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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 19, 2021 5:00pm-5:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall. the headlines at five. the health secretary refuses to rule out tighter covid restrictions before christmas in response to the rapid spread of the omicron variant but says it is time to be cautious about social interactions. there are no guarantees in this pandemic. i don't think... at this point we have to keep everything under review. germany bans british travellers and the netherlands goes into full lockdown, as europe ramps up its fight against the spread of omicron. the brexit minister lord frost resigns over concerns about the government's "direction of travel" and its covid policy. richard rogers, the architect behind london's millenium dome and the pompidou centre in paris, has died at the age of 88. and who will be crowned your
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champion as bbc sports personality of the year 2021 gets under way later this evening? good afternoon. the health secretary sajid javid says he can't rule out further covid restrictions in england in the run—up to christmas and he's urged everyone to be cautious, given the rapid spread of the omicron variant. mrjavid said the new variant is already the dominant strain in england as well as scotland. so far 12 people have died having contracted this latest form of coronavirus. our medical editor fergus walsh has the latest. # driving home for christmas...# this christmas, the hot ticket for many is not to see a football match but to get a boosterjab.
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wembley stadium had 10,000 vaccines available today and many were keen to get them before heading home to the family. i would prefer to have it done before christmas. i've got an elderly grandfather who's 90 years old, so i want to be able to see him. i am getting a booster vaccinations and my family members already have got the vaccinations but i think it is best to be as contained as possible. so, it's the booster versus the variant. omicron infections are thought to be doubling every two to three days. the epidemic is growing so fast, the health secretary could not rule out fresh restrictions before christmas. there are no guarantees, in this pandemic. i don't think... at this point, we just have to keep everything under review. he urged people across the country to be cautious in the days ahead. if i'm going to see my mum, for example, who's elderly, like most very old people, she's more vulnerable than young people, i will take a test. i might, you know, just not
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have the usual amount of hugs i get from my mum! just take a bit of caution and that's a sensible response. but the most sensible thing anyone can do right now is to get boosted. ministers have been given a stark warning by sage, the scientific advisory group on emergencies, that without further intervention, the scale of hospital admissions due to omicron would almost certainly lead to unsustainable pressure on the nhs. the scenarios for curbing omicron are an echo of lockdown controls from earlier this year, including closing indoor hospitality and limits on mixing of households. i think the longer we wait, the more problematic this is going to be. we have learned from previous experience, surely, that if we dither and delay, we get ourselves into more trouble. the problem here is, of course, we don't fully understand
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the implications of the omicron pandemic and infection in this country, in terms of severe disease. and that is the dilemma for ministers — do they wait until the threat from omicron becomes clear and hope to avoid lockdown measures, or act now as a precaution and risk the wrath of many in their own party and beyond westminster? fergus walsh, bbc news. the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk show there were 82,886 new infections recorded, in the latest 24—hour period. 45 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test. on vaccinations, over 28 million people have now had boosters or a third dose. if borisjohnson does decide to go for more restrictions, he could face considerable opposition to them from within his own party. his chief brexit negotiator, lord frost, has resigned from the government and among
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the reasons given were his opposition to vaccine passports and further restrictions. here's our political correspondent charlotte rose. the reaction to news of the chief brexit negotiator lord frost's resignation came quickly, with members in a whatsapp group of 100 tory mps describing it as very worrying and a disaster. in the images of the messages first broadcast by sky news, the culture secretary, nadine dorries, steps in to defend the prime minister, telling mps to show a bit of loyalty to the person who won an 83—seat majority and delivered brexit. the response — she is removed from the whatsapp group by senior brexiteer steve baker, who says enough is enough. reacting to the news this morning, the health secretary paid tribute to lord frost. i'm sorry to see him go. i think he's been an outstanding public servant. he's done great things for this country, not least in helping to get brexit done but he's resigned out of principle. i think you can see that.
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i know all about resigning from government out of principle, and he has made that decision. and many conservative backbenchers agree with him. the pm suffered his biggest rebellion over that issue last week when 100 of his own mps voted against him. many of the things he worries about, i and many of my colleagues worry about. we want to see the conservative party as a low tax party going forward and we don't want our civil liberties to be restricted. labour says his departure leaves the prime minister in a weaker position. where the prime minister should be leading at the moment, he's in hiding, hiding from his own party, hiding from his backbenchers, and failing to lead. now, that's an abdication of responsibility and our message to the government is you don't have to be held hostage by your own backbenchers. you can work with labour. although sajid javid was keen to insist this morning the government would do whatever is necessary to curb the rise of omicron infections,
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all of this leaves the pm with less room to manoeuvre. it seems the resignation of the government's key man in brussels may have an impact on policies much closer to home. charlotte rose, bbc news. our political correspondent damian grammaticas is here. the conservative party seems to be split on whether this is the conservative party seems to be split on whether this is an opportunity or a disaster, that lord frost has gone. either way, more scrutiny of the pm's strategy. yes. scrutiny of the pm's strategy. yes, it is. the week _ scrutiny of the pm's strategy. yes, it is. the week we've _ scrutiny of the pm's strategy. yes, it is. the week we've had - scrutiny of the pm's strategy. yes it is. the week we've had began with 100 mp5 it is. the week we've had began with 100 mps voting against the new measures being brought in by boris johnson. the by—election loss, more damage to his authority after that rebellion. lord frost's resignation saying he doesn't like the direction of travel, many of the mps who agree with lord frost are the same ones who were rebelling at the start of
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the week. they don't want to see more restrictions, covid passes, that sort of thing. that reduces boris johnson's room that sort of thing. that reduces borisjohnson�*s room for manoeuvre on the covid question. at the same time he has a problem because the has the job of chief brexit negotiator to fill. does he go for someone like lord frost, who is convert if towards bottles, and is liked on the backbenches or the negotiations are quite difficult... that's in the background but in the foreground we have the situation with the omicron variant and the need for the government to be taking measures, taking decisions about taking measures soon. fix, measures, taking decisions about taking measures soon.— taking measures soon. a cobra meetin: taking measures soon. a cobra meeting today _ taking measures soon. a cobra meeting today with _ taking measures soon. a cobra meeting today with all- taking measures soon. a cobra meeting today with all of - taking measures soon. a cobra meeting today with all of the l meeting today with all of the leaders of the devolved nations in downing street.— downing street. yes. it will be a virtual meeting _ downing street. yes. it will be a virtual meeting but _ downing street. yes. it will be a virtual meeting but scotland, i downing street. yes. it will be a - virtual meeting but scotland, wales, northern ireland, having this
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meeting. it's about trying to coordinate. but they are ahead in some ways of the government in london and what they're advising people to do, the measures they're rolling out in scotland and wales. that too, we may see more pressure ramping up in london, given what scotland and wales are doing. again, pressure from all sides and you have this situation where the health secretary is saying they're looking at the data. he's trying to consider broader things thanjust at the data. he's trying to consider broader things than just what the scientists are saying. the scientist so you don't have long to make decisions. so you don't have long to make decisions-_ let's speak to conservative mp and former cabinet minister, theresa villiers. thanks forjoining us. according to reports it was you that put the newspaper story about lord frost onto the watson group that we've seen leaked messages from. you described his departure is very worrying. why is that the case when some of your colleagues such as
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robert buckland think a new person in charge might be an opportunity? it's worrying because lord frost has proved himself such a capable negotiator in securing the trade and cooperation agreement with the eu, which many said was impossible. i think he did it taking a tough approach, being prepared to stand up for uk interests. so his departure i think has caused a number of us to worry that maybe the government will be going soft on plans to change the northern ireland protocol, and we do urgently need to fix the problems with that protocol. my concern is lord frost's departure, that maybe less likely to happen. prior lord frost's departure, that maybe less likely to happen.— less likely to happen. prior to the referendum. _ less likely to happen. prior to the referendum, when _ less likely to happen. prior to the referendum, when david - less likely to happen. prior to the referendum, when david frost. less likely to happen. prior to the - referendum, when david frost worked in the whiskey sector he's reported to have said that the eu was a great idea because it gave access to a fantastic market and then he wanted to walk away from that. so maybe he's had a change of heart and gone back to his original view? weill.
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he's had a change of heart and gone back to his original view?— back to his originalview? well, i think his recent _ back to his originalview? well, i think his recent speeches - think his recent speeches demonstrate that he is strongly committed to making brexit work. and one of the tasks he was given in government was to reform our regulatory system so we take advantage of our new brexit freedoms in order to generate economic growth. i think that's crucial. without doing that we've got no chance of cutting taxes in the future, and it's a shame that david frost, who was so committed to that agenda, is no longer there to take it through because it's not by any means an easy thing to deliver. fix, means an easy thing to deliver. a lot of people seem to be saying that brexit is a busted flush. where would you say it has been successful? we have a border down the irish sea, fishermen and farmers say they no longer enjoy the protection and financial support that they had within the eu and you still got the ecj with oversight. how is that a successful brexit? we
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have how is that a successful brexit? - have restored control over making our laws, we are introducing a new support system that will support the environment and we've signed 17 trade deals around the world. but the 're trade deals around the world. but they're tiny compared with what we had. david frost said, why would we walk away from the eu? we'd never get anything as good. the walk away from the eu? we'd never get anything as good.— get anything as good. the eu has sinned get anything as good. the eu has signed with _ get anything as good. the eu has signed with the _ get anything as good. the eu has signed with the uk _ get anything as good. the eu has signed with the uk the _ get anything as good. the eu has signed with the uk the most - signed with the uk the most extensive trade and cooperation they've signed with anyone. but where you are correct is that there is a lot further to go before we actually maximise the tangible benefits of leaving the european union. and one of the ways to do thatis union. and one of the ways to do that is to design our regulatory system so it suits our economy and so that we can grow the sectors of the future. that is the way we raise living standards, how we grow the
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economy and ultimately how we move to reduce taxes. who economy and ultimately how we move to reduce taxes.— to reduce taxes. who should take over from david _ to reduce taxes. who should take over from david frost? _ to reduce taxes. who should take over from david frost? i- to reduce taxes. who should take over from david frost? i don't - to reduce taxes. who should take i over from david frost? i don't know, there are lots _ over from david frost? i don't know, there are lots of _ over from david frost? i don't know, there are lots of good _ over from david frost? i don't know, there are lots of good people. - over from david frost? i don't know, there are lots of good people. iain i there are lots of good people. iain duncan smith has been touted. he would be brilliant. the prime minister has some very talented people within the parliamentary party and i'm sure he'll find someone good to take over the role. have you sent in your letter to sir graeme grady at the 1922 committee questioning whether borisjohnson questioning whether boris johnson should questioning whether borisjohnson should continue in the role as prime minister? we know that sir roger gale hasn't withdraw the letter he said some time ago. ida. gale hasn't withdraw the letter he said some time ago.— gale hasn't withdraw the letter he said some time ago. no, i haven't sent a letter- _ said some time ago. no, i haven't sent a letter. i _ said some time ago. no, i haven't sent a letter. i think— said some time ago. no, i haven't sent a letter. i think it's _ sent a letter. i think it's important that we back the prime minister. for important that we back the prime minister. ., ., ., important that we back the prime minister._ it's - important that we back the prime minister._ it's only | minister. for how long? it's only two years _ minister. for how long? it's only two years since _ minister. for how long? it's only two years since he _ minister. for how long? it's only two years since he won - minister. for how long? it's only two years since he won a - minister. for how long? it's only l two years since he won a landslide election victory. i think it's very sad that he won't have david frost in his key role any longer but the important thing to do is for the government to continue with the approach pioneered by david frost both in relation to the northern ireland protocol and in relation to
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regulatory reform to get the benefits of brexit. irate regulatory reform to get the benefits of brexit.— regulatory reform to get the benefits of brexit. ~ ., ., ., , benefits of brexit. we voted against covid passes — benefits of brexit. we voted against covid passes this _ benefits of brexit. we voted against covid passes this week _ benefits of brexit. we voted against covid passes this week -- _ benefits of brexit. we voted against covid passes this week -- you - benefits of brexit. we voted against| covid passes this week -- you voted covid passes this week —— you voted against. what other measures would you accept to control the omicron variant, if we need further measures? if variant, if we need further measures?— variant, if we need further measures? ., , , _, measures? if further measures come forward i'll look _ measures? if further measures come forward i'll look at _ measures? if further measures come forward i'll look at the _ measures? if further measures come forward i'll look at the data, - measures? if further measures come forward i'll look at the data, but - measures? if further measures come forward i'll look at the data, but i - forward i'll look at the data, but i think we'll have to come at you know, we have to recognise that, you know, we have to recognise that, you know, the evidence isn't there yet to demonstrate that greater case numbers of omicron lead to the kinds of hospitalisations that put pressure on the nhs, but it is vital that we all consider carefully the advice of medical and scientific experts. if parliament is recalled this week to look at new measures, i'll be listening carefully to the debate and i'll make up my mind on what is necessary and what is effective. one concern about vaccine
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passports is not only concerns about freedoms, but ijust didn't believe they'd be effective in relation to covid—19. they'd be effective in relation to covid-19. ., ~ they'd be effective in relation to covid-19. ., ,, , ., , . the netherlands has embarked on a month—long lockdown, in response to an expected surge in cases of omicron, the first european country to introduce stringent measures in response to the new variant. nonessentialshops, bars, gyms, hairdressers and other public venues will be closed until at least mid—january, as our correspondent anna holligan reports from the hague. silent high streets... a wholly locked down society. last christmas, the dutch thought covid would be under control by now. instead, the netherlands has become the first country in europe to lock down in response to the highly contagious omicron variant. now, it feels like it's starting all over again, to be isolated and, yeah... it feels really bad. we're used to going to the cafe, to a bar and with this lockdown, it's impacted me a bit.
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so, yeah, it's going to be difficult. so, tomorrow i'm working just to throw away a lot i of fresh food, lots of... basically, everything - that we can't sell any more. so that's...uh... the dutch prime minister said the lockdown was an unavoidable response to the omicron variant, but the government's critics argue this covid crisis is partly of their own making. the slow response to the delta strain and the slow roll—out of the booster vaccination programme have meant that hospitals have no extra room to deal with an impending surge of omicron cases. across the border, germany is battening down the hatches. from this evening, most travellers from britain will be banned from entering the country in an effort to stall the spread of omicron. german nationals and residents will still be allowed to arrive from the uk. they must have a negative test and quarantine for two weeks. france has already introduced similar restrictions, as infections in britain swell.
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for many people this christmas, coming together will be harder and riskier than anyone would have wished. anna holligan, bbc news, in the hague. polls have closed in the first elections in hong kong since china increased its control over the territory. but voter turnout has been very low. only candidates approved by beijing could stand, leading to calls for a boycott of the poll. that decision has been criticised by foreign governments and activists. our correspondent danny vincent gave us this update from one of the counts. the authorities here pushed quite hard to try to encourage people to vote during this election. they were obviously concerned that the turnout maybe low and it was low and it seems that it is low. we haven't got the final figures yet. it indicates that there's a lack of legitimacy in terms of the public support for these electoral the electoral mean that only
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support for these electoral reforms. the electoral mean that only candidates that are vetted by beijing and seen as patriotic can stand in this election. controversially, many of the very popular and prominent pro—democracy candidates that have won seats in years gone by, many of them have been imprisoned and many of them have fled the city and the remainder decided essentially not to stand in this election at all. many didn't even put their names forward, even though they would have been vetted by beijing. so, many critics say this is another example of the erosion of the political rights that hong kong was granted. many people say there's is no longer an election. it's more of a selection process and regardless of who wins, really, it's the establishment, the pro—beijing side that will be victorious. piers corbyn has been arrested on suspicion of encouraging people
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to attack mps' offices. the met police said the arrest related to a video filmed during saturday's rally in london against covid restrictions. he was arrested in south london in the early hours of sunday. the force hasn't named mr corbyn, however it previously said it was assessing a video which appears to show him calling for direct action. a murder investigation has been launched following the death of a woman in north belfast. she has been named locally as caoimhe morgan. her body was found in a house in harcourt drive on saturday morning. a 30—year—old man arrested on suspicion of her murder and remains in custody. one of the world's best—known and most influential architects, richard rogers, who designed some of the most striking buildings of the past half—century, has died at the age of 88. he came to international prominence in the 1970s, with the pioneering design of the pompidou centre in paris. david sillito looks
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back at his life. it's hard to exaggerate what a shock this building was. the pompidou centre's facade with its confusion of pipes, ducts and external corridors was revolutionary — the work of renzo piano and a young british architect called richard rogers. the building itself is inside out. in other words, what you usually see inside, which are those long, dank, dark corridors which you have in big institutional buildings — and it is an institution, theoretically, though i dislike the word, it's an institution — there's long, dark corridors on the outside. they're actually the fun. the inside out design made the interior airy and open and equally important was the public space outside. this was '60s egalitarianism, inspired by the piazzas of his home town, florence in italy. his parents had arrived in britain in the '30s. the young richard rogers struggled at school, he was dyslexic, but he got into art college and then trained as an architect, where he met another future superstar of british architecture, norman foster. my oldest and closest friend.
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collaborator, architect, humanist, extraordinary individual. but also not just an architect on individual buildings but a passionate supporter of the city, of the sustainable city — the compact, pedestrian—friendly city. so he was hugely influential. developments such as the lloyd's building in london were not to everyone's taste, but it didn't stop the commissions. the welsh sennedd... terminal five at heathrow... the millennium dome. he leaves a huge visible legacy, both as an architect and an advisor to politicians on the future of cities. there is a very major part of my architecture which is about trying to create a world which is influenced for the better through public space, through private space and so on.
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he was bold, colourful and driven. the richard rogers vision was of a city that was open, sociable, welcoming. the 68th annual bbc sports personality of the year awards are taking place in salford this evening. a shortlist of six candidates are up for the main prize this year — diver tom daley, boxer tyson fury, swimmer adam peaty, tennis player emma raducanu, footballer raheem sterling and paralympic cyclist dame sarah storey. voting will be open during the show, which will be shown live on bbc one. with me now is our sports correspondent andy swiss. a really nice range of sports for
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people to choose from.- a really nice range of sports for people to choose from. that's right, welcome to — people to choose from. that's right, welcome to salford. _ people to choose from. that's right, welcome to salford. behind - people to choose from. that's right, welcome to salford. behind me - people to choose from. that's right, welcome to salford. behind me you | welcome to salford. behind me you can see the red carpet where over the next hour or so some of the biggest names in british sport will be here and posing for photos before going in for the sports personality of the year show. once again, a slightly scaled back so inevitably because of covid. there won't be a studio audience but still plenty of big names from the sporting world. there are six nominees for the main award. the diver tom daley, tyson fury, emma raducanu, raheem sterling and dame sarah storey. you can vote online or via telephone. the details will be given out during the show, how you can vote for your chosen contender. plenty of other awards up for grabs. team of the year, coach
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of the year, the world personality of the year, the world personality of the year, the world personality of the year. rachel blackmore, the first female rider to win the grand national, in contention for that. but the main focus will be on who will succeed lewis hamilton as the bbc sport personality of the year. we'll find out when the show starts at 6:45pm. we'll find out when the show starts at 6:45m. ., ., we'll find out when the show starts at 6:45pm— at 6:45pm. covid has a habit of soilin: at 6:45pm. covid has a habit of spoiling these _ at 6:45pm. covid has a habit of spoiling these events. - at 6:45pm. covid has a habit of spoiling these events. what - spoiling these events. what impression is it leaving on this year's show? it’s impression is it leaving on this year's show?— impression is it leaving on this year's show? impression is it leaving on this ear's show? �*, . , ., ., year's show? it's a shame. until a week a . o year's show? it's a shame. until a week ago there — year's show? it's a shame. until a week ago there were _ year's show? it's a shame. until a week ago there were plans - year's show? it's a shame. until a week ago there were plans for - year's show? it's a shame. until a week ago there were plans for a l week ago there were plans for a studio audience of 500 people to be here inside the studio but the plans had to be changed because of the worsening covid situation so tonight there won't be a studio audience. just some of the stars from the sporting world. there will be a virtual audience, a big tv screen where lots of faces will be watching and cheering on but for the second year running, the sports personality of the year will be affected by
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covid and everyone keeping their fingers crossed that it will be back to normal next year.— fingers crossed that it will be back to normal next year. en'oy it. thank ou. the winner of this year's strictly come dancing final was crowned last night. some 11 million people tuned in to watch eastenders actress rose ayling—ellis make history as the first deaf winner of the dancing show. rose and her partner giovanni pernice beat tv chef john whaite and johannes radebe in the final. tv presenter aj odudu was forced to drop out of the final on friday due to an injury. what kind of an impact has rose's victory had on the deaf community? well, to discuss this i'm joined now by crystal rolfe, associate director at the charity for the deaf, rnid. thanks forjoining us. i'm sure you were cheering on rose all the way through, showing a bit of
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partiality?— through, showing a bit of artiali ? ,, ., , , partiality? she was absolutely fantastic, wasn't _ partiality? she was absolutely fantastic, wasn't she? - partiality? she was absolutely fantastic, wasn't she? well. partiality? she was absolutely - fantastic, wasn't she? well done, rose. she was amazing. i know millions of people were cheering her on. ~ ., ' . millions of people were cheering her on. . . , . ., , ., on. what difference has it made, then, on. what difference has it made, then. having _ on. what difference has it made, then, having somebody - on. what difference has it made, then, having somebody who - on. what difference has it made, then, having somebody who is i on. what difference has it made, i then, having somebody who is deaf competing in this incredibly popular programme, and then going on to win it? i programme, and then going on to win it? “ programme, and then going on to win it? ~ ., ., , ., , ., it? i think that deaf people have been absolutely _ it? i think that deaf people have been absolutely blown - it? i think that deaf people have been absolutely blown away - it? i think that deaf people have been absolutely blown away by. it? i think that deaf people have - been absolutely blown away by seeing rose and herjourney and they have loved watching her. i know it's inspired lots of children who have felt inspired that they can perform and they can dance and they can act. i'm one of my colleagues's children who is five, she is deaf and she has been inspired and she has written to rose to say how it has inspired her. she can do anything she puts her mind to. it shows that deaf people can do anything if the barriers are taken away and people provide the right communications that they need in order to be able to do everything
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people can do. rose has shown what a great person she is, that she can do that in spite of being deaf. there was no problem once the barriers were taken away and the communication support was there. she could excel. ,, ., ., ., , could excel. quite a lot of people have been _ could excel. quite a lot of people have been posting _ could excel. quite a lot of people have been posting things - could excel. quite a lot of people have been posting things on - could excel. quite a lot of people | have been posting things on social media about how their children, they just aren't even phased at all by the fact that there are same sex couples dancing in this year's competition, that there is a woman with a disability. they take it in their stride. with a disability. they take it in theirstride. how likely with a disability. they take it in their stride. how likely is it that we are going to see more of that attitude in the future from the next generation?— generation? absolutely, it's fantastic on _ generation? absolutely, it's fantastic on both _ generation? absolutely, it's fantastic on both counts. i generation? absolutely, it'sl fantastic on both counts. the generation? absolutely, it's- fantastic on both counts. the show is really inspiring and what rose said on tricky last night is that deaf people have seen small changes before but that this was a big leap in terms of how people see deaf people and how they can understand
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how they can communicate with them. rose has been such a good communicator, hasn't she, about the simple steps that people can take, and making people realise that deaf people can do anything. for children to say that they aren't fazed, and that they are inspired by rows, and we want to create a society for those children, in order to include deaf people, then there's lots of different things you can do out there, in order to be able to communicate with friends, neighbours, colleagues who might be deaf or have hearing loss. we have a lot of information on our website about how you can find out more about how you can find out more about learning bsl, but also how you can find out more about how to communicate with anyone who is deaf or has hearing loss. about facing someone, making sure you speak clearly, facing them when you speak
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to them. there's so many things you can do to make sure that you are creating an inclusive society so that children go on to be inspired and see this as normal. horse that children go on to be inspired and see this as normal. how easy would it be _ and see this as normal. how easy would it be for— and see this as normal. how easy would it be for other _ and see this as normal. how easy would it be for other deaf - and see this as normal. how easy| would it be for other deaf people, especially deaf children, who have watched rose and would love to have a go, to take up dancing at the moment, do you think? rose had the advantage of having an amazing professional partner. i advantage of having an amazing professional partner.— professional partner. i think giovanni really _ professional partner. i think giovanni really showed, - professional partner. i think i giovanni really showed, didn't professional partner. i think - giovanni really showed, didn't he, that if you stop and listen to people's communication needs, you can adapt your style and teaching to make sure that it is inclusive. that can be done. if children are looking to take up dancing. also if deaf people want to be included in any part of society, learning some simple things that can make them feel included, butjust ask simple things that can make them feel included, but just ask those deaf people as well what adjustments can be made to make them feel included and for people to be do all
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sorts of exciting things in society. thank you. vets in argentina have rescued a young turtle with a shocking amount of plastic found in its stomach. the small green turtle — around 35 centimetres long — had a total of 18 grams of plastic expelled from its stomach. it included fragments of nets, plastic caps, styrofoam, nylon and cellophane. the turtle was found trapped in a fishing net. it continues treatment at a rescue centre in the east of the country. axons in their best fancy dress have taken to the streets of london in the annual hyde park sausage walk. one common biggie smalls, or the notorious dog to his friends, had green baubles on his collar. next, bruno, channelling his innerfrosty the snowman while topping off the
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look with a red and green scarf. and who could ignore this

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