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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 22, 2021 9:00am-9:31am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines: opening up christmas for thousands — new government advice says people with covid can stop self—isolating up to three days early in england if they're testing negative but widespread disruption to rail and other public services are blamed on covid staff sickness and self—isolation. ministers in wales and northern ireland meet today to consider a range of new covid measures — new restrictions were announced for scotland yesterday. in other news , nearly 400 people are now thought to have died with hundreds of thousands more displaced in the philippines after last week's typhoon. also — aiming for a record fourth christmas
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number one in a row in the uk charts — ladbaby teams up with eltonjohn and ed sheeran. ijust said to them, if you are up for it, like, me and elton would love to join in with your one and help in any we can. people with covid in england can now stop self—isolating after a week — following two negative lateral flow tests — effectively opening up christmas for thousands of people. the health secretary says it's to ease disruption to people's lives, and comes after the prime minister ruled out imposing further covid restrictions in england, before christmas. so, from today, in england, self—isolation for those who have
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tested positive will be cut from 10 days to 7 days as long as they receive negative lateral flow test results on day 6 and 7 of their isolation period and have no symptoms. people ending isolation on day seven are strongly advised to limit contact with vulnerable people, not visit crowded or poorly ventilated spaces, and work from home. health secretary sajid javid said it would minimise disruption caused by the rapid spread of the omicron variant. it's hoped it could help head off chronic staff shortages in key industries. in northern ireland, ministers will meet later to discuss the possible reintroduction of covid restrictions in northern ireland. and in wales, plans for covid rules after christmas in wales will be announced later today by first minister mark drakeford in scotland, first minister nicola sturgeon announced yesterday that large events — like edinburgh's hogmanay — have been cancelled and football
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matches will be effectively spectator—free as part of tough new covid rules that into force on boxing day. here's our political correspondentjonathan blake. struggling under the strain. staff absences due to surging cases of the omicron variant are putting public services and parts of the economy under pressure. in an attempt to ease the burden, a change to self—isolation guidance. the period is being reduced from ten to seven days for people in england, providing they receive two negative lateral flow test results at least 2a hours apart. this is a very sensible, balanced and proportionate step to take. of course, this new variant is spreading very rapidly, it is disrupting many people's lives. it's great that when people do get infected that they are properly isolating. i think that clearly helps to stop, to prevent infection. but it is important also to look at how we can,
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you know, have policies, that will help to minimise that. and this step, again informed by our clinicians, i think is a very sensible step way forward. meanwhile, christmas can go ahead as planned in england. the prime minister confirmed last night there will be no new restrictions before then. uncertainty over the severity of omicron meant further measures could not yet bejustified, he said. but he warned they couldn't be ruled out later on. labour have accused boris johnson of weakness. beyond christmas, families need to be able to plan their own activities, and crucially, business needs to be able to plan for their trading. and the problem with the dither and delay that we're seeing from borisjohnson, entirely as a result of wranglings within his own political party, is that that lack of grip is costing the country dear. hogmanay celebrations are off in edinburgh this year, as scotland braces for more restrictions from boxing day. yesterday, limits on big events in hospitality venues were announced,
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with a return to table service for those serving alcohol. in wales, new restrictions to take effect after christmas will be set out later today. and the senedd reconvened for a virtual session. similar decisions are looming in northern ireland, where ministers will also meet to discuss further measures. so there's more clarity some about christmas now, but uncertainty still about how much disruption lies ahead. jonathan blake, bbc news. adam fleming is in westminster for us. not enough evidence this boris johnson but still a gamble as things fleshed out. , ., , ., fleshed out. there is a diversion between nations _ fleshed out. there is a diversion between nations in _ fleshed out. there is a diversion between nations in the - fleshed out. there is a diversion between nations in the uk, - fleshed out. there is a diversion - between nations in the uk, scotland talking about definitive restrictions after christmas and the same in wales and they are considering them in northern
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ireland. and there is still radio silence from the uk government about what restrictions might apply in england although ministers admit it is an uncertain situation and what the health and social care minister is doing in interviews this morning. it is really difficult, there is uncertainty. obviously, they will have to make a balanced decision based on, you know, their own analysis of the situation, but there is risk that we could get to, you know, after christmas we could look at some of this data we have been talking about, we could see a rise in hospitalisations and we may need to act. and mps had a briefing on data last night from the chief medical officer from england and mps who saw the slide back said there was no new significant information and certainly no information in the area that everyone wants, which is how often do people who contract omicron
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end up in hospital, how ill do they get and how long do they stay in hospital? these will be crucial variables to work out what the pressure will be on the nhs. we are hoinu to pressure will be on the nhs. we are heping to find _ pressure will be on the nhs. we are hoping to find out _ pressure will be on the nhs. we are hoping to find out when _ pressure will be on the nhs. we are hoping to find out when that - hoping to find out when that information will come through. politically, how much of his party is borisjohnson carrying with him on this position? i is boris johnson carrying with him on this position?— is boris johnson carrying with him on this position? i am glad you are s-ueakin on this position? i am glad you are speaking to — on this position? i am glad you are speaking to someone _ on this position? i am glad you are speaking to someone because - speaking to someone because wednesday is the d, 2d could be the day that ministers are presented with new projections which could sway their thinking. on wednesday, ministers get early access to the real world infection data from the office of national statistics which the rest of us see on friday. they may be getting a little bit more of a real—time picture about what is happening, especially how much of an effect people's natural caution is happening. you can see with your own eyes, people are not going to work, people are not going socialising or going shopping as much as you would
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expect. is that effecting the progress of the virus? in terms of the politics, we know that the cabinet is divided on this, with the majority of them saying there is not enough data to justify any new restrictions. and speaking to an mp last night from the tory backbenches who is quite sceptical about the need for further restrictions, he is cautious... his caution was confirmed by the lack of hard data on the severity of omicron from the scientist last night. we on the severity of omicron from the scientist last night.— scientist last night. we can move straiaht scientist last night. we can move straight on _ scientist last night. we can move straight on and _ scientist last night. we can move straight on and hang _ scientist last night. we can move straight on and hang in _ scientist last night. we can move straight on and hang in there - scientist last night. we can move straight on and hang in there to l straight on and hang in there to find out what emma davies is going to say. she's also part of �*spi—m', a committee that provides disease modelling advice to the government. she's speaking to us today in a personal capacity. then, what data is going to be announced today? i
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then, what data is going to be announced today?— then, what data is going to be announced today? i cannot speak on the data that — announced today? i cannot speak on the data that is _ announced today? i cannot speak on the data that is going _ announced today? i cannot speak on the data that is going to _ announced today? i cannot speak on the data that is going to be - the data that is going to be announced today. i had not seen the most up—to—date data, but it is not clear what the hospitalisation rates are per omicron. find clear what the hospitalisation rates are per omicron.— are per omicron. and the fatalities as well? yes. _ are per omicron. and the fatalities as well? yes, we _ are per omicron. and the fatalities as well? yes, we will— are per omicron. and the fatalities as well? yes, we will get - are per omicron. and the fatalities as well? yes, we will get the - as well? yes, we will get the hospitalisation _ as well? yes, we will get the hospitalisation data - as well? yes, we will get the hospitalisation data will - as well? yes, we will get the | hospitalisation data will come through first and then the data afterwards. d0 through first and then the data afterwards-_ through first and then the data afterwards. , ., ~ afterwards. do you think the prime minister was _ afterwards. do you think the prime minister was not _ afterwards. do you think the prime minister was not advised _ afterwards. do you think the prime minister was not advised to - afterwards. do you think the prime minister was not advised to take i minister was not advised to take lateral flow test if you are meeting vulnerable elderly people is enough? is it cautious enough bearing in mind other regions will be taking a different approach after christmas? although the policies on identical... aren't identical between england, wales, scotland and northern ireland, the overall intended effect is the same, reducing indoor mixing, protecting vulnerable and minimising large gatherings. local governments have
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made decisions based on what they believe will be acceptable to the population but it is obviously a balancing act. lateral flow test, although they are not ideal for detecting infection early on, they are pretty good indicators of you are pretty good indicators of you are currently infectious. if you have taken a lateral flow are currently infectious. if you have ta ken a lateral flow test for two or three days, avoiding vulnerable relatives or individuals, then you do... you give yourself the best chance of not being infectious although obviously there is still some risk of getting false negatives on the lateral flow. what some risk of getting false negatives on the lateral flow.— some risk of getting false negatives on the lateral flow. what do we know in terms of hard _ on the lateral flow. what do we know in terms of hard data about _ on the lateral flow. what do we know in terms of hard data about omicron | in terms of hard data about omicron at the moment? how severe is it compared to delta? that at the moment? how severe is it compared to delta?— at the moment? how severe is it compared to delta? at the moment it is a case of building _ compared to delta? at the moment it is a case of building the _ compared to delta? at the moment it is a case of building the evidence, - is a case of building the evidence, so at the moment, there is no substantial evidence that omicron is more severe than delta, and there is no substantial evidence that it
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leads to more hospitalisations either. we would not necessarily see the uptick in hospitalisations yet, it is the case that despite the fact that we have seen a very sharp increase in cases, hospitalisations are staying at a steady level. it is are staying at a steady level. it is a case of monitoring that number very closely over the festive period to see if it changes.— to see if it changes. according to a leaked report _ to see if it changes. according to a leaked report from _ to see if it changes. according to a leaked report from the _ to see if it changes. according to a leaked report from the health - leaked report from the health security agency says that omicron causes milder disease than delta. that is a... the caveat is there is positive and negative news as well. people will go to hospital and older people might be affected severely. is that fair to say from the data that you have seen? that omicron is causing a milder disease than delta? the data coming out of south africa from the early few weeks of omicron does imply that potentially the
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symptoms are less severe but it is important to stress that data is based on younger individuals than the average demographic of the uk population. so it is not necessarily generalisations. the population. so it is not necessarily generalisations.— generalisations. the research that ou are generalisations. the research that you are collating, _ generalisations. the research that you are collating, the _ generalisations. the research that you are collating, the data, - generalisations. the research that you are collating, the data, is - you are collating, the data, is based on a mixture of what we are seeing in south africa and what is happening here and around the world? the data i work with specifically is uk based. but part of the modelling and scientific process is keeping an eye on what is coming out in other countries, in particular where there are new variants emerging. can you exlain are new variants emerging. can you exnlain how— are new variants emerging. can you exnlain how you _ are new variants emerging. can you explain how you present _ are new variants emerging. can you explain how you present the - are new variants emerging. can you explain how you present the data? | explain how you present the data? what sort of range is presented through? the worst case scenario to the least worst case scenario? how is it presented because some reports
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have suggested that government is being presented with the worst case scenario, for example, and that's why these ranges are wide apart, 200 to 6000 extra hospitalisations each day. it to 6000 extra hospitalisations each da . , , , , ., ., day. it is definitely presented on a scenario basis. _ day. it is definitely presented on a scenario basis. it _ day. it is definitely presented on a scenario basis. it is _ day. it is definitely presented on a scenario basis. it is definitely - day. it is definitely presented on a scenario basis. it is definitely notl scenario basis. it is definitely not the case that the worst case scenario is the only thing being presented to the government. it is an important statistic, considering what the worst case scenario is allows us to prepare for the worst. but there are a range of scenarios from the best case to the worst case all presented over —— and over time we can work out what is happening and see which scenario it matches up to. ,., ., , ., , to. one report in the last few hours has suggested _ to. one report in the last few hours has suggested that _
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to. one report in the last few hours has suggested that if _ to. one report in the last few hours has suggested that if there - to. one report in the last few hours has suggested that if there is - to. one report in the last few hours has suggested that if there is an . has suggested that if there is an extra 400 hospitalisations, that is the threshold which must not be passed. if it is, another lockdown would come into place. do you have any data to speak to that? hat any data to speak to that? not specifically- — any data to speak to that? not specifically- i _ any data to speak to that? ijrrt specifically. i have not seen that report. having these ideas of thresholds is a good idea because it gives everyone an idea of when new restrictions are going to come in and it gives us a deadline or a limit on which we can feasibly make it to before introducing new restrictions.— it to before introducing new restrictions. ., ,, , ., , . restrictions. thank you very much for “oininr restrictions. thank you very much forjoining us- _ staff shortages caused by rising covid cases have forced some rail operators to cancel or reduce services ahead of the annual christmas getaway. long distance lines are among the worst affected, meanwhile transport for london says about 500 of its front line staff are currently off work.
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in the past week, 5.2 % of trains have been cancelled, compared to an average ofjust under 3%. and over the past seven days, almost 9% of staff across the railway network have been off work. seb gordon is from the rail delivery group, which represents train operators across the country... a train driver, for example, might drive up to ten trains on a particular shift. so, you know, it might sound like going off sick might not have such a big impact but you can tell from that that it really can make it really challenging for us to run a reliable service. but, as i say, we are doing everything we can, we are putting on longer trains where possible, we are cancelling staff training when it's not safety critical so we can get all of our staff onto the front lines and run the trains, we are relaxing peak—time restrictions on some trains. so we are doing everything we can to run as many trains as possible, to make as much space for people as possible because, obviously, that is important, but my plea
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for people is, please, don't turn up at the station and hope for the best. do check before you leave the house, before you set off on yourjourney. the surge in omicron cases has caused booking cancellations and illness in cast members and staff across the cultural sector — at a time when many were hoping to make their biggest profits of the year. yesterday, the government announced an extra 30 million pounds through the culture recovery fund to help support the arts through this difficult period, however, many in the sector have described this as "inadequate" and with some saying it is "bordering on the insulting". let's speak to mark davyd, founder and chief executive of music venue trust. what is your reaction to this amount? it what is your reaction to this amount?— what is your reaction to this amount? , ., , ., ., amount? it is woefully inadequate. it does amount? it is woefully inadequate. it does not — amount? it is woefully inadequate. it does not seem _ amount? it is woefully inadequate. it does not seem to _ amount? it is woefully inadequate. it does not seem to recognise - amount? it is woefully inadequate. j it does not seem to recognise what is actually happening out there, the number of no—shows and
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cancellations, the huge financial impact taking place. i guess we'd have to say it is good the government has finally realised there is a problem and has acted, now it needs to think about what is actually required. haifa now it needs to think about what is actually required.— actually required. how have things chanced actually required. how have things changed for— actually required. how have things changed for you — actually required. how have things changed for you in _ actually required. how have things changed for you in the _ actually required. how have things changed for you in the past - actually required. how have things i changed for you in the past months? since the 6th of december businesses overall are down by nearly 60%, no—shows are running at over 50%, 85% of our members have cancellations in the last 14 days, most of them are running at two or three per week. the sector is effectively in a stealth lockdown. we really need much more rigorous support. it needs to be much broader. �* ., , ., , support. it needs to be much broader. �* ., , ., ., broader. and the money as a one-off -a ment, broader. and the money as a one-off payment. what _ broader. and the money as a one-off payment, what does _ broader. and the money as a one-off payment, what does it _ broader. and the money as a one-off payment, what does it amount - broader. and the money as a one-off payment, what does it amount to - broader. and the money as a one-off| payment, what does it amount to and how far will it go? fin payment, what does it amount to and how far will it go?— how far will it go? on one side, the amount from _ how far will it go? on one side, the amount from local _ how far will it go? on one side, the amount from local authorities will l amount from local authorities will equate to £4000 each,... has a
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equate to £4000 each,... as a one-off payment? _ equate to £4000 each,... as a one-off payment? as - equate to £4000 each,... as a one-off payment? as a - equate to £4000 each,... as a one-off payment? as a one - equate to £4000 each,... as a one-off payment? as a one of| equate to £4000 each,... as a - one-off payment? as a one of payment which will not — one-off payment? as a one of payment which will not cover _ one-off payment? as a one of payment which will not cover the _ one-off payment? as a one of payment which will not cover the losses - one-off payment? as a one of payment which will not cover the losses of - which will not cover the losses of the last 14 days which is £6,335 amongst our neighbours. £6,000 over amongst our neighbours. £6,000 over a 14 day period — amongst our neighbours. £6,000 over a 14 day period or— amongst our neighbours. £6,000 over a 14 day period or over _ amongst our neighbours. £6,000 over a 14 day period or overjust _ amongst our neighbours. £6,000 over a 14 day period or overjust a _ amongst our neighbours. £6,000 over a 14 day period or overjust a few - a14 day period or overjust a few days? a 14 day period or over 'ust a few da s? ., , ' ._ , a 14 day period or over 'ust a few das? ' y�* days? over the last 14 days they've lost an average _ days? over the last 14 days they've lost an average of— days? over the last 14 days they've lost an average of £6,000 - days? over the last 14 days they've i lost an average of £6,000 each. the losses in the sector are nearly 5 million. ~ ., ., ., million. what about individual staff, the owners _ million. what about individual staff, the owners of _ million. what about individual staff, the owners of the - million. what about individual. staff, the owners of the venue, million. what about individual - staff, the owners of the venue, they are taking a hit, what happens to the staff working for them? will they just the staff working for them? will theyjust not get all bearing in mind the furlough scheme is coming to an end? in mind the furlough scheme is coming to an end? ., , . ., ::f ., to an end? in our sector, 70% are freelance. — to an end? in our sector, 70% are freelance. they — to an end? in our sector, 70% are freelance, they are _ to an end? in our sector, 70% are freelance, they are self _ to an end? in our sector, 70% are | freelance, they are self employed, the work when there is work, so people see their christmas wages collapse, everything they planned, often working 66 —— stations, that work has gone, there is no furlough
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scheme, the cultural recovery fund, members can bed for that but that is a 1.5% increase in the value of that fund and it is meant to address the entirety of culture, notjust music venues, theatres, cinemas, museums, libraries. it is simply not enough. some would see the government cannot continue supporting industry right across the board. this could go on for years and years. another billion pounds on top of all the other billions. , ., , ., ._ billions. some people would say that. it's billions. some people would say that- it's a _ billions. some people would say that. it's a question _ billions. some people would say that. it's a question of— billions. some people would say that. it's a question of believing| that. it's a question of believing in a long—term or short—term economics. do let culture close and to restore the economy you have to rebuild it. every music venue cost £600,000 to open. should be close that down and have to rebuild it in the future to bring those jobs back and those opportunities create new music in the future because we
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couldn't be bothered to spend 50 or £60,000 now? 7 couldn't be bothered to spend 50 or £60,000 now? ? thank you very much. the uk economy grew at a slower pace than initially thought between july and september. growth had been put at 0.3%, but the office for national statistics has revised the figure down to i.i%. experts expect the economy to contract this month, as consumers react to the spread of omicron. the headlines on bbc news... opening up christmas for thousands — new government advice says people with covid can stop self—isolating up to three days early in england if they're testing negative but widespread disruption to rail and other public services are blamed on covid staff sickness and self—isolation. ministers in wales and northern ireland meet today to consider a range of new covid measures — new restrictions were announced for scotland yesterday.
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sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here'sjohn watson. good morning. top flight football clubs have been meeting in scotland as they prepare a potential restructuring of the fixture list, following the new crowds will effectively be shut out from elite level sport from boxing day. it comes as scottish and welsh clubs prepare to deal with the financial implications of the new restrictions in both nations. joe lynskey reports. sport in scotland and wales is heading back into silence. from boxing day in both nations, crowds get straight back. in cardiff, no end date set. the welsh government will fund £3 million to help clubs through. in scotland, the restrictions last three weeks. the first minister says it is to stop the spread of omicron cases. capacities are capped at 500, it
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affects huge games, the old firm derby falls within the schedule and edinburgh's great rivals play in an empty ground too. next month, a two—week winter break, some clubs now want it brought forward. other exports must find it way through. an rugby union, the glasgow game due at murrayfield, and embracing the welsh grand national behind closed doors for a second straight year. so many --eole for a second straight year. so many people were _ for a second straight year. so many people were looking _ for a second straight year. so many people were looking forward - for a second straight year. so many people were looking forward to - for a second straight year. so many people were looking forward to it, i people were looking forward to it, it is frustrating, disappointing, tough on the staff,... fist it is frustrating, disappointing, tough on the staff,...- it is frustrating, disappointing, tough on the staff,... at each stage ofthe tough on the staff,... at each stage of the pandemic _ tough on the staff,... at each stage of the pandemic grassroots - tough on the staff,... at each stage of the pandemic grassroots are - tough on the staff,... at each stage of the pandemic grassroots are hit i of the pandemic grassroots are hit hardest. wrexham hoped for 10,000 on boxing day, an england it would be possible but here, not so. life on the fringes of football just got harder. it the fringes of football 'ust got harder. , ., , . ., , harder. it is the drastic measure, we are able _ harder. it is the drastic measure, we are able to _ harder. it is the drastic measure, we are able to socially _ harder. it is the drastic measure, we are able to socially distance i harder. it is the drastic measure, | we are able to socially distance in the stadium, and restricting those
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crowds on boxing day, and for the foreseeable future, it is frustrating.— foreseeable future, it is frustrating. foreseeable future, it is frustratina. , ., , ., frustrating. there is lots of uncertainty _ frustrating. there is lots of uncertainty about - frustrating. there is lots of uncertainty about how - frustrating. there is lots of uncertainty about how long frustrating. there is lots of. uncertainty about how long we frustrating. there is lots of - uncertainty about how long we need to lake _ uncertainty about how long we need to take protective measures. we will do the _ to take protective measures. we will do the right— to take protective measures. we will do the right thing to do everything we can— do the right thing to do everything we can to — do the right thing to do everything we can to not effect sporting firms and the _ we can to not effect sporting firms and the wider economy as well. getting — and the wider economy as well. getting a — and the wider economy as well. getting a game on is a challenge, but now in two nations, live sport has changed again. inside the grounds, the players are on their own. it feels like at the moment, if you get a chance to play, then make the most of it.. and arsenal striker eddie nkiteah certainly did that yesterday. he scored a hat trick as they beat sunderland 5—1 to reach the semi finals of the efl cup. there are three more games tonight, all still on as things stand. there was no signs of any covid anxiety from sunderland's fans, who brought 5,000 to north london. bowler mark wood said head coach craig silverwood was stern and angry in a meeting held immediately
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after defeat to australia in the second ashes test. the series moves to melbourne for the traditional boxing day test next, and wood — who was dropped previously in adelaide — believes there remains a way back for england, despite the errors the team have made so far. we've got to believe that we can turn this around. we have not shown our best yet. we know that and australia have played really well, if we can match them and we can believe that we can win test matches here, we'vejust believe that we can win test matches here, we've just got to, you believe that we can win test matches here, we'vejust got to, you know, but our game in all three areas. at the minute, australia has scored 400 twice, we have had batting collapses and we have dropped catches. we have got facets of the game that need major work. got facets of the game that need major work-— got facets of the game that need major work. got facets of the game that need ma'or work. , ., . ., ., major work. everything that could go wron: has major work. everything that could go wrong has gone _ major work. everything that could go wrong has gone wrong _ major work. everything that could go wrong has gone wrong so _ major work. everything that could go wrong has gone wrong so far. - that's all the sport for now.
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rescue efforts are continuing in the philippines, following a powerful storm which has killed hundreds of people and left many more missing. super—typhoon rai hit the country last thursday with winds of around 120 miles an hour. it caused widespread damage and has left many communities cut off, with little water. our philippines correspondent howard johnson has been visiting the island of shur—gow one of the areas hardest hit by the storm. this is a scene repeated across this island. you can see this tree here has fallen down across the road. people just squeezing underneath it here. but you can see it's also impacted the power lines. they have come down here. and that is really causing big problems on this island. we are seeing that the electricity here will be down for at least three months, according to the provincial governor. he is calling for people to come and help set up the grid, because without electricity there will be no internet, you can't pump water from the wells and you can't clean water either. so there is a big issue
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with water supplies. now, let's have a look here. this is a family planning centre. mind the cables down here. you can see a lot of debris on the floor, but this is a scene that we have seen many times. the roof has been ripped off like a can of sardines, the metal has been torn back, glass has smashed up there and you can see the roof in tatters down here. and so many people are without shelter at any moment. and people here are calling for more support. they need more aid, they need more water, more food, and at the moment the supplies are coming through, but they are not getting through quickly enough. the race for christmas number one is on — and youtuber �*ladbaby�* is hoping to take the festive top spot for the fourth year in a row. this year, the duo have teamed up with ed sheeran and sir eltonjohn. all proceeds will go the trussell trust. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports.
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we set you up a box on the end of the tables. ed sheeran and lad baby, an unlikely christmas collaboration. some macaroni. the waveney food bank in suffolk distributed almost 12,000 emergency food parcels last year. so some extra help from the christmas number one contenders is very much appreciated. here we go. for three years in a row, lad baby's sausage roll themed songs have topped the charts at christmas raising money forfood banks. this year, there is all start support. ed sheeran and sir eltonjohn. no pressure. the two musical heavyweights helped give their current number one single, merry christmas, a pastry snack makeover. # it's christmas time # sausage rolls and wine # we'll have a good time # and a merry christmas...# well, it came about because ed messaged us last year on instagram. yeah, i... well, what i love about christmas is
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the christmas songs and stuff having a little bit of humour in it. and i feel like with the x factor that was lost, i feel like every year it was just the x factor won it, and when streaming came in, itjust started being people that streamed christmas. and what mark and rox brought back was basically, it's like, a feel—good factor to christmas but also, massively important, light being shone on a great charity. he told us that he'd written one with elton, and we got to hear it very early on. we got to feel festive in summer and listen to it quite early on which was exciting. and then the pressure, how do you take a song that's got eltonjohn and ed sheeran on and try and rewrite it. elton was super up front. i mean, he, again, loves the whole concept of... he basically got his companion of honourfrom buckingham palace the morning that he recorded his sausage roll bits and he rang mejust being like, life has a funny way of reminding you sometimes. # we need some love like we've never
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needed love before...# and history could be made. the spice girls and the beatles managed three christmas number ones in a row. this would be lad baby's fourth. who is your favourite spice girl? who is your favourite beatle? i mean, i'll go for my favourite spice girl. definitely scary. that's why i married a scary spice. i thought i was posh but i think i was- more sort of geri, to be fair. i was always a geri. green beans, fruit cocktail. one person who has benefited from the food donated here is louise clarke, a supervising assistant at a primary school. two years ago, she used the food bank at hope church to help her get her feet back on the ground. it was a case of paying a bill for the roof over my head and not being able to sleep because i'd be so hungry or coming up to the food bank, engaging, getting food and support and being able to keep that roof over my head.
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and back at the distribution centre, before he left, ed sheeran had a gift for everyone. cheers. merry christmas. crowds have gathered at stonehenge to watch the sunrise after the winter solstice. traditionally observed by druids and pagans, they were joined by many others to celebrate the end of the longest night of the year. it marks the point when the north pole has its maximum tilt away from the sun. and from now on, of course, the days start to get longer. hurray for that! now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. well, it is a cold start to the day. well, it is a cold start to the day. we have had the coldest night of this winter so far.

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