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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  December 23, 2021 7:00pm-8:31pm GMT

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hello, i'm kasia madera with outside source. more evidence the omicron variant is less severe in the uk. the preliminary research suggests someone infected with omicron rather than the delta variant is between 50—70% less likely to be admitted to hospital. it's very early days. only a small number of individuals, but nonetheless, it is the first signs of cautious optimism. cases, meanwhile, continue to rise across europe — with france reporting 90,000 new infections in the past 2a hours. as tensions rise in ukraine, president putin demands western countries make a promise not to extend their influence
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in russia's back yard. translation: you must give us guarantees. - you must do it immediately, now. we're covering all the latest coronavirus developments here in britain and globally, and we're starting in the uk because the government has released its first official data on the impact of the omicron variant. research suggests someone with omicron is up to to 70% less likely to be admitted to hospital, compared with the delta variant. here's our medical eeditor, fergus walsh. a powerful illustration of the dangers facing facing the unvaccinated
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and the pressures on nhs staff, the unvaccinated and the pressure on nhs staff, filmed in the intensive care unit of royal liverpool hospital, where four out of five covid patients are notjabbed. the intensive care society said at least two thirds of covid patients were unvaccinated, in 12 out of 16 critical care units it contacted in england. it's not for us to judge people who haven't been vaccinated, it's for us to look after them as well as we can, but it's very sad when people come into hospital who haven't been vaccinated. they're very unwell and they asked to have the vaccine then, which of course they can't, because you have to get better from covid before you can be vaccinated. evidence that omicron causes milder disease has been reinforced by preliminary analysis from the uk health security agency. it suggests that someone infected
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with omicron is 30 to 45% less likely to attend a&e, compared to a delta patient, and between 50 and 70% less likely to be admitted to hospital. but the extra protection that the boosterjab gives against the infection does wane more rapidly against omicron than delta, being about 15 to 25% lower ten weeks after the boosterjab. it shows that people with omicron have a reduced risk of hospitalisation compared to delta. now, it's very early days, only a small number of individuals, about 100 were admitted to hospital with omicron in this period, but nonetheless, it is the first signs of cautious optimism we have had for a while. we can have for a while. as daily cases hit another new record, uk researchers estimate
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that half of people with cold—like symptoms actually have coronavirus. the number of nhs staff off work because of covid has risen by more than 50% in the past week in england to nearly 19,000. in london, the epicentre of the omicron outbreak, it's more than doubled to nearly 4000. nhs workforce was already under pressure before omicron came i along, there's increased pressure i as we are seeing in many workforces as we're seeing in many workforces at the moment, especially someone needs to isolate if they have a - positive case. but some of the recent moves we've had, - for moving from ten—day to seven—day isolation if you take _ for moving from ten—day to seven—day isolation, i if you take tests in the last two. days, i think all of this will help. but the ten—day isolation rule is to remain in wales. the welsh government said it wanted to put the brakes on omicron as much as possible. scotland and northern ireland are also keeping ten—day quarantine for now. nightclubs in scotland are to close for at least
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three weeks from 27th december, afterfresh restrictions were put on large events and hospitality venues earlier this week. in wales, nightclubs will close after boxing day, and no more than six people will be allowed to meet in pubs, cinemas and restaurants. no new measures have been announced for england, but the prime minister has said he can't rule out further restrictions after christmas. fergus walsh, bbc news. covid cases in the uk have surged to a new record. almost 120,000 new infections were recorded in the latest 24—hour period. as omicron continues to spread, one area affected is the premier league, which has postponed liverpool's game against leeds united and the match between wolves and watford. both were due to be played this sunday. the number of positive covid cases in the league means many teams no longer have enough players to make up a full squad. 12 premier league games have been cancelled this month.
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let's turn to us, where there's a rush to get tests. thousands have been queueing for a limited supply. free tests were given out on wednesday in new orleans, which has a population of 390,000. but only 17,000 tests were available, and the supplies ran out within an hour. that left some people frustrated. my my friend texted me ten minutes ago and said they're giving out free covid test. i went to a party and i want to make sure my next group of people are safe. blue we were a disappointed that they were out of tests already. but disappointed that they were out of tests already-— tests already. but i understand omicron has — tests already. but i understand omicron has gotten _ tests already. but i understand omicron has gotten really - omicron has gotten really aggressive, so a lot of people are looking _ aggressive, so a lot of people are looking for— aggressive, so a lot of people are looking for test.— aggressive, so a lot of people are looking for test. we're lucky enough to net a looking for test. we're lucky enough to get a counle _ looking for test. we're lucky enough to get a couple cases _ looking for test. we're lucky enough to get a couple cases in _ looking for test. we're lucky enough to get a couple cases in and - looking for test. we're lucky enough to get a couple cases in and put - to get a couple cases in and put them _ to get a couple cases in and put them out — to get a couple cases in and put them out and _ to get a couple cases in and put them out and they're _ to get a couple cases in and put them out and they're on. - president biden was asked about this in an interview with abc news. if you go to the pharmacy, you sear
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this over and over again, is that a failure? 1 this over and over again, is that a failure? ., �* ~' this over and over again, is that a failure? ., �* ~ ,., ~ failure? i don't think so. i think it's. .. failure? i don't think so. i think it's- -- you _ failure? i don't think so. i think it's. .. you can _ failure? i don't think so. i think it's. .. you can argue _ failure? i don't think so. i think it's. .. you can argue that - failure? i don't think so. i think it's. .. you can argue that we i failure? i don't think so. i think- it's. .. you can argue that we should it's... you can argue that we should of known _ it's... you can argue that we should of known a — it's... you can argue that we should of known a year ago, six months ago, a month— of known a year ago, six months ago, a month ago — of known a year ago, six months ago, a month ago. i've ordered half a billion— a month ago. i've ordered half a billion of— a month ago. i've ordered half a billion of the pills, 500 million pills _ billion of the pills, 500 million pills -- — billion of the pills, 500 million pills. —— excuse me, test kits, for anyone _ pills. —— excuse me, test kits, for anyone who — pills. —— excuse me, test kits, for anyone who wants it. but the answer is, i anyone who wants it. but the answer is, i wish _ anyone who wants it. but the answer is, i wish i _ anyone who wants it. but the answer is, i wish i thought about ordering the is, iwish i thought about ordering the pills— is, i wish i thought about ordering the pills two months ago before covid _ the pills two months ago before covid hit — the pills two months ago before covid hit here. let's get more on the covid situation in the us from cbs news correspondent courtney kealy. we're seeing long lines everywhere for testing — we're seeing long lines everywhere for testing ahead _ we're seeing long lines everywhere for testing ahead of _ we're seeing long lines everywhere for testing ahead of the _ we're seeing long lines everywhere for testing ahead of the holidays, l for testing ahead of the holidays, and also — for testing ahead of the holidays, and also of— for testing ahead of the holidays, and also of people _ for testing ahead of the holidays, and also of people we _ for testing ahead of the holidays, and also of people we know - for testing ahead of the holidays, and also of people we know thatl for testing ahead of the holidays, - and also of people we know that have gotten _ and also of people we know that have gotten this— and also of people we know that have gotten this new — and also of people we know that have gotten this new omicron _ and also of people we know that have gotten this new omicron variant. - and also of people we know that have gotten this new omicron variant. 1- gotten this new omicron variant. 1 million _ gotten this new omicron variant. 1 million cases _ gotten this new omicron variant. 1 million cases across _ gotten this new omicron variant. 1 million cases across america - gotten this new omicron variant. 1 million cases across america have i million cases across america have occurred _ million cases across america have occurred in — million cases across america have occurred in the _ million cases across america have occurred in the last _ million cases across america have occurred in the last week. - million cases across america have occurred in the last week. 9000 l occurred in the last week. 9000 deaths _ occurred in the last week. 9000 deaths in — occurred in the last week. 9000 deaths in the _ occurred in the last week. 9000 deaths in the last _ occurred in the last week. 9000 deaths in the last seven - occurred in the last week. 9000 deaths in the last seven days. . occurred in the last week. 9000. deaths in the last seven days. it's an unprecedented _ deaths in the last seven days. it's an unprecedented number. - deaths in the last seven days. it's an unprecedented number. a- deaths in the last seven days. it's an unprecedented number. a loti deaths in the last seven days. it's. an unprecedented number. a lot of them _ an unprecedented number. a lot of them are _ an unprecedented number. a lot of
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them are breakthrough _ an unprecedented number. a lot of them are breakthrough cases, - an unprecedented number. a lot of them are breakthrough cases, butl them are breakthrough cases, but people _ them are breakthrough cases, but people still— them are breakthrough cases, but people still will— them are breakthrough cases, but people still will be _ them are breakthrough cases, but people still will be travelling - them are breakthrough cases, but people still will be travelling for l people still will be travelling for the holidays _ people still will be travelling for the holidays. over— people still will be travelling for the holidays. over 200 - people still will be travelling for the holidays. over 200 million. the holidays. over 200 million people — the holidays. over 200 million people are _ the holidays. over 200 million people are vaccinated, - the holidays. over 200 million people are vaccinated, 50 - the holidays. over 200 million i people are vaccinated, 50 million the holidays. over 200 million - people are vaccinated, 50 million of which _ people are vaccinated, 50 million of which have — people are vaccinated, 50 million of which have boosters, _ people are vaccinated, 50 million of which have boosters, so— people are vaccinated, 50 million of which have boosters, so people - people are vaccinated, 50 million of which have boosters, so people are| which have boosters, so people are trying _ which have boosters, so people are trying to _ which have boosters, so people are trying to take — which have boosters, so people are trying to take necessary _ trying to take necessary precautions, _ trying to take necessary precautions, but- trying to take necessaryl precautions, but samosa trying to take necessary - precautions, but samosa have to trying to take necessary _ precautions, but samosa have to stay home _ precautions, but samosa have to stay home because — precautions, but samosa have to stay home because it's— precautions, but samosa have to stay home because it's ripped _ precautions, but samosa have to stay home because it's ripped through- precautions, but samosa have to stay home because it's ripped through thei home because it's ripped through the city. home because it's ripped through the city president— home because it's ripped through the city. president biden _ home because it's ripped through the city. president biden held _ home because it's ripped through the city. president biden held a - city. president biden held a conference _ city. president biden held a conference what— city. president biden held a conference what you - city. president biden held a conference what you would | city. president biden held a . conference what you would do city. president biden held a - conference what you would do up to the half—billion _ conference what you would do up to the half—billion test _ conference what you would do up to the half—billion test —— _ conference what you would do up to the half—billion test —— some - conference what you would do up to the half—billion test —— some of- the half—billion test —— some of them _ the half—billion test —— some of them have _ the half—billion test —— some of them have to _ the half—billion test —— some of them have to stay _ the half—billion test —— some of them have to stay home. - the half—billion test —— some of| them have to stay home. that's the half—billion test —— some of- them have to stay home. that's not untiljanuary. — them have to stay home. that's not untiljanuary. people _ them have to stay home. that's not untiljanuary. people are _ them have to stay home. that's not untiljanuary. people are really- untiljanuary. people are really scrambling _ untiljanuary. people are really scrambling to _ untiljanuary. people are really scrambling to get _ untiljanuary. people are really scrambling to get to _ untiljanuary. people are really scrambling to get to these - untiljanuary. people are really. scrambling to get to these testing sites _ scrambling to get to these testing sites some — scrambling to get to these testing sites some of— scrambling to get to these testing sites. some of them _ scrambling to get to these testing sites. some of them charge - scrambling to get to these testing l sites. some of them charge money, some _ sites. some of them charge money, some are _ sites. some of them charge money, some are free _ sites. some of them charge money, some are free. it _ sites. some of them charge money, some are free. it is _ sites. some of them charge money, some are free. it is hard _ sites. some of them charge money, some are free. it is hard to- sites. some of them charge money, some are free. it is hard to find, - some are free. it is hard to find, but biden— some are free. it is hard to find, but biden has— some are free. it is hard to find, but biden has reassured - some are free. it is hard to find, but biden has reassured peoplel some are free. it is hard to find, - but biden has reassured people that 20% of— but biden has reassured people that 20% of all— but biden has reassured people that 20% of all hospitals _ but biden has reassured people that 20% of all hospitals are _ but biden has reassured people that 20% of all hospitals are expected i but biden has reassured people that 20% of all hospitals are expected toi 20% of all hospitals are expected to be understaffed. _ 20% of all hospitals are expected to be understaffed. they— 20% of all hospitals are expected to be understaffed. they are _ 20% of all hospitals are expected toi be understaffed. they are deploying about _ be understaffed. they are deploying about 1000 — be understaffed. they are deploying about 1000 military— be understaffed. they are deploying about 1000 military medical- about 1000 military medical personnel— about 1000 military medical personnel to _ about 1000 military medical personnel to different- about 1000 military medical. personnel to different places. about 1000 military medical- personnel to different places. new testing _ personnel to different places. new testing sites— personnel to different places. new testing sites first _ personnel to different places. new testing sites first here _ personnel to different places. new testing sites first here in— personnel to different places. new testing sites first here in new- personnel to different places. new testing sites first here in new york city, testing sites first here in new york city. then— testing sites first here in new york city. then to — testing sites first here in new york city. then to six _ testing sites first here in new york city, then to six other— testing sites first here in new york city, then to six other states. - testing sites first here in new york city, then to six other states. it's i city, then to six other states. it's a real— city, then to six other states. it's a real wrap— city, then to six other states. it's a real wrap it _ city, then to six other states. it's a real wrap it up _ city, then to six other states. it's a real wrap it up deep _ city, then to six other states. it's a real wrap it up deepjust- city, then to six other states. it's a real wrap it up deepjust as - city, then to six other states. it's a real wrap it up deepjust as the | a real wrap it up deepjust as the omicron — a real wrap it up deepjust as the omicron variant— a real wrap it up deepjust as the omicron variant surged - a real wrap it up deepjust as the omicron variant surged the - a real wrap it up deepjust as the l omicron variant surged the federal government— omicron variant surged the federal government and _ omicron variant surged the federal government and local— omicron variant surged the federal government and local officials - omicron variant surged the federal| government and local officials have been trying — government and local officials have been trying to _ government and local officials have been trying to meet _ government and local officials have been trying to meet the _ government and local officials have been trying to meet the need -
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government and local officials have been trying to meet the need not l been trying to meet the need not only for— been trying to meet the need not only for testing. _ been trying to meet the need not only for testing, but _ been trying to meet the need not only for testing, but also - been trying to meet the need not only for testing, but also urging i only for testing, but also urging americans— only for testing, but also urging americans once _ only for testing, but also urging americans once again. - only for testing, but also urging l americans once again. president biden— americans once again. president biden saying _ americans once again. president biden saying at _ americans once again. president biden saying at the _ americans once again. president biden saying at the people - americans once again. president. biden saying at the people refusing to get— biden saying at the people refusing to get vaccinations _ biden saying at the people refusing to get vaccinations who _ biden saying at the people refusing to get vaccinations who are - biden saying at the people refusing to get vaccinations who are at - biden saying at the people refusing to get vaccinations who are at the i to get vaccinations who are at the most _ to get vaccinations who are at the most risk— to get vaccinations who are at the most risk of— to get vaccinations who are at the most risk of hospitalisation. - regulators in the us have authorized pfizer's antiviral covid—19 pill for people aged 12 and older who are at risk of severe illness. it's the first oral treatment for covid that can be taken at home, and there are hopes it could become a vital weapon in the fight against the omicron variant, by keeping patients out of hospital. michelle fleury has more from new york. i think for a long time, this is something the medical community have been looking towards, and that is an idea of more tools in the tool box to try and treat this virus, and the idea is if you can have a pill that can help treat people before they get to that point of hospitalisation and relieve the pressure on the medical staff, than that really is a huge step forward in the fight against covid. at a time when more
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people are worried about omicron, the search around the world, and here in the united states. about 75% of covid cases are believed to be omicron. here in new york, we're seeing new york for several days recording record high numbers of cases on a daily average. it couldn't be better, that being said, you hear those in the medical profession saying this is not a magic bullet. the reason is several fold, you still need to get more from people vaccinated, but there is a huge amount of hesitancy and that remains of a policy challenge for the biden administration. the second thing is the administration has said it will take several months before orders for this new pale can be fulfilled, because it takes time to manufacture. it is progress on the last energisers —— pfizer �*s shares were up 1%.
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france has recorded 91,000 covid cases in the last 2a hours, its worst daily tally so far. here's the french health minister. translation: today's numbers are not good. in fact, _ today's numbers are not good. in fact, they're _ today's numbers are not good. in fact, they're the worst figures recorded _ fact, they're the worst figures recorded since the beginning of the pandemic — recorded since the beginning of the pandemic. we're testing yourself a lot, so— pandemic. we're testing yourself a lot, so finding a lot, but clearly, francis — lot, so finding a lot, but clearly, francis experiencing what all... the number— francis experiencing what all... the number of— francis experiencing what all... the number of positive cases here are doubling — number of positive cases here are doubling almost every two days. tomorrow, wearing facemasks outdoors in spain will be compulsory again. it's a measure spain has had in place before, but it was lifted injune this year. here's guy hedgecoe with reaction from madrid. the feeling is the government feels this is— the feeling is the government feels this is an _ the feeling is the government feels this is an effective _ the feeling is the government feels this is an effective measure - the feeling is the government feels this is an effective measure to - this is an effective measure to battle — this is an effective measure to battle the _ this is an effective measure to battle the rise _ this is an effective measure to battle the rise of— this is an effective measure to battle the rise of omicron, - this is an effective measure to - battle the rise of omicron, although it is facing _ battle the rise of omicron, although it is facing a — battle the rise of omicron, although it is facing a lot _ battle the rise of omicron, although it is facing a lot of— battle the rise of omicron, although it is facing a lot of criticism. - battle the rise of omicron, although it is facing a lot of criticism. if - it is facing a lot of criticism. if you _ it is facing a lot of criticism. if you go— it is facing a lot of criticism. if you go out— it is facing a lot of criticism. if you go out in— it is facing a lot of criticism. if you go out in the _
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it is facing a lot of criticism. if you go out in the streets- it is facing a lot of criticism. if you go out in the streets of. it is facing a lot of criticism. if i you go out in the streets of most cities _ you go out in the streets of most cities and — you go out in the streets of most cities and towns, _ you go out in the streets of most cities and towns, including - you go out in the streets of most . cities and towns, including madrid, you'll— cities and towns, including madrid, you'll see _ cities and towns, including madrid, you'll see people _ cities and towns, including madrid, you'll see people wearing - cities and towns, including madrid, you'll see people wearing masks. you'll see people wearing masks anyway— you'll see people wearing masks anyway out _ you'll see people wearing masks anyway out on _ you'll see people wearing masks anyway out on the _ you'll see people wearing masks anyway out on the street. - you'll see people wearing masks anyway out on the street. but i you'll see people wearing masks anyway out on the street. but a i you'll see people wearing masks. anyway out on the street. but a lot of politicians — anyway out on the street. but a lot of politicians have _ anyway out on the street. but a lot of politicians have criticised - anyway out on the street. but a lot of politicians have criticised this i of politicians have criticised this measure. — of politicians have criticised this measure. saying _ of politicians have criticised this measure, saying either- of politicians have criticised this measure, saying either it's - of politicians have criticised this . measure, saying either it's simply not necessary _ measure, saying either it's simply not necessary because _ measure, saying either it's simply not necessary because of- measure, saying either it's simply not necessary because of social i not necessary because of social distancing — not necessary because of social distancing is— not necessary because of social distancing is enough. _ not necessary because of social distancing is enough. others i not necessary because of sociall distancing is enough. others are saying _ distancing is enough. others are saying that — distancing is enough. others are saying that this _ distancing is enough. others are saying that this measure - distancing is enough. others are saying that this measure is - distancing is enough. others are saying that this measure is not. saying that this measure is not enough — saying that this measure is not enough. yesterday, _ saying that this measure is not enough. yesterday, we - saying that this measure is not enough. yesterday, we saw. saying that this measure is not- enough. yesterday, we saw 60,000 saying that this measure is not— enough. yesterday, we saw 60,000 new cases _ enough. yesterday, we saw 60,000 new cases that— enough. yesterday, we saw 60,000 new cases that is— enough. yesterday, we saw 60,000 new cases that is a _ enough. yesterday, we saw 60,000 new cases. that is a new— enough. yesterday, we saw 60,000 new cases. that is a new record. _ enough. yesterday, we saw 60,000 new cases. that is a new record. we - enough. yesterday, we saw 60,000 new cases. that is a new record. we keep- cases. that is a new record. we keep seeing _ cases. that is a new record. we keep seeing the _ cases. that is a new record. we keep seeing the record _ cases. that is a new record. we keep seeing the record being _ cases. that is a new record. we keep seeing the record being broken - seeing the record being broken pretty much— seeing the record being broken pretty much each _ seeing the record being broken pretty much each day. - seeing the record being broken pretty much each day. there i seeing the record being broken i pretty much each day. there doesn't seem _ pretty much each day. there doesn't seem to _ pretty much each day. there doesn't seem to be — pretty much each day. there doesn't seem to be a — pretty much each day. there doesn't seem to be a sign— pretty much each day. there doesn't seem to be a sign of— pretty much each day. there doesn't seem to be a sign of that— seem to be a sign of that letting up. seem to be a sign of that letting up so. — seem to be a sign of that letting up. so. there _ seem to be a sign of that letting up. so, there are _ seem to be a sign of that letting up. so, there are concerns - seem to be a sign of that lettingl up. so, there are concerns about seem to be a sign of that letting i up. so, there are concerns about the numbers— up. so, there are concerns about the numbers of— up. so, there are concerns about the numbers of cases _ up. so, there are concerns about the numbers of cases. in _ up. so, there are concerns about the numbers of cases. in terms - up. so, there are concerns about the numbers of cases. in terms of - numbers of cases. in terms of omicron, _ numbers of cases. in terms of omicron, just _ numbers of cases. in terms of omicron, just over— numbers of cases. in terms of omicron, just over a - numbers of cases. in terms of omicron, just over a week- numbers of cases. in terms of. omicron, just over a week ago, numbers of cases. in terms of i omicron, just over a week ago, we were _ omicron, just over a week ago, we were told _ omicron, just over a week ago, we were told the — omicron, just over a week ago, we were told the percentage - omicron, just over a week ago, we were told the percentage of- omicron, just over a week ago, we were told the percentage of new i were told the percentage of new cases _ were told the percentage of new cases attributed _ were told the percentage of new cases attributed to _ were told the percentage of new cases attributed to the - were told the percentage of new cases attributed to the new i cases attributed to the new variants _ cases attributed to the new variants. that _ cases attributed to the new variants. that was - cases attributed to the new variants. that was below i cases attributed to the new i variants. that was below 5%, cases attributed to the new - variants. that was below 5%, and a week— variants. that was below 5%, and a week later, — variants. that was below 5%, and a week later, we're _ variants. that was below 5%, and a week later, we're told _ variants. that was below 5%, and a week later, we're told it's- variants. that was below 5%, and a week later, we're told it's nearly. week later, we're told it's nearly 50%~ _ week later, we're told it's nearly 50%~ it— week later, we're told it's nearly 50%~ it looks _ week later, we're told it's nearly 50%. it looks as _ week later, we're told it's nearly 50%. it looks as if— week later, we're told it's nearly 50%. it looks as ifthat- week later, we're told it's nearly 50%. it looks as if that will - week later, we're told it's nearly 50%. it looks as if that will be i week later, we're told it's nearly. 50%. it looks as if that will be the dominant— 50%. it looks as if that will be the dominant variant _ 50%. it looks as if that will be the dominant variant if _ 50%. it looks as if that will be the dominant variant if not _ 50%. it looks as if that will be the dominant variant if not already, . dominant variant if not already, then— dominant variant if not already, then very— dominant variant if not already, then very soon _ dominant variant if not already, then very soon. if _ dominant variant if not already, then very soon. if you - dominant variant if not already, then very soon. if you compare | dominant variant if not already, i
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then very soon. if you compare the figures _ then very soon. if you compare the figures to— then very soon. if you compare the figures to last _ then very soon. if you compare the figures to last year, _ then very soon. if you compare the figures to last year, early - then very soon. if you compare the figures to last year, earlyjanuary, i figures to last year, earlyjanuary, the last— figures to last year, earlyjanuary, the last big — figures to last year, earlyjanuary, the last big spike _ figures to last year, earlyjanuary, the last big spike we _ figures to last year, earlyjanuary, the last big spike we saw, - figures to last year, earlyjanuary, the last big spike we saw, there . figures to last year, earlyjanuary, i the last big spike we saw, there are more _ the last big spike we saw, there are more daily— the last big spike we saw, there are more daily cases, _ the last big spike we saw, there are more daily cases, many _ the last big spike we saw, there are more daily cases, many more - the last big spike we saw, there are more daily cases, many more dailyl more daily cases, many more daily cases— more daily cases, many more daily cases of— more daily cases, many more daily cases of covid, _ more daily cases, many more daily cases of covid, but _ more daily cases, many more daily cases of covid, but around - more daily cases, many more daily cases of covid, but around a - more daily cases, many more daily. cases of covid, but around a quarter of the _ cases of covid, but around a quarter ofthe number— cases of covid, but around a quarter of the number of _ cases of covid, but around a quarter of the number of hospitalisations. . of the number of hospitalisations. the same — of the number of hospitalisations. the same goes _ of the number of hospitalisations. the same goes for— of the number of hospitalisations. the same goes for intensive - of the number of hospitalisations. the same goes for intensive care. j the same goes for intensive care. so, the same goes for intensive care. so. the _ the same goes for intensive care. so. the pressure _ the same goes for intensive care. so, the pressure on _ the same goes for intensive care. so, the pressure on the _ the same goes for intensive care. so, the pressure on the health. the same goes for intensive care. i so, the pressure on the health care service _ so, the pressure on the health care service is— so, the pressure on the health care service is not— so, the pressure on the health care service is not as _ so, the pressure on the health care service is not as heavy— so, the pressure on the health care service is not as heavy as _ so, the pressure on the health care service is not as heavy as it - so, the pressure on the health care service is not as heavy as it was i so, the pressure on the health care service is not as heavy as it was a l service is not as heavy as it was a year— service is not as heavy as it was a year ago. — service is not as heavy as it was a yearago. but— service is not as heavy as it was a yearago. but the _ service is not as heavy as it was a year ago, but the government i year ago, but the government has said it _ year ago, but the government has said it wants— year ago, but the government has said it wants to _ year ago, but the government has said it wants to bring _ year ago, but the government has said it wants to bring people, i said it wants to bring people, health— said it wants to bring people, health care _ said it wants to bring people, health care professionals i said it wants to bring people, health care professionals out| said it wants to bring people, . health care professionals out of retirement— health care professionals out of retirement to _ health care professionals out of retirement to help _ health care professionals out of retirement to help with - health care professionals out of retirement to help with the i health care professionals out of i retirement to help with the surge cases— retirement to help with the surge cases should _ retirement to help with the surge cases should it _ retirement to help with the surge cases should it be _ retirement to help with the surge cases should it be necessary- retirement to help with the surge cases should it be necessary to l retirement to help with the surge i cases should it be necessary to help broaden— cases should it be necessary to help broaden the — cases should it be necessary to help broaden the vaccination _ cases should it be necessary to help broaden the vaccination programmej cases should it be necessary to help. broaden the vaccination programme as well. in australia, covid is putting the healthcare system under strain. it's led to the country's most populous state, new south wales, to propose charging unvaccinated people for covid medical costs. but that's led to widespread criticism, as shaimaa khalil explains.
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the new south wales state government is considering whether to force people who are on vaccinated to pay for their medical bills if they required hospitalisation for covid—19. if implemented, this will be extremely controversial because it is going to be a drastic change from australia's universal health care system. it has already come underfierce care system. it has already come under fierce criticism from australia's top medical association, the australian medical association, and its president said that this was unethical to charge people for medical care based on previous health choices, that it was a shame to deny people health care, to deny people medical care in the middle of a pandemic. also, where'd you draw line? do you charge smokers? even if it'sjust an idea, it's going to make that divide between the
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vaccinated and unvaccinated even deeper, and i think it also shows you a certain nervousness from the local government's side about whether or not that health care is going to handle more cases. vladimir putin has rejected accusations that russia is preparing to invade ukraine, after amassing thousands of troops on the border between the two countries. during his annual press conference, the russian president said he wants to avoid conflict, but again insisted that the west must give russia guarantees that nato won't expand to the east. our moscow correspondent, steve rosenberg, reports. it's the most wonderful time of the year, if you happen to like long news conferences. vladimir putin's end—of—year press briefing is always a marathon affair. forfour hours, the kremlin leaderfielded questions, and he used the event to vent his resentment at how nato enlarged after the fall
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of the soviet union. translation: "we won't move one east towards the east," they _ translation: "we won't move one inch towards the east," they _ told us in the 1990s, and what happened? they deceived us. they brazenly tricked us. there were five waves of nato expansion, and now missile systems are appearing in romania and poland. is this russia's response? a build—up of russian troops near ukraine's border. the kremlin denies it plans to invade, but this is pressure, and on the west, too, as moscow demands an end to nato enlargement and nato military activity in eastern europe, what it calls security guarantees. you must give us guarantees, you must do it immediately, now. we won't be palmed off with decades of idle chatter about the need of security for all while the other side carries out its own plans.
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vladimir putin spoke for a long time, but gave little away about his intentions, regarding ukraine, about whether, as the west fears, he is planning a large—scale military operation there. but what we do know now is that next month, us and russian officials will sit down to discuss but what we do know now is that next month, us and russian officials will sit down to discuss the security guarantees that moscow is demanding, so there's still hope for a diplomatic resolution. vladimir putin has done 17 of these press conferences now as president. you need plenty of stamina to do this and to listen to it, and since all main tv channels in russia show it live, it is in russia show it live, it's wall—to—wall putin, a reminder, as if russians didn't need it, as if russians didn't know it, who's in charge here. steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow. you certainly do need plenty of stamina to watch that. it is long.
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olga ivshina is from bbc russian. she was monitoring it for us. predident putin was talking about the threat from the west, and very much describing this as an aggressive stance from the west, and that's why russia had to protect themselves and build up those troops we're seeing on the border with ukraine. olga?— we're seeing on the border with ukraine. olga? yes. we need to remember— ukraine. olga? yes. we need to remember this _ ukraine. olga? yes. we need to remember this conference i ukraine. olga? yes. we need to remember this conference is i remember this conference is internal, and putin creates these... he defends those dragons, and here you go. either stays the same or gross. that's why once again, russia is only responding to provocations from the west. the other things that russia economy is struggling. standards of living are dramatically
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declining, and year after year, putin is saying our economy is doing better, russia is rising up from... but it's definitely not getting better. it's all due to the west. of course, there was also a message in the borders, and basically, he wants to show that he's ready for the negotiations next month and he has a very strong position and few very good points for a trade—off. what very strong position and few very good points for a trade-off. what is his stron: good points for a trade-off. what is his strong position _ good points for a trade-off. what is his strong position then, _ good points for a trade-off. what is his strong position then, because . good points for a trade-off. what is | his strong position then, because he is continuing the? historically a part of russia. we know russia viewed ukraine as being little russia, part of russia. he cannot accept the sovereignty of ukraine. mr putin is demanding from the west guarantees. what he's not
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explaining, why southern ukraine is a threat to russia. the thing is that we don't know what's going on in his mind, but ukraine is only one point in that grand game happening in the mind of mr putin. this is just one of those figures on the chessboard which he would have to exchange, to relieve that pressure in exchange for something else. that's always his strategy, and in a way, he always achieves some games without. but way, he always achieves some games without. �* ~ , ., , ., without. but western leaders are commenting _ without. but western leaders are commenting on _ without. but western leaders are commenting on it. _ without. but western leaders are commenting on it. the _ without. but western leaders are commenting on it. the uk - without. but western leaders are | commenting on it. the uk foreign minister has said that any russian incursion into ukraine would be a massive strategic mistake i have severe consequences. are we realistically close to that possibility?— realistically close to that ossibili ? , ., , realistically close to that
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ossibili ? , . ., possibility? there is always a possibility — possibility? there is always a possibility from _ possibility? there is always a possibility from big _ possibility? there is always a i possibility from big politicians, but there is always a possibility on the ground, that ordinary people, very young people on both sides of the border. no one knows. if you speak with politicians, if you speak to... and they all say they think it's unlikely. so, maybe the answer is that mr putin is actually enjoying this nervousness, enjoying this threshold that has appeared because the more nervous the west is, the easier it is for him to come back to those negotiations because if you put that pressure aside, what does russia have to offer? olga. does russia have to offer? olga, thanks so much. _ does russia have to offer? olga, thanks so much. olga _ does russia have to offer? olga, thanks so much. olga ivshina i does russia have to offer? olga, i thanks so much. olga ivshina form bbc russian. the uk foreign minister
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adding nato and g7 are united in supporting ukraine. another topic that came up at that press conference was energy. the price of gas on the wholesale markets hit record levels this week, and while that's happening, russia has been reducing its supply to europe. that's led to accusations moscow is using its pipelines for political leverage, something president putin denies. translation: many factors are to blame a cold lon- many factors are to blame a cold long spring, the pumping into the storage _ long spring, the pumping into the storage facility, winter didn't work — storage facility, winter didn't work all— storage facility, winter didn't work. all this created a shortage. at the _ work. all this created a shortage. at the same time, the official authorities pressure their oil and -as authorities pressure their oil and gas producing companies, so they in turn do _ gas producing companies, so they in turn do not — gas producing companies, so they in turn do not invest sufficient funds. that's— turn do not invest sufficient funds. that's how — turn do not invest sufficient funds. that's how the shortage appeared. the problems they've created themselves to be solved by themselves. well, here in the uk, energy suppliers say those high prices on the wholesale markets will soon find their way to consumers.
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gas bills are currently capped by the industry regulator ofgem at £1,277 a year. but they could go up as much as 50% - to £1,800 - when the cap is next set in april. that�*s according to the industry body, energy uk- emma pinchbeck is its chief executive. the price responds to the cost in the market. _ the price responds to the cost in the market. so— the price responds to the cost in the market, so we _ the price responds to the cost in the market, so we currently- the price responds to the cost in. the market, so we currently update it twice _ the market, so we currently update it twice a _ the market, so we currently update it twice a year. _ the market, so we currently update it twice a year, in _ the market, so we currently update it twice a year, in the _ the market, so we currently update it twice a year, in the spring - the market, so we currently update it twice a year, in the spring and i it twice a year, in the spring and autumn — it twice a year, in the spring and autumn. essentially, _ it twice a year, in the spring and autumn. essentially, it- it twice a year, in the spring and autumn. essentially, it reflectsl it twice a year, in the spring and i autumn. essentially, it reflects the cost in _ autumn. essentially, it reflects the cost in the — autumn. essentially, it reflects the cost in the previous _ autumn. essentially, it reflects the cost in the previous period. - autumn. essentially, it reflects the cost in the previous period. if- autumn. essentially, it reflects the cost in the previous period. if the i cost in the previous period. if the cost in the previous period. if the cost of— cost in the previous period. if the cost of buying _ cost in the previous period. if the cost of buying energy— cost in the previous period. if the cost of buying energy goes - cost in the previous period. if the cost of buying energy goes up, i cost in the previous period. if the i cost of buying energy goes up, and it has— cost of buying energy goes up, and it has done, — cost of buying energy goes up, and it has done, and _ cost of buying energy goes up, and it has done, and that _ cost of buying energy goes up, and it has done, and that cost - cost of buying energy goes up, and it has done, and that cost gets i it has done, and that cost gets passed — it has done, and that cost gets passed on— it has done, and that cost gets passed on and _ it has done, and that cost gets passed on and the _ it has done, and that cost gets passed on and the suppliers i it has done, and that cost gets i passed on and the suppliers have to buy it _ passed on and the suppliers have to buy it at _ passed on and the suppliers have to buy it at those — passed on and the suppliers have to buy it at those prices. _ passed on and the suppliers have to buy it at those prices. the _ passed on and the suppliers have to buy it at those prices. the point - passed on and the suppliers have to buy it at those prices. the point of. buy it at those prices. the point of the cap— buy it at those prices. the point of the cap is— buy it at those prices. the point of the cap is to — buy it at those prices. the point of the cap is to make sure _ buy it at those prices. the point of the cap is to make sure prices - buy it at those prices. the point of the cap is to make sure prices are| the cap is to make sure prices are fair, _ the cap is to make sure prices are fair, but _ the cap is to make sure prices are fair, but of— the cap is to make sure prices are fair, but of course, _ the cap is to make sure prices are fair, but of course, it— the cap is to make sure prices are fair, but of course, it changes - the cap is to make sure prices arei fair, but of course, it changes with the market. — fair, but of course, it changes with the market, and _ fair, but of course, it changes with the market, and that's _ fair, but of course, it changes with the market, and that's why- fair, but of course, it changes with the market, and that's why we're i
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the market, and that's why we're saying _ the market, and that's why we're saying we — the market, and that's why we're saying we are _ the market, and that's why we're saying we are doing _ the market, and that's why we're saying we are doing what - the market, and that's why we're saying we are doing what we - the market, and that's why we're| saying we are doing what we can, the market, and that's why we're - saying we are doing what we can, but we need _ saying we are doing what we can, but we need government— saying we are doing what we can, but we need government to _ saying we are doing what we can, but we need government to act. - our business correspondent, colletta smith, has this assessment. we're feeling these price rises in so many areas. it's worth remembering that lots of our power stations like the one behind me are fuelled by guest to produce electricity —— by gas. business is are already paying those higher whole scale prices, and they are passing that on to us by charging us more for everything we're buying, which is why everyone is feeling so expensive and we're seeing inflation going up. europe are seeing the same price rises for their own electricity thanks to russian pipeline problems. of course, there are things that the government here as a result of all that. they could cut the amount of vat we pay on our
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energy bills, they could change the way we're all having to pay for a lot of those failed energy providers over the last couple of months, but the government's and the regulator are under pressure at the moment because so many households are already struggling to pay the really high prices this winter that if we see another increase in the new year, lots more people will struggle and damage will be done.— and damage will be done. colletta smith. and damage will be done. colletta smith- don't _ and damage will be done. colletta smith. don't go _ and damage will be done. colletta smith. don't go away. _ and damage will be done. colletta smith. don't go away. we're - smith. don't go away. we're expecting a development from the us. this is the live scene from minnesota, the court where the trial of kim potter is taking place. she is the police officer accused of killing a black man, daunte wright, while on duty. she claims she mistakenly pulled out her gun when reaching for a taser. the jury has been deliberating for four days. we're expecting judge regina chu to speak, we'll bring you that live as soon as it happens. this is the live shot. to stay with
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us. hello there. you'll have to rely on morecambe and wise, i'm afraid, to bring the sunshine this christmas period. there's going to be a lot of cloud around, so that rules out a white christmas for most of us. however, there is a possibility across the pennines and through the higher ground of scotland, we could wake up to a light dusting of snow over the next couple of days. but for most of us, the talking point will be how mild it is, particularly across england and wales — temperatures into double figures. it's not the warmest we've seen over the christmas period. these are the christmas day records across the country over the years, so we have to be close orjust above 15 degrees to break that, and that's not going to happen. but the mild weather is responsible by these weather fronts that continue to move their way steadily northwards. that south—westerly flow continues to drive that mild air across the country, but it really is struggling to displace that
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cold air across the far north of scotland. that means tonight, as the rain pushes into the cold air, we could see some snow for a time. mist and fog will be a problem across england and wales as well. that'll be slow to lift first thing, but it will be a mild start to our christmas eve, particularly across england and wales. so, early morning mist and fog lifting to low cloud across england and wales. early morning cloud and drizzly rain slowly easing in scotland. hopefully across aberdeenshire, we'll get some sunshine into the afternoon. but later on into the day across southwest england, wales and into northern ireland, we'll see some wet and windy weather arriving. so, we keep that colder air up into the north. furthersouth, however, it stays on the mild side — temperatures widely into double figures across the country. so, that's christmas eve. as we move out of christmas eve towards christmas day, that weather front still making progress across northern england into the scottish borders. still bumping into that cold air that's sitting anchored to the northeast of scotland.
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so, we could have, again, a few flurries of rain, sleet and snow, the snow obviously on higher ground to start off on christmas day. that eases away quite quickly. a lot of cloud for most of us on christmas day with the exception of northeast scotland, and some increasingly wet and windy weather pushing into northern ireland, wales and southwest england by the end of the afternoon. that divide in the temperatures, double—digit down to the south, cooler up into the north. still some rain around, unfortunately, on boxing day, but mild for most. take care. the court room where the trail of kim potter is taking place she is the police officer accused of killing a black man while on duty. she claims she mistakingly pulled out her gun when reaching for her
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taser. thejury has been deliberating for four days now and they're expecting the judge to speak. let's listen into what she is saying. we are waiting for the judge to speak. this is thejudge in the trail of kim potter which has been taking place in minnesota. this is kim potter who is the police officer just to remind you of the backgrounds of these. the police officer who is accused of killing a black man, dante writes. she was on duty when the death happened and she claimed she mistakingly pulled out her gun when reaching for a taser. like i say thatjerry has been
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deliberating for four days. so we are waiting. as kim potter sits down we are waiting for the judge to bring us up—to—date because they're expecting a development in this trial. �* , , , expecting a development in this trial. , , , , trial. belted deputy please retrieved _ trial. belted deputy please retrieved the _ trial. belted deputy please retrieved the forms - trial. belted deputy please retrieved the forms and . trial. belted deputy please - retrieved the forms and provide it to me for review? —— well will kim potter please rise? i am not going to be different x as it would appear in the court records. in the matter of state of minnesota
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variance is —— versus kim potter. court file number 27 cr 217490 three the jerry on court file number 27 cr 217490 three thejerry on the charge of manslaughter in the first degree while committing a misdemeanor on or about april 11, 2021 in the state of minnesota find the defendant guilty. and the verdict was agreed to at the hour of 11:40am and signed by the jury hour of 11:40am and signed by the jury person. 0n hour of 11:40am and signed by the jury person. on 12, hour of 11:40am and signed by the jury person. 0n12, 23, 21. the verdict on how two is really cheery on the charge of manslaughter in the second degree culpable negligence on or about april 11, 2021 in the state of minnesota find the defendant guilty. and that verdict was agreed
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to at 10:30am guilty. and that verdict was agreed to at10:30am on guilty. and that verdict was agreed to at 10:30am on december 21, 2021. members of thejury to at 10:30am on december 21, 2021. members of the jury is this your true and correct verdict so say you want and so see you all.— true and correct verdict so say you want and so see you all. yes. 0k, ou ma want and so see you all. yes. ok, you may be _ want and so see you all. yes. ok, you may be seated. _ want and so see you all. yes. ok, you may be seated. i _ want and so see you all. yes. ok, you may be seated. i am - want and so see you all. yes. ok, you may be seated. i am now going to pull the jerry you may be seated. i am now going to pull thejerry —— the jury. jerry pull the jerry —— the jury. jerry number two, pull thejerry —— the jury. jerry numbertwo, is pull thejerry —— the jury. jerry number two, is this your true and correct verdict? it is. jerry number six, is this year true and correct verdict? . six, is this year true and correct verdict?- jerry _ six, is this year true and correct verdict? yes. jerry number seven is verdict? yes. jerry number seven is in situ and — verdict? yes. jerry number seven is in situ and correct _ verdict? yes. jerry number seven is in situ and correct verdict? juror 11. and juror 17 is this your
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true and correct verdict?- juror 11. and juror 17 is this your true and correct verdict? yes. juror number 21. — true and correct verdict? yes. juror number21. is— true and correct verdict? yes. juror number 21, is this _ true and correct verdict? yes. juror number 21, is this your true and correct verdict?— number 21, is this your true and correct verdict? yes. juror number 22 is this your _ correct verdict? yes. juror number 22 is this your true _ correct verdict? yes. juror number 22 is this your true and correct verdict? . 22 is this your true and correct verdict?- juror— 22 is this your true and correct verdict? yes. juror number 40, is this our verdict? yes. juror number 40, is this your true _ verdict? yes. juror number 40, is this your true and _ verdict? yes. juror number 40, is this your true and correct verdict? yes. , ., , j~ this your true and correct verdict? yes. , ., , j~ , , this your true and correct verdict? yes. ., , j~ , yes. juror number 48, is this your true and correct _ yes. juror number 48, is this your true and correct verdict? - yes. juror number 48, is this your true and correct verdict? yes, - yes. juror number 48, is this yourj true and correct verdict? yes, and “uror true and correct verdict? yes, and juror number— true and correct verdict? yes, and juror number 55. _ true and correct verdict? yes, and juror number 55, is _ true and correct verdict? yes, and juror number 55, is this _ true and correct verdict? yes, and juror number 55, is this your- true and correct verdict? yes, and juror number 55, is this your true l juror number 55, is this your true and correct — juror number 55, is this your true and correct verdict?— juror number 55, is this your true and correct verdict? yes. members of the jer , and correct verdict? yes. members of the jerry. when _ and correct verdict? yes. members of the jerry. when he — and correct verdict? yes. members of the jerry, when he first _ and correct verdict? yes. members of the jerry, when he first came - and correct verdict? yes. members of the jerry, when he first came into - thejerry, when he first came into thejerry, when he first came into the courtroom, i told you that the heroes of ourjudicial system. well, the 12 of you are our heroes in this
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case. you may remember that it was a question on the questionnaire that asked whether you to be on this jury, you are to check yes, no, or maybe. a number of you checked mail or not sure and if you have you checked all three but when i ask each of you if you be ready to serve if the party selected you you all said yes. you said yes even though we are in a pandemic with omicron spreading in our community, you said yes even though you had concerns about serving given the nature of the case. he said yes even though you knew you would be sequestered jury you knew you would be sequestered jury deliberations and await your dash away from your loved ones and
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you said yes even though there was a chance that this case could have lasted past christmas. you are willing to sacrifice much because he believed in ourjustice system. and then he went into deliberations and each of you brought to you your common sense, individual perceptions and life experiences and you came to and life experiences and you came to an agreement on the verdicts. you did your deity. am so proud of you. you should be proud of yourself. without civic minded citizens like you our system ofjustice cannot function. thank you for your service, thank you for your sacrifices. i wish you all a wonderful holiday season and may be
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peace and beauty of the season be yours throughout the year. at this time i would like you to go into your reading courtroom and i will be an interest injust a moment. i would like to thank you personally and to answer any questions that you have. the breaking news that the former police officer kim potter has been found guilty of manslaughter. following the killing of the black motorist in a traffic stop in
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minneapolis.— motorist in a traffic stop in minneapolis. motorist in a traffic stop in minneaolis. ., . , minneapolis. for in custody we will be takin: minneapolis. for in custody we will be taking kim _ minneapolis. for in custody we will be taking kim potter _ minneapolis. for in custody we will be taking kim potter into _ minneapolis. for in custody we will be taking kim potter into custody l be taking kim potter into custody and holding without bail. so i think we probably want to do a tear number four. we will be looking at january 13 or 14th. irate four. we will be looking at january 13 or14th. ~ .., four. we will be looking at january 13 or14th. ~ ., ., 13 or14th. we can to him a.m. on either day- _ 13 or14th. we can to him a.m. on either day- -- _ 13 or14th. we can to him a.m. on either day. -- we _ 13 or14th. we can to him a.m. on either day. -- we to _ 13 or14th. we can to him a.m. on either day. -- we to 11:30am - 13 or14th. we can to him a.m. on either day. -- we to 11:30am on i either day. —— we to 11:30am on either day~ _ either day. —— we to 11:30am on either day~ |_ either day. -- we to 11:30am on either day-— either day. -- we to 11:30am on either da . ., ., ., ,, either day. i am having a psi report done. we either day. i am having a psi report done- we are _ either day. i am having a psi report done. we are not _ either day. i am having a psi report done. we are not available - either day. i am having a psi report done. we are not available on - either day. i am having a psi report done. we are not available on the l done. we are not available on the 13th. could be — done. we are not available on the 13th. could be do _ done. we are not available on the 13th. could be do the _ done. we are not available on the 13th. could be do the 14th? - iam in i am in trial of the week after that
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and it— i am in trial of the week after that and it seems— i am in trial of the week after that and it seems to _ i am in trial of the week after that and it seems to be _ i am in trial of the week after that and it seems to be epic— i am in trial of the week after that. and it seems to be epic accelerated giving _ and it seems to be epic accelerated giving the _ and it seems to be epic accelerated giving the seriousness _ and it seems to be epic accelerated giving the seriousness of _ and it seems to be epic accelerated giving the seriousness of the - giving the seriousness of the decision— giving the seriousness of the decision you _ giving the seriousness of the decision you are _ giving the seriousness of the decision you are about - giving the seriousness of the decision you are about to - giving the seriousness of the . decision you are about to make certain— decision you are about to make certain tater _ decision you are about to make certain later in _ decision you are about to make certain later injanuary- decision you are about to make certain later injanuary it - decision you are about to make certain later in january it would j decision you are about to make i certain later in january it would be a preference _ certain later in january it would be a preference. we _ certain later in january it would be a preference-— a preference. we are awaiting to hear when _ a preference. we are awaiting to hear when the _ a preference. we are awaiting to hear when the sentencing - a preference. we are awaiting to hear when the sentencing will i a preference. we are awaiting to l hear when the sentencing will take place but they are expecting you to take place in about three weeks, january 13 or 14th was mentioned but kim potter has been found guilty. she said she mistook her handgun for a taser during a routine traffic stop. the prosecution argued she showed culpable negligence during the incident which led to several nights of intense protest. the jury list showing a buddy camp at each of the traffic stop stopping short of the traffic stop stopping short of the moment when he died. a woman's voice could be heard shouting taser several times. kim potter said she thought she was
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trying her taser rather than her nine mm handgun when she shot dante right in the chest. the incident occurred at a very sensitive time, not far from the courts where the white police officer derrick shelby was standing trial for the murder of the two. n was standing trial for the murder of the two. . was standing trial for the murder of the two. , , ., , the two. i remember yelling taser, taser, the two. i remember yelling taser, taser. taser _ the two. i remember yelling taser, taser, taser and _ the two. i remember yelling taser, taser, taser and nothing _ the two. i remember yelling taser, | taser, taser and nothing happened. and he told me i shot him. kim potter when — and he told me i shot him. kim potter when she _ and he told me i shot him. kim potter when she was giving evidence. she has been found guilty. let's cross over to washington. he had been following this so as we saw, breaking years that kim potter was guilty on both counts. that's right. it took the jury which is made up of six men and six women over 27 hours
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in the course of four days to reach their verdicts and they had asked questions to thejudge their verdicts and they had asked questions to the judge during that time sharing that they were really engaged in base right from the beginning returning that verdict and she was facing two manslaughter charges for his death and as he heard the defence had said she had she was trying to tackle someone who is resisting arrest and she had mistook her taser and her gun there at the prosecution said this is something that was just beyond an honest mistake and this was something much more serious than that and theyjerry and the case against her and finding guilty of both charges and just on the sentencing which as you mentioned we should be getting in the next three weeks and in terms of the guidelines that the state gives on that is just
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over seven years in prison if you're convicted of first—degree manslaughter which he has been in for years for second degree and the prosecutors have said they plan to push for a much longer sentence. thank you for being here with us as the breaking years was taking place. kim potter has been found guilty on both of those kinds of manslaughter. he will continue to monitor this story and our website as well. my details and background analysis to that charge. several studies from south africa and the uk show a reduced risk of severe ms with omicron variant of coronavirus. newly released data from the health security agency shows that people catching omicron are 31 to 45% less likely to go to amd and 50 to 70% less likely to be admitted to hospital for treatment. this less likely to be admitted to hospitalfor treatment. this is based on all cases of omicron and
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delta since the beginning of november. here in the uk to health security agencies chief medical adviser doctor susan hopkins gave this reaction. i think this is cautious. this is a sign as an individual year at risk of severe disease potentially reduced and your risk of hospitalisation is reduced however we have got very high amounts of infection circulating and so the more infections we have circulating in our population to more people will get admitted to hospital and put hospitals under pressure. it does not change any of the advice they are giving and that really is if you're going to visit family and friends take a lateral flow and make sure you get vaccinated and get the step and at all times think about things cautiously and infections are really high levels across the uk and particularly in london at the moment. professor francois bayou is director of the genetics institute at university college london.
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we had different studies suggesting or breaking that omicron is less severe and hospitalisations are fewer. what is your assessment of these different studies? i fewer. what is your assessment of these different studies?— these different studies? i think these different studies? i think the oint these different studies? i think they point is — these different studies? i think they point is similar _ these different studies? i think they point is similar values - these different studies? i think they point is similar values as i these different studies? i think i they point is similar values as you mentioned there is a reduction of at least half in terms of risk and sometimes a bit more and for most of them they tend to compare cases in them they tend to compare cases in the to leave and in the omicron wave which is not exactly the same so the ones that give us a good idea at the ones that give us a good idea at the ones where they prepare cases now and the tennis omicron seems to be less apparent. it’s and the tennis omicron seems to be less apparent-— less apparent. it's more infectious
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and that cancels _ less apparent. it's more infectious and that cancels out _ less apparent. it's more infectious and that cancels out the _ less apparent. it's more infectious and that cancels out the lists - less apparent. it's more infectious and that cancels out the lists of. and that cancels out the lists of their nests of this particular variant. if their nests of this particular variant. , ., ., ., their nests of this particular variant. ., ., ., ., . variant. if you had a variant which is half and _ variant. if you had a variant which is half and ten _ variant. if you had a variant which is half and ten times _ variant. if you had a variant which is half and ten times my - variant. if you had a variant which is half and ten times my cases . variant. if you had a variant which | is half and ten times my cases and we are not exactly fair so omicron has increased its case numbers quite dramatically and different parts of the world and particularly in london and this is a large number of cases and it's the wave seems to be peaking and there are signs we might be reaching a plateau in other places in the uk and it's a knife edge but whatever happens and its morbidity and mortality. i edge but whatever happens and its morbidity and mortality.— edge but whatever happens and its morbidity and mortality. i wonder if i can aet morbidity and mortality. i wonder if i can get you _ morbidity and mortality. i wonder if i can get you to _ morbidity and mortality. i wonder if i can get you to comment _ morbidity and mortality. i wonder if i can get you to comment on - morbidity and mortality. i wonder if i can get you to comment on a tree | i can get you to comment on a tree if you sent out yesterday. he said
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let's go for a final push to try to convince as many as possible to get vaccinated or boosted and by the spring we shall burn and dismantle and being the test and celebrate life and we talk about we are seeing it at its peak are we talking about some sort of normality or is that optimistic of you? i some sort of normality or is that optimistic of you?— some sort of normality or is that optimistic of you? i think we should alwa s optimistic of you? i think we should always have — optimistic of you? i think we should always have complaints _ optimistic of you? i think we should always have complaints and - optimistic of you? i think we should always have complaints and thingsl always have complaints and things can go wrong and we're still always projecting ourselves and i'm quite optimistic and fairly optimistic that they the spring and i think evenif that they the spring and i think even if we look backwards yes, at the moment it looks green and peak
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and if we compare the hospitalisations we see now prepared to what we see again in spring 2020 or the winter of 2021 and very soon you will have effective drugs and it will be helping a lot and it's a bit of a meakes and i feel the spring should bring somejoy. hong kong university is defending his decision to remove a statue commemorating the lives lost in the massacre in tiananmen square.
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the only scooter is allowed on public highways are the rental splinters from approved operators taking part in the government trial across england. privately owned ones can only be used on private land if they land owners consent. in a scooter operation we meet stephen quality. he has bought his own scooter and pushing it so it's not doing anything wrong on this occasion. when you bought it, what you told about where you could use it? ~ ., . ., ,
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it? we did not inquire. what gets me is findin: it? we did not inquire. what gets me is finding this — it? we did not inquire. what gets me is finding this out _ it? we did not inquire. what gets me is finding this out and _ it? we did not inquire. what gets me is finding this out and they _ is finding this out and they each could not believe that you can use it. , ., ., ., , ., could not believe that you can use it. he is among the many who argued this clear i print _ it. he is among the many who argued this clear i print -- _ this clear i print —— confusing people into thinking personal devices can be used in the same way. what retailers he spoke to say they provide clear and visible information so customers understand the legal restrictions. calls to legalise our growing and a decision could be taken by the government next year. the department for transport says safety is a top priority and the rental trials across england would allow an understanding of the benefits and impact of this new form of transport. many ce scooters provide a fun and convenient way to travel but if you misuse a privately owned one you could indianans be a very expensive journey.
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kim potter, a former police officer who shot a black man having mistaking her handgun for a taser has been found guilty of manslaughter and her trial in minneapolis. president biden has signed into law a bill that requires companies to prove that goods imported from china's region were not produced with forced labour. the data also include sanctions against individuals alleged to be responsible and china has been accused of human rights abuses in the region is home to many of the countries most population and possibly genocide. based on your
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research showing tamulis forcing hundreds of thousands of minorities including bennington manual labour. and they criticised it. though white house was initially not in support of this a lot that was being worked out by congress but eventually in pretty much late in the game they heard they were going to support this rule. and it was something congress put together and something be pushed through and click on the one congressional leader not voting in favourfor one congressional leader not voting in favour for it. and what it signifies is the kind of pressure at the united states wants to put on to china and the best way to do that in their minds is to do so using some
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of these financial pressures. by making sure multinational corporations connect corporations around the world are prevented from using any forced labour from that particular region the united states is able to exert some power over china and its treatment of the people. not to hong kong. entities images. they share construction workers removing the pillar of shame statue from the university of hong kong on wednesday night. the statue commemorates the 1989 cinnamon square massacre and had been standing on the campus for 24 years. here it is before it was removed. it's eight metres high and depicts 50 to an interest in bodies that represent the pro—democracy protesters killed by the chinese government. it was one of the few remaining public memorials in hong kong and was at the forefront of annual vigils in the university demanded its removal in october by
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letting china's crackdown in that cemetery. i letting china's crackdown in that cemete . ., �* ~' letting china's crackdown in that cemete . cemetery. i don't think people exect cemetery. i don't think people exoect this — cemetery. i don't think people expect this thing _ cemetery. i don't think people expect this thing we're - cemetery. i don't think people expect this thing we're having | cemetery. i don't think people l expect this thing we're having in the universities with the most freedom of expression or freedom the universities with the most freedom of expression orfreedom of speech and they try to become the first one to remove every history or part of history inside the campus. the statute was created by the danish artist and he's been speaking to us. it’s danish artist and he's been speaking to us. 3 .. danish artist and he's been speaking to us. �*, ., danish artist and he's been speaking tous. �*, ., ,., , ., danish artist and he's been speaking tous. �*, danish artist and he's been speaking tous. to us. it's a sad story and it's a story about _ to us. it's a sad story and it's a story about a _ to us. it's a sad story and it's a story about a democracy - to us. it's a sad story and it's a story about a democracy in - story about a democracy in hong kong. they destroyed the democracy in hong kong and destroyed and it's not allowed to talk about what happened and they are not allowed to talk about what happened and the tiananmen crackdown so maybe it's not really the university this is more a place where china share their
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own version of the story and it's the opposite that they it's a place for freedom of expression and a place like the western world so this is the image of hong kong and it destroyed hong kong totally. let’s destroyed hong kong totally. let's remind ourselves _ destroyed hong kong totally. let's remind ourselves what _ destroyed hong kong totally. let's remind ourselves what happened in 1989. during the 80s the communist party began to allow some private companies and foreign investment to boost the economy and raise living standards. this raised hopes for greater political openness and by the spring of 1989 large crowds of protesters began gathering in ten where asking for greater political freedom and in the last two weeks martial law was declared in beijing and by earlyjune troops began to move towards tenant square opening fire in the resting protesters to regain control of the area. no one knows how many people were killed
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and estimates range from several hundred to 10,000. the events remain a highly sensitive topic in china relating to the massacre are regularly removed from the internet and there is little information about what happened in the younger generation. about what happened in the younger veneration. ., ., , , generation. enough to the university contacted the _ generation. enough to the university contacted the sculptor _ generation. enough to the university contacted the sculptor to _ generation. enough to the university contacted the sculptor to declare - contacted the sculptor to declare that essentially the statue needed to be removed and after that they set a deadline for the removal and the deadline passed and it was not clear when this that she would be removed but in the morning construction workers started covering up the statue and the popular barriers surrounding statue which is on the university campus and then and the early hours of the morning construction workers came in the statue is removed and it was put
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into a container and driving away. the breaking news that the former police officer kim potter has been found guilty of two charges of manslaughter for rfa killing the black motorist daunte wright in minneapolis. she said she mistook her handgun for a taser during a routine traffic stop. it is here what happened in court. taste routine traffic stop. it is here what happened in court. we the cherry on the — what happened in court. we the cherry on the charge _ what happened in court. we the cherry on the charge of - what happened in court. we the - cherry on the charge of manslaughter in the first degree while committing a misdemeanor on or about april 11, 2021 and the state of minnesota find the defendant guilty. and the verdict was agreed to at the hour of 11:40am and signed by thejury person on 122321. the verdict on count two is we the jury on the charge of manslaughter in the second
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degree culpable negligence on or about april 11, 2021... thea;r degree culpable negligence on or about april 11, 2021. . ._ about april 11, 2021. .. they are exoecting _ about april 11, 2021. .. they are exoecting more _ about april 11, 2021. .. they are expecting more on _ about april 11, 2021. .. they are expecting more on this - about april 11, 2021. .. they are expecting more on this in - about april 11, 2021. .. they are expecting more on this in the l about april 11, 2021. .. they are i expecting more on this in the next half an hour. they will be a lot of crowd around so that rules out a white christmas for most of us. there is a possibility across the pen names and through the high ground in scotland that we could wake up to a light dusting of snow over the next couple of days but for most of us the talking points will be how mild it is across england and wales and temperatures in the double figures. it's not the warmest of it up figures. it's not the warmest of it up dismissed period and these are the christmas day records across the country that he sets over the years so we have to be close orjust above 15 degrees to break that and it will not happen. for the mild weather it's responsible for the leather
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funds moving steadily in the southwestern flow continues to drag them out air across the country but it is struggling to displace the cold air across the far north of scotland. it means tonight as the rain pushes and we could see snow for a time and the mist and fog will be a problem as well and it will be slow to lift first thing but it will be a mild start to our christmas eve across england and wales. early morning mist and fog lifting across england and wales and early morning crowd and drizzling rain slowly easing in scotland across aberdeen to look some sunshine into the afternoon. later in the day we lessee wet and windy weather arriving and we keep the cold air in the north further south expands on the north further south expands on the mild side and temperatures in the mild side and temperatures in the double figures across the country. so as a move out of christmas eve to its christmas day the weather fronts making christmas eve to its christmas day the weatherfronts making progress across northern england into the
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scottish borders still bumping into the cold air sitting anchored to the northeast of scotland and we could have a few flurries of rain, sleet and snow on high ground to start off on christmas day and quickly with a lot of crowd for most of us on christmas day with the exception of scotland and wet and windy weather pushing him tonight in ireland, wales and southwest england by the end of the afternoon. the dividing temperatures double digits down to the south cooler in the north. still rain around on boxing day but mild for most. take care.
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hello, i'm kasia madera. this is outside source. kimberley potter, a former police officer who killed a black man in a routine traffic stop, has been found guilty of manslaughter at her trial in minneapolis. kimberley potter mistook her handgun for a taser when she shot daunte wright. more evidence the omicron variant is less severe. people infected are at least 50% less to end up in hospital, according to preliminary research in the uk. it's very early days. only a small number of individuals, but nonetheless, it is the first signs of cautious optimism.
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and as tensions rise in ukraine president putin demands western countries make a promise not to extend their influence in russia's back yard. translation: you must give us guarantees. i you must do it immediately, now. welcome to the programme. the former police officer kimberley potter has been found guilty of two charges of manslaughter, for fatally killing the black motorist daunte wright in minneapolis. ms potter says she mistook her handgun for a taser during a routine traffic stop. the prosecution argued she'd shown culpable negligence during the incident, which led to several nights of intense protests. this is the moment the judge read out the verdicts reached by the jury. we the jury, on the charge
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of manslaughter in the first degree while committing a misdemeanour, on or about april 11, 2021, in hennepin county, state of minnesota, find the defendant guilty. and the verdict was agreed to at the hour of 11:40am and signed by the jury person on 12.23.21. the verdict on count two is, we, the jury on the charge of manslaughter in the second degree, culpable negligence on or about april 11, 2021, in hennepin county, state of minnesota, find the defendant guilty. during the trial, the jury was shown bodycam footage of the traffic stop, stopping short of the moment when daunte wright died.
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a woman's voice can be heard shouting "taser!" several times. kimberly potter says she thought she was drawing her taser, rather than her 9mm handgun, when she shot daunte wright in the chest. the incident occurred at a very sensitive time, not far from the court where white police officer derek chauvin was standing trial for the murder of a black man george floyd. here is some of kimberly potter's evidence in court. i remember yelling, "taser, taser, taser!" and nothing happened. and then he told me i shot him. here's more from nomia iqbal in washington. it took the jury, which was made up of six men and six women, over 27 hours over the course of four days to reach their verdict. they had asked questions to the judge during that time,
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showing that they were really engaged in this right from the beginning, returning that verdict. she was facing two manslaughter charges for his death, and as we heard there, the defence had said that she was trying to tackle someone who was resisting arrest and she had mistook her taser and her gun, whereas the prosecution said that this was something that was beyond just an honest mistake, that this was something much more serious than that. the jury in the end believed the state's case against her, finding her guilty of both charges. and just on the sentencing, which as you mentioned there we should be getting in the next three weeks, in terms of the guidelines that the state gives on that, it's just for over seven years in prison if you're convicted of first degree manslaughter, which she has been,
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and four years for second degree. the prosecutors have said that they plan to push for a much longer sentence. nomia iqbal they are speaking to me just after we got that verdict. let's crossover live to the court, where we respected to members of daunte wright �*s family, including his mother, to speak —— we are expecting. as nomia was saying, expecting. as nomia was saying, expecting sentencing in three weeks' time. the live shot moving there, but that the image we are getting from the us, from minneapolis, following the finding of kim potter guilty on two counts of manslaughter. we're covering all the latest coronavirus developments here in britain and globally. and we're starting in the uk because the government has released its first official data on the impact of the omicron variant. research suggests someone with omicron is up to to 70% less likely to be admitted to hospital, compared with the delta variant. here's our medical
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editor fergus walsh. a powerful illustration of the dangers facing the unvaccinated and the pressure on nhs staff, filmed in the intensive care unit of royal liverpool hospital, where four out of five covid patients are notjabbed. the intensive care society said at least two thirds of covid patients were unvaccinated in 12 out of 16 critical care units it contacted in england. it's not for us to judge people who haven't been vaccinated, it's for us to look after them as well as we can, but it's very sad when people come into hospital who haven't been vaccinated.
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they're very unwell and they ask to have the vaccine then, which of course they can't, because you have to get better from covid before you can be vaccinated. evidence that omicron causes milder disease has been reinforced by preliminary analysis from the uk health security agency. it suggests that someone infected with omicron is 30 to 45% less likely to attend a&e, compared to a delta patient, and between 50 and 70% less likely to be admitted to hospital. but the extra protection that the boosterjab gives against the infection does wane more rapidly against omicron than delta, being about 15 to 25% lower ten weeks after the boosterjab. it shows that people with omicron have a reduced risk of hospitalisation compared to delta. now, it's very early days, only a small number of individuals,
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about 100 were admitted to hospital with omicron in this period, but nonetheless, it is the first signs of cautious optimism we can have for a while. as daily cases hit another new record, uk researchers estimate that half of people with cold—like symptoms actually have coronavirus. the number of nhs staff off work because of covid has risen by more than 50% in the past week in england to nearly 19,000. it's more than doubled to nearly 4,000. in london, the epicentre of the omicron outbreak, it's more than doubled to nearly 4,000. nhs workforce was already under i pressure before omicron came along, there's increased pressure, - as we're seeing in many workforces at the moment, especially someone needs to isolate| if they have a positive case.
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but some of the recent moves we've had, from moving from ten—day- to seven—day isolation, - if you take tests in the last two days, i think all of this will help. but the ten—day isolation rule is to remain in wales. the welsh government said it wanted to put the brakes on omicron as much as possible. scotland and northern ireland are also keeping ten—day quarantine for now. nightclubs in scotland are to close for at least three weeks from 27th december, after fresh restrictions were put on large events and hospitality venues earlier this week. in wales, nightclubs will close after boxing day, and no more than six people will be allowed to meet in pubs, cinemas and restaurants. no new measures have been announced for england, but the prime minister has said he can't rule out further restrictions after christmas. fergus walsh, bbc news. covid cases in the uk have surged to a new record. almost 120,000 new infections were recorded in the latest 24—hour period.
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france has recorded 91,000 covid cases in the last 24 hours, its worst daily tally so far. here's the french health minister. translation: today's numbers are not good. j in fact, they're the worst figures recorded since the beginning of the pandemic. we're testing ourselves a lot, so we're finding a lot, but very clearly france is experiencing what all countries affected by the omicron variant are experiencing. the number of positive cases here are doubling almost every two days. let's turn to us, where there's a rush to get tests. thousands have been queueing for a limited supply. free tests were given out on wednesday in new orleans, which has a population of 390,000. but only 17,000 tests were available, and the supplies ran out within an hour. that left some people frustrated. a friend texted me ten minutes ago and said they're giving out free covid tests. and i went to a christmas party. i want to make sure my next
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group of people are safe. we were a little disappointed that they were out of tests already, but i understand that omicron has gotten really aggressive, and so a lot of people are looking to get tests. i don't know if we're i going to get any more in. we were lucky enough to get a couple of cases in and we put them _ out and they're gone. president biden was asked about this in an interview with abc news. if you go to the pharmacy, we hear this over and over again, empty shelves, no test kits. is that a failure? no, i don't think it's a failure. i think it's a... you can argue that we should have known a year ago, six months ago, two months ago, a month ago. i've ordered 500 billion of the pills. 500 million pills... excuse me, 500 million test kits, that are going to be available to be sent to every home in america if anybody wants them. but the answer is, yeah, i wish i had thought about ordering 500 million pills two months ago, before covid hit here. let's get more on the covid situation in the us from cbs news
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correspondent courtney kealy. we're seeing long lines everywhere for testing ahead of the holidays and we are also seeing and personally hearing of people we know that have got this new omicron variant. across america, 1 million cases occurred in the last week and 9,000 deaths in the last seven days. it's an unprecedented number. a lot of them are breakthrough cases. but people still will be travelling for the holidays. over 200 million people are vaccinated, 50 million of them have boosters, so people are trying to take necessary precautions, but some people will have to stay home because it's really ripped through the city. just this week, president biden held a live press conference, talking about what he would do, up to the 500 million at home tests that would be delivered on request to people, but that's not until january. so people are really scrambling to get to the testing sites. some of them charge money, some of them are free. it is hard to find.
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but president biden has re—assured people... for instance, 20% of all hospitals are expected to be understaffed. they're deploying about 1000 military and medical personnel to different places. deploying new testing sites, first here in new york city and then to six other states. it's a real rapid uptake, just as the omicron variantjust surged. the federal and local officials have been trying to meet the need not only for testing but also really urging americans. once again, president biden saying it's the unvaccinated, people refusing to get vaccinations, that are really at the most risk for hospitalisations and deaths. the situation across the united states. stay with us on outside source. still to come: president putin demands "security guarantees" from the west, as he refuses to back down over ukraine. ghislaine maxwell will spend
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christmas day, her 60th birthday, behind bars, after thejury in her sex crimes trial suspended deliberations on wednesday without reaching a verdict. here's barbara plett usher. thejury the jury deliberated for two full days, but it was not able to reach a verdict for christmas, and the court has not recessed for the holiday weekend. thejurors has not recessed for the holiday weekend. the jurors are considering six counts against ghislaine maxwell of grooming and transporting girls for sex, of grooming and transporting girls forsex, indicates of grooming and transporting girls for sex, indicates his nearly focused on the accusations of four women who say that she facilitated or participated injeffrey epstein's abuse of her. the jurors have several times as the judge to send them try and skip scive testimony or to clarify certain issues. they will come back on monday to continue deliberating about whether to convict ghislaine maxwell of all, some or none of the charges. in the meantime, miss maxwell will be spending christmas at the federal detention centre in brooklyn where she has been for more than a year,
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with this decision still hanging over her. welcome back. this is outside source live from the bbc. our main story: kimberley potter, a former police officer who shot a black man, daunte wright, having mistaken her handgun for a taser, has been found guilty of manslaughter at her trial in minneapolis. vladimir putin has rejected accusations that russia is preparing to invade ukraine, after amassing thousands of troops on the border between the two countries. during his annual press conference, the russian president said he wants to avoid conflict, but again insisted that the west must give russia guarantees that nato won't expand to the east. our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg reports. it's the most wonderful time of the year, if you happen to like long news conferences. vladimir putin's end—of—year press briefing is always a marathon affair.
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forfour hours, the kremlin leaderfielded questions, and he used the event to vent his resentment at how nato enlarged after the fall of the soviet union. translation: "we won't move one inch towards the east," _ they told us in the 1990s, and what happened? they deceived us. they brazenly tricked us. there were five waves of nato expansion, and now missile systems are appearing in romania and poland. is this russia's response? a build—up of russian troops near ukraine's border. the kremlin denies it plans to invade, but this is pressure, and on the west, too, as moscow demands an end to nato enlargement and nato military activity in eastern europe, what it calls security guarantees.
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translation: you must give us guarantees. i you must do it immediately, now. we won't be palmed off with decades of idle chatter about the need of security for all while the other side carries out its own plans. vladimir putin spoke for a long time, but gave little away about his intentions regarding ukraine, about whether, as the west fears, he's planning a large—scale military operation there. but what we do know now is that next month, us and russian officials will sit down to discuss the security guarantees that moscow is demanding, so there's still hope for a diplomatic resolution. vladimir putin has done 17 of these press conferences now as president. you need plenty of stamina to do this and to listen to it, and since all main tv channels in russia show it live, it's wall—to—wall putin, a reminder, as if russians didn't know it, who's in charge here. steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow.
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for more on this story, i've been speaking to olga ivshina from bbc russian. we need to remember that, first of all, this conference is mainly aimed at an internal audience. and putin, in a way, the trick he does, he creates these fearful dragons, and then with a glory he defends those dragons and, here we go, his political rating either stays the same or even grows. so, that's why, once again, he's talking about russia is only responding to provocations from the west. the other thing is the russian economy is struggling, russian standards of living are dramatically declining, and people need an answer. putin is saying that the economy is doing better, russia is rising up from the knees, but their life is definitely
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not getting better. and again he has an answer, it's all due to the west. of course, there was also a message, an external one, to the international audience. basically, he wants to show that he's ready for the negotiations next month and he has very strong position and a few very good points for a trade—off. so, what is his strong position, then? because he's continuously... today, he spoke about ukraine being historically a part of russia. we know that russia viewed ukraine as being little russia, part of russia. he cannot accept the sovereignty of ukraine. yes, mr putin is demanding from the west guarantees, some guarantees. what he is not explaining, why the independence of sovereign ukraine is a threat to russia and why the west should defend russia from that threat. the thing is, we don't know what's going on in his mind, but ukraine is only one point,
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you know, in that grand game which is happening in the mind of mr putin. so this is just one of the figures on the chessboard which he would love to move and exchange, for example, to relieve that pressure in exchange for something else. that's always his strategy, and in a way, he always achieved some gains with that. us presidentjoe biden has signed into a law a bill that requires all companies to prove that goods imported from china's xinjiang region were not produced with forced labour. the bill, which passed congress last week, also includes sanctions against individuals alleged to be responsible. china has been accused of human rights abuses in xinjiang. the region is home to many of country's muslim uyghur population and there have been allegations of forced labour and possibly genocide. last year, the bbc published an investigation based on new research showing china
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was forcing hundreds of thousands of minorities, including uyghurs, into manual labour. many big us companies such as coca—cola, nike and apple will be affected by the law — and they've criticised it. samira hussein is in new york. you know, to be fair, the white house actually was not in support of this new law that was being worked out by congress. but eventually, and pretty much late in the game, we heard from the white house that they were in fact going to support this rule. and it was something that congress had really put together, it was something they had pushed through, got it passed through the house and senate with only one congressional leader actually not voting in favour for it. and what it really signifies is just the kind of pressure that the united states wants to put onto china. and the best way to do that in their minds, of course, is to do so using some of these financial pressures. so, by making sure that
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multinational corporations, american multinational corporations, corporations around the world are prevented from using any forced labour from that particular region, the united states is able to exert some power over china and its treatment of the uighur peoples. let's go to hong kong now and straight to these pictures. they show construction workers removing the pillar of shame statue from the university of hong kong on wednesday night. this statue commemorates the 1989 tiananmen square massacre and had been standing on campus for 24 years. here it is before it was removed. it's eight metres high and depicts 50 tom and twisted bodies that represent the pro—democracy protesters killed by the chinese government. it was one of the few remaining public memorials in hong kong and was at the forefront of annual vigils. the university had demanded its removal in october
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following china's crackdown on dissent in the territory. let's hear from a student from the university. i don't think people expect this thing would happen in the university, so—called, with the most freedom of expression or freedom of speech. they try to become the first one to remove every history or parts of history inside campus. the statue was created by the danish artistjens galschiot. he's been speaking to us. this is really, really a sad story, and it's a story about democracy in hong kong. they have destroyed the democracy in hong kong, really. they've destroyed the freedoms, and it's not allowed for a university to talk about what happened in the chinese story. it's not allowed to talk about what happened in tiananmen, the crackdown in �*89. so maybe it's not really a university any more. this is more a place where china tells their own version of the story
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and it's completely the opposite of what hong kong wants. hong kong is a place for freedom of expression, and hong kong is a place like the western world, like new york and london. so, this is the image of hong kong and they're destroying hong kong totally. here's a reminder of what happened in 1989. during the �*80s, the ruling communist party began to allow some private companies and foreign investment to boost the economy and raise living standards. this raised hopes for greater political openness. and by spring 1989, large crowds of protesters began gathering in tiananman square asking for greater political freedom. in the last two weeks of may, martial law was declared in beijing. by earlyjune, troops began to move towards tiananmen square, opening fire, crushing and arresting protesters to regain control of the area. no—one knows how many people were killed, estimates range
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from several hundred to 10,000. the events remain a highly sensitive topic in china. posts relating to the massacres are regularly removed from the internet. there is little awareness about what happened in the younger generation. the bbc�*s danny vincent is in hong kong. the university contacted the sculptor to declare that essentially this statue, following legal advice, needed to be removed. after that, they set a deadline for the removal. the deadline passed, and it wasn't clear when the statue would be removed, but in the early hours of the morning, construction workers started covering up the statue. they put up yellow barriers surrounding the statue, and then in the early hours of the morning construction workers came, which is on the university campus of hong kong, and then in the early hours of the morning,
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construction workers came, the statue was removed. it was put into a container and then driven away. denny vincent. what's more, as ever, reporting on our website —— lots more. hello there. you'll have to rely on morecambe and wise, i'm afraid, to bring the sunshine this christmas period. there's going to be a lot of cloud around, so that rules out a white christmas for most of us. however, there is a possibility across the pennines and through the higher ground of scotland, we could wake up to a light dusting of snow over the next couple of days. but for most of us, the talking point will be how mild it is, particularly across england and wales — temperatures into double figures. it's not the warmest we've seen over the christmas period. these are the christmas day records across the country over the years, so we have to be close orjust above 15 degrees to break that, and that's not going to happen. but the mild weather is responsible by these weather fronts that continue to move their way steadily northwards. that south—westerly flow continues to drive that
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mild air across the country, but it really is struggling to displace that cold air across the far north of scotland. that means tonight, as the rain pushes into the cold air, we could see some snow for a time. mist and fog will be a problem across england and wales as well. that'll be slow to lift first thing, but it will be a mild start to our christmas eve, particularly across england and wales. so, early morning mist and fog lifting to low cloud across england and wales. early morning cloud and drizzly rain slowly easing in scotland. hopefully across aberdeenshire, we'll get some sunshine into the afternoon. but later on into the day across southwest england, wales and into northern ireland, we'll see some wet and windy weather arriving. so, we keep that colder air up into the north. furthersouth, however, it stays on the mild side — temperatures widely into double figures across the country. so, that's christmas eve. as we move out of christmas eve towards christmas day, that weather front still making progress across northern england into the scottish borders. still bumping into that cold air that's sitting anchored to the northeast of scotland.
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so, we could have, again, a few flurries of rain, sleet and snow, the snow obviously on higher ground to start off on christmas day. that eases away quite quickly. a lot of cloud for most of us on christmas day with the exception of northeast scotland, and some increasingly wet and windy weather pushing into northern ireland, wales and southwest england by the end of the afternoon. that divide in the temperatures, double—digit down to the south, cooler up into the north. still some rain around, unfortunately, on boxing day, but mild for most. take care.
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this is bbc world news.
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the headlines. a former police officer who killed a black man in a routine traffic stop has been found guilty of manslaughter at her trial in minneapolis. kimberley potter mistook her handgun for a taser when she shot daunte wright. the latest british government data says far fewer people are ending up in hospital with the omicron variant. people infected are 50 to 70% less likely to need hospital care, compared to previous variants. the research also shows that protection from catching covid starts to wane 10 weeks after a booster. scientists warn that record numbers of infections could still lead to hospitals being overwhelmed. president putin has again insisted that the west must give russia guarantees that nato won't expand eastwards to ukraine. in his end—of—year press conference he also said he'd initiated high—level talks with the us.
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that's

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