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tv   Witness History  BBC News  December 26, 2021 12:30am-1:01am GMT

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with more than 120,000 new infections. european countries reported record numbers of cases with the increase in spain introducing mandatory face coverings outdoors. but omicron appears to resulted in less serious illnesses than delta. millions are the rolled travel disruption of her christmas as the search in the varied cases see 2000 flights cancelled due to staff shortages. united airlines says it is contacted impacted passengers before they arrived in the airport. china and the us are the worst affected. just celebrations have taken place, including an annual procession led by the head of the roman catholic church in the region.
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the former england test cricket captain, ray illingworth, has died. he was 89, and had been undergoing treatment for oesophageal cancer. he had a fifteen year test career, playing 61 times for england. joe wilson looks back at his career raymond illingworth. beautifully hooked. batsman, bowler, leader, a cricketer for all seasons. he began his career in the 1950s. it must be out. he finally stopped playing in the 1980s. just think, when he became england captain in 1969, they wondered then if he was too old. some people would say this is too old to start being captain of england? yes, well obviously it's not a ten—year policy or anything like that, but i think i am still as good a bowler as i have ever been. i don't think it makes any difference.
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in sydney in 1971, during a fractious ashes test, he led his players off the field when beer cans were thrown from the stands. yes, he is out! the end of the match. his team—mates carried illingworth off when england won the match and the series. this must surely be the greatest moment of ray illingworth's cricketing life. english cricket appointed a new man today — ray illingworth becomes chairman of selectors. his time as chief administrator of english cricket wasn't as successful. as selector and coach, he didn't secure the results nor the dressing room harmony he once sought as a captain. i have fined michael on two accounts. first, for using dirt. secondly, for giving incomplete evidence to the match referee. but at his adopted county, leicestershire, and his native yorkshire, illingworth was a master tactician. the australians regarded his england as the mentally toughest opponents they'd faced. there is no higher compliment for a man who spanned the decades of post—war
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cricket. the former england cricket captain, ray illingworth, who's died, at the age of 89. now on bbc news. witness history introduces us to some of the team's favourite films from the past 12 months. hello and welcome to witness history with me. here at the bbc in london. with more remarkable moments from the past as told by the people who were there. and in this episode, we present five of our most memorable recent eyewitness stories. coming up, remembering the founder of north korea. also, the forensic pioneer unearthing war crimes. why us police bombed
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philadelphia and afghanistan first man in space. we start with the story of a true trailblazer who made history in 1960. he became the modern world first female head of government when she was elected prime minister of sri lanka as it was known. her daughter spoke to witness history. first woman prime _ spoke to witness history. first woman prime minister. - spoke to witness history. f "sit woman prime minister. would this make your influence less or more strong? considerably more strong- _ or more strong? considerably more strong. do _ or more strong? considerably more strong. do you - or more strong? considerably more strong. do you think- more strong. do you think the 'll more strong. do you think they'll be _ more strong. do you think they'll be more _ more strong. do you think they'll be more capable i more strong. do you think. they'll be more capable than they'll be more capable than the problems the men are? that remains to _ the problems the men are? that remains to be _ the problems the men are? that remains to be seen. _ the problems the men are? that remains to be seen. my mother was incredible. she showed her reticence. — was incredible. she showed her reticence, she came forward and
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on every— reticence, she came forward and on every political platform, she — on every political platform, she spoke. my father was prime minister— she spoke. my father was prime minister first from 1956 to 59 of sri — minister first from 1956 to 59 of sri lanka. sadly, his enemies— of sri lanka. sadly, his enemies assassinated him. my mother— enemies assassinated him. my mother had no intention of going — mother had no intention of going into politics. her three children_ going into politics. her three children were fatherless and she wanted to devote all her time — she wanted to devote all her time to— she wanted to devote all her time to bringing them up. but there — time to bringing them up. but there was_ time to bringing them up. but there was such a pressure from there was such a pressure from the party— there was such a pressure from the party and the people in generat— the party and the people in general that finally she agreed because — general that finally she agreed because she was convinced that it was_ because she was convinced that it was her— because she was convinced that it was her duty we won the election— it was her duty we won the election in 1960, but right wing — election in 1960, but right wing forces started saying the nastiest — wing forces started saying the nastiest possible things running down women. they said
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don't _ running down women. they said don't worry— running down women. they said don't worry about it. , she carried _ don't worry about it. , she carried on _ don't worry about it. , she carried on. as for us, we three felt, _ carried on. as for us, we three felt, my— carried on. as for us, we three felt, my god, we lost our father— felt, my god, we lost our father to _ felt, my god, we lost our father to politics. now, are we going — father to politics. now, are we going to — father to politics. now, are we going to lose her mother as well? — going to lose her mother as well? but she never forgot that she was— well? but she never forgot that she was a — well? but she never forgot that she was a mother. she took on the mantle _ she was a mother. she took on the mantle of the role its first— the mantle of the role its first woman prime minister very comfortably. i was quite amazed at how _ comfortably. i was quite amazed at how she became passionately of the _ at how she became passionately of the international scene. she played — of the international scene. she played a — of the international scene. she played a very important role there — played a very important role there. . played a very important role there. , ., ., , there. the first woman premier sirimavo bandaranaike. - there. the first woman premier sirimavo bandaranaike. i - sirimavo bandaranaike. noticed in no time at sirimavo bandaranaike.“ noticed in no time at all, sirimavo bandaranaike._ noticed in no time at all, the way— noticed in no time at all, the way she _ noticed in no time at all, the way she was carrying herself with — way she was carrying herself with the _ way she was carrying herself with the great sense of authority, walking in the cabinet _
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authority, walking in the cabinet meetings, she had files clutched — cabinet meetings, she had files clutched like that in her left arm — clutched like that in her left arm and _ clutched like that in her left arm and walked with her head hetd _ arm and walked with her head held high. she came across in a very— held high. she came across in a very strong _ held high. she came across in a very strong way when she was negotiating one—to—one with leaders _ negotiating one—to—one with leaders of other countries. i have — leaders of other countries. i have never, ever her losing her tempen — have never, ever her losing her temper. she would get angry but in a very— temper. she would get angry but in a very calm, stern manner. she _ in a very calm, stern manner. she would _ in a very calm, stern manner. she would say what she had to say which _ she would say what she had to say which was far more effective. she was very proud of her— effective. she was very proud of her second daughter, my mother— of her second daughter, my mother could see that she was a born_ mother could see that she was a born leader. mother could see that she was a born leader-— born leader. taking the oath of office and _ born leader. taking the oath of office and all— born leader. taking the oath of office and all three _ born leader. taking the oath of office and all three of - born leader. taking the oath of office and all three of the - office and all three of the countries _ office and all three of the countries main _ office and all three of the l countries main languages. office and all three of the - countries main languages. she was overjoyed _ countries main languages. was overjoyed when my sister became — was overjoyed when my sister became the president of sri lanka _ became the president of sri lanka. she saw the legacy that her husband left behind which
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she took— her husband left behind which she took on from there. the mantle _ she took on from there. the mantle. the first woman prime minister— mantle. the first woman prime minister has died at the age of 84. minister has died at the age of 84 but— minister has died at the age of 84. but she has been voting in the general election. the daughter— the general election. the daughter of _ the general election. the daughter of the - the general election. the daughter of the current president _ daughter of the current president.— daughter of the current president. being the first female prime _ president. being the first female prime minister. president. being the first | female prime minister was president. being the first - female prime minister was very important to her. she felt very proud — important to her. she felt very proud that she had done it. do ou proud that she had done it. you hope proud that she had done it. do you hope to see more women and politics? — you hope to see more women and politics? [— you hope to see more women and olitics? . . , you hope to see more women and olitics? . ., , .,, politics? i certainly hope so. her remarkable _ politics? i certainly hope so. i her remarkable achievements. the next story is about another pioneer in a very different field. a forensic anthropologist from argentina who is dedicated her life to searching for the remains of missing victims of war atrocities and state violence. in her search for the truth, she remains in more than 30
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countries and among them, el salvador. the scene of a brutal civil war in the 1980s. taste salvador. the scene of a brutal civil war in the 1980s.- civil war in the 1980s. we end u . civil war in the 1980s. we end no exhuming _ civil war in the 1980s. we end up exhuming the _ civil war in the 1980s. we end up exhuming the remains - civil war in the 1980s. we end up exhuming the remains of l up exhuming the remains of close to 140 kids that were all in this very small one room house. we were exhuming all these little dresses and whatever they have in their pockets. those kinds of details are actually the ones that kind of, devastate you. they are very hard. yes. i started doing the forensic work on human rights cases in 1984 when democracy returned argentina after a quite brutal military government. as a student, we werejust finishing very government. as a student, we were just finishing very close to the area. it wasn't
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something that we were thinking of, let's form an international organisation that will do this globally. it was more like, if we want to be consistent with what we think and what we believed, we thought we could not say no. in december 1981, the army entered to the area as well as another 500s that were nearby, separated children, women and men, executed them, burn their houses and everything. removing any possibility of civilians support. at the time or we arrive, you could still see human bones in different parts of the houses.— of the houses. this indicates where we — of the houses. this indicates where we found _ of the houses. this indicates where we found all- of the houses. this indicates where we found all of- of the houses. this indicates where we found all of the . of the houses. this indicates i where we found all of the spent
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cartridges. where we found all of the spent cartridges— cartridges. this wall here was where the _ cartridges. this wall here was where the victims _ cartridges. this wall here was where the victims are - cartridges. this wall here wasl where the victims are probably tined _ where the victims are probably lined up — where the victims are probably lined up before being executed. we were — lined up before being executed. we were just amazed about what we were finding. we have never worked on a case of that scale at that time. i see the work that we do in different parts of the world as part of a reparation process. 0r reparation process. or something horrible happened, we cannot fixed what happens, but we can provide some solace by providing information and returning the remains of people to the land and we really so important that that is. these are crimes that are often political crimes and part of a
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political crimes and part of a political situation. and so, you learn to wait and push as much as you can so that the evidence can be heard. but, it is a work that requires a lot of patience. 0ften, is a work that requires a lot of patience. often, we felt very strong feelings of frustration. this process is never—ending and so, we never feel completed. complete closure. rarely.— feel completed. complete closure. rarely. the forensic anthropologist. _ closure. rarely. the forensic anthropologist. now, - closure. rarely. the forensic anthropologist. now, to - closure. rarely. the forensic anthropologist. now, to a i closure. rarely. the forensic. anthropologist. now, to a very different kind of historical mystery. the same family that have ruled north korea for over seven decades. the original korean leader, how exactly did he get thejob? korean leader, how exactly did he get the job? 101—year—old professor who came from the same village as he was starting out on his rise to power. fight!
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out on his rise to power. and north korea. _ out on his rise to power. and north korea, he _ out on his rise to power. and north korea, he is— out on his rise to power. and north korea, he is praised as the greatest leader of all time _ the greatest leader of all time. kim il—sung is at the heart — time. kim il—sung is at the heart of— time. kim il—sung is at the heart of the kim dynasty. the origin— heart of the kim dynasty. the origin of— heart of the kim dynasty. the origin of north korea begins with— origin of north korea begins with kim il—sung. 0ver70 origin of north korea begins with kim il—sung. over 70 years ago. _ with kim il—sung. over 70 years ago. when — with kim il—sung. over 70 years ago. when i _ with kim il—sung. over 70 years ago, when i first met kim tt-sung. _ ago, when i first met kim tt-sung. i_ ago, when i first met kim il—sung, i was 25 years old. back— il—sung, i was 25 years old. back then. _ il—sung, i was 25 years old. back then, we knew him by his real name _ back then, we knew him by his real name-— real name. after 40 years of japanese _ real name. after 40 years of japanese domination, i real name. after 40 years of japanese domination, they l real name. after 40 years of i japanese domination, they make the start— japanese domination, they make the start back— japanese domination, they make the start back on _ japanese domination, they make the start back on the _ japanese domination, they make the start back on the road - japanese domination, they make the start back on the road back. the start back on the road back to national— the start back on the road back to national independence. i we we re we were both from the same area and i_ we were both from the same area and i had — we were both from the same area and i had gone to the same primary— and i had gone to the same primary school. my school
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seniors _ primary school. my school seniors said that she was always— seniors said that she was always the football team captain. they also said kim was a hossy— captain. they also said kim was a bossy child who ordered the other— a bossy child who ordered the other kids around. kim asked of village elders to celebrate his homecoming after the war~ — celebrate his homecoming after the war. 0ver breakfast, we asked — the war. 0ver breakfast, we asked now that korea free from japan. _ asked now that korea free from japan, what the future hold? just — japan, what the future hold? just like _ japan, what the future hold? just like a schoolboy reporting to a teacher, he said first, japanese _ to a teacher, he said first, japanese collaborators much st be purged. —— must be purged.
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all land — be purged. —— must be purged. all land should be nationalised. lastly, all businesses will become state owned — businesses will become state owned. during the occupation, korean— owned. during the occupation, korean guerrillas fought the japanese. a fighter called kim ll-sung — japanese. a fighter called kim il—sung led many battles. about 20 days — il—sung led many battles. about 20 days after that breakfast meeting, a welcoming ceremony for the _ meeting, a welcoming ceremony for the famous fighter was held _ for the famous fighter was held. those who went said instead _ held. those who went said instead of seeing kim il—sung, it was— instead of seeing kim il—sung, it was our— instead of seeing kim il—sung, it was our old friend from the village — it was our old friend from the village. they went in for a closer look and it was him. some _ closer look and it was him. some ordinary citizens were also — some ordinary citizens were also suspicious. they expected kim il—sung to be in his 50s
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and— kim il—sung to be in his 50s and experienced military veteran. this man was in his 30s — veteran. this man was in his 30s some _ veteran. this man was in his 30s. some people were asking if it had _ 30s. some people were asking if it had all— 30s. some people were asking if it had all been staged? that is when — it had all been staged? that is when i — it had all been staged? that is when i realised perhaps kim il-suhg _ when i realised perhaps kim il—sung had been chosen by the communist while in exile to lead — communist while in exile to lead and _ communist while in exile to lead and take on the name of kim _ lead and take on the name of kim il—sung. his breakfast talk soon _ kim il—sung. his breakfast talk soon became a reality. this was a time _ soon became a reality. this was a time of— soon became a reality. this was a time of chaos. the communist party— a time of chaos. the communist party flourished. anti—communist were pushed out. by anti—communist were pushed out. by the _ anti—communist were pushed out. by the spring of 1947, i feared i could — by the spring of 1947, i feared i could go— by the spring of 1947, i feared i could go to jail to if i stayed _ i could go to jail to if i stayed any longer. that was 101-year-old _ stayed any longer. that was 101-year-old professor. i stayed any longer. that wasj 101-year-old professor. you stayed any longer. that was i 101-year-old professor. you can 101—year—old professor. you can watch witness history every
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month on the bbc news channel or you can catch up on all our films with more than a thousand radio programmes and our online archives which is set for bbc witness history. our next eyewitness story takes us to the 1980s and hugely controversial operation by us law enforcement. in may 1985, police in philadelphia dropped a bomb on a residential street to end the standoff with the radical black activists. 11 people died, five for children. the former philadelphia reporter remembers that tragic day. the siege had been under way for 36 hours— way for 36 hours when the olice, way for 36 hours when the police, where _ way for 36 hours when the police, where put - way for 36 hours when the i police, where put sharpshooters in a nearby rooftops decided to bring an air power. the bomb was dropped with the aim of blowing a hole through the roof. it's a slow—motion sequence shows, there was a devastating miscalculation. watching that fire burned the
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way you — watching that fire burned the way you did in knowing that there — way you did in knowing that there were people in that house and children in that house, it was — and children in that house, it wasiust_ and children in that house, it wasjust an and children in that house, it was just an extraordinary sense of rage — was just an extraordinary sense of rage. you wanted to do something, but there was of the achoo— something, but there was of the achoo could do. what happened on may— achoo could do. what happened on may 13, 1985 is the most horrific— on may 13, 1985 is the most horrific incident that i ever covered _ horrific incident that i ever covered as a news reporter. in the nearly 40 years that i have — in the nearly 40 years that i have covered this, still to this— have covered this, still to this day. _ have covered this, still to this day, i am not entirely sure — this day, i am not entirely sure of— this day, i am not entirely sure of what they are, they have — sure of what they are, they have fashioned themselves as black— have fashioned themselves as black revolutionaries who adapted environmentalism and the many times their lifestyles were _ the many times their lifestyles were not— the many times their lifestyles were not in conformance with life in — were not in conformance with life in an _ were not in conformance with life in an urban area. and as result— life in an urban area. and as result of— life in an urban area. and as result of that, there are many clashes — result of that, there are many clashes with police. in the
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early— clashes with police. in the early 80s, it was an organisation that relocated to the avenue and s the years progressed, they began to fortify— progressed, they began to fortify the house. they built a bunker— fortify the house. they built a bunker on _ fortify the house. they built a bunker on the roof, they also had _ bunker on the roof, they also had a — bunker on the roof, they also had a public address system on their— had a public address system on their roof— had a public address system on their roof and they would harangue the neighbours sometimes 24 hours a day. so the shots would've been coming _ so the shots would've been coming from the second floor of the first— coming from the second floor of the first floor. the police were _ the first floor. the police were in _ the first floor. the police were in their houses on the outside _ were in their houses on the outside of the street here and so, outside of the street here and so. they— outside of the street here and so, they were shooting in. so it was— so, they were shooting in. so it was from _ so, they were shooting in. so it was from here, here, gunfire coming — it was from here, here, gunfire coming from here to. while. i
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saw— coming from here to. while. i saw the — coming from here to. while. i saw the helicopter hover over the area _ saw the helicopter hover over the area and then there was this— the area and then there was this horrific explosion. the ground _ this horrific explosion. the ground literally shook my knees buckled — ground literally shook my knees buckled. and as the fire started _ buckled. and as the fire started raging with more intensity, you could see the flames— intensity, you could see the flames literallyjump across flames literally jump across the flames literallyjump across the street to the south side and — the street to the south side and within about 90 minutes, the whole block was on fire. it was _ the whole block was on fire. it was surreal. 11 people in that house — was surreal. 11 people in that house perished. six adults and five children. . did house perished. six adults and five children. ._ five children. . did you hear the big bomb? _ five children. . did you hear the big bomb? it _ five children. . did you hear the big bomb? it shook- five children. . did you hear the big bomb? it shook the| the big bomb? it shook the whole house _ the big bomb? it shook the whole house up. _ the big bomb? it shook the whole house up. and i the big bomb? it shook the whole house up. and whatl whole house up. and what happened _ whole house up. and what happened then? _ whole house up. and what| happened then? everybody whole house up. and what - happened then? everybodyjumped happened then? everybody 'umped down and went i happened then? everybody 'umped down and went downstairs i
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happened then? everybodyjumped down and went downstairs in i happened then? everybodyjumped down and went downstairs in the i down and went downstairs in the garage. this incident took place during the administration of a black mayor~ — the administration of a black mayor~ it— the administration of a black mayor. it wasjust the administration of a black mayor. it was just unfathomable to people — mayor. it was just unfathomable to people and that created a distrust— to people and that created a distrust and a dissatisfaction that— distrust and a dissatisfaction that persists in many ways to this day _ that persists in many ways to this da . . ., ., ., this day. washington and philadelphia. _ this day. washington and philadelphia. and - this day. washington and philadelphia. and finally, this day. washington and i philadelphia. and finally, an uplifting story in every sense from afghanistan. back in 1988, abdul became the first afghan to go to space. he spent nine days of the russian crew on the space station. it was a symbolic moment of the soviet war in afghanistan but as you will cure, the mission almost went tragically wrong. ——
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—— hear. the soviet space rocket was successfully launched from central asia heading for the space station. for the first time, nap
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it was on a mission commander and his afghan colleagues separated for the flight home that the problems began. 90 minutes and to the return flight, a computer malfunction. within the next three hours, two cosmonauts were trying to fire manually, rockets that might bring them back to earth,
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if they fail, there could be marooned in space. the two cosmonauts have returned to earth safely after spending a day stranded in space with their oxygen running out. thea;r their oxygen running out. they made light _ their oxygen running out. they made light of— their oxygen running out. they made light of their _ their oxygen running out. tie: made light of their troubles. the first man from afghanistan to go to space. here at the bbc in london. we'll be back next time with more first—hand accounts of amazing moments from the past. but from now, for the rest of the witness
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history team, goodbye. hello, there, and a very merry christmas to you. we have seen a band of rain and hill snow working its way northwards across the country to end christmas day and into the early hours of boxing day. most of the rain and hill snow will become confined to the north of the country, certainly across scotland through the day, and then we will see something a bit brighter with some showers following in across the south. this weather front has continued to journey northwards. as it bumped into the cold air which has been sitting across the north and east of the country, that is where we had the rain turn to snow initially, across the hills of north wales, north midlands and also northern ireland,
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but very much so across the pennines and in towards central and southern scotland, some drifting with strong wind as we head through the course of boxing day morning. into the afternoon, the rain and hill snow becomes confined to the hills of scotland. something a bit drier in the south, a legacy of cloud, mind you. some brightness for northern ireland, wales and the south—west. winds light here but still strong and gusty further north, close to the weather front. again, another cold day across northern areas, particularly with any lying snow over the hills. again something much milder in the south and south—west. as we move out of boxing day, that weather front to the north begins to fizzle out, taking the rain and hill snow when it. elsewhere, lots of dry weather, lighter winds, clear spells, a recipe for mist and fog.
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furthersouth, into the south—west, a new weather front working its way in. milder, wetter and windy weather arriving here. a cold night to come across the north. here it is, the new area of low pressure, a weather front swiping the south—west and the south of the country as we move through the day. most of the impact will be felt across france but we will still have enough wind and rain for it to be noticeable. initially, south wales and south—west england, pushing into the midlands and across to the south—east through the day. turning mild and windy with it. further north, not a bad day, particularly across scotland and northern england. it will be chilly but bright with plenty of sunshine. temperatures are struggling to get much above six or seven. again, double figures across the south. the mild air really wins out as we move through the new week and in the run—up to new year. it could turn very mild for a time with winds coming up from the south or south—west. but low pressure will always be nearby and in fact, it will be quite wet and windy at times. it could become balmy for a while across southern areas, even into the first part of january.
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this is bbc news. i'm simon pusey. our top stories: save the children condemns the military in myanmar, for the deaths of 38 people found in burnt—out vehicles in kayah state. queen elizabeth speaks about her memories of prince philip in herfirst christmas day message since his death. that mischievous enquiring twinkle was as bright at the end as it was when i first set eyes on him. the pope uses his christmas message to highlight the tragedies in yemen and syria, which he says are being passed over in silence. ..and lift off. the world's most powerful telescope is launched into space — to offer unprecedented images of the universe. and after three months of spewing lava and ash,
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the volcanic eruption on la palma, finally comes

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