second set to a tiebreak against the world number five. rublev the winner, 6—4, 7—6. having not played competitively since a car crash in febuary, tiger woods is back on the golf course again with the aid of a buggy to help with his injured leg. he has been playing in an exhibition tournament alongside his son charlie, and talk about a chip off the old block. this is charlie putting all of us to shame, even his dad, at the pnc championship in florida.
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that was a wonderfully delivered putt. must be quite odd going out and playing golf when your dad is tiger woods. and playing golf when your dad is tiger woods-— tiger woods. absolutely, what a le . a tiger woods. absolutely, what a lea to tiger woods. absolutely, what a legacy to live — tiger woods. absolutely, what a legacy to live up _ tiger woods. absolutely, what a legacy to live up to. _ tiger woods. absolutely, what a legacy to live up to. he - tiger woods. absolutely, what a legacy to live up to. he looks i legacy to live up to. he looks really good, you know. i think you could be definitely one for the future. he has been trailed for quite some time, so something to look too, but it is unbelievable pressure to live up to. tiger woods is possibly the greatest of all time, incredible, isn't it? absolutely, nice to see you. now it's time for the travel show with rajan datar. coming up on the programme this week: it has been another challenging year for travel. but that has not stopped us from doing what we love best. hello and welcome to the travel show with me,
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rajan datar. there is no denying that 2021 will not go down as a great year for travel. hotels, airlines, tour operators and all of us who wanted to get away have had to cope with ever—changing rules and restrictions to do what we simply took for granted two years ago before the pandemic struck. so this week on the show we are looking back at 2021 and some of our favourite stories of the year. and it was a year when many of us started changing the way we think about travel. in a moment we have a report from mike in kenya about how the pandemic meant that many kenyans can now afford to take a safari holiday for the
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very first time. first up, sustainability was a big topic this year and that is why back in august i took a voyage on a ship that is hoping to change the way that some cruise passengers travel. the golden horizon weighs a whopping 8770 tons and took five years to be built in croatia. it is taking me on a 160 mile journey to the isle of wight off the south coast of england before heading to the mediterranean and croatian coast. captain, permission to come on bridge. yes, permission granted. please. now look at this. this is really high—tech. and yet you are the captain of a sailing ship with five masts and 42 sails. it is like a combination of old and new, right? yes, it is. it is not only the sails we need. we need the steering and the engine for the operation in the port. we need all this equipment to make the safe navigation of the seas.
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by using the sails, how much fuel are you saving? if we utilise the sails in the full power then we are only using the generators to produce energy we need for cooking and lights so it can be even up eight tonnes per day saving on the energy. there are 136 cabins and suites over the ship's four decks. this won't be a cheap holiday but what is on offer here is ver different to one of your regular mass—market traditional cruises. it is obvious that this is a very complex ship to operate and making things run smoothly takes a lot of skill and teamwork. the wonderful thing on a small ship and especially on a sailing ship is that when we have a lot of wind and a storm we all need
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to work together and rely on each other because sometimes we also have to go up in the rig on the yards up there and furl in the sails if the semiautomatic system doesn't work. that creates a lot of bonding but the only thing that counts here is skill. do you think this is the future? this is true sustainability. it is also time—proven sustainability because sailing ships have been around for hundreds of years and now we are coming back to something that we already know and developing it a little further. i have one more thing to try before i head back to land. just come here. so one leg. and that is to check out the view from the top. you are going to climb, ok? i will keep the tension. step on this all the way up. 0k.
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step and then step. and then step. look ahead. and then step. it is actually a lot higher than i thought. i will be honest with you, it is scary and it gets narrower. 0k. and this is the worst bit, for sure. hold on to where? this. and this one. this is also good to hold because it is not slippery. you might have to pull me. 0k. all right. victory! that was a little bit frightening. the view was well worth it. this has been such a different experience to being on board a bigger and more conventional modern cruise ship and it is hard to compare
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the two experiences. clearly nobody is suggesting that sail power will take the place of engines throughout the entire cruise industry. but the golden horizon and ships like her will open up more sustainable options and that can encourage more traditional cruise lines to up their game when it comes to things like emissions and waste. which hopefully can be a win for everybody. hello and welcome to kenya's maasai mara. one of the best game reserves in the entire world. and for good reason. local tourism authorities say that nowhere else africa has wildlife this abundant. in 2020 when international tourism largely stopped, a lot of high—end resorts had to come up with new ways to keep their
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rooms and theirjeeps full. there are not many nature reserves on earth quite as well—known as kenya's maasai mara. this is the final destination everyjuly and august for all the creatures involved in the great migration from the serengeti plains over the border in tanzania. there is around 1.5 million wildebeests alone, with a large number of zebra and antelope species joining thejourney. can we get closer to the elephant? do you want many? we want many. yeah, that would be good. this is wild, guys. one, two, three, four, five... 11. 11 lions. this is wild! they are just looking at us like what are we doing here? it is only 7:30.
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is this yourfirst time on safari? yes. 0k. and how do you feel being on safari? excited. we are excited. and we hope to do this again. why did you come now and not before? just because of the high rates. and now we can afford the rates. that's why we are here. last year saw a huge push to attract more kenyans to go on safari in their own country. normally this is an expensive trip, but prices have been dropped by almost half at some resorts. other luxury hotels offer tantalising package deals. and this is one of those places. in pre—covid times a stay here would put you back a little bit. during the pandemic there were special deals offered to local tourists and they have been a big hit. but some people are beginning to ask questions about the future. one pineapple mint for you.
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thank you. sorry, i spilt a little bit. no worries. what happens when borders reopen and wealthy foreigners start to return? harriet is a kenyan travel writer and she sees trouble ahead. if prices go high again i think these hotels will not have learned their lessons. i think the covid experience should have taught them a lesson in that they would have made fair prices. we do not need to use them when they are down and then dump them when things are good. there are some who will have learned from the lessons probably some who would have diversified, understood the kenyan market, what they like. even social media pages. it will make a difference having a kenyan or black people in there. changing times in kenyan. let's hope that prices stay reasonable there so that local people can still enjoy amazing wildlife in their own backyard.
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next up we are off to dubai where, like everywhere else, social distancing and safety measures were still things to consider this year. so we sent lucy out to explore the ways that you can enjoy the great outdoors without a mask. this is dubai aquafun, the brainchild of a young emirati entrepreneur called ahmed ben chaibah, who claims that it's the biggest inflatable waterpark in the world. against the backdrop of hotels and skyscrapers, and a short 25 metre swim from the beach, you will find a course made up of over 70 floating blowu p slippery slides, swings and other obstacles, all designed to test your stamina, balance and bravery. and after a bit of undignified clamber on board, i am ready to accept the challenge.
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it is a little slipperier than you think. come on, lucy! almost. i think i have been in the wa... i was just about to say, i think i have been in the water enough. 0.5 seconds and i did not even touch the obstacle. here we go! boo! that's what you've got to look out for. you might complete the obstacle, but the slipping at the end...every time. every time! something tells me i may have spoken too soon. i challenge anyone to get over
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this thing and stay dry. i'm unfit, yeah. i'm trying my hardest! but, most importantly, this is so much fun. 3, 2, 1... all right, here we go! woo! how can you not love the slide? i think i'm ready to get off now! well, now that i'm thoroughly soaked through, it's time to dry off. but i'm not heading back to the beach. instead, perhaps it's time to feel the wind in my very wet hair. how is this for a socially distanced experience?! these are the dubai hero boats, your own personal speedboat
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that lets you cut through the warm waters of the gulf at speeds of up to 50km/h. after a short instructional and safety tutorial, you'll stick to a vast, but designated course accompanied by a guide who's on hand to ensure that you stick to the rules whilst getting a high—speed and unique view of the dubai beaches and skyline. as far as rides go, this one is awesome, it is super easy to drive and brandon's nearby for safety just in case. you know, yeah, you could go pretty slow, but the real fun begins when you crank up the engine and, more importantly, you do it with no mask. well, there's no doubt that the star of our show in 2021 was a little blue electric van that we drove across the uk and ireland to test out how practical it was to travel sustainably whilst rediscovering attractions closer to home.
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and wherever we went, the van was certainly turning heads and we all had an absolute ball. this prototype is a reimagining of an old iconic morris motor. it's the first vehicle built by the company since the 1980s, and it's all electric. now, the original morrisj type came out in 1948 alongside the classic morris minor, which was the first british car to reach a million sales. so what we've done is stuck some portable hand controls on the car so i can drive it with my...with my hands, and because it's a van and there's plenty of room in there, we've just stuck my wheelchair in the back and away we go on our uk road
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tour for the travel show. there's more to the cairngorms than just walks and wildlife. adventure companies offer zip lining, canyoning and something called white water tubing — riding one of these rubber rings downriver. i was hoping to give it a go but the conditions were a little wild. so, what was the issue about the tubing today? the river's too high, it's in flood, so it wouldn't be safe. we couldn't actually stop you, you mightjust keep going. where do the rapids and? ah...the north sea. ok, yeah, that's an issue, isn't it? well, i might not be able to get out on the river, but kevin insisted i had a go on one of their longest zip lines. i am feeling a bit more nervous. i mean, i was quite chilled out about this, �*cause i'm like, zip wire, everyone does this, you know, kids do it, and now, looking down into that gorge, um...my nether regions have got a little bit tighter.
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two hands on top... and then i'll go. yeah, when you lift your legs up... i don't wanna do it! you're fine, you're fine. all right, here we go. 0h...bleep! screaming woo! whoa! there she is... scarbados! glinting in the sunshine. scarborough is the uk's oldest beach resort. this is where you come if you're looking for the proper old—school seaside traditions. got the ice cream parlours, you've got the slot machines, you've got the beach, the sea, the smell of fish and chips
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out the window. after a week in scotland, the electric van's still holding up well and getting a lot of love here on the south bay. how are you doing, guys? you all right? good! how are you? yes, really good, really good. we're travelling around scarborough and yorkshire. take care! 0i, it's you off the tale! how are ya? i'm all right. you? yeah, good, good! we're filming for the travel show. you're actually on camera there. look — come here, come here. look, look, look, look! say hello! hello. if it's seaside traditions you're after, this is the place to be. the harbour bar's been in scarborough for 75 years. these days, like all of us, it's doing its best to follow the covid guidelines with customers kept safely
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in the fresh air. i'm looking for your biggest, most extravagant and spectacular ice cream, yeah? i'll make the knickerbocker glory for you then? is that the one? yeah. it's flashy. . .and tasty? yeah. you know something's really good when you're sucking as hard as you can and you just can't get anything out. it's ridiculous. the shop's been open since the end of the second world war. giulian started working here when he was 12 and he's the third generation of his family to make and sell ice cream in scarborough. we've done 75 years, so we celebrated at the beginning of august. now, how confident are you about the future? oh, very confident, yeah. i think scarborough's. ..scarborough will do well. uh, therese and i have been talking about starting a family. laughing what's in these knickerbocker glories? is it something in these? theresa, did you hear that? idid, yes.
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i'm worried. i think giulian said twins! i leave the city for the rolling hills of the brecon beacons, less than an hour's drive from cardiff. the national park is home to over a thousand farms largely dedicated to livestock. and with over 250,000 visitors a year, one particularly savvy farmer has developed an interesting business model — trekking with sheep. he's checking me out. he'sjust checking, he's checking i'm all good. his problem is he can't really see very well because his hair is so long, it's in his face. meet patches, my new pal for the afternoon. do you want more food? i need to prove that i'm your friend. oh, it feels really weird on my hand! you've got a very warm tongue there, patches. come on! patches, you can have
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more food in a moment. the plan is to follow a trail around the farm with my fluffy companion. he's pretty obedient. sometimes he kind of veers to the left or right and i feel like i'm the one being walked. it turns out to be trickier than it looks. come on, patches. come on. so, nicola, since lockdown, have you seen demand for this experience growing? yeah, so a lot of people want to be outside in the open air. this experience, because we're able to be distanced, there isn't so much pressure on that and people just enjoy being with the sheep and being able to stroke the sheep and actually being able to physically be around them, whereas normally, theyjust see them in the fields and they run away! when we first opened, it was quite slow, we didn't really have that many people. i think people were a bit wary. they were like, "oh, really? walking sheep? i've not actually heard about that before."
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we started it because it was similar to alpaca trekking, but with sheep, it is more native, and we, ourselves, we're used to looking after sheep, whereas alpacas were something a bit different and a bit scary. back on the road, i'm heading into cork city. here, old stereotypes of ireland's conservative outlook are once again becoming outdated. a growing drag community has emerged in cork. they've been through a difficult covid period, and tonight will be the first public performance for some drag artists here since the pandemic began. we're ireland's first drag house and we're now the biggest house, other ones are springing up, and now there's this incredible scene where, like, you see all these different styles of drag and performers, which we didn't have before. tell me about how the pandemic affected you and the whole scene here. specifically, we're queer people in the lgbt+ community, again, our space has been taken away, and for the likes of myself and the other queens,
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our work was taken away. yet it's taught us a lot and what i've loved personally seeing is how resourceful queer people are. i haven't seen so of my friends in 18 months all in the same room. i haven't seen a proper audience in so long. but i'm ready to not do drag in my bedroom anymore! i'm very excited to go back on stage! just some of the places we went to, and some of the people we met thanks to our little blue electric van, undoubtedly the star of our show in 2021. well, that's all for us. coming up next week on the programme, another new face. steve brown joins the show as he explores japan and finds out what kind of effect hosting the paralympics there has had for travellers with disabilities. so i do hope that you can join him for that. in the meantime, from me,
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rajan datar, and everybody else on the programme, stay healthy, happy and hopeful at 2022 will be the year that we can finally all start travelling again. we'll see you in the new year. goodbye. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with chris mason and nina warhurst. our headlines today: another blow for borisjohnson as the brexit minister, lord frost, resigns, saying he is concerned about the government's direction of travel.
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omicron cases continue to surge in the uk as a major incident is declared in london. the mayor of london says he is extremely concerned. he is wanting that hospitals like this one are already under massive pressure. rose and giovanni. eastenders actor rose ayling—ellis dazzles on the dancefloor to become the first deaf contestant to win strictly. australia are looking to put england out of sight in the second ashes test. travis head reached his half—century before going after lunch on the fourth day, a brilliant catch from ben stokes here. england are still well behind, though, in adelaide. good morning. it's a cold start to the day out there, and we've got some mist and some dense fog patches around as well. but some places will see a bit of sunshine later on. i'll have all the details here on bbc breakfast. it is sunday 19 december.
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our main story: the brexit minister, lord frost, has resigned because of his concerns about the current direction of the government, including its approach to tax and to covid restrictions. it is another setback for borisjohnson after by—election defeat in north shropshire and a conservative rebellion over plan b covid measures. here is our political correspondent damian grammaticas. lord frost's resignation is without doubt another blow to borisjohnson, delivered right at the time the prime minister is at his weakest since coming to office. a one—time diplomat, david frost was brought in just days after borisjohnson became conservative leader to negotiate a brexit deal. he helped mrjohnson win the backing of hardline brexit supporters in his party, advocating a tough approach to brussels. the gap between us is still quite significant. here on the left, he was key to securing mrjohnson's brexit
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and his win at the general election. in return, the prime minister made him a lord and elevated him to the cabinet. but at that table, he has been arguing loudly against some of the prime minister's decisions. he was opposed to the recent re—imposition of covid restrictions and also to increasing national insurance to pay for social care. in his resignation letter to borisjohnson, he wrote, you know my concerns about the current direction of travel, adding he wanted the uk to become a lightly regulated, low—tax country, saying on covid he hoped the government would not be tempted by the kind of coercive measures we have seen elsewhere. he set out his beliefs in a recent speech. i personally will argue as strongly as i can that free—market capitalism, low taxes, free speech and the maximum possible amount of economic and political freedom for individuals are the best choices we could make as a country. in reply, borisjohnson wrote he was very sorry, given everything you have achieved and contributed to government.
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but the timing could hardly be worse for mrjohnson, right after the shock by—election defeat for the tories in north shropshire. now, the liberal democrats have said lord frost's resignation shows the rats are fleeing borisjohnson's sinking ship. labour said the government was in total chaos. the noes to the left, 126. boris johnson's authority in his party was weakened after 100 of his own mps rebelled against him in parliament over the covid restrictions. now, some are saying time is running out for him. he has lost a minister who was key to getting him into office, and he looks more vulnerable than ever. damian grammaticas, bbc news. our political correspondent charlotte rose joins us now. charlotte, what has the reaction been to lord frost's departure? plenty been to lord frost's departure? of people will be v who plenty of people will be wondering who is lord frost and why does this matter, but it will cause reverberations within westminster. yes, as you say, his resignation
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overnight quite a shock and it seems it has been for a number of different reasons. firstly his concern over the uk's softening approach towards brussels, but also his disagreement with a broader direction of travel of the government, something he mentioned in his letter to borisjohnson last night. he sees brexit as an opportunity for britain to have less regulation and for the uk economy to be opened up. he was also known to disagree with a tax rise that was introduced back in september to pay for social care, and he was one of the most vocal critics in cabinet of the most vocal critics in cabinet of the government's policy to introduce vaccine passports, something he described as a coercive measure. so what will the impact of his departure be? well, messages from the whatsapp group of 100 tory mps called clean global brexit was published by sky news last night. one mp said it was very worrying, another said it was a disaster. a third mp said that lord frost was a
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hero for delivering brexit. well, the culture secretary, who was a member of that whatsapp group, replied to them to say they should show more loyalty to borisjohnson, who had delivered an 83 seat majority for the party. in response to that, she was kicked out of that whatsapp group. now, i am sure there is going to be a lot of discussion on all the political programmes this morning about what exactly this will mean, but one thing is already very clear: a difficult week for the prime minister, but a lot more difficult because of lord frost's departure last night.— difficult because of lord frost's departure last night. thank you, charlotte- _ departure last night. thank you, charlotte. would _ departure last night. thank you, charlotte. would any _ departure last night. thank you, charlotte. would any of - departure last night. thank you, charlotte. would any of us - departure last night. thank you, i charlotte. would any of us survive departure last night. thank you, - charlotte. would any of us survive a wander through our private whatsapp groups? tt wander through our private whatsapp arou s? ., , wander through our private whatsapp u-rous? ., , ., ~ groups? it does not bear thinking about, chris. _ germany will ban most travellers from britain from entering the country from 11:00pm tonight uk time as it tries to slow the spread of the omicron variant of coronavirus. german citizens and residents will still be able to travel, but they'll need proof of a negative covid test and will then have to isolate at home for two weeks,
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regardless of whether they've been vaccinated. a month—long lockdown has come into force in the netherlands this morning. all but essential shops will shut until mid—january, as well as bars, restaurants and cinemas. schools and colleges will also remain closed. the dutch prime minister, mark rutte, said immediate action was needed to prevent hospitals form becoming unmanageable. there has been a significant rise in the number of omicron cases in the uk, with10,000 reported yesterday. it comes amid calls for tougher restrictions before the end of the year. in london the mayor, sadiq khan, has declared a major incident, warning the nhs in the capital was at risk of being overwhelmed. simonjones is outside a hospital in central london. simon, what pressures are nhs staff under right now?
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the mayor of london says the nhs is coming under a huge amount of pressure. he says they are facing massive demand. now, yesterday the uk overall recorded around 90,000 new covid cases, and omicron cases are doubling every couple of days. now, according to the mayor, staff at hospitals are having to cope with those patients, currently around 1500 patients in hospitals in london have covid, and also staff themselves are having to deal with themselves are having to deal with the pandemic. many of them are having to take time off because they have developed covid or having to deal with family members who have covid, and that is adding to the pressure. that is why the mayor has declared a major incident. that is partly two express just how serious this situation is, but it also gives you a sense of what the emergency services are dealing with. it is bringing them all together, several
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meetings each day — so you have the nhs, the fire service, the police and local councils coming together to look at how they can deal with this situation. now, the mayor says the best thing people can do is get their boosterjabs, so there are a number of pop—up clinics which have been taking place throughout the weekend. overall, though, a worrying situation, some calling for more restrictions. the view from the government, though, is they want to wait and see how effective plan b and the booster campaign is here in england. the number of shoppers in london and other large city centres yesterday fell by between 8% and 15% compared with last weekend. retailers had been hoping for an increase in footfall and sales on the final saturday trading before christmas. local high streets fared a little better but many businesses have turned to online sales.
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# bam bam! that was good. i want you to net # bam bam! that was good. i want you to get through — # bam bam! that was good. i want you to get through the _ # bam bam! that was good. i want you to get through the entire _ # bam bam! that was good. i want you to get through the entire thing. - # bam bam! that was good. i want you to get through the entire thing. you - to get through the entire thing. you know what we're talking about, the strictly come dancing final. we found the imac found out who the winner was. found the imac found out who the winnerwas. please found the imac found out who the winner was. please mute your telly if you had a night out last night. if you have found the remote and hit pause, i will do the big reveal. the eastenders star rose ayling—ellis has become the first deaf contestant to take home the glitterball trophy. rose and her partner, giovanni pernice, beat tv chef john whaite and johannes radebe in the final. our media and arts correspondent david sillito has all the details. welcome to strictly come dancing. it's the grand final...
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with the tv presenter aj odudu having to pull out because of injury, it was a straight head—to—head final between the first male same—sex couple, john whaite and johannes radebe, and strictly�*s first deaf contestant, rose ayling—ellis, and giovanni pernice — a partnership that in this little burst of silence brought one of the tv moments of the year. rose ayling—ellis went on the show, she said, to change perceptions about the deaf community. this show changed a lot of things, and it made me realise how powerful dance can be. it shared my messages with the deaf community.
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and for me and for giovanni, and how he adapted to my role — ijust feel like this is a dance that said everything about my strictlyjourney. let's take a look at the final leaderboard... the judges couldn't separate them, but the audience vote... and we can now reveal the strictly come dancing champions 2021 are rose and giovanni. the culmination of 13 weeks of dancing that has provoked applause, a lot of tears and inspired thousands to learn some sign language. it was just what we needed, wasn't it? tt it was “ust what we needed, wasn't it? , ,.., , , ., it? it is the escapism of it, even if ou it? it is the escapism of it, even if you know _ it? it is the escapism of it, even if you know absolutely - it? it is the escapism of it, even if you know absolutely diddly i it? it is the escapism of it, even i if you know absolutely diddly squat about dancing, which is my outlook on the whole thing. somehow, yes, particularly at the moment, you can just sort of lose yourself in it for
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a bit. and the stories, as well. t a bit. and the stories, as well. i went to bed feeling emotionally drained, but happy. stand went to bed feeling emotionally drained, but happy. and uplifted, exactl . it has been a tough few weeks for the prime minister, from those allegations of christmas parties held during lockdown to a backbench rebellion over coronavirus restrictions and thursday's by—election defeat. now one of his cabinet, the brexit minister, lord frost, has resigned saying he was concerned about what he called the current direction of travel. we're joined now by the conservative mp peter bone. good morning to you. good morning. what do you — good morning to you. good morning. what do you make _ good morning to you. good morning. what do you make of _ good morning to you. good morning. what do you make of it, _ good morning to you. good morning. what do you make of it, then, - good morning to you. good morning. what do you make of it, then, lord i what do you make of it, then, lord frost walking the plank? tt is what do you make of it, then, lord frost walking the plank?— frost walking the plank? it is a treat frost walking the plank? it is a great loss _ frost walking the plank? it is a great loss to — frost walking the plank? it is a great loss to the _ frost walking the plank? it is a great loss to the government, | frost walking the plank? it is a i great loss to the government, and obviously many of the things that he worries about, i and many of my colleagues worry about. we want to see the conservative party as a low tax party going forward, and we don't want our civil liberties to be
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restricted, so many of the things he said, i think, restricted, so many of the things he said, ithink, many restricted, so many of the things he said, i think, many backbench conservative mps would agree with. t conservative mps would agree with. i have been reading on social media this morning about this leak from one of the whatsapp groups of conservative mps reacting last night to his resignation. what is it cold? the clean global brexit group. are you a member of this group? yes. the clean global brexit group. are you a member of this group? yes, i believe in a — you a member of this group? yes, i believe in a clean _ you a member of this group? yes, i believe in a clean global— you a member of this group? yes, i believe in a clean global brexit, i believe in a clean global brexit, absolutely. believe in a clean global brexit, absolutely-— believe in a clean global brexit, absolutel . �* , ., ., absolutely. and “ust reading some of the absolutely. and just reading some of the contributions, _ absolutely. and just reading some of the contributions, as _ absolutely. and just reading some of the contributions, as i _ absolutely. and just reading some of the contributions, as i say, - absolutely. and just reading some of the contributions, as i say, we i absolutely. and just reading some of the contributions, as i say, we havel the contributions, as i say, we have all typed things into a whatsapp group we might not want to see red out in public, but having said that i am going to do exactly that. it is a disaster, it is very worrying, it is a further hammer blow to the prime minister. to be fair, you have said pretty much the same thing out loud on the television. what then needs to change? what needs to change to bring some sort of stability to the government? plenty of people, bluntly, won't have heard of people, bluntly, won't have heard of lord frost, but he has felt
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strongly enough about all of this to walk out of government. people will think the government seems to be in a right old tangle at the moment. yeah, iam yeah, i am a great fan of boris and ithink he yeah, i am a great fan of boris and i think he has done a greatjob and will continue to do a good job. find will continue to do a good 'ob. and he has will continue to do a good 'ob. and be has done — will continue to do a good 'ob. and be has done a h will continue to do a good job. mr. he has done a great many will continue to do a good job. a"tc he has done a great many things. will continue to do a good job. atc he has done a great many things. i don't agree with the vaccine passports and i want to see, going forward, taxes coming down, and it is that sort of, what lord frost said is what many of us would like to see the next stage in the prime minister's premiership. he delivered brexit, put a token —— broken parliament together, the levelling up parliament together, the levelling up agenda, more police on the beat, catching criminals and deterrence of crime and these are all things he has delivered. now we want to see going forward what i might say is a conservative agenda now that, hopefully, in the next few weeks and
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months, we can put covid behind us. we could talk about rexford and his actual brief and all of the things that surround the situation in northern ireland, now let's settle on the pandemic now that you and i have focused on what we think about it. given the plan b measures for england which were introduced recently, how do you read the situation right now? we see the scientists, the sage scientists that advise the government, saying some pretty alarming things about what they fear might be happening around they fear might be happening around the corner and they will be some people watching our conversation this morning to think, reluctantly, that perhaps there should be more restrictions. what do you say to them? ~ , ,., , ., restrictions. what do you say to them? ~ ,,., , ., ., them? absolutely there are and i have, in them? absolutely there are and i have. in my _ them? absolutely there are and i have, in my e-mails, _ them? absolutely there are and i have, in my e-mails, people i them? absolutely there are and i have, in my e-mails, people are| have, in my e—mails, people are saying we need more restrictions and others are saying we need less. i think what should happen is parliament should be think what should happen is parliament should be recalled think what should happen is parliament should be recalled this week. i think that is essential. we should look at all the information.
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government should make its case out and if it thinks there should be more restrictions, argue the case and then i and my colleagues will look at it and we will vote on it. we other people's representatives. it should not be made behind closed doors and just imposed. and if there is a case, and if there is a case for a lockdown and it makes sense and then i'll support it. iloathed for a lockdown and it makes sense and then i'll support it. what would the case for — and then i'll support it. what would the case for a _ and then i'll support it. what would the case for a lockdown _ and then i'll support it. what would the case for a lockdown look - and then i'll support it. what would the case for a lockdown look like i and then i'll support it. what would the case for a lockdown look like to you? the case for a lockdown look like to ou? , ., , , , the case for a lockdown look like to ou? , ., _ , , , , you? obviously, “ust simple things. we could you? obviously, “ust simple things. we could go — you? obviously, just simple things. we could go back, _ you? obviously, just simple things. we could go back, if _ you? obviously, just simple things. we could go back, if we _ you? obviously, just simple things. we could go back, if we have - you? obviously, just simple things. we could go back, if we have to i you? obviously, just simple things. we could go back, if we have to do | we could go back, if we have to do tojust we could go back, if we have to do to just not having anyone at football matches because there is a 40- 50,000 football matches because there is a 40— 50,000 people altogether. let's see if there is the case for this and let's scrutinise it and let's debate and make a decision. what i don't want is suddenly later on today there is a press conference where it is announced that we are abandoning christmas this year because of a terrible disease without people actually being able to question and debate whether
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that's write and vote on it. after all, that is what mps are paid for. we shouldn't be letting decisions be made by people behind closed doors. is there a bottom line for you at this stage in the pandemic under what under any circumstances shouldn't shut. i'm thinking, for instance, schools.— shouldn't shut. i'm thinking, for instance, schools. well, schools, i think most — instance, schools. well, schools, i think most people _ instance, schools. well, schools, i think most people and _ instance, schools. well, schools, i think most people and i _ instance, schools. well, schools, i think most people and i think- instance, schools. well, schools, i think most people and i think the i think most people and i think the prime minister will say this, schools should be absolutely the last thing they should close. if we had a wave where the vaccines weren't working and thousands of people were going into hospital. unfortunately people were dying in great numbers, we would have to look at everything. i don't think we're anywhere near that. the vaccinations - i anywhere near that. the vaccinations — i mean, absolutely, go and get your booster. that is the one thing your booster. that is the one thing you can do for christmas, get the booster, get protection. obviously you have to look at the facts. the government will no more than we do about the situation but come to
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parliament, tell us what the problems are and then we can debate them and then decide whether they are right or wrong. i wouldn't rule anything out but at the moment i can't see myself the argument for greater restrictions and lockdown. most talky this morning. thank you. —— nice to talk to you this morning. let's bring in professor lawrence young, who is a virologist at the university of warwick. we had to bear the political resistance that they would be to enhanced measures at the moment. are they right? t enhanced measures at the moment. are the riuht? ., �* ~' enhanced measures at the moment. are the riuht? ., �* " , enhanced measures at the moment. are the riuht? ~ they right? i don't think they are. the longer _ they right? i don't think they are. the longer we — they right? i don't think they are. the longer we wait _ they right? i don't think they are. the longer we wait the _ they right? i don't think they are. the longer we wait the more i the longer we wait the more problematic it is going to be and we have learned from previous experience, surely, that if we differ and delay to get ourselves into more trouble. the problem here is of course we don't fully understand the indications of the omicron pandemic in this country in terms of severe disease but what we know for sure if this is unlike any
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other variant we have ever seen, doubling at least every two days, and the longer we leave it the worse it is going to get. t5 it and the longer we leave it the worse it is going to get-— it is going to get. is it not too soon to gauge _ it is going to get. is it not too soon to gauge whether - it is going to get. is it not too soon to gauge whether or- it is going to get. is it not too soon to gauge whether or noti it is going to get. is it not too i soon to gauge whether or not plan it is going to get. is it not too - soon to gauge whether or not plan b is working? tt is soon to gauge whether or not plan b is workin. ? , ., soon to gauge whether or not plan b is workin: ? , ., , ., ., is working? it is a little bit too soon but i _ is working? it is a little bit too soon but i don't _ is working? it is a little bit too soon but i don't think - is working? it is a little bit too soon but i don't think we i is working? it is a little bit too soon but i don't think we have i is working? it is a little bit too i soon but i don't think we have the luxury of sitting around waiting because surely at this stage it is better to be safe than sorry and what we need to be doing is planning for the worst and hoping for the best. vaccination is going to be really important so supercharging the booster campaign is great but as the booster campaign is great but as the director—general of the world health organization has said, vaccines alone will not get any country out of this crisis and plan b is a very, sort of lightweight approach when what we need now is something that would just allow us to delay the spread. we're not going to delay the spread. we're not going to stop the spread of enormously infectious variant if we could delay it, suppress it, just for a period, not only to allow more boosters to
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get into the arms of people but also to delay it spreading so we don't end up with all the consequences of enormous numbers of staff absent, for instance. that would be a good thing. for instance. that would be a good thin. �* ., , ., , ., thing. but lots of people are lookin: thing. but lots of people are looking at — thing. but lots of people are looking at the _ thing. but lots of people are looking at the data - thing. but lots of people are| looking at the data emerging thing. but lots of people are i looking at the data emerging from other countries about the way that this virus behaves. rowing evidence that vaccinations and previous exposure will protect you from this variant in a way it has in other ways. they look at the collateral damage of a lockdown. we talk about mental health crises and other areas of them nhs suffering, children suffering behind closed doors to social services. suffering behind closed doors to socialservices. is suffering behind closed doors to social services. is it worth it? t5 social services. is it worth it? is it social services. is it worth it? t3 it worth it to save lives, that is the question. i personally don't think we are in a situation where we need a lockdown like holland are doing, the netherlands hasjust announced that today, but something that restricts social contact for a short time, a short, sharp shock... what would that look like? perhaps what we had _ what would that look like? perhaps what we had before _ what would that look like? perhaps what we had before with _
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what would that look like? perhaps what we had before with previous i what we had before with previous step one, step two, if you like. the rule of six, for instance. just restricting household contact for a period of time, and also large gatherings in big events, but only for a short period. we're not going to stop this virus from spreading. we're not going to stop it from causing serious disease in vulnerable individuals. but what we can do is delay the inevitable, get on with a booster campaign and also make sure that we keep other services running and we don't end up with loads of people having to self isolate. , ,., with loads of people having to self isolate. , ., ., ., , isolate. the message throughout has been at some — isolate. the message throughout has been at some point _ isolate. the message throughout has been at some point as _ isolate. the message throughout has been at some point as a _ isolate. the message throughout has been at some point as a society i isolate. the message throughout has been at some point as a society that l been at some point as a society that we need to learn to live with it and live alongside it. is the alternative that we have to get used to these circuit breaks, forever, if need be? t to these circuit breaks, forever, if need be? ., �* ~' to these circuit breaks, forever, if need be? ., �* ,, ~ need be? i don't think so. i think thins need be? i don't think so. i think things will— need be? i don't think so. i think things will settle _ need be? i don't think so. i think things will settle down. - need be? i don't think so. i think things will settle down. the i need be? i don't think so. i think| things will settle down. the level of immunity in the population is quite high. we are facing a very, very taxing situation with this particular variant and it is telling us how important it is that we suppress this coronavirus all round
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the world because as long as it is allowed to circulate it will throw up allowed to circulate it will throw up variants and therefore vaccination all around the world is important. it will settle into a relationship with this virus. it is adapting and evolving in real time and i think it is likely we are going to need to have annualjabs to keep it under control for a few years and then it will settle into this endemic seasonal infection as we experience with flu and other respiratory viruses but at the moment that isn't the case. we can't wait around to see whether or not this is a really dangerous situation in terms of very severe disease. we have got to see something —— do something now to protect ourselves. what would you say to people a week away from christmas now and people are thinking about whether or not to adjust our plans. many of us desperate to spend that time with our loved ones and feel like we have missed out on a lot of memories being made. what would you say to people this week? t being made. what would you say to people this week?— people this week? i would say be careful now _ people this week? i would say be careful now because _ people this week? i would say be careful now because what - people this week? i would say be careful now because what you i people this week? i would say be i careful now because what you don't want to do is go into a large crowded area, get infected and then
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have to isolate away from your friends and family over christmas so just be careful in the next few days. and we have a really great tool now. we have lateral flow tests though my slogan is flow before you go. in other words, just take a lateralflow go. in other words, just take a lateral flow test and check if you are positive or not. use that tool. we didn't have that tool year ago. and that on a high. flow before you go. thank you forjoining us this morning. go. thank you for “oining us this morninu. ., .., , go. thank you for “oining us this morninu. ., , ., go. thank you for “oining us this mornin.. ., , ., ., morning. that could be on a christmas — morning. that could be on a christmas hat. _ morning. that could be on a christmas hat. lot's - morning. that could be on a christmas hat. lot's more i christmas hat. lot's more conversations about the whole question of what we do in the next week or so and around christmas and new year and how the entertainment industry response. ourfootball response. industry response. our football resonse. ~' industry response. our football resonse. ~ ., , industry response. our football resonse. ~ , ., response. unlike last year where it was ruite response. unlike last year where it was quite prescriptive _ response. unlike last year where it was quite prescriptive about - response. unlike last year where it was quite prescriptive about what i was quite prescriptive about what and —— what was and wasn't allowed. we are trying to help guide you through those decisions.
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here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you, chris and nina and good morning to you at home, too. it might feel a bit chilly because last night was the coldest night of the season so far. of autumn and winter, we had temperatures down at —8.9 degrees in aberdeenshire but quite a chilly start for many of us. we also have some fairly dense fog patches around but through the course of the day, the fog is gradually starting to lift so some sunshine coming through, particularly in the north and west but most places will stay grey and cloudy but mostly dry against all down to this big area of high pressure which has been with us for quite a while, still with us, driving our weather. not many isobars and is an optically breezy but a little bit of a breeze flowing towards the english channel and the south—west. here is where we will see the cloud lingering. up towards the far east of scotland. big enough here, the cloud, for some drizzle.
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the mist and fog lingering. northern ireland, northern england and western parts of wales, perhaps a glimpse of sunshine in south—west england, too. temperatures between four and 10 degrees or so today. through this evening and overnight we have a cloudy sort of night but probably not quite as chilly as last night and they will be mist and fog again but not quite as extensive as it has been because there is a bit more of a breeze around. not quite as cold as last night into northern england as well that many of us staying frost free under the linkage of low cloud. heading on into monday, high pressure still very much with us across the uk, keeping weather fronts at bay ko —— so quite a cloudy day again on monday but the cloud will then —— tend to thin and break up so glimpses of sunshine for england and wales. haven't seen the sun for a while and a bit of a brighter day to come through the day
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on monday. temperatures not particularly warm despite a bit more sunshine. high are typically two degrees in aberdeen and perhaps up to 10 degrees in plymouth. then things don't change in a hurry as we head into the middle of the week. high pressure is still with us, just slipping away as we head into wednesday and potentially a cold front working in from the north are just a week feature, but looking out towards the atlantic in the run—up towards the atlantic in the run—up to christmas because this is where weather fronts will try and push on and they are bumping into the area of high pressure so still some uncertainty about which is going to win out— the colder, dry air coming in from the north of his milder, more unsettled weather coming in from the south—west. it does look like eventually we will start to see something milder and wetter moving into was the christmas period but the next few days it certainly looking dry overnight frost, all to play for, i think, still as we head towards christmas eve and christmas day that it does look likely that some rain, potentially a little bit of sleet and snow, could may well move in for a time. ahead of snow
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there, sarah, potentially. a tiny hint, get too excited. t there, sarah, potentially. a tiny hint, get too excited.— hint, get too excited. i was wondering _ hint, get too excited. i was wondering how _ hint, get too excited. i was wondering how far - hint, get too excited. i was wondering how far we i hint, get too excited. i wasl wondering how far we would hint, get too excited. i was i wondering how far we would get through the programme before there was quite —— the phrase "white christmas"? what about big getaway as well? that has been a feature. tobie as well? that has been a feature. we could have all of those. because... dozens of tractors decorated in tinsel will light up the streets of liverpool tonight, to bring some festive cheer and a bit of money for charity as well. more than 80 tractors took part in the procession last year, raising more than £43,000 for alder hey children's hospital. we're joined now by farmer olly harrison, who started the annual christmas tractor convoy. good morning to you! look at that! tractor over your shoulder and that is a bobby dazzler of attractor, isn't it? fantastic! tobie
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is a bobby dazzler of attractor, isn't it? fantastic!— is a bobby dazzler of attractor, isn't it? fantastic! we should have over 100 to _ isn't it? fantastic! we should have over 100 to night _ isn't it? fantastic! we should have over 100 to night out. _ isn't it? fantastic! we should have over 100 to night out. this - isn't it? fantastic! we should have over 100 to night out. this is i over 100 to night out. this is terrific. when _ over 100 to night out. this is terrific. when you _ over100 to night out. this is terrific. when you think- over 100 to night out. this is terrific. when you think of i terrific. when you think of liverpool, the first thing that springs to mind usually is not tracked. how —— how did this come about? last year there was a bit of about? last year there was a bit of a lockdown going on, obviously, and when i woke up on sunday morning, the week before christmas, i had seen some friends did attractor parade around the isle of man. i thought i am sure we could do that bigger and better because there is probably only 30 tractors in the isle of man. i suddenly had about 50 tractors after putting up a post on facebook. i spoke to the local children's hospital so i thought if we can head and raise money for them thatis we can head and raise money for them that is fantastic. and also being farmers, we produce food so we did a foodbank for fans supporting food banks which is a joint between liverpool and everton football club. that meant we could use the car park to do the foodbank between the two football clubs. lats
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to do the foodbank between the two football clubs.— football clubs. lots of us are caettin football clubs. lots of us are getting excited _ football clubs. lots of us are getting excited for _ football clubs. lots of us are getting excited for our i football clubs. lots of us are | getting excited for our friends football clubs. lots of us are - getting excited for our friends and families but also really mindful that perhaps people aren't having as nice a time are said to be able to do that for the community must feel great. do that for the community must feel areat. , a, , , do that for the community must feel areat. , ~,, , c, do that for the community must feel areat. , , , a, great. the problem is last year we raised 43,000. _ great. the problem is last year we raised 43,000. raising _ great. the problem is last year we raised 43,000. raising money - great. the problem is last year we raised 43,000. raising money for| raised 43,000. raising money for charity is quite addictive so this yeari charity is quite addictive so this year i want to beat it. i want to try and raise 100,000 this year. i’m try and raise 100,000 this year. i'm wonderin: try and raise 100,000 this year. i'm wondering about the practicalities of how— wondering about the practicalities of how you get all of those lights on the _ of how you get all of those lights on the tractor and how it is powered and all— on the tractor and how it is powered and all that— on the tractor and how it is powered and all that kind of stuff. it is difficult. they _ and all that kind of stuff. it is difficult. they are _ and all that kind of stuff. it is difficult. they are not - and all that kind of stuff. it 3 difficult. they are not lights actually. they are tape that is reflecting into uv light. we have six uv lights mounted around it shining back at the track is to make it bounce back. we are using 240 vert —— 240 volt converters. this one, similarthing. i
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vert -- 240 volt converters. this one, similar thing.— one, similar thing. i bet it gets uuite one, similar thing. i bet it gets quite competitive. _ one, similar thing. i bet it gets quite competitive. who - one, similar thing. i bet it gets quite competitive. who has - one, similar thing. i bet it gets| quite competitive. who has the one, similar thing. i bet it gets - quite competitive. who has the best decorations. i quite competitive. who has the best decorations-— decorations. i was trying to make sure that my _ decorations. i was trying to make sure that my look— decorations. i was trying to make sure that my look the _ decorations. i was trying to make sure that my look the best. - i spent all week dressing this up. tell us how it works when you're out and about on the streets. i was totally overwhelmed _ and about on the streets. i was totally overwhelmed last - and about on the streets. i was totally overwhelmed last year | and about on the streets. i —" totally overwhelmed last year how many people were able to donate, but we have had the support from the local police as well, and their road bike policing teams. they basically escort us as we go through, because obviously 100 tractors driving through the city centre can cause chaos unless managed properly. so they have escorted us through and keeping us moving, so the 30 mile journey will only take about three hours instead of taking probably ten without them. you hours instead of taking probably ten without them.— hours instead of taking probably ten without them. you wouldn't feel too festive if you — without them. you wouldn't feel too festive if you are _ without them. you wouldn't feel too festive if you are caught _ without them. you wouldn't feel too festive if you are caught behind - without them. you wouldn't feel too festive if you are caught behind you | festive if you are caught behind you lot at this time of year. finally, tell us exactly where the route is and how people can donate if they
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wish to. ., , , ._ and how people can donate if they wish to. .,, , ., ., wish to. the easiest way to find the root is on alder— wish to. the easiest way to find the root is on alder hey _ wish to. the easiest way to find the root is on alder hey charity - root is on alder hey charity website, and to donate you can go on thejust giving with the barcode behind me, and we have a text to donate of 70450. you behind me, and we have a text to donate of 70450.— behind me, and we have a text to donate of 70450. you are a pro at this, lovely _ donate of 70450. you are a pro at this, lovely demonstration - donate of 70450. you are a pro at this, lovely demonstration of- donate of 70450. you are a pro at this, lovely demonstration of the l this, lovely demonstration of the tractors. brilliant stuff. we this, lovely demonstration of the tractors. brilliant stuff.— tractors. brilliant stuff. we will ride to land's _ tractors. brilliant stuff. we will ride to land's end _ tractors. brilliant stuff. we will ride to land's end on _ tractors. brilliant stuff. we will ride to land's end on a - tractors. brilliant stuff. we will| ride to land's end on a combine harvester. ride to land's end on a combine harvester-— ride to land's end on a combine harvester. "~ ~ :: :: :: , ., ., harvester. $46,000 last year, and hoinu to harvester. $46,000 last year, and heping to tep— harvester. $46,000 last year, and hoping to top $100,000. - harvester. $46,000 last year, and hoping to top $100,000. it - harvester. $46,000 last year, and hoping to top $100,000. it is - harvester. $46,000 last year, and hoping to top $100,000. it is a - hoping to top $100,000. it is a great cause. thank you, and good luck. imagine the road rage if you get trapped behind them. it is one thing getting stuck behind the convoy on the way to liverpool,
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imagine getting stuck behind combine harvesters, it would be a slog through the west country all the way to land's end. stay with us, plenty more still to come on breakfast.
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hello, this is breakfast, with chris mason and nina warhurst. let's go back to our main story this morning, the resignation of the brexit minister, lord frost. he has quit over concerns about the government's direction of travel. we can speak now to his opposite number, labour's baronessjenny chapman, whojoins us from darlington. could morning to you. good morning, chris. could morning to you. good morning, chris- your— could morning to you. good morning, chris. your reaction, _ could morning to you. good morning, chris. your reaction, then, _ could morning to you. good morning, chris. your reaction, then, to - could morning to you. good morning, chris. your reaction, then, to the - chris. your reaction, then, to the departure _ chris. your reaction, then, to the departure l— chris. your reaction, then, to the departure. i described _ chris. your reaction, then, to the departure. i described you - chris. your reaction, then, to the departure. i described you as - chris. your reaction, then, to the | departure. i described you as lord frost's opposite number, i suppose former opposite number now. i think he has 'ust former opposite number now. i think he hasjust made _ former opposite number now. i think he hasjust made me _ former opposite number now. i think he hasjust made me redundant. - former opposite number now. i think he hasjust made me redundant. i. former opposite number now. i ii�*u “if. he hasjust made me redundant. iwas he hasjust made me redundant. i was shocked. i was about to enjoy the strict the final and pouring a glass of bailey's and you get this. i think he has done it deliberately to cause as much damage as he possibly
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can, given the torrid week that the prime minister has had with the big rebellion and the by—election in north shropshire. talk about kicking someone when he is down, but really what this is is a whole government team that does not get on with itself and it is in chaos. it doesn't know which way it wants to go. doesn't know which way it wants to i o. , doesn't know which way it wants to co. . . ., ., , doesn't know which way it wants to go. given the chaos, as you describe. — go. given the chaos, as you describe, and _ go. given the chaos, as you describe, and fruitier- go. given the chaos, as you describe, and fruitier wordsj go. given the chaos, as you - describe, and fruitier words are used, even by people within the conservative party — and there is no doubt that factually they have had a bumpy few weeks— given all of that, why on earth aren't labour even further ahead? why on earth aren't labour even furtherahead? i why on earth aren't labour even further ahead? i know you will point to some opinion polls that will show that labour has made progress but it was the liberal democrats winning that by—election the other day. should you not be making more progress? we should you not be making more rouress? ~ ., ., ., ., ~ should you not be making more rouress? ~ ., ., ., .w ., progress? we do want to make more rouress, progress? we do want to make more progress, absolutely. _ progress? we do want to make more progress, absolutely. not— progress? we do want to make more progress, absolutely. not satisfied . progress, absolutely. not satisfied with where we are. we will keep on pushing. but even our harshest critics can't deny the progress that we have made as a party over the last two years, with a new leader
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and a new team. we are getting there. i don't think any serious political commentator, especially one such as yourself, would be asking me why didn't the labour party when north shropshire. that is not really a credible question. ii not really a credible question. if you are an aspiring party of government, which you are, i grant that this is a seat that has been held by the conservatives for 200 years, but the liberal democrats managed to break that precedent. so why shouldn't you? are there other parts of the country that you are accepting are just no—go areas for labour? accepting are 'ust no-go areas for labour? ., . . accepting are 'ust no-go areas for labour? ., ., ., ., , ., accepting are 'ust no-go areas for labour? ., ., ., ., ., labour? not at all. that is a fair challenge _ labour? not at all. that is a fair challenge back, _ labour? not at all. that is a fair challenge back, and _ labour? not at all. that is a fair challenge back, and i _ labour? not at all. that is a fair challenge back, and i think- labour? not at all. that is a fair| challenge back, and i think being more ambitious is something that the labour party needs to do. there aren't any no—go areas, but the truth is about this, you know, north shropshire was a seat that the labour party was never in serious contention for. neither should anybody have been able to challenge the tory party with the size of
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their majority, look at what happens. that was an extraordinary thing that we saw on thursday, where boris johnson's thing that we saw on thursday, where borisjohnson's leadership thing that we saw on thursday, where boris johnson's leadership faced real—world contact with the electorate and they said what they thought of it. it is a big deal, and i think there are many people in the tory party now, many of their mps, who are very nervous about the prospect of facing the electorate themselves. weak leadership is a problem, and believe me, i have lived that. that is not a great way to lead the country.— to lead the country. let's talk about the _ to lead the country. let's talk about the actual _ to lead the country. let's talk about the actual brief - to lead the country. let's talk about the actual brief that - to lead the country. let's talk| about the actual brief that you shadow and the brief that lord frost did hold, the whole question of brexit. it feels extraordinary in the context of the pandemic at the moment that it seems like light relief to talk about brexit. we didn't always use to think in those kinds of terms. what needs to happen now? there is this ongoing row about northern ireland and what is known as the protocol and the whole business about how trade works between northern ireland and the republic, northern ireland and the
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rest of the uk. if you were the brexit minister, if labour were in government, what would you be doing now? the government, what would you be doing now? . government, what would you be doing now? , ., , ., ., now? the first thing that you have to do in a situation _ now? the first thing that you have to do in a situation where - now? the first thing that you have to do in a situation where you - now? the first thing that you have to do in a situation where you are| to do in a situation where you are now, where we are in the eu, and i think sometimes the tory party has forgotten that we have actually left the eu and we don't have to have week after week of antagonism and argument and looking for things to fall out about. you have to move forward now. you've got an agreement, laboursupported forward now. you've got an agreement, labour supported that agreement, labour supported that agreement when it came to a vote. we do have some outstanding issues, of course we do. there are things that need to be fixed such as opportunities for young people, creative industries, the northern ireland issues definitely need to be addressed, but you don't do that by constantly picking fights. people want stability. the people of northern ireland have been completely left out of these negotiations. why is that? there are things that the labour party would do very differently to the conservatives, but the truth is we are out of the eu and we have got to get on with life in the country
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outside of the eu.— get on with life in the country outside of the eu. let's talk about the pandemic. _ outside of the eu. let's talk about the pandemic, because _ outside of the eu. let's talk about the pandemic, because it- outside of the eu. let's talk about the pandemic, because it is- outside of the eu. let's talk about the pandemic, because it is quite| the pandemic, because it is quite striking that lord frost in his resignation letter talked about his fear of what he describes as the coercive measures that we have seen elsewhere in europe around additional lockdown restrictions, for instance. you point to what you describe as the mess within the government at the moment, and yet labour have backed the government in the various covid restrictions we have seen recently. what is the reading of the current situation from labour, given what we have seen from labour, given what we have seen from the sage scientists? do you want to see more restrictions on england? want to see more restrictions on encland? ~ , ., want to see more restrictions on encland? �* ., england? well, you say we're back to government. — england? well, you say we're back to government, that _ england? well, you say we're back to government, that is _ england? well, you say we're back to government, that is because - england? well, you say we're back to government, that is because we - england? well, you say we're back to| government, that is because we don't believe in playing party politics with this stuff. we think that you need to make decisions on the national interest, so there are things that we would have been doing before now about wearing masks, about support for businesses. but what would you do now? now- about support for businesses. but what would you do now? now we | about support for businesses. but - what would you do now? now we would be listenin:
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what would you do now? now we would be listening to — what would you do now? now we would be listening to the _ what would you do now? now we would be listening to the sage _ what would you do now? now we would be listening to the sage advice. - what would you do now? now we would be listening to the sage advice. we - be listening to the sage advice. we would be supporting plan b. if there are additional measures that need to be made, let's hear it. let's look at the evidence, let's have that discussion. if you needs to happen, the labour party will be there and will step up if the government needs us to do so, as we have done already. us to do so, as we have done alread . , us to do so, as we have done already-— us to do so, as we have done l already-_ ln already. sorry to interrupt... in all fairness, _ already. sorry to interrupt... in all fairness, i— already. sorry to interrupt... in all fairness, i am _ already. sorry to interrupt... in all fairness, i am not _ already. sorry to interrupt... in all fairness, i am not going - already. sorry to interrupt... in all fairness, i am not going to i already. sorry to interrupt... in i all fairness, i am not going to sit here and make up public health measures on the hoof. it is not how the labour party wants to operate. i have seen tory mps the labour party wants to operate. i have seen tory mp5 on the airwaves this morning saying we would do this, we wouldn't do that. what you have actually got to do here is listen and think and decide, and then implement. what the government has not done, every time, is take that coolheaded, measured approach. we have delayed, we have waited, we then have panic measures. everyone remembers the scenes from last christmas. we all hoped we have to
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see that again. people have been taking responsibility for themselves when the government has failed to, but that means we have big parts of our industry that are really suffering now. so what is the government going to do about that? we saw the chancellor in california talking to private health companies when he should have been here talking to our theatres, our cultural sector, hospitality industry. he has been absent. you could not get more of a contrast with the way the labour party deal with the way the labour party deal with this stuff.— with the way the labour party deal with this stuff. thank you, baroness cha - man. with this stuff. thank you, baroness chapman- lt — with this stuff. thank you, baroness chapman- it is _ with this stuff. thank you, baroness chapman. it is nice _ with this stuff. thank you, baroness chapman. it is nice to _ with this stuff. thank you, baroness chapman. it is nice to talk _ with this stuff. thank you, baroness chapman. it is nice to talk to - with this stuff. thank you, baroness chapman. it is nice to talk to you. . gavin is here with the sport. hello. the ashes keeps going, doesn't it? lots of football consolations but unfortunately the ashes keeps going. it is consolations but unfortunately the ashes keeps going.— ashes keeps going. it is turning into the nightmare _ ashes keeps going. it is turning into the nightmare test - ashes keeps going. it is turning into the nightmare test before i into the nightmare test before christmas for england, that they did start pretty well. australia are piling on the runs at the moment. england had a huge task ahead of them, and they started the fourth
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day of the second ashes test brightly in adelaide. australia were 282 runs ahead but england took three wickets in the first session including this greatjos buttler catch which removed marcus harris. since then they've lost momentum. travis head made 51 before he was superbly caught by ben stokes in the deep. but the aussie lead is now more than 400. marnus labuschagne went to his own half—century before falling, alex carey not long gone too. and the aussies are 212/7. it was an odd saturday in the football, with five games postponed in the premier league because of covid. they are due to have an emergency meeting tomorrow. yesterday, leeds versus arsenal was the only match on. and it didn't disappoint, with five goals in total as the gunners comfortably won 4—1, gabriel martinelli getting the first two. england internationals bukayo saka and emile smith rowe also both got on the scoresheet as arsenal made it three league wins in a row. they're fourth, whilst leeds
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are struggling in 16th. three matches are still on today at the moment — but 19 games were cancelled across the english football league yesterday due to covid cases. we're joined now by the chairman of the league two side tranmere rovers, mark palios, who is also a former chief executive of the fa. how much of a problem is this forfootball right now? i think we reflect the problem that is going on in the country right now. in internationalfootball, you can't really have a bio bubble, the guys will go home, they were mix with their parents and children and so forth. they are as exposed to the general situation as anybody else. what would you do now, if you are either in government or advising government about what they should do around football? particularly around this time of year, it is so important to get out and about, to go to the football, it is part of the annual ritual. and yet we hear all this alarming stuff from the
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scientists. i all this alarming stuff from the scientists. . . all this alarming stuff from the scientists-— scientists. i have been in a position — scientists. i have been in a position whereby - scientists. i have been in a position whereby people . scientists. i have been in a - position whereby people scrutinise publicly when i was at the fa and i respect the fact that it is very difficult for people who are sitting there on the one hand having the information, but not all the information, but not all the information, therefore they have to make a decision on incomplete information. how serious is this pandemic? on the other hand they are judged against the seriousness of this, which is people will die. and then you have the other guys who look at the balance on this, which is the balance of the economic, the social issues, et cetera, and so you can see the tension. there is no right answer at this point in time, so you just have to respect that fact and, if you want my personal opinion, yes, iam fact and, if you want my personal opinion, yes, i am a fan of vaccines because i am not an epidemiologist, i am not a clinician, but actually, i am not a clinician, but actually, i also understand the difficulties. if i look at ourselves as a club, which sort of mirrors a lot of what other people have, yesterday we had a carroll's concert and actually
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that was poorly attended, but the game itself was pre—christmas and is usually a low turnout, but it was a good turnout, and you saw the fact that it was really one of these things that was helping people, if you talk about the mental health of people that struggle during a pandemic, it was a focal point in our community. you have to respect that as well, and there is a balance in this. nobody has the right answer. . . in this. nobody has the right answer. ., , ., , , . in this. nobody has the right answer. ., , ., , '. ., answer. that is what is difficult at the moment- _ answer. that is what is difficult at the moment. you _ answer. that is what is difficult at the moment. you mentioned - answer. that is what is difficult at the moment. you mentioned the| the moment. you mentioned the vaccines, and it is estimated that 25% of players don't intend to get the vaccines. that is way higher than the national average, though, isn't it? why do you think that is? element what was the percentage? 25%. i element what was the percentage? 2596. ., , , ., 2596. i am sure it is higher than the national average _ 2596. i am sure it is higher than the national average of _ 2596. i am sure it is higher than the national average of people - 2596. i am sure it is higher than the national average of people of- 2596. i am sure it is higher than the national average of people of that i national average of people of that age group and if you look at that, i read an article that says it is same as what is happening out but you put footballers on a pedestal because, and, sometimes unfairly describe a
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lot of almost as, these guys should be role models for society when actually, i think, be role models for society when actually, ithink, you need be role models for society when actually, i think, you need tojust check that and that is a principle. should they be role models or other individuals who make a choice. personally at our club, was talking to somebody yesterday and they said it was convenient, i don't know how many football players are vaccinated. it is not about convenience, it is actually about respecting the medical information that you have about individuals. i did speak to our medical guides and very professional and i did try to find out who was vaccinated and the answer came back, we would rather not tell you. and we didn't press them. i have a simple philosophy, i get good people around me, give them a steer and give them the head and they can get on with it. and so they come back. what we do is try and educate the guys with regards with what we see. when it comes to the financial side of things. haifa
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what we see. when it comes to the financial side of things.— financial side of things. how much does it impact _ financial side of things. how much does it impact and _ financial side of things. how much does it impact and efl— financial side of things. how much does it impact and efl club? - financial side of things. how much does it impact and efl club? and | financial side of things. how much | does it impact and efl club? and it de-ends does it impact and efl club? and it depends on — does it impact and efl club? and it depends on what _ does it impact and efl club? and it depends on what you _ does it impact and efl club? and it depends on what you talk - does it impact and efl club? and it depends on what you talk about. does it impact and efl club? and it depends on what you talk about in | depends on what you talk about in terms of and efl club. there is a scale. if you talk about a champion club it is far different to somebody in the lower leagues. in the lower leagues it is much more significant but the reality is, if we, for example, i will give you the figures, if we, for example, now adhere to the protocols, when we go away it may cost us an extra £2500 again. extra hotels, extra coaches, et cetera. when you talk about what happens when you go over, if we keep playing. if we go over the 10,000, it probably would cost us, people say, well, do you allow people in over 10,000? well, actually, you just... over10,000? well, actually, you 'ust...g . over10,000? well, actually, you 'ust...g , ., over10,000? well, actually, you 'ust... , .,, , over10,000? well, actually, you 'ust... , , , just... just to be, this is where ou just. .. just to be, this is where you check— just... just to be, this is where you check to — just... just to be, this is where you check to people _ just... just to be, this is where you check to people been - just... just to be, this is where - you check to people been vaccinated. will you would probably decide to do
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it based on the economics because it would probably cost us an extra £4000 to do that. the economics. it is not great because boxing day is clearly a big part of the calendar in the english game and it is great for us and we would like to see that happen again you have to respect the fact that if the word comes out that gatherings, although outdoors, are not to be done then fine. i think the approach we've seen is the, we just don't know, we just don't know. it is still early days, isn't it? it would be such a shame if that boxing day is lost. it is such an amazing tradition. full bellies and dizzy heads. ., , , ., no, heads. not the players though. no, the miaht heads. not the players though. no, they might be _ heads. not the players though. no, they might be relieved! _ heads. not the players though. no, they might be relieved! your- heads. not the players though. no, | they might be relieved! your talking about yourself. _ they might be relieved! your talking about yourself, nina. _ they might be relieved! your talking about yourself, nina. i— they might be relieved! your talking about yourself, nina. i am! - they might be relieved! your talking about yourself, nina. i am! yell- they might be relieved! your talking about yourself, nina. i am! yell at. about yourself, nina. i am! yell at -- ou about yourself, nina. i am! yell at -- you are — about yourself, nina. i am! yell at -- you are talking _ about yourself, nina. i am! yell at -- you are talking about _ about yourself, nina. i am! yell at -- you are talking about yourself. | —— you are talking about yourself. the's talk about the weather. here is sarah with a look
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at this morning's weather. this is seifert in east sussex. it is a bit misty out there with drizzle around but it is also very cold where you have the clear skies and braemar in aberdeenshire, —8.9 celsius. the coldest night of the season so far. driving our weather out there at the moment so another largely dry day and a lot of cloud trapped underneath the area of high pressure so it will be slow to lift and clear for central pressure so it will be slow to lift and clearfor central and pressure so it will be slow to lift and clear for central and eastern parts of england in particular and eastern scotland turning murky at times, too. they will be some sunshine for central and western scotland and western parts of wales and glimpses of sunshine for south—west england and northern ireland as well. temperatures between about 3—9 so it won't fill particularly warm, particularly where you have the lingering fog and low cloud. through tonight, cloudy once again. some mist and fog but not quite as much as we have seen over recent nights and it won't be
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as cold as last night but still a touch of frost for scotland and parts of north—west england as well. into tomorrow, high pressure still with us so things aren't changing in a hurry over the next few days. one day looking predominantly dry with some sunny spells and i think we will see a bit brighter weather developing compared to recent days across central and eastern parts. not particularly warm. more details on the run up to christmas in around half—an—hour. chris and nina. the half-an-hour. chris and nina. the time now is— half—an—hour. chris and nina. the time now is 7:50am. click with spencer kelly and lara lewington. the victoria and albert museum in london is a treasure trove of beautiful artworks. some 3—dimensional wonders and some
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masterpieces so realistic, you could walk into them. which is precisely what's about to happen in the painting gallery where, in amongst the turners and the constables, a kelly and a lewington are about to get stuck in to some very modern art. there's a dancer and she's wearing pyjamas? or is that fashion these days? spencer chuckles. that's the fashion. that's the fashion? don't you know — don't you know about fashion? why aren't you wearing that? i've got three sets of those. spencer laughs. this is sonzai — an augmented reality performance you can see using the hololens headset and specifically designed to take place in this space. it's the brainchild of roland lane, who had dancer maeva berthelot�*s performance captured in a volumetric space and a cgi landscape built around her.
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it's also worth, if you can, taking a step back, to maybe here, to see the whole — if you can see the whole structure from a distance, you can get a whole of the top and bottom and everything that's going on. oh, yes! in some ways, it's more impressive when you stand back. it is! yeah, yeah, yeah. you feel like you're in a theatre. sonzai is also interactive. reach out and touch one of the globes or the flowers and they will react. so that's the hololens looking at my hands, as well as the space. yeah. although some of the objects looked really gooey and i really didn't feel like touching them! they weren't real — you do know that, don't you? well, yes. spencer chuckles. do you think that the artists who painted these amazing paintings on the wall would've used this technology had it been available to them at the time? i don't know. it's a difficult question, isn't it? i mean, art can be cutting—edge and art can be classical. i think it's an interesting juxtaposition, this room, surrounded by turners and constables. "turner might have loved it and constable would've hated it" was said a few times by people who viewed it. spencer laughs. this five—minute performance is an experiment into how a mixed
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reality art experience might work in the future. and once the dancer disappears, the whole thing simmers down to work more in harmony with its surroundings. when i say simmers down... oh, wow! oh, i'm loving that! that's every doctor who and star wars experience i've ever wanted, right there, so that's made my day. marvellous. wow! it now feels very weird to be back in the room. oh, hello! hello! that's where you are! that was lovely, wasn't it? yeah! pretty lost in that. that's what's so bizarre is that the normal world now seems strange. and i say "the normal world" — we are in this room. yeah, we work on click. we don't live in the normal world. no, of course not. laughter. and someone who's taking that concept to the next level is marc cieslak, who's been asking where all this could go next. and the answer, of course, is the metaverse. so, what actually is the metaverse? well, if we think of the internet as something that we look at, the metaverse is a version of the internet that we're inside.
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the idea is that we will experience the metaverse as an avatar — a virtual version of ourselves that we control as we explore this new online frontier. but what will we actually do in here? whoa! i'd say there are examples of the metaverse already. if you look at some video games, for instance, they are, you know, digital worlds that you can interact with as an avatar. i'd see the metaverse as an extension of technologies that we currently have. i think a lot of people see the future metaverse as expanding on that experience to include not just gaming, but maybe things like a digital workspace or digital events, digital socialising. andrew bosworth is from meta, the company formerly known as facebook. the tech giant says it's transforming itself from a social media company into a metaverse company. we spoke using oculus virtual reality headsets,
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appearing as avatars inside software designed for virtual meetings, called workrooms. ok, so, boz, here we are in what might be considered a representation of what the metaverse could be. yeah, for us, the metaverse is a spacial construct, as opposed to the previous web, which was really a very linear kind of 2d, flat thing. we want this one to be immersive — something that you could, were you so inclined, really experience in an embodied way. now, of course, it doesn't mean it has to be virtual reality — it could also just be on a phone or on a desktop computer. you might have noticed that we are using the tools of the metaverse to create a good portion of this item. my avatar�*s been created by a couple of companies — ready player me and oz. they already create tools for people to make avatars from a photo. it's this virtual version of us which will travel between online experiences in any metaverse. bosworth believes new online economies will spring up around these pixelated people.
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and then, over time, what i'm most excited about is an economy there. and i mean, you know, economy notjust of digital goods, sure, and entertainment, that's great, but also services. in an immersive environment, i'm gonna have an avatar. i'm gonna need a stylist, i'm gonna have a home space, i'm gonna need a decorator, you know, and these are — i'm gonna invite my friends over to my home space. when we consider that video games already sell virtual goods like clothes or vehicles, we can see where this idea draws its inspiration, but there's other parts of online culture which these companies might be less enthusiastic about. now, in the contemporary online experience, there's a lot of online hatred out there, a lot of online abuse and misinformation and things of that nature. how are you going to avoid those kinds of experiences seeping into a metaverse? yeah, so, one of the things that's interesting about metaverse
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experiences is that we imagine them being real—time. do you really want the system or a person standing by, listening in? probably not. i don't. that feels like a real violation of privacy. but if the conversation's happening in real time, then how can we modify content without listening in? and so, i think we have a privacy trade—off against, you know, if you want to have a high degree of content safety — or what we would call 'integrity�* — well, that trades off against privacy. but i do think that we're gonna have, as a society, a lot of hard conversations ahead of us around the trade—offs between privacy, content and interoperability. yeah, the more time we spend in these digital worlds, the more data about ourselves we may be giving up and obviously, that is a privacy concern — especially if you are going from one domain to another. maybe you're going from a digital work zone to a digital gaming zone. do you want the same identity to be associated with both?
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there's calls that maybe you would have to verify your identity and match that to your avatar, so that people know who you are. but that in itself raises a whole bunch of privacy concerns. maybe not everyone will be comfortable doing that. microsoft has adapted its workplace meeting software teams for the metaverse by creating a system called mesh. it's designed to work with a variety of different devices, including virtual and augmented reality. ar, as it's known, projects graphics on top of the real world using headsets like microsoft's hololens or mobile phones. but after nearly two years of lockdowns and meetings with friends, family and colleagues via video call, is now the right time for an idea like this one? there's quite a few people that have got fatigued by having to have video chat meetings and things of that nature and that they realise they now crave human contact. human communication is about 5% speech, it's 95% everything else. i've been in my — in my, you know, living room with the entire team around the table, right? making eye contact, where all the gestures are coming
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into the right place and i can touch that digital object and instead of having a person next to me, having a walking one on one, i can have the avatar version of that person one on one next to me, so it changes completely the — the, you know, call it the 'screen fatigue' we're feeling today. the next piece of the metaverse puzzle isn't just about seeing these virtualworlds, but feeling them as well. work on haptics or forced feedback — the ability to touch and feel while inside a virtual space — has been going on for years now. the artist formerly known as facebook, meta, has revealed that it's been working on a glove that will let the user feel sensations, like holding an object. the glove has a number of sensors that measure the wearer's movements and air pockets across the glove's surface inflate to create sensation. these gloves aren't quite ready for prime time yet, but they're an indicator of the kind of research that's going on behind the scenes.
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the big question, though, is will people embrace this new vision for our online lives? i think it depends on the specific application. we've seen in gaming lots of people really do enjoy those experiences. they use avatars, they interact with the world in that way. would you want to sit in a virtual office as an avatar? i'm less sold on that idea. it seems the metaverse is coming. but its success rests solely in our hands. i don't know about you, but i do think augmented reality is pretty much there, now, which means in the future the 3d sculptures that you see around you might not actually be in the room. true. they're not quite the same, though, are they, at ar? you can't touch them. not that you could touch that, obviously. no, for goodness' sake. don't touch it, we'll all be in trouble. listen, there's one thing about ar they still do need to solve, though. what's that? it's the ar groove and the ar hair. oh, dear, have i still got
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that on my forehead? yeah, and my hair's all over the place. once you've sorted that, ar, we are in. anyway, that is it for the shortcut of click for this week from the v&a museum. the full—length version is waiting for you right now on iplayer. as ever, you can keep up with the team on social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks for watching. we'll see you soon. bye— bye. and good morning, welcome to breakfast with chris mason and nina warhurst. our headlines today... another blow for boris johnson, as the brexit minister lord frost resigns, saying he's concerned about the government's "direction of travel". omicron cases continue to surge in the uk, as a major incident
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is declared in london. the mayor of london says he is hugely concerned, he is warning hospitals like this one are already under huge pressure in the run—up to christmas. australia are looking to put england out of sight, in the second ashes test. they've declared, setting england a huge total on the fourth day. england have it all to do in adelaide. good morning. it's a cold start to the day out there, and we've got some mist and some dense fog patches around too. but some places will see a bit of sunshine later on. i'll have all the details here on bbc breakfast. it's sunday 19th december. our main story. the brexit minister, lord frost, has resigned, because of his concerns about the current direction of the government, including its approach to tax and to covid restrictions. it's another set—back for borisjohnson after by—election defeat in north shropshire and a conservative rebellion over plan b covid measues.
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here's our political correspondent, damian grammaticas. lord frost's resignation is without doubt another blow to borisjohnson, delivered right at the time the prime minister is at his weakest since coming to office. a one—time diplomat, david frost was brought in just days after borisjohnson became conservative leader to negotiate a brexit deal. he helped mrjohnson win the backing of hardline brexit supporters in his party, advocating a tough approach to brussels. the gap between us is still quite significant. here on the left, he was key to securing mrjohnson's brexit and his win at the general election. in return, the prime minister made him a lord and elevated him to the cabinet. but at that table, he has been arguing loudly against some of the prime minister's decisions, opposed to the recent re—imposition of covid restrictions and also to increasing national insurance to pay for social care. in his resignation letter
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to borisjohnson, he wrote, "you know my concerns about the current direction of travel," adding he wanted the uk to become a lightly regulated, low—tax country, saying on covid he hoped the government would not be tempted by the kind of coercive measures we have seen elsewhere. he set out his beliefs in a recent speech. i personally will argue as strongly as i can that free—market capitalism, low taxes, free speech and the maximum possible amount of economic and political freedom for individuals are the best choices we could make as a country. in reply, borisjohnson wrote he was very sorry, given everything you have achieved and contributed to this government. but the timing could hardly be worse for mrjohnson, right after the shock by—election defeat for the tories in north shropshire. now, the liberal democrats have said lord frost's resignation shows the rats are fleeing borisjohnson's sinking ship. labour said the government was in total chaos. the noes to the left, 126.
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boris johnson's authority in his party was weakened after 100 of his own mps rebelled against him in parliament over the covid restrictions. now, some are saying time is running out for him. he has lost a minister who was key to getting him into office, and he looks more vulnerable than ever. damian grammaticas, bbc news. our political correspondent charlotte rose joins us now. charlotte, what has the reaction been to lord frost's departure? why is this important? in terms of the impact of his departure, messages from a whatsapp group of 100 tory mps called clean global brexit were published by sky news last night and in one of them an mp describes it as very worrying, another says it is a disaster and a third describes lord frost as a hero who delivered brexit. in response to that the culture secretary nadine
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dorries who was also in that whatsapp group tells them they should show some loyalty to boris johnson, who as well as delivering brexit also gave the party and 83 seat majority in parliament, she says. in response to that, she was then removed from the whatsapp group with the leading brexiteer steve baker saying, with the leading brexiteer steve bakersaying, enough with the leading brexiteer steve baker saying, enough is enough. of course you have also had the conservative mp peter bone on saying he shares many of lord frost's concerns, so there is a real worry about. and then there is a broader context of all of this, it has been a tough month or so for the prime minister with rows about second jobs and sleaze allegations about parties in downing street and about the redecoration of the downing street flat, a big rebellion at the start of this week and a huge defeat for the conservatives in the north shropshire by—election. it was
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already a difficult week for the prime minister and now this has made it even more difficult for him. mani; it even more difficult for him. many thanks. germany will ban most travellers from britain from entering the country from 11 o'clock tonight uk time, as it tries to slow the spread of the omicron variant of coronavirus. german citizens and residents will still be able to travel, but they'll need proof of a negative covid test, and will then have to isolate at home for two weeks, regardless of whether they've been vaccinated. a month—long lockdown has come into force in the netherlands this morning. all but essential shops will shut until mid—january, as well as bars, restaurants and cinemas. schools and colleges will also remain closed. the dutch prime minister, mark rutte, said immediate action was needed to prevent hospitals form becoming unmanagable. there has been a significant
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rise in the number of omicron cases in the uk, with 10,000 reported yesterday. it comes amid calls for tougher restrictions before the end of the year. in london, the mayor sadiq khan has declared a major incident, warning the nhs in the capital was at risk of being overwhelmed. simonjones is outside a hospital in central london. simon, what pressures are nhs staff under right now? hospitals are coming under massive pressure according to the mayor of london. yesterday in the uk another 90,000 covid cases were recorded overall and here in london there are currently around 1500 patients with covid being treated in hospital, that number has risen by about 28% in the past week alone but the mayor says that is putting huge pressure on services, having to care for the patients who often need intensive
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care but also the number of staff having to isolate because of covid is rising also and that is why a major incident has been declared. it is partly to express the rising concern of the rising cases in london but it also means the health service, the police, the ambulance service, the fire service all come together, a number of times each day for meetings to look at how they can best coordinate the response to this. in terms of what the government says, there is some thought there should be more restrictions imposed across the uk to deal with the situation but the government says it is currently in the process of analysing what effect plan b has. and also, the booster campaign and how effective that will be against omicron. it has been really ramped up, a number of pop—up centres being opened across the country during the course of this
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weekend. let's bring in dr katherine henderson, the president of the royal college of emergency medicine. good morning. we see the rates rise but also the vaccine being rolled out at a pace. what needs to happen now, then? 50 out at a pace. what needs to happen now. then?— out at a pace. what needs to happen now, then? , ., , ., ., now, then? so the problem we have at the moment — now, then? so the problem we have at the moment is — now, then? so the problem we have at the moment is there _ now, then? so the problem we have at the moment is there are _ now, then? so the problem we have at the moment is there are a _ the moment is there are a significant number of staff going off with covid. the work force of the nhs as part of the general population and as the rates rise, it is inevitable that staff get infected and our problem is at the same time as we are trying to manage all of the other work and the vaccination programme, we see a lot of stuff going off sick. the thing we need at the moment is for the rates to go down as fast as possible, so we need people to be very aware of the risks of catching covid at the moment because it seems so easily transmissible and we need people to understand just what
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pressures the system is under so that if there are any ways they can avoid needing the emergency services, they do. indie avoid needing the emergency services, they do.— avoid needing the emergency services, the do. ~ ~ ., . ., services, they do. we know omicron is more transmissible _ services, they do. we know omicron is more transmissible but _ services, they do. we know omicron is more transmissible but are - services, they do. we know omicron is more transmissible but are you i is more transmissible but are you confident that early indicators are if they have been vaccinated or exposed before, it is not as bad, they are not as poorly as they have been. ~ . . . they are not as poorly as they have been. . ., , ., ., ., been. we are still waiting the data to confirm that _ been. we are still waiting the data to confirm that is _ been. we are still waiting the data to confirm that is the _ been. we are still waiting the data to confirm that is the case, - been. we are still waiting the data to confirm that is the case, but. been. we are still waiting the data to confirm that is the case, but we are seeing patients in vaccinated coming into hospital that are poorly. that is the problem, because of the high rates, it is inevitable that the covid infection will get to those patients who are unvaccinated, many of whom are extremely vulnerable and so we will get patients who are sick and need admission and potentially intensive care facilities because simply there is so much around it will get to people who have not been vaccinated, evenif people who have not been vaccinated, even if we have got some protection from those who have been boosted.
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the peak in last january was nearly 39,000 people in hospital with covid, at the moment it is about 7500. can we carry on as we are and see how plan b takes hold? that 7500. can we carry on as we are and see how plan b takes hold?- see how plan b takes hold? that is the real worry _ see how plan b takes hold? that is the real worry of _ see how plan b takes hold? that is the real worry of people's - the real worry of people's understanding, that we are trying to do something differently from last year, we had very much of our services shut down, we don't want to do this this time, we want to carry on with doing elective surgery, there are people who have been waiting a long time for some serious operations and we don't want to make the backlog any worse so we are trying to manage work carrying on in the nhs, but we may reach a point where we have to cancel a lot more of the routine work, which is barely beauty now, mostly urgent work, and we have to redeploy staff, but we are already short of staff so that will put a great deal of pressure. it is about protecting the nhs and
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the population by providing a health service. i5 the population by providing a health service. . , ., the population by providing a health service. , , ., ., ., the population by providing a health service. . ,, ., ., .., . service. is your fundamental concern more about — service. is your fundamental concern more about the _ service. is your fundamental concern more about the strength _ service. is your fundamental concern more about the strength of - service. is your fundamental concern more about the strength of the - service. is your fundamental concern more about the strength of the virus| more about the strength of the virus or about not having the staff in place because of the virus? both are the issue. place because of the virus? both are the issue- we _ place because of the virus? both are the issue. we have _ place because of the virus? both are the issue. we have a _ place because of the virus? both are the issue. we have a workforce - the issue. we have a workforce problem because we have got people going off sick, we have patients who are coming in with covid, patients coming in with another problem and are found to have covid. that immediately causes difficulties of where you place them in the hospital. someone with a broken leg and you testing identifies they have covid, you cannot put them in orthopaedic ward that is trying to do elective surgery for those being protected from catching covid so you have got all the inefficiencies of trying to manage infection streams and you have the lack of staff. so it is all interconnected, it is not an either or, we have a problem, lots covid, it will badly affect
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people's outcomes if they are vulnerable, unvaccinated, more likely to be admitted if they are unvaccinated, but the amount of patience will be a problem. do you worry if there are more restrictions, we saw last time people didn't present they should have done in emergency services because of lockdown restrictions, on top of the economic ramifications, the social implications of those becoming invisible to the state, do you worry if we see more measures and restrictions, that the collateral damage will be massive? i agree that is a considerable worry and we are beginning to see that already. i'm worried the most vulnerable of patients will be the most fearful of coming to hospital because they are worried about catching an infection from a crowded emergency department sol catching an infection from a crowded emergency department so i want those people to still come. the moment we see more people staying at home, we see more people staying at home, we see those people falling over in the
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street, cutting themselves with a knife and a restaurant, those things, it is fine, but it is the most seriously unwell that we want to come that we wanted to be a safe, welcoming environment but at the moment our departments are crowded, our ambulance delays are significant. we have to balance. none of this is risk—free, there is always risks, but clearly the thing we can do is try and reduce the number of people catching covid. i hope you get some rest. thank you. thank you. 50 hope you get some rest. thank you. thank you-— thank you. so many implications of what miaht thank you. so many implications of what might be _ thank you. so many implications of what might be just _ thank you. so many implications of what might be just around - thank you. so many implications of what might be just around the - what might be just around the corner. the implications for us, for health, the social concerned and then economically as well. the theatre industry has also been badly hit by recent covid—related outbreaks and cancellations. we'rejoined now by dame rosemary squire, owner of trafalgar entertainment.
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good morning. good morning. you will own 15 theatres around the uk, how are things own 15 theatres around the uk, how are thin ., ., , .,, are things now, giving that people will be taking _ are things now, giving that people will be taking tests _ are things now, giving that people will be taking tests and _ are things now, giving that people will be taking tests and cropping l are things now, giving that people. will be taking tests and cropping up positive and not being able to work? things are very difficult indeed, especially in the london area. we have three productions that have been taken down through covid infections in and around london and last night in london, i am a member of the trade association for london, there were 26 shows that were not able to perform just because of covid through the companies. there are some who are gallantly shut soldiering on and i thank everyone for their efforts, soldiering on and i thank everyone fortheir efforts, but soldiering on and i thank everyone for their efforts, but it is very tough for us. for their efforts, but it is very tough for us— tough for us. and what about audiences. — tough for us. and what about audiences, i— tough for us. and what about audiences, i people's - tough for us. and what about audiences, i people's but - tough for us. and what about l audiences, i people's but given tough for us. and what about - audiences, i people's but given the things we are hearing from the scientists around the scientists around turning up? i
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scientists around the scientists around turning up?— scientists around the scientists around turning up? i think people are spooked _ around turning up? i think people are spooked but _ around turning up? i think people are spooked but the _ around turning up? i think people are spooked but the guidance - around turning up? i think people. are spooked but the guidance from the government has been quite contradictory. on the one hand, we are told to go easy on the socialising and be selective about what we do, and then told don't cancel your parties and your nativity is. i think the public are confused. i know from our call centre we are inundated from calls from people who want to move their tickets until after christmas or one to rearrange aided because somebody in their party has tested positive or won't come at all. the government has to help us and the whole wider hospitality industry.— hospitality industry. when you say hel , what hospitality industry. when you say help. what do _ hospitality industry. when you say help, what do you _ hospitality industry. when you say help, what do you mean? - hospitality industry. when you say help, what do you mean? fellowi hospitality industry. when you say l help, what do you mean? fellow for instance? ., ., , ., , instance? there are lots of things. the last months _ instance? there are lots of things. the last months have _ instance? there are lots of things. the last months have been - instance? there are lots of things. | the last months have been terribly damaging for our industry, our usp
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is we are live and if you cannot perform it live, industry is taken down, so many people cannot earn their livings. plus we are a huge economic generatorfor their livings. plus we are a huge economic generator for all city centres. ih economic generator for all city centres. . . . economic generator for all city centres. , . , , ., , centres. in precise terms, what help would ou centres. in precise terms, what help would you want _ centres. in precise terms, what help would you want from _ centres. in precise terms, what help would you want from the _ centres. in precise terms, what help i would you want from the government? i think the government could help us enormously if they turn back on a lot of the measures that have only fairly recently been turned off, for example vat back down to 5%, bringing back the furlough scheme for people. i have productions with hundreds of people in who ijust laid off, they need to turn back on the furlough scheme and we need perhaps unspent funds, which we believe there is, in these support schemes. there was a big scheme for the arts which i have to say the commercial sector, which has driven the economic recovery and business has been a really good since last
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july. has been a really good since last july, people want live theatre, to share that experience, so we have driven the recovery but disproportionately we have not received much of the government funding under the different coronavirus schemes that were available. i would urge the government to turn those back on, look to reinstate furlough, look at the business rates, anything you can do to support our businesses. indie do to support our businesses. we wish ou do to support our businesses. we wish you the best. thank you for talking to us. it is coming up to 822. let's check in with sara to look at the weather. oh, a misty moment behind you. good morning. it is a bit of a misty, murky sort of morning, some dense fog patches around for some places, this is the picture in norfolk at the moment but if you haven't got the low cloud, you have probably had clear skies overnight and in scotland it has been the coldest night of the autumn
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winter so for. we have our temperatures down at... keeping things dry and settled, notjust in a bid for the next few days. there was lots of low cloud in general and mist and fog trapped underneath that area of high pressure and the many central and eastern areas, it will be slow to clear. the north and west should see sunshine, because of some glimpses of it and temperatures between three and 9 degrees in our towns and cities. this evening and night remains largely dry, the cloud is taken of the some rain and drizzle at times to today and tonight, some mist and fog reforming but not as extensive as the fog over recent nights and we will see a frost for parts of scotland and northern england but it should remain frost free elsewhere. heading through into monday, high pressure with us so largely dry and fairly cloudy but some more holes in the clouds. try for the next few days,
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perhaps more and settled towards the festive period. i will be wrapping up festive period. i will be wrapping up this week! the andrew marr show is on bbc one at nine o'clock. this is the last sunday we will say it. your last programme. a big moment for you. but a much bigger moment for the country, a momentous weekend, i am sure you would agree and by the dangerous one for the government. i am joined by sajid javid for obvious reasons, by sadiq khan, the mayor of london, where the omicron wave is happening most effectively, that's the wrong word. most dramatically put up david tennant, the actor, and we have wonderful music. join us for the very last show if you possibly can. it is a big day! for the country as well. he has done a greatjob. if you don't want to know who won
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strictly come dancing, mute your tv and look away now. jutttp jump behind the sofa. we are going to do the spoiler thing. history was made on the strictly dancefloor last night, as eastenders star rose ayling—ellis became the first deaf contestant to win the show with her professional partner giovanni pernice. the pair lifted the glitterball trophy after beating strictly�*s first same—sex couple, tv chefjohn whaite and johannes radebe. let's take a look at the winning moment. music: love is an open door music: shape of my heart by sting
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music: you've got the love by florence and the machine. i'm thinking what a great time it is to be part of strictly on this day, to have seen you, to have seen rose, to be sitting here and saying, i'm a part of that. and we are changing so many lives with this dance show. and this felt like it was for all of us. we can now reveal the strictly come dancing champions 2021 are... rose and giovanni.
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the first same—sex couple and grows being deaf, quite extraordinary. former strictly professional dancer flavia cacace—mistryjoins us now in the studio. why did you make of the final? i'm 'ust lad i why did you make of the final? i“n just glad i had a box of tissues next to me, because literally i was struggling to see the dancing. each one was so emotional, because they are a very unique partnership, both of them, and they have their stories and so intense that... i thought it was great. i was surprised even though we are at this stage of the competition, john stepped it up again i think. i think you got to the point where he went, i've won it anyway for is to be let go completely. i thought his technique was even better than the first time round, his rumba. no one would ever dream of doing the rumba in a final,
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you would never take that risk. he would do charlestons, paso doble, tangos, but the rumba is a difficult done so to take that... i think it is the first time we have had a rumba in the final but his technique was even better than the first time round. it was even better than the first time round. ., , ., , , ., round. it flows through every bit of his bod . round. it flows through every bit of his body- i — round. it flows through every bit of his body- i was _ round. it flows through every bit of his body. i was really _ round. it flows through every bit of his body. i was really impressed i his body. i was really impressed with him- _ his body. i was really impressed with him. even _ his body. i was really impressed with him. even though - his body. i was really impressed with him. even though my - his body. i was really impressed with him. even though my heart his body. i was really impressed - with him. even though my heart was alwa s with him. even though my heart was always edging _ with him. even though my heart was always edging towards _ with him. even though my heart was always edging towards rose - always edging towards rose because of her quality. i always edging towards rose because of her quality-— of her quality. i have to ask you about the _ of her quality. i have to ask you about the two _ of her quality. i have to ask you about the two years, _ of her quality. i have to ask you about the two years, you - of her quality. i have to ask you i about the two years, you mention them yourself watching. have there been more tears this year? all of the temperatures would well up. i think in the series there have been more tears last night for sure, every single routine, moment, i
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tissue was out. we need to make notes. i don't know if everyone is just a bit more emotional because everything going on and this has been a very special series for many reasons, it has giving people something to really look forward to this year. something to really look forward to this ear. ., , ., this year. two things about the finalists. a _ this year. two things about the finalists. a lot _ this year. two things about the finalists. a lot of _ this year. two things about the finalists. a lot of this _ this year. two things about the finalists. a lot of this is - this year. two things about the finalists. a lot of this is about i finalists. a lot of this is about how it trickles down to there is dancing for the first time, to see a same—sex couple in the final, somebody who cannot hear, do think that will expose dancing to a much wider audience, that they can be a part of it? wider audience, that they can be a artofit? ~ , ~' part of it? absolutely. i think --eole part of it? absolutely. i think people need _ part of it? absolutely. i think people need to _ part of it? absolutely. i think people need to see _ part of it? absolutely. i think people need to see this. - part of it? absolutely. i think people need to see this. i - part of it? absolutely. i think| people need to see this. i get part of it? absolutely. i think- people need to see this. i get lots of people coming up to me saying, i've got two left feet, i wouldn't be able to do it, but everyone can, everyone can learn.—
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everyone can learn. even chris mason! absolutely. _ everyone can learn. even chris mason! absolutely. and - everyone can learn. even chris mason! absolutely. and with l everyone can learn. even chris - mason! absolutely. and with rose's sto , mason! absolutely. and with rose's story. because _ mason! absolutely. and with rose's story. because as — mason! absolutely. and with rose's story, because as you _ mason! absolutely. and with rose's story, because as you say, - mason! absolutely. and with rose's story, because as you say, i - mason! absolutely. and with rose's story, because as you say, i would i story, because as you say, i would be exactly that person who would say, two left feet, i couldn't do it. and then you see rose achieve what she has achieved with the limitations of what she can hear and you think, that excuse has just bitten the dust. but you think, that excuse has 'ust bitten the dusti you think, that excuse has 'ust bitten the dust. but her disability is actually her — bitten the dust. but her disability is actually her quality, _ bitten the dust. but her disability is actually her quality, the - bitten the dust. but her disability is actually her quality, the thing i look about her if she has something you cannot explain, she has this mesmerising attraction when you look at her, you'll love what she does, her quality in the way she moves or floats across the floor and connects with her partner and i believe that is, the disability as her quality and makes her stand out and makes her special and unique. fight! and makes her stand out and makes her special and unique.— and makes her stand out and makes her special and unique. and she gave us an insight — her special and unique. and she gave us an insight into _ her special and unique. and she gave us an insight into her _ her special and unique. and she gave us an insight into her world, - her special and unique. and she gave us an insight into her world, we - her special and unique. and she gave us an insight into her world, we got i us an insight into her world, we got a tiny glimpse of her world and that is what made it so special. that moment. _ is what made it so special. that moment. i— is what made it so special. that
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moment, i don't _ is what made it so special. that moment, i don't think - is what made it so special. trust moment, i don't think anyone wouldn't feel something because it makes you realise how different how feelings —— herfeelings are compared to what we are feeling is so different. i compared to what we are feeling is so different-— so different. i have not worked out how she does _ so different. i have not worked out how she does it. _ so different. i have not worked out how she does it. i _ so different. i have not worked out how she does it. i think— so different. i have not worked out how she does it. i think initially, . how she does it. i think initially, ou how she does it. i think initially, you could _ how she does it. i think initially, you could see — how she does it. i think initially, you could see the _ how she does it. i think initially, you could see the first _ how she does it. i think initially, you could see the first couple i how she does it. i think initially, you could see the first couple of| you could see the first couple of weeks, you could see giovanni counting the numbers, so like having an internal clock, a timer and focusing on that beach. i think she can hear probably a subtle beat and thatis can hear probably a subtle beat and that is what she is aiming everything on, and then as the weeks have gone past, i didn't see any counting at all, so she was just completely let go and going with the flow. , ., ., ., “ “ completely let go and going with the flow. , ., ., ., ~' ~' , flow. they all looked like they were havin: a flow. they all looked like they were having a great _ flow. they all looked like they were having a great time. _ flow. they all looked like they were having a great time. it _ flow. they all looked like they were having a great time. it was - having a great time. it was wonderful. _ having a great time. it was wonderful. when - having a great time. it was wonderful. when you i having a great time. it was wonderful. when you get i having a great time. it was i wonderful. when you get that having a great time. it was - wonderful. when you get that point, like, this is it, you havejust got to go for it and relax and that took everything up a notch as well. thahk everything up a notch as well. thank ou. it everything up a notch as well. thank you- it has — everything up a notch as well. thank you. it has been _ everything up a notch as well. thank you. it has been a _ everything up a notch as well. thank you. it has been a joy _ everything up a notch as well. thank
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you. it has been a joy to _ everything up a notch as well. thank you. it has been a joy to you. - we'll bejoined by rose and giovanni here on breakfast tomorrow morning. this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. bye for now.
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where it now represents the dominant strain of the virus with which we are wrestling. it strain of the virus with which we are wrestling.— strain of the virus with which we are wrestling. it is incumbent on --eole to are wrestling. it is incumbent on people to please _ are wrestling. it is incumbent on people to please themselves i are wrestling. it is incumbent on people to please themselves up| are wrestling. it is incumbent on l people to please themselves up to three households mixing at christmas and it is your understanding that by and it is your understanding that by and large people are following that. i think people will be following those approaches. i think we have a high level of complaints over the whole covid experience. we have communicated clearly the scale of the challenge we face because of omicron and i think the public response to that has been very strong. it is also evident in the response to the booster vaccination
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programme where we have a lot of drop—in centres available around the country and people coming forward to be vaccinated at the earliest possible opportunity and we are making very good progress and working through the booster vaccination programme. in all of these indications, it shows the public are with us to do what they can to suppress the circulation of the virus. there are other measures we need, people need to wear face coverings and on public transport, we need people to observe physical distancing, to reinstate some of the measures that we have in place to protect people when they were in a retail environment and other such environments and hospitality so there is lots that need to be done to make sure we are all playing our part. to make sure we are all playing our art. . ~ . to make sure we are all playing our art. . ~ , .., ., to make sure we are all playing our part. first minister nicola sturgeon now sa s
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part. first minister nicola sturgeon now says omicron _ part. first minister nicola sturgeon now says omicron is _ part. first minister nicola sturgeon now says omicron is the _ part. first minister nicola sturgeon now says omicron is the dominant| now says omicron is the dominant strain_ now says omicron is the dominant strain and — now says omicron is the dominant strain and a — now says omicron is the dominant strain and a tsunami has hit scotland _ strain and a tsunami has hit scotland-— strain and a tsunami has hit scotland. ~ ., ., ., ~ , ., strain and a tsunami has hit scotland. ~ ., ., .«r ., scotland. what would it take you to brina in scotland. what would it take you to bring in more _ scotland. what would it take you to bring in more measures? _ scotland. what would it take you to bring in more measures? we i scotland. what would it take you to bring in more measures? we are i bring in more measures? we are monitoring _ bring in more measures? we are monitoring cases _ bring in more measures? we are monitoring cases on _ bring in more measures? we are monitoring cases on a _ bring in more measures? we are monitoring cases on a daily i bring in more measures? we are| monitoring cases on a daily basis, monitoring cases on a daily basis, monitoring hospitalisation very closely and we are concerned that the pace at which omicron is developing in scotland is a much faster rate than any of the previous variants of the virus. we have gone from omicron representing 2% of the cases in scotland to being over 50% in the space of three weeks so it has been really aggressive. we continue to review those measures and have put in place a number of protections to support the public and the public are complying with those measures but we will update parliament in the course of this week on the further views that we have about any other measures we need to take. iflan have about any other measures we
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need to take-— have about any other measures we need to take. ., , ., , ., , need to take. can you understand why --eole are need to take. can you understand why people are confused _ need to take. can you understand why people are confused they _ need to take. can you understand why people are confused they don't - need to take. can you understand why people are confused they don't get i people are confused they don't get to mix rather households and hogmanay in edinburgh is going ahead. ~ ., ., , ahead. what we are seeing in the run-up to — ahead. what we are seeing in the run-up to christmas _ ahead. what we are seeing in the run-up to christmas is _ ahead. what we are seeing in the run-up to christmas is getting i run—up to christmas is getting people to limit their mixing. we are not asking people to change the christmas day or christmas eve and boxing day plans when families get together and asking people to dial down the social interaction may have to try to provide us with a bit more protection against the circulation of the virus there are some larger events that take place and we are saying to people before they go to test themselves with lateral flow tester make sure they are negative and this should be and get the boosterjag and sink people on a
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variety of ways to take steps to put themselves into position when they might infect others. l.tlol’hat themselves into position when they might infect others.— might infect others. what you see eo - le might infect others. what you see people look _ might infect others. what you see people look at _ might infect others. what you see people look at the _ might infect others. what you see people look at the evidence i might infect others. what you see | people look at the evidence around omicron and see it as the dominant variant but there is evidence that is not so much hospitalisation and so these measures don't go far enough. so these measures don't go far enou . h. . . so these measures don't go far enou . h. , ., ., so these measures don't go far enou:h. , ., ., . ., enough. there is a view that omicron is somewhat — enough. there is a view that omicron is somewhat milder _ enough. there is a view that omicron is somewhat milder as _ enough. there is a view that omicron is somewhat milder as a _ enough. there is a view that omicron is somewhat milder as a variant i enough. there is a view that omicron is somewhat milder as a variant and i is somewhat milder as a variant and we don't need to be so concerned. we will have many more cases of omicron sweden if we have a small proportion of cases been hospitalised we will have enormous pressure on our national health service and enormous pressure on the public and private services in which we all depend because of the level of illness and
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self isolation so we really can't take a casual attitude about omicron, we can'tjudge it to be milder virus because if we have a small proportion of a much larger number of cases being hospitalised and people offset, we will have real pressure on our health service and other essential public services. gavin is here with the sport. i suppose the cricket brings us to distraction but not a vast amount of cheer. it's not looking good
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for england in adelaide. australia declared setting them a total of 469 to win, but with the end of the fourth day of the second test in sight, they have a battle to stay in this. things began well for england — jos buttler making up for dropping steve smith, the australia captain for this test. smith went for just six. but australia found their rhythm — and half centuries from travis head, and marnus labuschagne helped them to declare on 230—9. england's second innings got off to a poor start. haseeb hameed out for zero. england currently 20—1. it was an odd premier league saturday with five games postponed because of covid, so it was up to to arsenal and leeds to be the sole entertainment. and it didn't disappoint with five goals in total as the gunners comfortably won 4—1, gabrielle martinelli getting the first two.
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england internationals bukayo saka and emile smith rowe also both got on the scoresheet as arsenal made it three league wins in a row. they're fourth whilst leeds are struggling in 16th. three of the four premier league games today are still scheduled to go ahead, with the top three all in action. leaders manchester city are away at newcastle, chelsea travel to wolves but the game of the day sees spurs hosting second—placed liverpool. jurgen klopp has been having his say on players who haven't had the covid vaccine. ifa if a player is not vaccinated at all he is a constant threat to all of us. he doesn't want to be a threat, of course, it is not that he thinks i don't care about the others, we have to find different scenarios, he has to change to a different dressing room, eat in a different dining room, sit in different buses are a different car. from an organisational point of view it is a
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real mess. celtic could secure the first trophy of the ange postecoglou era in today's scottish league cup final — hibernian are their opponents at hampden park, led by interim manager david gray after the sacking ofjack ross ten days ago. in the premiership, rangers have extended their lead at the top with a 1—0 win over covid—hit dundee united. james tavernier scored the only goal of the game from the penalty spot. britain's derek chisora has been beaten by new zealand's joseph parker in a heavyweight classic at the ao arena in manchester. it was decided on points after a strong start from parker who had chisora down taking a count in round four. chisora was down again in the seventh and eighth, but managed to continue and made it to the final hell, but parker took the victory as he looks to get back to world title level. three—time champion michael van gerwen is through to the third round of the pdc world championships. he recovered after losing the first set, winning six legs in a row to beat chas barstow in a 3—1victory.
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well, the fans at ally pally have been treated to two nine—darters in two days after willie borland achieved the rare feat on friday, darius labanauskas got one of his own on saturday but still ended up losing his match. i always find it is such an amazing atmosphere at this time of year but it could be affected by what we are seeing in the news. it is it could be affected by what we are seeing in the news.— seeing in the news. it is not 'ust that one moment i seeing in the news. it is not 'ust that one moment but i seeing in the news. it is not 'ust that one moment but every i seeing in the news. it is notjust i that one moment but every single one with the building of the tension. it is an incredible feat to be able to do it. i is an incredible feat to be able to do it. ., ., ., is an incredible feat to be able to do it. ., , ., ., ., do it. i am too short and always havin: do it. i am too short and always having to _ do it. i am too short and always having to point _ do it. i am too short and always having to point which _ do it. i am too short and always having to point which is - do it. i am too short and always having to point which is a i do it. i am too short and always. having to point which is a serious disadvantage. the cold weather and the increasing spread of coronavirus means that homeless people across the uk — and those helping them — are facing a challenging winter.
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in scotland, a new law could be introduced requiring public organisations to identify those at risk of becoming homeless and refer them for support. our reporter emma snow has been to meet a paramedic from derby who helps rough sleepers in the city. there is nothing left in my world and when i have nothing, she's my star. tracy is a beacon of hope for the rough sleepers in derby and she currently looks after 200 homeless people. each day i go out on outreach from the city centre and down to normanton and look out for any new rough sleepers or anybody that i need to make contact with, follow up on their health, medication, gp appointments and things like that or see how they got on in hospital and things. it's been difficult for tracy to gain the trust of the rough sleepers in derby. at first it took me six months to find my footfall with them because they are quite disengaging with any health, they don't attend hospital or gp appointments or engage with other workers,
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but it's just when i attended one of them that was having an overdose and since i brought that person back round, that's it, i'm kind of end in with the gang now, sort of. so i'm a bit like their mother, to be honest. she chuckles. because of this lady i've never had to spend a night on the streets, she's aways got my back. i have mental health problems, i have alcohol issues, this lady works unbelievable hours. without tracy you'd be dead? and that's the truth. many of us would be, actually, there's a few people whose life
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she's actually saved. she means everything to me, and some more. she's worth her weight in gold and then some, she's all like a green goddess. tracy cares so much about the homeless people in derby that she rarely has a day off. i think i've had five days off, i had a really bad cold, chest infection. she laughs. and that's in how long? and that's in the two and a half years. one of tracy's many projects has been overseeing vaccinating rough sleepers in derby. yeah, we've introduced quite a lot of things now and actually when you see them walking round they are quite healthy to what they was when we first started. tracy is making a huge difference to the community and she really is a health care hero. i can see what difference i'm making plus it's nice that they've got that contact whereas they've never had it before so if they are feeling poorly the don't hesitate now in coming to find me or signpost other people through me. so, yeah, it's all about that engagement and that trust now, you see. we're joined now by matthew downie, director of policy at the homeless charity, crisis. what do you make derby? i have been to see what tracy _ what do you make derby? i have been to see what tracy and _ what do you make derby? i have been to see what tracy and the _ what do you make derby? i have been to see what tracy and the other i to see what tracy and the other paramedics are doing. it is not always the case that it is the health service helping the homeless
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and the average age of death is sadlyjust 44 if and the average age of death is sadly just 44 if you and the average age of death is sadlyjust 44 if you are homeless in this country so it is about life and death particularly this time of year. death particularly this time of ear. ~ . ., year. we were reflecting about the reali of year. we were reflecting about the reality of the _ year. we were reflecting about the reality of the cold _ year. we were reflecting about the reality of the cold at _ year. we were reflecting about the reality of the cold at this _ year. we were reflecting about the reality of the cold at this time i year. we were reflecting about the reality of the cold at this time of i reality of the cold at this time of yearfor reality of the cold at this time of year for people who are sleeping rough. it is so obvious even when you are walking down the street let alone having to sleep outside. what happens in particular around these coming weeks, around christmas, when there tends to be a bit more focus on those who are homeless to try to offer people support and crucially offer people support and crucially offer the support that might last beyond the christmas and new year period? it beyond the christmas and new year eriod? . beyond the christmas and new year eriod? , ., , , ., beyond the christmas and new year eriod? ., , period? it is obviously a very dangerous — period? it is obviously a very dangerous time _ period? it is obviously a very dangerous time every - period? it is obviously a very dangerous time every year i period? it is obviously a very l dangerous time every year and period? it is obviously a very i dangerous time every year and we period? it is obviously a very - dangerous time every year and we are seeing more and more extreme weather. organisations like a crisis open special services and an opening hotels and centres up and down the country and when the weather which
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is freezing local councils open special provision at that stage for severe weather but it's not enough. the idea we have to wait until it is actually freezing to provide emergency help for people is not good enough and we saw in the early days of the pandemic what was called the everyone in scheme. 37,000 people were provided with emergency accommodation because other virus. homelessness and rough sleeping already was and is an disaster and emergency and seeing it in that light and providing people with unconditional access to somewhere to live notjust unconditional access to somewhere to live not just for a unconditional access to somewhere to live notjust for a few days is really the answer for this. mikel wanted to ask you about the everyone in scheme in england. l.tlol’hat wanted to ask you about the everyone in scheme in england.— in scheme in england. what lessons have been properly _ in scheme in england. what lessons have been properly learned - in scheme in england. what lessons have been properly learned from i in scheme in england. what lessons. have been properly learned from that and what have not? in the practical sense one of the things that could happen is hotel rooms otherwise close to the rest of us could be
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used and i guess that isn't possible when those restrictions are not in place? when those restrictions are not in lace? . when those restrictions are not in lace? , , ,., , ., when those restrictions are not in lace? , ,., ., , place? the big lesson is a really ositive place? the big lesson is a really positive one. — place? the big lesson is a really positive one, which _ place? the big lesson is a really positive one, which is _ place? the big lesson is a really positive one, which is when i place? the big lesson is a really positive one, which is when we | place? the big lesson is a really i positive one, which is when we set our minds to a collective goal to end rough sleeping as quickly as possible miraculous things are totally possible and i think that is brought into sharp focus, if we can do it during the emergency of the unfolding pandemic we can do it at any stage. it is true that hotels were unoccupied and that is not the case no so it is much harderfor councils to find places for people to stop but really that brings me to the other lesson, hotel room isn't a home and there are a number of people who have their lives improved immeasurably by having some time safely in a hotel room but for others who need supportjust having a hotel room and nothing else is not
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the answer. so what that leads to is we need something called housing first which is get somebody into home of their own as soon as possible, their own flat, notjust run hotel and give them what you need for as long as is required and we see miraculous things we are rough sleeping and homelessness really does plummet. it is rough sleeping and homelessness really does plummet.— really does plummet. it is nice to talk to you. _ really does plummet. it is nice to talk to you, thank _ really does plummet. it is nice to talk to you, thank you. _ really does plummet. it is nice to talk to you, thank you. a - really does plummet. it is nice to talk to you, thank you. a real i talk to you, thank you. a real eye—opener into the kind of christmas people will actually be having. this is where we say goodbye to chris who is going to read the news for the andrew marr show. it is since last programme. it is a privilege to read the news for him on his last programme. sarah's here with the weather.
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isn't it a beautiful image behind me? i couldn't resist showing you this. this is the wintry sunrise in spean bridge in highlands of scotland. it is been the coldest night of the autumn and winter in the uk and we had temperatures in braemar down to minus 8.9 celsius so a sharp frost in highland but for the rest of us a bit more cloud around particularly south and east saw through today a bit of sunshine on offer but it will stay mostly cloudy and fairly grey with dense fog patches around across many areas which will be quite slow to clear for some. which will be quite slow to clear forsome. high which will be quite slow to clear for some. high pressure really dominating our weather notjust for the rest of the day but for the next few days as well. the weather not changing in a hurry. low cloud and mist and fog beneath a high pressure, particularly for central and eastern england, thick enough for drizzle and east scotland clouding over. the northern isles and west of scotland and northern
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ireland and wales and the west of england. south—west england could see a glimpse of blue sky with temperatures of 9 degrees but most of us typically from a three to eight celsius. overnight quite dry and cloudy with the odd spot of drizzle. mist and fog patches will not be as extensive as over the past couple of nights and we will see frost for scotland and into parts of northern england perhaps but many of us largely frost free with the blanket of low cloud sticking around. demand a high pressure right across the uk something is not changing very much. what you will notice is the cloud particularly for central and eastern england will break up a bit more tomorrow compared to yesterday and today she could see glimpses of sunshine for areas that have not seen it for quite a while. the best of the brightness in northern and western parts of scotland but it is colder thanit parts of scotland but it is colder than it has been recently and a high and aberdeen of 2 degrees. the
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south—west of england nine or possibly 10 degrees. in the week ahead high pressure looks like it might slowly ease towards the east towards mid week and that could open the doors for a lower pressure to move on from the atlantic. a bit of uncertainty about the timing of any of those weather fronts but we will see from thursday to friday because they are trying to push on from the north and milder area sweeping in from the south—west. when those two air masses meet we could see something more unsettled. the next few days looking calm with overnight frost and the potential for rain and perhaps sleet and snow here and there towards the christmas period. a bit more unsettled in the lead up to christmas. fraser lamb was born with spina bifida and had life saving surgery at sheffield children's hospital when he was 12 years old. to say thank you, he decided to embark on a mammoth 2,021—mile wheelchair fundraising
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challenge back injanuary — and today he'll complete the final four miles. we've been following his progress — so let's remind ourseves of his journey so far. every day there is somebody is cheering me on or beeping their horn at me. it's more than i could ever have imagined. we've seen him out in rain, torrential rain, sleet, snow, wind. he just never stops. fraser, why is it so important that you raise money for sheffield children's hospital?
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just because they did so much for me when i was a child. what keeps you going day after day? knowing that i'm going to make a difference to people's lives. fraserjoins us now, alongside catherine foster, from the children's hospital charity which will benefit from his fundraising. four miles to go, how are you feeling? four miles to go, how are you feelin: ? ,., ., ., ., �* feeling? good morning. fine. i don't know how i'm _ feeling? good morning. fine. i don't know how i'm feeling, _ feeling? good morning. fine. i don't know how i'm feeling, to _ feeling? good morning. fine. i don't know how i'm feeling, to be - feeling? good morning. fine. i don't know how i'm feeling, to be honest. | know how i'm feeling, to be honest. a bit shocked that it is gone by so quickly that i'm actually know here. at the end. —— mikel quickly that i'm actually know here. at the end. —— mike i am now here.
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what is the toughest bit? at the end. -- mike i am now here. what is the toughest bit?— what is the toughest bit? there are two bits that _ what is the toughest bit? there are two bits that stick _ what is the toughest bit? there are two bits that stick in _ what is the toughest bit? there are two bits that stick in my _ what is the toughest bit? there are two bits that stick in my mind. i what is the toughest bit? there are | two bits that stick in my mind. when we had snow and rain in the early months of the year when i was just starting. although i was enthusiastic and waiting to go, i have found the weather challenging over the year at certain times stop —— raring to go. i have also picked up —— raring to go. i have also picked up an injury or two along the way which hasn't helped but as i say i am just glad to be here now. what am 'ust glad to be here now. what are amjust glad to be here now. what are our amjust glad to be here now. what are your injuries? _ amjust glad to be here now. what are your injuries? i— amjust glad to be here now. what are your injuries? i have _ amjust glad to be here now. what are your injuries? i have a - amjust glad to be here now. what are your injuries? i have a wound, | am just glad to be here now. what. are your injuries? i have a wound, a are your in'uries? i have a wound, a ressure are your injuries? i have a wound, a pressure wound. — are your injuries? i have a wound, a pressure wound, on _ are your injuries? i have a wound, a pressure wound, on my _ are your injuries? i have a wound, a
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pressure wound, on my foot - are your injuries? i have a wound, a pressure wound, on my foot which i j pressure wound, on my foot which i actually had before before i started the challenge, and having my feet constantly down doing miles hasn't helped it to heal. it has gone a bit bad and i have needed antibiotics and things like that stop catherine, ou have and things like that stop catherine, you have been _ and things like that stop catherine, you have been alongside _ and things like that stop catherine, you have been alongside fraser- and things like that stop catherine, you have been alongside fraser for| you have been alongside fraserfor some of the miles. it seems he has not let it get him down at any point despite the injuries. what has it been like to be with them? it has been like to be with them? it has been one of— been like to be with them? it has been one of the _ been like to be with them? it has been one of the greatest - been like to be with them? it has been one of the greatest pleasures for fraser— been one of the greatest pleasures for fraser to have allowed me to 'oin for fraser to have allowed me to join him — for fraser to have allowed me to join him on — for fraser to have allowed me to join him on one of his challenge days _ join him on one of his challenge days it — join him on one of his challenge days. it has been particularly difficult — days. it has been particularly difficult at certain times of the yeah — difficult at certain times of the yeah he — difficult at certain times of the year. he has never stopped smiling. all the _ year. he has never stopped smiling. all the local — year. he has never stopped smiling. all the local supporters he has have
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supported _ all the local supporters he has have supported his challenge so strongly and i think that has really kept fraser— and i think that has really kept fraser going. he really is an inspiration.— fraser going. he really is an insiration. ., , ., , , inspiration. the money he raises, he wanted to raise _ inspiration. the money he raises, he wanted to raise £2021 _ inspiration. the money he raises, he wanted to raise £2021 and _ inspiration. the money he raises, he wanted to raise £2021 and so - inspiration. the money he raises, he wanted to raise £2021 and so far - inspiration. the money he raises, he wanted to raise £2021 and so far he l wanted to raise £2021 and so far he has gone over £16,000. tok is through the difference that can make for children and the sheffield children's hospital. its, for children and the sheffield children's hospital.- children's hospital. a huge difference _ children's hospital. a huge difference and _ children's hospital. a huge difference and only - children's hospital. a huge difference and only on - children's hospital. a huge l difference and only on fraser assigned _ difference and only on fraser assigned his funds to a new cancer and leukaemia ward nearing the end of its _ and leukaemia ward nearing the end of its appeal at the moment. so literally— of its appeal at the moment. so literally his fundraising will be a tasting — literally his fundraising will be a lasting legacy for thousands of chitdren— lasting legacy for thousands of children coming through that particular department in years to come _ particular department in years to come it— particular department in years to come. it has made a huge difference. fraser, _ come. it has made a huge difference. fraser, talk— come. it has made a huge difference. fraser, talk me through your memories of sheffield children
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hospital because you were there at a very difficult time.— very difficult time. obviously i sent very difficult time. obviously i spent months _ very difficult time. obviously i spent months there _ very difficult time. obviously i spent months there is - very difficult time. obviously i spent months there is an - very difficult time. obviously i | spent months there is an early very difficult time. obviously i - spent months there is an early teen. from 12 to my early teens and ijust remember getting so much good care and such caring friendly people and just amazing support, basically. so it was a no—brainer for me to want to give back. it was a no-brainer for me to want to give back-— it was a no-brainer for me to want to give back. what does it feel like for ou to give back. what does it feel like for you when _ to give back. what does it feel like for you when people _ to give back. what does it feel like for you when people have - to give back. what does it feel like for you when people have met - to give back. what does it feel like for you when people have met you| for you when people have met you along the way across the 2000 miles to see your enthusiasm for the charity is infectious and they want
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to be there to support you, how much of a difference does it make and will it make for those final four miles today? it will it make for those final four miles today?— will it make for those final four miles today? it has made a huge difference all _ miles today? it has made a huge difference all year. _ miles today? it has made a huge difference all year. it _ miles today? it has made a huge difference all year. it has - miles today? it has made a huge difference all year. it has really l difference all year. it has really been a lot easier, to be honest. especially over the hard times of the challenge talk especially over the hard times of the challeng— the challenge talk me through finally what — the challenge talk me through finally what today _ the challenge talk me through finally what today looks - the challenge talk me through finally what today looks like. i the challenge talk me through i finally what today looks like. you are setting off soon and where is the finish line, if anybody wants to come and show their support? the finish line come and show their support? ire: finish line will come and show their support? iie: finish line will be come and show their support? i“il: finish line will be at come and show their support? iil finish line will be at the white hart pub at around two o'clock this afternoon. : ~ , ., afternoon. and will there be a celebration _ afternoon. and will there be a celebration in _ afternoon. and will there be a celebration in the _ afternoon. and will there be a celebration in the pub? - afternoon. and will there be a celebration in the pub? how. afternoon. and will there be a l celebration in the pub? how will afternoon. and will there be a - celebration in the pub? how will you wind down after this, would you be able to relax? i wind down after this, would you be able to relax?—
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able to relax? i am intending to have a relaxing _ able to relax? i am intending to have a relaxing afternoon - able to relax? i am intending to have a relaxing afternoon and i able to relax? i am intending to. have a relaxing afternoon and we will see what happens after that stop i will see what happens after that sto_ ., ., , ., will see what happens after that sto ; . ., , ., , stop i have a feeling you will be back with another _ stop i have a feeling you will be back with another challenge - stop i have a feeling you will be | back with another challenge next year. catherine, how much will it mean when he crosses that line and enters the pub? it mean when he crosses that line and enters the pub?— enters the pub? it will be a wonderful— enters the pub? it will be a wonderful feeling. - enters the pub? it will be a wonderful feeling. we - enters the pub? it will be aj wonderfulfeeling. we have enters the pub? it will be a i wonderful feeling. we have all enters the pub? it will be a - wonderful feeling. we have all been so inspired — wonderful feeling. we have all been so inspired by fraser, he is an absolute — so inspired by fraser, he is an absolute hero for undertaking this challenge the last 12 months and he rightlv_ challenge the last 12 months and he rightly deserves a relaxing afternoon and certainly a relaxing christmas — afternoon and certainly a relaxing christmas as well.— afternoon and certainly a relaxing christmas as well. fraser, what is next for you? _ christmas as well. fraser, what is next for you? i— christmas as well. fraser, what is next for you? i don't _ christmas as well. fraser, what is next for you? i don't think - christmas as well. fraser, what is next for you? i don't think this - next for you? i don't think this seen the last of you i next for you? i don't think this seen the last of you— next for you? i don't think this seen the last of you i have actually been in a way _ seen the last of you i have actually been in a way quite _ seen the last of you i have actually been in a way quite fortunate, - seen the last of you i have actually been in a way quite fortunate, i. been in a way quite fortunate, i have been unemployed this year and have been unemployed this year and have had the time to dedicate myself to the challenge and i would quite like my next challenge to be next
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year to get into the working world again and that sort of thing. i will see how that goes first. taste again and that sort of thing. i will see how that goes first.— again and that sort of thing. i will see how that goes first. we wish you all the best in _ see how that goes first. we wish you all the best in securing _ see how that goes first. we wish you all the best in securing a _ see how that goes first. we wish you all the best in securing ajob, - see how that goes first. we wish you all the best in securing ajob, i - see how that goes first. we wish you all the best in securing ajob, i am i all the best in securing a job, i am sure you will. thank you so much for joining us. flan sure you will. thank you so much for 'oinin: us. . ,_ sure you will. thank you so much for 'oinin: us. . :, ,, sure you will. thank you so much for 'oinin. us. ., ., y., ., ~' joining us. can i say to you thank ou while joining us. can i say to you thank you while i _ joining us. can i say to you thank you while i am — joining us. can i say to you thank you while i am on. _ joining us. can i say to you thank you while i am on. firstly, - joining us. can i say to you thank| you while i am on. firstly, mainly to the people that have sponsored me, the town council, life mobility for the piece of machinery that the optioned off and made available to me and independent living. taste optioned off and made available to me and independent living. we will have to wrap _ me and independent living. we will have to wrap up — me and independent living. we will have to wrap up the _ me and independent living. we will have to wrap up the thank - me and independent living. we will have to wrap up the thank you, - me and independent living. we will have to wrap up the thank you, i i me and independent living. we will| have to wrap up the thank you, i am so sorry, but i'm glad you got some
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n. that's all from breakfast for today. we'll be back tomorrow from six. until then, enjoy your weekend. goodbye. to make sure we are all playing our part. this is bbc news. our top stories... the uk's brexit minister lord frost resigns citing concerns about what he called the government's "direction of travel" germany bans british travellers and the netherlands goes into full lockdown — as europe ramps up its fight against the spread of omicron. translation: it was nice to go to the city for a little _ while before the lockdown. translation: it's too busy everywhere, but i have - to come to get presents before the christmas holidays. scientists in the uk put more pressure on the government to announce fresh restrictions to stem the spread of the covid variant. in the first election since china tightened its control, people in hong kong are voting in a poll where every candidate has been vetted for their loyalty to beijing.

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