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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 25, 2021 4:00pm-4:21pm GMT

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. queen elizabeth speaks about her personal grief over the death of her husband, prince philip, in her christmas day message, saying there was "one familiar laugh missing", amid the continuing impact of the coronavirus pandemic. that mischievous inquiring twinkle was as bright at the end as when i first set eyes on him. but life, of course, consists of final partings, as well as first meetings. and as much as i and my family miss him, i know he would want us to enjoy christmas. in his christmas message, pope francis highlighted the tragedies in yemen and syria which he said are being passed over in silence.
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and lift off. the world's most powerful telescope has blasted into space, soon to offer unprecedented images of the universe. christmas day boosterjabs in england — thousands of people are expected to be vaccinated today, as the race to fight the surging omricon variant continues. and tributes are paid to the former england and yorkshire captain ray illingworth who has died at the age of 89. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the queen has spoken movingly in her christmas day message about her grief at the death of her husband, prince philip, who died in april.
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the monarch poignantly reflected on a year of personal grief saying there was "one familiar laugh missing" amid the continuing impact of the coronavirus pandemic. earlier, i spoke to our royal correspondent nicholas witchell who told me this was a very intimate broadcast from her majesty. that is how it was described to us by buckingham palace, that it would be particularly personal. and actually, i think it is really quite touching. it is really quite a departure from the normal christmas broadcast, which is normally a reflection on the year. but this was very personal. and i think one god and impression of the keen sense of loss that she clearly feels for the man who was her husband for 73 years. let's have a listen to how the broadcast open. christmas can be hard for those who have lost _ christmas can be hard for those who have lost loved ones. this year especially _ have lost loved ones. this year especially i understand why. but for me, especially i understand why. but for me. in_ especially i understand why. but for me. in the — especially i understand why. but for me, in the months since the death of
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my beloved _ me, in the months since the death of my beloved philip, i have drawn great _ my beloved philip, i have drawn great comfort from the warmth and affection _ great comfort from the warmth and affection of the many tributes to his life _ affection of the many tributes to his life and work from around the country. — his life and work from around the country, the commonwealth, and the world _ country, the commonwealth, and the world his _ country, the commonwealth, and the world. his sense of service, intellectual curiosity and capacity to squeeze fun out of any situation, were _ to squeeze fun out of any situation, were all— to squeeze fun out of any situation, were all irrepressible. that mischievous enquiring twinkle was as bright _ mischievous enquiring twinkle was as bright at _ mischievous enquiring twinkle was as bright at the end is when i first set eyes — bright at the end is when i first set eyes on him. but life, of course, _ set eyes on him. but life, of course, consists of final partings, as well— course, consists of final partings, as well as — course, consists of final partings, as well as first meetings. and as much _ as well as first meetings. and as much as— as well as first meetings. and as much as i— as well as first meetings. and as much as i and my family miss him, i know— much as i and my family miss him, i know he— much as i and my family miss him, i know he would want us to enjoy christmas _ christmas. a- christmas. a subdued year for her family christmas. — a subdued year for her family as much as many others in this country and around the world, but a year coming up that has a lot to look forward to, both for the queen and her admirers? that forward to, both for the queen and her admirers?— her admirers? that is absolutely riuht. her admirers? that is absolutely right- there _ her admirers? that is absolutely right. there is _ her admirers? that is absolutely right. there is little, _ her admirers? that is absolutely right. there is little, in - her admirers? that is absolutely right. there is little, in passing, | right. there is little, in passing, in the broadcast about covid. just a
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passing reference to the fact that covid has once again disrupted christmas plans, and it has disrupted her own. she was planning to go to sandringham, which he stated windsor instead and she was joined there today by six members of the royalfamily, the prince of wales and the duchess of cornwall, and others. but then, yes, indeed, looking ahead to next year, which is a significant one for her, for the monarchy, because it will be the platinum jubilee to 70 years since she acceded to the throne in february 1952, and also the commonwealth games, which are happening here in the united kingdom, in birmingham. next summer, we look forward to the commonwealth games. the balaton is currehtly_ commonwealth games. the balaton is currently travelling the length and breadth _ currently travelling the length and breadth of the commonwealth. it is heading _ breadth of the commonwealth. it is heading towards birmingham. —— bat on. heading towards birmingham. —— bat m a _ heading towards birmingham. —— bat m a beacon — heading towards birmingham. —— bat on. a beacon of hope on itsjourney. it on. a beacon of hope on itsjourney. it will— on. a beacon of hope on itsjourney. it will be _ on. a beacon of hope on itsjourney. it will be a _ on. a beacon of hope on itsjourney. it will be a chance to set about the achievements of athletes and the
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coming _ achievements of athletes and the coming together of like—minded nations — coming together of like—minded nations. and februaryjust six weeks from how— nations. and februaryjust six weeks from now we'll see the start of my platinum _ from now we'll see the start of my platinum jubilee year. which i hope will be _ platinum jubilee year. which i hope will be an— platinum jubilee year. which i hope will be an opportunity for people everywhere to enjoy a sense of togetherness, a chance to give thanks — togetherness, a chance to give thanks for— togetherness, a chance to give thanks for the enormous changes of the last— thanks for the enormous changes of the last 70 — thanks for the enormous changes of the last 70 years, social, scientific— the last 70 years, social, scientific and cultural, and also, to look— scientific and cultural, and also, to look ahead with confidence. it is to look ahead with confidence. it is only— to look ahead with confidence. it is only a _ to look ahead with confidence. it is only a couple of months since he had to withdraw from some important events, not least remembrance sunday, which he would never normally miss. what can we say about her health?— about her health? well, i wish i could say more. _ about her health? well, i wish i could say more. i _ about her health? well, i wish i could say more. i wish - about her health? well, i wish i could say more. i wish i - about her health? well, i wish i could say more. i wish i knew. about her health? well, i wish i - could say more. i wish i knew more. buckingham palace downplays any question about health as much as possible. it's a sensitive issue. it is nine weeks now since she cancelled a trip to northern
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ireland. we have seen very little of her in those nine weeks. there have been some video audiences, conferences, but this, really, the christmas broadcast, is the first time we have a chance to see her sort of face—to—face that sense. and i think that the planning for the platinumjubilee is preceding, but i think that there is this unknown element, because clearly, all of her officials will now put her well—being, her health and well—being, her health and well—being, is the absolute priority. but we are told by buckingham palace that they are still proceeding with plans for the platinum jubilee. but she will be 96 in april of next year. so that, of course, is very much colouring all their thinking. nicholas witchell. in the last few minutes we have had a statement from thames valley police because of an intruder at windsor castle during the course of the morning. we are told that thames valley and
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metropolitan police were in charge of royal protection. no suggestion it is a terrorist incident, but it does involve the met. a19—year—old man from southampton was arrested. he remains in custody. thames valley police investigation is ongoing following the incident. they are working with colleagues from the med. it says, the man arrested on suspicion of breach or trespass of a protected site, and possession of an offensive weapon. he remains in custody. we will come of course, bring us more of that story should be gutted in the next hour. —— should we get it.
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pope francis has called for more dialogue and warned against a tendency to withdraw during the coronavirus pandemic. here's the pope addressing a crowd at saint peter's sqaure during his christmas day speech. translation: sisters and brothers, what would our world be _ like without the patient dialogue of the many generous persons who keep families and communities together. in this time of pandemic, we have come to realise this even more. 0ur capacity for social relationships is sorely tried. there is a growing tendency to withdraw, to do it all by ourselves, to stop making an effort to encounter others and do things together. 0n the international level too, there is the risk of avoiding dialogue, the risk that this complex crisis will lead to taking short cuts, rather than setting out on the longer path of dialogue. yet only those paths can lead to the resolution of conflicts and to lasting benefits for all.
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the archbishop of canterbury has used his christmas sermon to preach a message of support to volunteers helping refugees. the most revjustin welby was speaking at canterbury catherdral this morning. the christmas story shows us how we must treat those who are unlike us, who have far less than us, who have lived with the devastating limits of war and national tragedy. there have been the volunteers who have been on my mind, welcoming and caring for refugees arriving on the beaches so close to this cathedral, and they do one thing, save life at sea. it is not politics, it is simply humanity.
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a christmas service has been held in a renovated church in indian—administered kashmir for the first time in thirty years. the mayor of the city of srinagar and other officials greeted those who visited st luke's church, one of the oldest in kashmir. the 125—year—old place of worship was shut down three decades ago when the separatist violence began in the muslim—majority region. iam sure i am sure there will be some mark of respect, tribute perhaps, the start of the ashes test in australia later today. the former england and yorkshire cricket captain ray illingworth has died. he was 89 and had been suffering from cancer. 0ur sport correspondent, joe wilson, looks back on his life. raymond illingworth, batsman, bowler, leader, a cricketer for all seasons.
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he began his career in the 1950s. it must be out. he finally stopped playing in the 1980s. just think, when he became england captain in 1969, they wondered then if he was too old. some people said this is too old to start being captain of england? yes, well obviously it's not a ten year policy or anything like that, but i think i am still as on the ball as i have ever been. i don't think it makes any difference. in sydney in 1971, during a fractious ashes test, he led his players off the field when beer cans were thrown from the stands. yes, he is out. the end of the match. his team—mates carried him off when england won the match and of ray illingworth's cricket life. english cricket appointed a new man today — ray illingworth becomes chairman of selectors. in his time as chief
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administrator of english cricket as selector and coach, he didn't secure the results or the dressing room harmony he once sought as a captain. i have fined michael on two counts. first, for using dirt. secondly, for giving incomplete evidence to the match referee. at his adopted county, leicestershire, and his native yorkshire, he was a master technician. the australians regarded his england as the mentally toughest opponents they faced. there is no higher compliment for a man who spanned the decades of post—war cricket. ray illingworth, whose death has been announced today at the age of 89. one of the greatest scientific missions of modern times has taken a giant leap forward in the past few hours with the launch of the james webb space telescope. the ten—billion—dollar project has taken 30 years to reach this moment. the telescope was launched from kourou in french guiana. it's the most powerful ever built
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and the developers hope it will reveal stars and galaxies from the birth of the universe as well as distant planets which could provide evidence of life beyond earth. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. and we have engine start. and lift—off. the start of a blockbuster astronomy mission. james webb begins a voyage back to the birth of the universe. inside this rocket is the biggest telescope ever sent into space. punching a hole through the clouds. 20 seconds into the flight... this is the james webb space telescope. it's a successor to hubble, but 100 times more powerful. after three decades in the making, and a cost of $10 billion, it's finally on its way. we've never attempted anything like that in space before. we're going to be entering a whole new regime of astrophysics. a new frontier. and that is what gets so many of us excited about james webb space telescope.
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this space telescope is a feat of engineering. at its heart is a 6.5 metre—wide mirror, made up of 18 hexagonal segments, each coated in a layer of gold. its size means it can detect the incredibly faint light coming from the most distant stars. it also has a huge sun shield, about the size of a tennis court. it's made up of five layers, each as thin as a human hair, and this protects the telescope from the heat and light of the sun. sitting a million miles away from the earth, the telescope will give us our deepest ever view of the cosmos. from seeing the birth of the very first stars and galaxies, to revealing new planets in far—flung solar systems. what excites me is making discoveries, things we haven't thought about. and there's a whole history of astronomy that shows
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how, when we've looked at the new universe in a new way, we discover things we hadn't thought about. and there's something really exciting about doing that. to get into space, the telescope is so big, it's been folded up to fit inside the rocket. the most challenging part is getting it to unfurl. it's been practised here on earth, and that's hard enough. there are 300 points where it could go wrong, but if anything fails in space, the telescope is too far away to be fixed. this is the most ambitious space telescope ever built. now its mission has finally begun and our view of the universe is about to be transformed. rebecca morelle, bbc news. and here in the uk, the charity campaigners, ladbaby, have claimed the christmas number one spot for a record—breaking fourth year in a row. sausage rolls for everyone, the duo's collaboration with ed sheeran and sir eltonjohn, hit the top spot on friday. ladbaby have now surpassed the beatles and the spice girls as the act with the most consecutive
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christmas number ones. coming up next, pasties at christmas. that is next year. it is just it isjust a it is just a suggestion. in the queen's christmas day broadcast, a short while ago, she has spoken for the first time in some detail about the loss of her husband, prince philip, who died in april. the monarch poignantly reflected on a year of personal grief saying there was "one familiar laugh missing" amid the continuing impact of the coronavirus pandemic. she remarked how his "mischievous, enquiring twinkle" was as bright at the end as when she first set eyes on him, as she empathised with families who had lost loved ones this year. here is the queen's full christmas message. band plays the national anthem.
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the queen: he is someone who doesn't take easily to compliments. but he has, quite simply, been my strength and stay all these years. and i, and his whole family, and this, and many other countries, owe him a debt greater
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than he would ever claim or we shall ever know. although it's a time of great happiness and good cheerfor many, christmas can be hard for those who have lost loved ones. this year, especially, i understand why. but, for me, in the months since the death of my beloved philip, i have drawn great comfort from the warmth and affection of the many tributes to his life and work from around the country, the commonwealth and the world. his sense of service, intellectual curiosity, and capacity to squeeze fun out of any situation were all irrepressible. that mischievous, enquiring twinkle was as bright at the end as when i first set eyes on him.
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but life, of course, consists of final partings as well as first meetings, and as much as i and my family miss him, i know he would want us to enjoy christmas. we felt his presence as we, like millions around the world, readied ourselves for christmas. while covid again means we can't celebrate quite as we may have wished, we can still enjoy the many happy traditions, be it the singing of carols, as long as the tune is well known, decorating the tree, giving and receiving presents, or watching a favourite film, where we already know the ending. it's no surprise that families so often treasure their christmas routines. we see our own children and their families embrace the roles, traditions and values that mean so much to us, as these are passed from one generation to the next, sometimes being updated
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for changing times. i see it in my own family, and it is a source of great happiness. prince philip was always mindful of this sense of passing the baton — that's why he created the duke of edinburgh's award, which offers young people throughout the commonwealth and beyond the chance of exploration and adventure. it remains an astonishing success, grounded in his faith in the future. he was also an early champion of taking seriously our stewardship of the environment, and i am proud beyond words that his pioneering work has been taken on and magnified by our eldest son charles and his elder son william, admirably supported by camilla and catherine, most recently at the cop climate change summit in glasgow.
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next summer, we look forward to the commonwealth games.

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