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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 19, 2021 2:00pm-2:31pm GMT

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pernice ll — the headlines at 3: this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall — the headlines at 2: the health security says it's time to be cautious about social interactions and refuses to rule out tighter covid restrictions before christmas, in response to the rapid spread of the omicron variant there are no guarantees in this pandemic, i don't think. at this point, we just have to keep everything under review. germany bans british travellers and the netherlands goes into full lockdown — as europe ramps up its fight against the spread of omicron. the brexit minister, lord frost, resigns — citing concerns about what he called the government's "direction of travel." in the first election since china tightened its control, people in hong kong are voting in a poll — where every candidate has been vetted for their loyalty to beijing.
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richard rogers — the architect behind buildings including the pompidou centre, in paris, and the lloyds building, in london, has died at the age of 88. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the health secretary, sajid javid, has urged us all to be cautious in the run up to christmas and says he can't rule out further restrictions as the government continues to battle the fast—spreading omicron variant. mrjavid said seven people have now died after contracting omicron and it was already the dominant strain in england as well as in scotland. sanchia berg reports. # driving home for christmas...# to the sound of christmas songs, people queued this morning forjabs
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outside a chilly wembley stadium. omicron accounts for an estimated 80% of cases in london now. people are trying to protect themselves and their family christmas plans. i would prefer to have it done before christmas. i have an elderly grandfather who is 90 years old so i want to be able to see him and get this over and done with. as soon as i heard that they have an event here where they are giving the boosters out, so i decided to book one immediately for myself. it feels really good. but the virus is spreading so rapidly, the health secretary didn't rule out new restrictions even for next week. there are no guarantees in this pandemic. i think at this point we have to keep everything in review. he urged people across the country to be cautious in the days ahead. if i'm going to see my mum for example, who is very elderly, like most older people, she's more vulnerable than younger people, i will take a test and i mightjust not have the usual amount of hugs i get from my mum.
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you just take a little bit of caution and i think that's a sensible response but the most important thing that anyone can do right now is to get boosted. earlier this week in central london people were still out and about but venues were generally quieter now is the variant spreads and scientist worn they cannot say warn they cannot say how severe it will be. frankly, the evidence is not there that it is either less severe or more severe than the delta variant. we just don't know, but what we do know is that the cases are rising very fast. so far, there are 85 patients in english hospitals with omicron and seven confirmed deaths, but the health secretary said they were typically infected over a fortnight ago, well before omicron became the dominant strain. if borisjohnson does decide to go for more restrictions, he could face considerable opposition to them from within his own party.
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his chief brexit negotiator, lord frost, has resigned from the government — and among the reasons given were his opposition to vaccine passports and further restrictions. here's our political correspondent, charlotte rose. the reaction to news of the chief brexit negotiator, lord frost's resignation came quickly, with members in a whatsapp group of 100 tory mps describing it as a very worrying and a disaster. in the images of the messages first broadcast by sky news, the culture secretary, nadine dorries, steps in to defend the prime minister, telling mps to show a bit of loyalty to the person who won an 83 —seat majority and delivered brexit. the response, she is removed from the whatsapp group by senior brexiteer steve baker, who says enough is enough. reacting to the news this morning, the health secretary paid tribute to lord frost. i'm sorry to see him go. i think he's been an
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outstanding public servant. he's done great things for this country, not least in helping to get brexit done but he's resigned out of principle. i think you can see that. i know all about resigning from government out of principle and he has made that decision. and many conservative backbenchers agree with him. the pm suffered his biggest rebellion over that issue last week when 100 of his own mps voted against him. many of the things he worries about, i and many of my colleagues worry about. we want to see the conservative party as a low tax party going forward and we don't want our civil liberties to be restricted. labour says his departure leaves the prime minister in a weaker position. where the prime minister should be leading at the moment he's in hiding, hiding from his own party, hiding from his backbenchers and failing to lead, now, that's an abdication of responsibility and our message to the government is you don't
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have to be held hostage by your own backbenchers. you can work with labour. although sajid javid was keen to insist this morning the government would do whatever is necessary to curb the rise of omicron infections, all of this leaves the pm with less room to manoeuvre. it seems the resignation of the government's key man in brussels may have an impact on policies much closer to home. charlotte rose, bbc news. several european countries have introduced tough new restrictions to tackle covid, as the omicron variant spreads rapidly across the continent. a month—long lockdown has come into force in the netherlands. the dutch prime minister, mark rutte, said immediate action — including the closure of schools — was needed to avoid hospitals being overwhelmed. denmark, ireland and switzerland are all stepping up or re—introducing restrictions — but they've stopped short of full lockdowns. in london — one of europe's hotspots for the omicron strain — more than one in a hundred
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people now have the virus. our coverage starts in the netherlands with this report from anna holligan. a final flourish of festive cheer before dutch cities shut down for christmas. department stores and toy shops weren't ready for this level of footfall. while hair and beauty salons squeezed clients in for a last—minute shave. translation: it was nice to go to the city for a little _ while before the lockdown. it's too busy everywhere, but i have to come to get presents before the christmas holidays. under the new measures outlined on saturday, all nonessential stores, bars, restaurants, and other public places, are to shut from sunday. essential shops, such as supermarkets and pharmacies, must close by 8pm. and, as previously announced, schools are closed until at least january 9. the prime minister delivered the message in a sombre tone. translation: omicron is spreading even faster than feared, _
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and so we must intervene now to prevent much worse. this is one of the most popular shopping streets in the heart of the hague, and normally at this time of year it would be heaving. the dutch prime minister said the response to the omicron variant was unavoidable. but the government's critics argue the crisis is partly of their own making — the slow response to the delta variant combined with the slow roll—out of the booster vaccination programme — which has meant hospitals have no extra capacity to deal with an impending surge of omicron cases. the dutch are seeking to speed up that booster programme — the over—60s have just been invited to get theirs, and it's hoped that within a month everyone in the netherlands who wants a booster shot will have the chance to get one. this is usually a highly organised society — the dutch don't like chaos. there is some good news.
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father christmas will still be allowed to deliver presents. his message to the nation — merry christmas, happy lockdown. well, back to the uk now — and the caseload on hospitals we and the caseload on hospitals have some figures fr health we have some figures from the uk health security agency ofjust how many omicron cases have been confirmed and that the uk today. 37,101, that isjust confirmed and that the uk today. 37,101, that is just mccrone, that is not the entire number of cases and circulation at the moment. that is up more than 12,000 is on the previous day. we havejust is up more than 12,000 is on the previous day. we have just heard from our political reporter that the cabinet minister, steve barclay,
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will be chairing an emergency cobra meeting at five o'clock this afternoon. also present will be the leaders of the devolved nations, obviously going to be talking about strategy. we have seen wales, northern ireland and scotland at times throughout the pandemic take very different decisions from the westminster government. we'll see what they all come up with and whether they are all the same frame of mind a later. let's talk to the royal college of nursing's england director, patricia marquis. she is fresh from giving out plenty of vaccinations and boosters today. patricia, were you doing a roaring trade? we patricia, were you doing a roaring trade? ~ ., , , , trade? we were, absolutely. it is ureat that trade? we were, absolutely. it is great that so _ trade? we were, absolutely. it is great that so many _ trade? we were, absolutely. it is great that so many people - trade? we were, absolutely. it is great that so many people are i trade? we were, absolutely. it is - great that so many people are coming forward and are so grateful to receive the best era.-
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forward and are so grateful to receive the best era. people are seemin: receive the best era. people are seeming to _ receive the best era. people are seeming to get _ receive the best era. people are seeming to get the _ receive the best era. people are seeming to get the message - receive the best era. people are - seeming to get the message before christmas, aren't they? what are the various factors that are causing the pressures in our hospitals at the moment? �* ., . moment? before the pandemic, there was a shortage — moment? before the pandemic, there was a shortage of— moment? before the pandemic, there was a shortage of nurses _ moment? before the pandemic, there was a shortage of nurses and - moment? before the pandemic, there was a shortage of nurses and many i was a shortage of nurses and many other professionals, so we went into the pandemic short of nursing staff. during the pandemic, people have become quite burnt out, exhausted physically and mentally, and the services are really busy now, both with increasing covid patients as well as trying to catch up on the past 18 months of nhs nonemergency care of. on top of that we are now seen high sickness rates, from burn—outs, both physical and mental, of nhs staff, and now an increasing numbers infected themselves with omicron and needing to take time off sick as a result of being ill. hagar
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sick as a result of being ill. how does the situation _ sick as a result of being ill. how does the situation now - sick as a result of being ill. how does the situation now compared with the wave last january? in does the situation now compared with the wave last january?— the wave last january? in fact, it robabl the wave last january? in fact, it probably feels — the wave last january? in fact, it probably feels worse _ the wave last january? in fact, it probably feels worse than - the wave last january? in fact, it probably feels worse than the i the wave last january? in fact, it i probably feels worse than the wave last january, in that the nhs is lastjanuary, in that the nhs is still trying to deliver non—emergency care. although the staff at that time had already exhausted, they have had another year on top of that. so it does seem worse and at the moment there doesn't seem to be an end in sight. it is clear we have not reached the peak of hospitalisations and those needing medical support for having caught covid. at the moment it feels like that isn't very much hope of things getting under control. to get thins things getting under control. to get things other — things getting under control. to get things other control, _ things getting under control. to get things other control, to _ things getting under control. to get things other control, to alleviate i things other control, to alleviate at least some of that pressure, what do you think needs to happen? clearly, the buster programme, we are ahead of the netherlands, that needs to continue outpace. but
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actually, there does need to be some tough decisions taken at government level about what to do to protect the nhs from the increasing pressures that it is under and has been on now for some time, but look like they are going to rise exponentially if people become sick at the rate of which people are becoming infected. all the things around lockdowns now, social distancing, protecting the nhs by actually stopping nonemergency care. so there's lots of things i'm sure they will need to be discussing at they will need to be discussing at the meeting this afternoon and really listening to the scientific advisers as to what steps need to be taken. ., . ., advisers as to what steps need to be taken. . . ., ., ~ i. advisers as to what steps need to be taken. . . . ., ,, i. ., taken. patricia, thank you for “oininr taken. patricia, thank you for joining us _ taken. patricia, thank you for joining us on _ taken. patricia, thank you for joining us on what _ taken. patricia, thank you for joining us on what has - taken. patricia, thank you for joining us on what has clearly taken. patricia, thank you for - joining us on what has clearly been a busy day for you already. a record number of boosterjabs were given in england yesterday — with 830,000 administered across the country. it comes as the nhs continues to urge more people to get boostered. an army of nhs vaccine ambassadors
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have been deployed to shopping centres and transport hubs across england to encourage people to get their boosterjabs. around 900 people will form "street teams" and will visit dozens of high footfall areas across the country every day until christmas eve. our correspondent, aruna iyengar, is at a vaccination centre in wembley. it looks pretty busy they are? it certainly is. i'm here at wembley stadium, which is home to english football, but as you can see today it has been transformed into a coronavirus vaccination centre. they are aiming to jab around 5000 people today. i havejust booked one of are aiming to jab around 5000 people today. i have just booked one of the volunteers, she thinks they have vaccinated around 2500. the place is open until six o'clock this evening, so they are hoping to get another 2005 and a people through these doors to get the jabs into their
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arms. i'm here of the vaccinations directory for the north—west of london, juliette brown. what is that the atmosphere here today and how successful has the roll out bean? it has been incredible today, we have -ot has been incredible today, we have got hundreds of people coming in, notiust_ got hundreds of people coming in, notiust for— got hundreds of people coming in, notjust for their got hundreds of people coming in, not just for their boosters, but for the first_ not just for their boosters, but for the first and second vaccinations as welt _ the first and second vaccinations as welt we _ the first and second vaccinations as well. we were just urge anyone, whatever— well. we were just urge anyone, whatever vaccination it is, to come down, _ whatever vaccination it is, to come down, you — whatever vaccination it is, to come down, you can walk into wembley this afternoon _ down, you can walk into wembley this afternoon and we would encourage you to get _ afternoon and we would encourage you to get your _ afternoon and we would encourage you to get your vaccination. we afternoon and we would encourage you to get your vaccination.— to get your vaccination. we have 'ust had to get your vaccination. we have just had figures _ to get your vaccination. we have just had figures in _ to get your vaccination. we have just had figures in the _ to get your vaccination. we have just had figures in the saying - to get your vaccination. we have | just had figures in the saying that the omicron cases in the uk has risen 12,001 day, up to 37,000. what is your reaction to that?— is your reaction to that? there is no doubt that _ is your reaction to that? there is no doubt that this _ is your reaction to that? there is no doubt that this viruses - is your reaction to that? there is no doubt that this viruses very, i no doubt that this viruses very, very— no doubt that this viruses very, very gallant and spreading very quickly — very gallant and spreading very quickly i— very gallant and spreading very quickly. i would urge people, the best thing — quickly. i would urge people, the best thing you can do to keep yourself— best thing you can do to keep yourself and your family safe, is to come _ yourself and your family safe, is to come and — yourself and your family safe, is to come and get vaccinated as soon as possible _ come and get vaccinated as soon as ossible. , ., , , come and get vaccinated as soon as ossible. , .,, , _, ,., ., possible. christmas is coming soon, sa'id javid possible. christmas is coming soon, sajid javid said _ possible. christmas is coming soon, sajid javid said he _ possible. christmas is coming soon, sajid javid said he can't _ possible. christmas is coming soon, sajid javid said he can't rule - possible. christmas is coming soon, sajid javid said he can't rule out - sajid javid said he can't rule out there might be more restrictions before christmas. what do you think
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of that? we before christmas. what do you think of that? ~ .., before christmas. what do you think of that? ~ _, ., ., ., of that? we will continue to follow the government _ of that? we will continue to follow the government guidelines. - of that? we will continue to follow the government guidelines. we i of that? we will continue to follow the government guidelines. we all have to _ the government guidelines. we all have to keep our self say. i would 'ust have to keep our self say. i would just repeat — have to keep our self say. i would just repeat again, let's keep ourselves safe, let's work together, let's get— ourselves safe, let's work together, let's get vaccinated and do our best to combat— let's get vaccinated and do our best to combat it. the let's get vaccinated and do our best to combat it— let's get vaccinated and do our best to combat it. . . . . , , to combat it. the area which wembley stadium is and — to combat it. the area which wembley stadium is and has _ to combat it. the area which wembley stadium is and has a _ to combat it. the area which wembley stadium is and has a high _ to combat it. the area which wembley stadium is and has a high proportion l stadium is and has a high proportion of minority groups, how to reach communities. some of them have been reticent to get their jabs— what message would you give to them? it’s message would you give to them? it's really important to me and all of our team — really important to me and all of our team that we are doing this here today— our team that we are doing this here today because it has been one of the worst— today because it has been one of the worst impacted area with coronavirus. it is a culturally diverse _ coronavirus. it is a culturally diverse borough and not many people want to _ diverse borough and not many people want to come forward. but looking around _ want to come forward. but looking around today, we have people of all ages. _ around today, we have people of all ages. att— around today, we have people of all ages, all cultures, all races— that is brilliant — ages, all cultures, all races— that is brilliant i_ ages, all cultures, all races— that is brilliant. i will hope more and more _ is brilliant. i will hope more and more people from here it will come down _ more people from here it will come down this— more people from here it will come down this afternoon, they can walk
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in, down this afternoon, they can walk in. don't _ down this afternoon, they can walk in, don't need an appointment. many --eole in, don't need an appointment. many people here — in, don't need an appointment. many people here today — in, don't need an appointment. many people here today are _ in, don't need an appointment. ifiag'iy people here today are having their first vaccination, that's a good sign? first vaccination, that's a good sin? ~ ., first vaccination, that's a good sin? . ., first vaccination, that's a good sin? ., ., 11:1 sign? we do about 2500 new vaccinations _ sign? we do about 2500 new vaccinations a _ sign? we do about 2500 new vaccinations a day, _ sign? we do about 2500 new vaccinations a day, about i sign? we do about 2500 new| vaccinations a day, about 10% sign? we do about 2500 new. vaccinations a day, about 10% of sign? we do about 2500 new- vaccinations a day, about 10% of our vaccinations— vaccinations a day, about 10% of our vaccinations are first vaccinations will stop — vaccinations are first vaccinations will stop it — vaccinations are first vaccinations will stop it is a really important first step — will stop it is a really important first step. i would urge anyone who has not _ first step. i would urge anyone who has not been vaccinated, please come and get _ has not been vaccinated, please come and get vaccinated. a has not been vaccinated, please come and get vaccinated.— and get vaccinated. a massive push here to get — and get vaccinated. a massive push here to get vaccinations _ and get vaccinated. a massive push here to get vaccinations under- and get vaccinated. a massive push here to get vaccinations under wayl here to get vaccinations under way in wembley stadium. in the run—up to christmas restaurants, pubs and other venues in the hosptiality industry have seen mass cancellations at what would normally be their busiest time of year. the sector has been asking for more financial help and say further restrictions would be devasting for the industry. body, uk hospitality. we understand that ministers do need to be led by the data and the evidence and need to take measures to protect public health. what we would ask for is to make sure that those measures that are taken are proportionate, balanced and pragmatic and that support for business is available,
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if it will have an economic cost. but we would urge ministers to allow the sector to remain open and trading. we have an investment that's made to keep our venues and our customers and our premises safe. it will be far more beneficial to the industry to continue to trade than to be closed down. we know from bitter experience that the more often we go into lockdown, shut down, close, open, the more businesses we lose because the costs are so substantially higher. so if new restrictions are put in place — so if new restrictions are put in place, how are the public likely to react? let's speak to dr simon williams — who's a senior lecture in people and organisations at the university of swansea. he's carried out studies into behaviour throughout the pandemic. welcome, doctor williams. what are the factors and whether we choose to adhere to restrictions or not? i
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think there's a few factors. when we think there's a few factors. when we think about to what extent will the public, along with government on the effort out the restrictions, i think in some sense it is to what extent world government, along with the public. i think we have seen an appetite for reasonable precaution, whether that was on a facemask wearing a facemask work mandated, etc. as long as the rational is clear. we are being updated on a daily basis to be told that this is necessary, that we are in a crisis. even at no point once we felt that may be too jabs, the last wave, the last lockdown was the last time we would have to go into the situation. clearly this omicron trading has changed the dynamic. so clear communication is the first thing. i think the second thing is consistency. the the four nations can get on at the same page and ensure that the policies and the messages are at the same, the
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better. i think the third thing is protection. we have seen high compliance throughout the last 18 months. i think going forward we need to make sure both businesses and individuals i financially supported, whether it is easier to access self isolation, or more importantly funding for hospitality and other sectors affected by restrictions when they come in, because i think it is a matter of when, not if. because i think it is a matter of when. not if-— because i think it is a matter of when, not if. ., . , . when, not if. how much difference doesnt when, not if. how much difference doesn't make _ when, not if. how much difference doesn't make from _ when, not if. how much difference doesn't make from whom - when, not if. how much difference doesn't make from whom the i when, not if. how much difference i doesn't make from whom the message comes? i'm thinking about whether we trust the person who is giving us the message. trust the person who is giving us the message-— trust the person who is giving us the message. touch the only one i missed out- _ the message. touch the only one i missed out. trust _ the message. touch the only one i missed out. trust in _ the message. touch the only one i missed out. trust in ways - the message. touch the only one i missed out. trust in ways is i the message. touch the only one i missed out. trust in ways is the i missed out. trust in ways is the biggest predictor of compliance. compliance has been enormously high throughout, but trusting those setting the rules is is really important. the recent controversy over those setting the rules are not following them is not really good
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for maintaining adherence. so the less of those kind of instances we see going forward. we have seen in the uk a general decline in trust in government, so i think it's really important to try and promote the message that this is important, for people to lead by example. certainly trust is a big one.— trust is a big one. what about the timin: of trust is a big one. what about the timing of new— trust is a big one. what about the timing of new restrictions - trust is a big one. what about the timing of new restrictions that i trust is a big one. what about the l timing of new restrictions that been announced? i timing of new restrictions that been announced?— announced? i suppose the timing couldn't be _ announced? i suppose the timing couldn't be worse _ announced? i suppose the timing couldn't be worse than _ announced? i suppose the timing couldn't be worse than now, i announced? i suppose the timing i couldn't be worse than now, because understandably people will be looking forward to christmas. the pandemic has been devastating to many people, including mental health. the time to bring new restrictions in would have been prior to christmas, and then maybe we could have protected those days. i think we still will and it still should. certainly, when we look at the data on public attitudes people want to be able to socialise on
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christmas, that is meaningful. so i think the question what can we do before and after, certainly looks like for christmas a lot is going to be voluntary, we have seen a reduction in mixing and moving about. certainly, after christmas it is looking inevitable that we need further protections to really religious context much further. doctor williams, thank you very much. piers corbyn has been arrested on suspicion of encouraging people to attack mps' offices. the met police said the arrest related to a video filmed during saturday's rally in london against covid restrictions. he was arrested in south london in the early hours of sunday. the force hasn't named mr corbyn, however it previously said it was assessing a video which appears to show him calling for direct action. a murder investigation has been launched following the death
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of a woman in north belfast. she has been named locally as caoimhe morgan. her body was found in a house in harcourt drive on saturday morning. a 30—year—old man arrested on suspicion of her murder and remains in custody. there's been a low turnout in the the first election in hong kong since china increased its control over the territory. every candidate now needs to be approved by a pro—beijing committee. but that decision has been criticised by foreign governments and activists. our correspondent in hong kong, danny vincent, reports from outside a polling station. we do know the authorities pushed very hard to try to get as large a turnout as possible. there was free transportation across the city to make sure voters could get to the polling stations. there was even threats from the police that anybody that was caught attempting to boycott, or incite people
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to boycott, the election would face arrest. but still we have seen relatively low turnout. many activists and campaigners would say that this is simply because many of the pro—democracy candidates simply can't stand this year, partly because of electoral reform, partly because of the national security law, which critics would say has spread fear across the city, but it has also led to the arrest of many pro—democracy candidates. many prominent candidates that haven't been arrested have fled the city. so critics would say that hong kong's political landscape has completely changed. the authorities would say that this change has created, or restored, stability in the city and the anti—china elements that were once here have now been eradicated. danny vincent there. richard rogers, one of the leading architects of his generation, has died. he was 88.
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he gained international attention in the 1970s with the pompidou centre, in paris, and other works included the millennium dome in london. the winner of this year's strictly come dancing final was crowned last night. some 11 million people tuned in to watch eastenders actress rose ayling—ellis make history as the first deaf winner of the dancing show. rose and her partner, giovanni pernice, beat tv chef john whaite and johannes radebe in the final. tv presenter aj odudu was forced to drop out of the final on friday due to an injury. let's speak to two experts from the strictly on the sofa podcast. joining us from lincolnshire is laura stanley, and joining us from london is flo sayers. laura, tell us how your podcast started. if anyone has not listened to it yet, what sort of treat are
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theyin to it yet, what sort of treat are they in for?— to it yet, what sort of treat are the infor? , ., , they in for? basically, we have been they in for? basically, we have been the thing makes _ they in for? basically, we have been the thing makes a _ they in for? basically, we have been the thing makes a profound - the thing makes a profound teenagers. we realise our group chat was always popping off when it was on, so we thought we would need to do on a wider scale and do a podcast on it. so we start to and this is our fourth now. on it. so we start to and this is ourfourth now. it is on it. so we start to and this is our fourth now. it is good fun, we try to be positive, because strictly are such a positive show. we try to be positive, because strictly are such a positive show.- are such a positive show. we are very passionate. _ are such a positive show. we are very passionate. i— are such a positive show. we are very passionate. i understand i are such a positive show. we are| very passionate. i understand you have had 20,000 downloads this season, so you are clearly onto something. flo, in yourview season, so you are clearly onto something. flo, in your view how has the series compared with the previous ones? i the series compared with the previous ones?— the series compared with the previous ones? the series compared with the revious ones? ~ , ., , , previous ones? i think this has been one of the best _ previous ones? i think this has been one of the best serious _ previous ones? i think this has been one of the best serious i _ previous ones? i think this has been one of the best serious i have i previous ones? i think this has been one of the best serious i have ever i one of the best serious i have ever seen, _ one of the best serious i have ever seen. the — one of the best serious i have ever seen, the standard hasjust been incredible — seen, the standard hasjust been incredible. the diversity has added so much _ incredible. the diversity has added so much to— incredible. the diversity has added so much to the show. it is amazing
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seeing _ so much to the show. it is amazing seeing people like rose, who won, she is— seeing people like rose, who won, she is profoundly deaf, she can't hear— she is profoundly deaf, she can't hear the — she is profoundly deaf, she can't hear the music, she is profoundly deaf, she can't hearthe music, but she is profoundly deaf, she can't hear the music, but still being able to take _ hear the music, but still being able to take on — hear the music, but still being able to take on all this training and learning — to take on all this training and learning to become a beautiful dancer~ — learning to become a beautiful dancer~ i— learning to become a beautiful dancer. i think elements like that have _ dancer. i think elements like that have added to the show, it's been wonderfut — have added to the show, it's been wonderful. i have added to the show, it's been wonderful. ~ have added to the show, it's been wonderful-— wonderful. i think people were robabl wonderful. i think people were probably spoilt _ wonderful. i think people were probably spoilt for _ wonderful. i think people were probably spoilt for choice i wonderful. i think people were probably spoilt for choice as i wonderful. i think people were probably spoilt for choice as to wonderful. i think people were i probably spoilt for choice as to who were at their favourites. we will talk about aj odudu in a moment, but certainlyjohn and johannes had a massive following didn't they? thea;r massive following didn't they? they did. ithink massive following didn't they? they did- i think any _ massive following didn't they? he did. i think any winner massive following didn't they? tie: did. i think any winner of massive following didn't they? iiez1: did. i think any winner of the massive following didn't they? i“ie:1: did. i think any winner of the three finalists would have been deserving. a friend of mine said that she felt that ofjohn and johannes had been dancing when she was a teenager, she felt it would have been easier to come out. i think things have changed since last night's strictly. i don't think that is too much hyperbole to say so. we i don't think that is too much hyperbole to say so. we must talk about a] hyperbole to say so. we must talk
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about aj odudu — hyperbole to say so. we must talk about a] odudu who _ hyperbole to say so. we must talk about a] odudu who had - hyperbole to say so. we must talk about a] odudu who had to - hyperbole to say so. we must talk about a] odudu who had to drop l hyperbole to say so. we must talk i about a] odudu who had to drop out. about aj odudu who had to drop out. she had a horrible injury, she pulled a ligament and it was impossible for her to carry on. how you to see her drop out? so disappointed. she has been such an incredible _ disappointed. she has been such an incredible dance at the serious, absolutely loves watching her. she was an— absolutely loves watching her. she was an absolute shoe in for the final— was an absolute shoe in for the final from — was an absolute shoe in for the final from the beginning. was an absolute shoe in for the finalfrom the beginning. she couldn't— finalfrom the beginning. she couldn't take part when it meant so much _ couldn't take part when it meant so much to— couldn't take part when it meant so much to her. — couldn't take part when it meant so much to her, it was really sad. but they made — much to her, it was really sad. but they made all the way to the final, they made all the way to the final, they gave — they made all the way to the final, they gave some incredible dances, so really _ they gave some incredible dances, so really glad _ they gave some incredible dances, so really glad they have been able to -et really glad they have been able to get that— really glad they have been able to get that far throughout the competition. it get that far throughout the competition.— get that far throughout the com etition. . , . �* , competition. it was her child's thing that _ competition. it was her child's thing that you _ competition. it was her child's thing that you particularly i competition. it was her child's| thing that you particularly like, laura? it thing that you particularly like, laura? . . thing that you particularly like, laura? .,, thing that you particularly like, laura? , ., laura? it was so so good, it should have not laura? it was so so good, it should have got a — laura? it was so so good, it should have got a 40 _ laura? it was so so good, it should have got a 40 all— laura? it was so so good, it should have got a 40 all day _ laura? it was so so good, it should have got a 40 all day long, - laura? it was so so good, it should have got a 40 all day long, so i have got a 40 all day long, so amazing. there are some things and that that defies gravity, i don't know how she did it.— that that defies gravity, i don't know how she did it. they were all rather amazing. _ know how she did it. they were all rather amazing. flo, _ know how she did it. they were all rather amazing. flo, what - know how she did it. they were all rather amazing. flo, what would i know how she did it. they were all l rather amazing. flo, what would you like to see next time? is there
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anything in particular you would like to see in the next serious? i definitely think having same—sex partnerships is something that should — partnerships is something that should stay in the series. last series— should stay in the series. last series we _ should stay in the series. last series we had two women dancing together. — series we had two women dancing together, nicola adams and her dance partner~ _ together, nicola adams and her dance partner~ i_ together, nicola adams and her dance partner. i think having an all female — partner. i think having an all female and old mill partnership next year would be really good. ithink continuing — year would be really good. ithink continuing on with diversity of disabled — continuing on with diversity of disabled contestants, i think that's a really— disabled contestants, i think that's a really good element in the show, 'ust a really good element in the show, just showing anybody, if they put their mind — just showing anybody, if they put their mind too and they love it enough. — their mind too and they love it enough, can dance. i would just love to see _ enough, can dance. i would just love to see more — enough, can dance. i would just love to see more of that. enough, can dance. iwould 'ust love to see more of thati to see more of that. even if you are no nood, to see more of that. even if you are no good. it's _ to see more of that. even if you are no good, it's still— to see more of that. even if you are no good, it's still good _ to see more of that. even if you are no good, it's still good fun. - to see more of that. even if you are no good, it's still good fun. flo i no good, it's still good fun. flo and laura, thank you very much. time to look at the weather forecast not with chris. the weather not too bad today. lots of sunshine across high upland areas
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of sunshine across high upland areas of the uk, with relatively mild conditions in the sunshine, but a an area of low cloud and marked out for area of low cloud and marked out for a low lying areas. most of us to live in low—lying parts of the country. the sunshine poking out above that of the high ground and across western parts as well stop temperatures today reaching a high around for — seven, it does feel on the chilly side. overnight tonight, it is going to get really cold again with a sharp frost in scotland. temperatures could get down to minus eight degrees in the coldest areas. where do we keep the cloud, it is frost free, but there will be some mist and fog patches. monday still has a bit of cloud around. but this cloud coming into e scotland and england will have the better chance of thinning and giving some brighter weather overall. temperatures similar to the weekend, around six orseven
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similar to the weekend, around six or seven celsius for most.

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