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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  December 22, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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changes to quarantine rules in england for those with covid — isolation can end after seven days, not ten, if you have two negative lateral flow tests. for many, it means christmas plans and trips to see family could now be back on the cards. saved christmas for me. i thought i was kind of here till midnight on boxing day in self—isolation, so i can go back to the family home now and see my young daughter. the change is based on the latest guidance from health experts, say ministers. people can leave isolation after day seven, as long as they've taken these two lateral flow tests and the results are negative. the protection it provides is very similar to ten days of isolation, without tests. we'll be looking at the science behind this reduction in the quarantine period.
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also this lunchtime: new covid restrictions are announced for wales from boxing day, including a return to social—distancing and limiting numbers inside. we have a special report from siargao island, in the philippines — one of the areas worst hit by typhoon rai. # it's christmas time, sausage rolls and wine and ed sheeran, sir eltonjohn, ladbaby and sausage rolls — the festive mix hoping to be this year's christmas number one. and in sport: arsenal manager mikel arteta pleads with the premier league not to return to playing behind closed doors, as the omicron variant�*s impact on football grows, saying the game is about sharing.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. people infected with covid—19 in england will, from today, be able to stop self—isolating after seven days — as long as they've had a negative lateral flow test on days six and seven. the change comes amid a spike in cases caused by the omicron variant, which has led to staff shortages in businesses, the nhs and rail services. the health secretary, sajid javid, said the move would minimise disruption, and that it was based on the latest guidance from health experts. our health correspondent dominic hughes has the latest. with hundreds of thousands of people forced to isolate for ten days after testing positive for covid, staff shortages are becoming an issue. it is already affecting train companies, hospitality and, crucially, some hospital trusts. let's notjust measure the pressure on the nhs by looking at the number of hospitalisations in london
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because staff absences are likely to because staff absences are likely to be just as great, if not an even more important indicator of how much pressure the nhs is under. plow more important indicator of how much pressure the nhs is under.— pressure the nhs is under. now in encland at pressure the nhs is under. now in england at least, _ pressure the nhs is under. now in england at least, the _ pressure the nhs is under. now in england at least, the rules - pressure the nhs is under. now in england at least, the rules are - england at least, the rules are changing, with the time spent in isolation cut from ten days to seven. but to do that, you must record two consecutive negative lateral flow tests from day six onwards and those tests must be taking —— might take on a minimum of 24 taking —— might take on a minimum of 2a hours apart. taking -- might take on a minimum of 24 hours apart-— 24 hours apart. what has changed is the availability _ 24 hours apart. what has changed is the availability of _ 24 hours apart. what has changed is the availability of tests, _ 24 hours apart. what has changed is the availability of tests, the - 24 hours apart. what has changed is the availability of tests, the fact - the availability of tests, the fact we have — the availability of tests, the fact we have ordered a lot in advance and we have ordered a lot in advance and we are _ we have ordered a lot in advance and we are using — we have ordered a lot in advance and we are using them as a tool, the fact that — we are using them as a tool, the fact that the uk hsa testing all of these _ fact that the uk hsa testing all of these various systems and put sensible — these various systems and put sensible approaches in place. people endin: sensible approaches in place. people ending isolation _ sensible approaches in place. people ending isolation early _ sensible approaches in place. people ending isolation early still _ ending isolation early still strongly advised to be cautious, to work from home, limit contact with vulnerable people and not visit crowded or poorly ventilated spaces. that is because, as this graph shows, it is still possible to be carrying the virus at levels that can't be detected by lateral flow devices, even some days after first
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falling ill. but for some, devices, even some days after first falling ill. but forsome, likely, it means christmas plans are now back on. ~ ., , it means christmas plans are now back on. ~ .,, back on. well, it has saved christmas _ back on. well, it has saved christmas for _ back on. well, it has saved christmas for me. - back on. well, it has saved christmas for me. i - back on. well, it has saved| christmas for me. i thought back on. well, it has saved l christmas for me. i thought i back on. well, it has saved - christmas for me. i thought i was here _ christmas for me. i thought i was here tiii— christmas for me. i thought i was here till midnight _ christmas for me. i thought i was here till midnight on _ christmas for me. i thought i was here till midnight on boxing - christmas for me. i thought i was here till midnight on boxing day. christmas for me. i thought i wasl here till midnight on boxing day in self—isolation. _ here till midnight on boxing day in self—isolation. so— here till midnight on boxing day in self—isolation. so i— here till midnight on boxing day in self—isolation. so i can _ here till midnight on boxing day in self—isolation. so i can go - here till midnight on boxing day in self—isolation. so i can go back- here till midnight on boxing day in self—isolation. so i can go back to| self—isolation. so i can go back to the family— self—isolation. so i can go back to the family home _ self—isolation. so i can go back to the family home now— self—isolation. so i can go back to the family home now and - self—isolation. so i can go back to the family home now and see - self—isolation. so i can go back to the family home now and see myl self—isolation. so i can go back to - the family home now and see my young daughter _ the family home now and see my young daughter the _ the family home now and see my young dau:hter. , ., ., daughter. the new rules have also come as a — daughter. the new rules have also come as a huge — daughter. the new rules have also come as a huge relief— daughter. the new rules have also come as a huge relief to _ daughter. the new rules have also come as a huge relief to those - daughter. the new rules have also| come as a huge relief to those who have been struggling to keep their businesses running as staff fall ill, although finances remain very tight. i ill, although finances remain very tiuht. ~' ill, although finances remain very tiuht. ~ ,., ., tight. i think the government have been very supportive _ tight. i think the government have been very supportive to _ tight. i think the government have been very supportive to the - been very supportive to the hospitality industry throughout the pandemic so i can't criticise that. however, the six grand doesn't go very and particularly for small businesses at this time of year when christmas is so important.— christmas is so important. there are no lans christmas is so important. there are no plans for— christmas is so important. there are no plans for a _ christmas is so important. there are no plans for a rule _ christmas is so important. there are no plans for a rule change _ christmas is so important. there are no plans for a rule change in - no plans for a rule change in scotland or northern ireland, but the welsh government has announced more restrictions from boxing day including limiting to six the number of people who can meet up in pubs, restaurants and cinemas. the government has also ordered more than four and government has also ordered more thanfourand a government has also ordered more than four and a quarter million extra doses of antiviral drugs to
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treat covid, preventing it from becoming a more serious illness. these antivirals are significant new defences. we haven't had these before, one of these antivirals that has already been approved by our regulator was quite recent. and so it is the first time we have got this type of defence. changing isolation rules _ this type of defence. changing isolation rules means - this type of defence. changing isolation rules means that - this type of defence. changing isolation rules means that for| this type of defence. changing - isolation rules means that for some, christmas has come early, but this still threatens to be a very challenging festive season, with the new variant spreading fast. dominic hughes, bbc news. our health correspondent anna collinsonjoins me now. what's the science behind reducing quarantine time in england? well, it is a really good question, the government says the way to reduce this disruption we are seeing is by shortening this time from ten days to seven. research suggests the window of infectiousness, the time when people are most likely to pass on the coronavirus, is the first five days after they display symptoms. so they have got that in place and as an extra layer of protection, people are being asked
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to provide two negative lateral flow tests on day six and day seven. lateral flow tests are less sensitive compared to pcr tests processed in labs, but it is thought evenif processed in labs, but it is thought even if a person returned a negative lateral flow and returned even if a person returned a negative lateralflow and returned positive pcr, it is very unlikely the level of virus will be so how it would then transmit. so they see this as a really good compromise. irate then transmit. so they see this as a really good compromise.— then transmit. so they see this as a really good compromise. we had the health secretary _ really good compromise. we had the health secretary talking _ really good compromise. we had the health secretary talking about - really good compromise. we had the health secretary talking about 4 - health secretary talking about 4 million doses of antiviral treatments.— million doses of antiviral treatments. what is really interesting _ treatments. what is really interesting about - treatments. what is really| interesting about antivirals treatments. what is really i interesting about antivirals is until now, we have been looking at treatment for sick patients in hospitals, whereas antivirals or more aimed at vulnerable patients at the start of contracting covid so if given quickly, it can help prevent people from falling seriously ill. these millions of extra pills are likely to be available next year and it is believed they are effective against omicron. we have already seen some already rolled out on the nhs as part of a study and they have basically been targeting really high risk patients like cancer patients. the hopers from next year, they will
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be able to expand further. maw; be able to expand further. many thanks. well, in the last hour, the devolved administration in cardiff has been outlining new restrictions to be introduced in the days after christmas. in a moment, we'll speak to our ireland correspondent, chris page in belfast about the possible reintroduction of further restrictions there, but first, let's hear from our wales correspondent, tomos morgan, in cardiff. what's been said? the first minister has put regulations in place that will come in on boxing day in wales. they mostly involve the hospitality sector, the rules of six will come into force again in restaurants, in cinemas and theatres as well. and table service will be required in licensed premises. the two meet social—distancing rule will also come back in and that will dictate how many people can attend weddings and funerals —— two metre. from boxing day. when it comes to
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household mixing, this is the thing the welsh government cabinets were wrestling over in the last few days, they have issued guidance, not regulation. but they have said to people to limit the amount of people they mix with in their homes and to change who they mix with on different days as well. and what they have also said it is although thatis they have also said it is although that is guidance, there is a ban on groups of 30 or more inside. and these rules are in addition to the rules already announced this week in that nightclubs will close on boxing day and no spectators at sporting events as well.— day and no spectators at sporting events as well. chris. ministers in belfast are _ events as well. chris. ministers in belfast are meeting _ events as well. chris. ministers in belfast are meeting right - events as well. chris. ministers in belfast are meeting right now. . belfast are meeting right now. that's right, ministers in the power—sharing devolved government at stormont _ power—sharing devolved government at stormont are meeting to decide which restrictions— stormont are meeting to decide which restrictions to reimpose here. the data i_ restrictions to reimpose here. the data i suppose is a bit of a mixed picture — data i suppose is a bit of a mixed picture 0n— data i suppose is a bit of a mixed picture. on the one hand, the number of cases— picture. on the one hand, the number of cases is_ picture. on the one hand, the number of cases is high and northern ireland — of cases is high and northern ireland are still thought to be a few days — ireland are still thought to be a few days behind the rest of the uk.
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when _ few days behind the rest of the uk. when it— few days behind the rest of the uk. when it comes to the spread of the highly— when it comes to the spread of the highly contagious omicron variant. but the _ highly contagious omicron variant. but the number of people in hospital with covid _ but the number of people in hospital with covid is at its lowest level since _ with covid is at its lowest level since july. _ with covid is at its lowest level sincejuly. ministers with covid is at its lowest level since july. ministers made it clear they do— since july. ministers made it clear they do think some action is necessary, but there was no talk of closing _ necessary, but there was no talk of closing down entire sectors of the economy— closing down entire sectors of the economy as has been the case in previous— economy as has been the case in previous stages in the pandemic. instead, — previous stages in the pandemic. instead, it— previous stages in the pandemic. instead, it is understood ministers are discussing for example could there _ are discussing for example could there he — are discussing for example could there be some new regulations for there be some new regulations for the hospitality industry, possibly the hospitality industry, possibly the closure of my clubs? a reduction in table _ the closure of my clubs? a reduction in table sizes in pubs and restaurants. may be the return of social—distancing in other workplaces, too. —— in nightclubs. a united _ workplaces, too. —— in nightclubs. a united message from politicians and doctors _ united message from politicians and doctors and scientists in the run—up to this _ doctors and scientists in the run—up to this meeting is that the booster programme is really vital, that the severity _ programme is really vital, that the severity of — programme is really vital, that the severity of the restrictions which could _ severity of the restrictions which could he — severity of the restrictions which could be imposed in northern ireland over the _ could be imposed in northern ireland over the coming month will be directly— over the coming month will be directly linked to the number of people — directly linked to the number of people who come forward for their hooster— people who come forward for their boosterjab, but we are expecting to hear an— boosterjab, but we are expecting to hear an announcement this afternoon
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for some _ hear an announcement this afternoon for some new restrictions that will probably— for some new restrictions that will probably come into effect just after christmas. probably come into effect “ust after christmas. , ., probably come into effect “ust after christmas. , . �* . , probably come into effect “ust after christmas. , . �* ., christmas. chris page in belfast and rouramme christmas. chris page in belfast and programme macro _ christmas. chris page in belfast and programme macro in _ christmas. chris page in belfast and programme macro in cardiff, - christmas. chris page in belfast and programme macro in cardiff, thankl programme macro in cardiff, thank you both very much. —— and tomos morgan in cardiff. and you can find out more about the restrictions where you live over on the bbc website — bbc.co.uk/news. the rising number of covid infections is causing problems across the rail network for people trying to travel home for the christmas holiday. a number of train operators have had to cancel services because of staff being off sick or having to self—isolate. our correspondent simon browning is at king's cross station, in central london. simon, what is going on there? this is london kings cross, a busy and important station as people begin the christmas getaway. busy here this morning, lots of people arriving with big suitcases and bags filled with presence as they begin the all—important christmas getaway to see friends and family. but it has been a difficult week for the rail industry and train network with
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lots of cancellations. more than 5% of services have been cancelled in the less week, that is up from an average ofjust under 3%. the reason why is covid. almost 9% of train staff, crews and train operating crews and drivers, have been off because of catching covid and rising infections. services are still way behind pre—pandemic levels atjust behind pre—pandemic levels at just about behind pre—pandemic levels atjust about 50% of services. more on those cancellations, lner who operate here from london kings cross on the anglo scotland line up to newcastle and further north, they have had to cancel i6 and further north, they have had to cancel 16 services a day, that is 12 to leeds and four to lincoln to prioritise the anglo scotland route and to make sure people can get to where they need to go. avante west coast operating from down the road at euston, their services have improved today, but it is the core message, make sure you check before you travel. services have been interrupted because the rail delivery group says even if one driver gets covid, one driver can be driving up to 10%, ten services per day and that can have a real
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knock—on on the rhythm of services and the knock—on of services being cancelled. but they have welcomed this morning the government's decision to reduce the days of covid isolation from ten down to seven in england with the hope being that that will bring more drivers back onto the network and hopefully appease some of the problems some of the companies are facing with trying to get services running and most importantly get people where they need to be for christmas, but the advice is to check, check, check and check again. advice is to check, check, check and check again-— check again. thanks, simon. simon brownin: check again. thanks, simon. simon browning reporting. _ one of the uk's largest homebuilders, taylor wimpey, has agreed to drop terms in their contracts by which ground rents for leaseholders double every 10—15 years. taylor wimpey is the latest to agree to the changes, following a long—running investigation by the competition and markets authority. it said ground rents of those affected will now stay the same as when people first bought their home. millions of people will be hoping to spend time
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gaming over christmas. but while, for most, gaming isjust an enjoyable pastime, for some, it can lead to addiction — which, at its most extreme, can include violent outbursts and a breakdown of family relations. bbc news has gained exclusive access to the uk's only treatment facility for addiction to video games. the bbc�*s technology correspondent marc cieslak has more. having people around, you do feel a degree of embarrassment sometimes for the duration of the visit. he'll be just upstairs gaming all the time and he'll be shouting and cursing. stephen and louise are describing life with their 16—year—old son, who suffers from gaming disorder. those aren't their real names, we're protecting their identities. it's a controversial condition defined by the world health organization by three characteristics — impaired control when gaming, prioritising gaming over other interests, and escalation of gaming, despite negative consequences. the games industry, and some psychologists, question the evidence used
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to define the disorder. until quite recently in the uk, help for problems like this could only be sought via private health care. the nhs has created a specialist clinic for treatment of the condition via therapy. hello, national centre for gaming disorder. based in west london, it's part of the national centre for behavioural addictions. this is the first time cameras have been allowed to film inside the gaming clinic. we know that gaming disorder is quite a rare condition. so the symptoms of gaming disorder can be really quite severe, which has surprised us. so they can struggle with anger, anxiety and low mood. often, they also experience physical symptoms, in terms of loss of sleep, and that's often because people will be gaming at night to connect with gamers abroad. yeah. so, we need to think- about the groups that we're going to start in the new year. this is the only nhs clinic in the uk treating gaming disorder. its patients are spread out
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across england and are often across england and wales and are often treated via video chat. a recent study amongst gamers concluded that, broadly speaking, playing video games is good for well—being, and that playing games has helped lots of people get through the pandemic. so, we're not saying that gaming's bad at all. we completely accept that for a lot of people, it's a really positive thing in their life. we are really talking about that small percentage of people who are having a massive problem with it, and it's genuinely affecting their quality—of—life and their ability to interact and their ability to function. we opened our doors at the end of 2019. we've had well over 300 referrals since then, 200 just in 2021. it's very strongly weighted in favour of male, so we've seen 89% of people have been male. stephen and louise's 16—year—old son has recently been diagnosed with autism. they referred him to the gaming disorder clinic themselves, but he hasn't engaged with the treatment. what was most helpful for us
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is talking to other parents. . they made a special support group - for parents who have the same gaming needs, or addiction, - whatever you want to call it. we meet once a fortnight on zoom to discuss how we're doing. - more than anything else, i think the greatest thing about that, in terms of benefit, is to realise that you're not alone. there's loads of other people up and down the country and all across the world that are going through the exact same situation. what do you think the future looks like for your son, and what do you think the future looks like for you as a family? i feel optimistic because . on facebook, i follow a lot of people who are very like our son, but they're adults now, _ and i follow them because they're i hugely insightful, but also really| helps me feel he will find his way. marc cieslak, bbc news. our top story this lunchtime. changes to quarantine rules in england for those with covid — isolation can end after 7 days not 10 if you have two negative lateral flow tests.
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and how arsenal broke advertising rules with its posts about fan tokens. and in sport, steven gerrard reveals one of his aston villa players was too scared to get out of his car because he had covid symptoms and he didn't want to affect his team's festive fixtures, or his family's christmas. now, comedy is — obviously — about making us laugh — but what if the audience finds the joke not funny but offensive? actor and comedian dame maureen lipman says the fear of being "cancelled" has left comedy on the verge of being wiped out with comedians staying away from controversial subjects for fear of not being booked again. it comes as a poll seen by bbc news suggests that more than half of those surveyed stopped themselves from fully expressing their views for fear of getting a negative reaction. our culture editor katie razzall has been looking at the issue. i'm depressed and suicidal. guess where i'm working?
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it's stand—up comedy night in manchester. new act faizan is telling jokes that some could find offensive. i was working at manchester airport in aviation security... laughter. a depressed, suicidal muslim at the airport... but who decides what's funny, and what will it end? — what will offend? and is this tension a reflection of what's happening in wider society, too? comedians are very paranoid that they might word something the wrong way and then that is out there forever. and then they are cancelled and will never work again. is this your idea of a joke, then? maureen lipman, starring in coronation street right now, has a dramatic prediction. i think it's a revolution. something has to be forbidden to make your really laugh. to make you really belly laugh. it's when you shouldn't be laughing. we are, literally, we are
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on the cusp of wiping out comedy. so, i'm not trying to offend anyone, but... comedian russell kane says comedy is in fact in rude health. i was good at dungeons and dragons, so... i don't think anyone is saying we can't be offended. no one is saying that. what we are saying is you can't use hate speech that would prompt a gender—related crime, a sex—related crime, or a race—related crime. there has been a massive, much—needed shift in the conversation around gender, around men's attitudes to women, around consent, blah blah blah. the sort of ironic, loud humour of "yeah, she's up for it," which at the time i'm pretty sure was delivered with irony by 99.9% of the people, but now, irony or not, not appropriate. a poll suggests in normal life people are stopping themselves from saying what they really think on certain subjects for fear of being judged. 57% of those asked said they self—censor on topics including immigration and transgender rights, particularly if their opinions are seen as less politically correct. perhaps it is obvious that they don't speak openly with people they have just met.
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nearly half say they don't. but 40% keep views quiet at work and nearly a third don't tell friends their real views on these subjects either. i'm not worried about being judged. i would just far rather not say something because i don't think it's right. as well as being judged, yeah. i think that might be people trapped a bit in the past. it's about human decency, really. because at the end of the day, making offensive remarks is bullying. ok, could you tell me the last time you are weighed, what was your weight? eight pounds four ounces... what's happening on the comedy stage and in real life is a sign outdated views are being weeded out. or a worrying assault on free speech, depending on your perspective. culture often leads the way on the big issues of our time as we all navigate what we can say, and what it's best not to. katie razzell, bbc news, manchester. it's nearly a week since typhoon rai hit the philippines killing at least 375
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people, and leaving hundreds of thousands without shelter. one of the worst affected areas was the popular tourist island of siargao. from there, our correspondent howard johnson sent this report. devastation as far as the eye can see. voted best island in asia this year by conde nast, siargao now resembles an apocalyptic mess. super typhoon rai first made landfall here last thursday, packing winds in excess of 150 miles an hour and dumping huge quantities of rainfall. this scene is repeated many times across the island. a tree felled by the super typhoon across the road blocking the passage of motorcycles and it has caused all this debris to block the road. we can see
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corrugated iron and electricity cables which have come down from the pylon and that is affecting things gravely because there is no electricity and that means no internet signal, no cellular network and no pumping of water. prices for filtered bottled water have doubled in the last week forcing the poor to find other sources. this family are drawing water from an old well, but it isn't clean. diarrhoea cases are on the rise here. it is bad for the stomach but we have no choice, we need to drink. we do not have safe water to drink. this is general luna, a popular surf spot for international tourists and young nomadic workers. but as our drone footage reveals, the area is now totally inhospitable. this man shows me to where his home and convenience store once stood. i'm scared because no more food and
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then my house is broken from the typhoon. i don't know what happened and what i'm going to do to start again with my store in my home. at the island's badly damaged airport, aid is getting through, but in limited quantities. we are geographically isolated in this area so transport of goods is very difficult. construction materials for repair and especially for evacuation centres to move people especially when the rain will come, many people are living on the streets in makeshift houses and this is just the start of the typhoon season which normally ends in mid—march. outside the airport, residents have been waiting for up to three days for a flight off the island.
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it is leading to a sense of panic. there is no system, we have to figure it out ourselves. the real pandemic is not having a system. as night falls, and newly arrived philippine red cross team helped islanders to speak with loved ones using their satellite phone. help is on hand here, but there needs to be a lot, lot more. howard johnson, bbc news, siargao island. a 44—year—old man has been sentenced to nearly three years in prison for stalking the former bbc breakfast presenter, louise minchin, and one of her daughters. mold crown court heard that carl davies, from flint, had sent the women "graphic and disturbing" messages — causing them "deep distress". the metropolitan police has referred itself to a police watchdog following a complaint about how it handled a christmas gathering in downing street during last year's covid restrictions. it is understood the independent office for police conduct will make a decision over
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whether to investigate before the end of the week. arsenal football club broke advertising rules, a watchdog has ruled, by promoting fan tokens online. the uk's advertising regulator said the adswere misleading as they didn't spell out the risks of investing in cryptocurrencies. let's speak to our correspondent chris vallance. explain to us how arsenal has broken the rules? we should start by saying what fan tokens are, they worked a bit like a club specific cryptocurrency and can be bought and sold using an app. european top league clubs are getting into them as an extra source of income and away to engage with fans. they give them a to purchase stuff in the club shop or give them a decide what song is chosen. but
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first they must convert their money into cryptocurrency and that one in the advertising watchdog which says that arsenal broke rules in a facebook and web book page promoting the tokens. it said it took advantage of the experience of investors in cryptocurrency. similar concerns were raised in august by the arsenal supporters club. how has arsenal responded? they say that the tokens were not promoted as an investment. they said they made the risk clear to the fans and that they would be seeking an independent review of the decision. ed sheeran, sir eltonjohn and the youtuber ladbaby have combined forces in a bid to be this year's christmas number one. "sausage rolls for everyone"
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is a spoof of ed and elton's current single "merry christmas". all proceeds will go to the charity, the trussell trust — and ed sheeran and ladbaby went along to one of their distribution centres to see how the money will be spent. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson was there. we set you up a box on the end of the tables. ed sheeran and ladbaby, an unlikely christmas collaboration. some macaroni. the waveney food bank in suffolk distributed almost 12,000 emergency food parcels last year. so some extra help from the christmas number one contenders is very much appreciated. here we go. for three years in a row, lad baby's sausage roll themed songs have topped the charts at christmas raising money forfood banks. this year, there is all star support. ed sheeran and sir eltonjohn. no pressure. the two musical heavyweights helped give their current number one single, merry christmas,
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a pastry snack makeover. # it's christmas time # sausage rolls and wine well, it came about because ed messaged us last year on instagram. yeah, i... well, what i love about christmas is the christmas songs and stuff having a little bit of humour in it. and i feel like with the x factor that was lost, i feel like every year it was just the x factor won it, and when streaming came in, itjust started being people that streamed christmas. and what mark and rox brought back was basically, it's like, a feel—good factor to christmas but also, massively important, light being shone on a great charity. he told us that he'd written one with elton, and we got to hear it very early on. we got to feel festive in summer and listen to it quite early on which was exciting. and then the pressure, how do you take a song that's got eltonjohn and ed sheeran on and try and rewrite it. elton was super up front.
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i mean, he, again, loves the whole concept of... he basically got his companion of honourfrom buckingham palace the morning that he recorded his sausage roll bits and he rang me just being like, life has a funny way of reminding you sometimes. # we need some love like we've never needed love before...# and history could be made. the spice girls and the beatles managed three christmas number ones in a row. this would be lad baby's fourth. who is your favourite spice girl? who is your favourite beatle? i mean, i'll go for my favourite spice girl. definitely scary. that's why i married a scary spice. i thought i was posh but i think. i was more sort of geri, to be fair. i was always a geri. green beans, fruit cocktail. one person who has benefited from the food donated here is louise clarke, a supervising assistant at a primary school. two years ago, she used the food bank at hope church to help her get her feet back
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on the ground. it was a case of paying a bill for the roof over my head and not being able to sleep because i'd be so hungry or coming up to the food bank, engaging, getting food and support and being able to keep that roof over my head. and back at the distribution centre, before he left, ed sheeran had a gift for everyone. cheers. merry christmas. time for a look at the weather. here's louise lear. ijust i just put ijust put sausage rolls in my freezer yesterday so i think i will be eating them in the next few days! it was really cold this morning. temperatures getting down to —10. the cold and frosty weather was quite widespread but what a difference a day makes. tomorrow
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morning it is all change

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