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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 26, 2021 9:00pm-9:30pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. tributes pour in for archbishop desmond tutu, nobel laureate and veteran of south africa's struggle against apartheid, who has died at the age of 90. at a time when many people are celebrating with family and friends, we have lost one of the most illustrious, courageous and beloved amongst us. the bodies of 16 iraqi kurds who drowned when their inflatable boat sank last month in the channel while trying to reach the uk have been returned to northern iraq. new coronavirus restrictions come into force in scotland, wales and northern ireland, to try to limit the spread of the omicron variant.
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hello and welcome, if you're watching in the uk or around the world. tributes have been paid from around the world to archbishop desmond tutu, one of the leading figures in the fight against white minority rule in south africa, who has died aged 90. desmond tutu's tireless campaigning against apartheid was rewarded with the nobel peace prize. south africa's president, cyril ramaphosa, described him as a "patriot without equal". former us president barack obama said he had been a "mentor, friend and moral compass." president biden said he was "heartbroken". nomsa maseko reports from soweto.
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paying their last respects, people from all walks of life dropped off flowers here at desmond tutu's soweto home, demonstrating what the 90—year—old stood for. he was the voice of reason, the face of reconciliation and south africa's moral compass. it's a dark day to us, south africans, because he is he in many ways embodied the essence of our humanity. he he in many ways embodied the essence of our humanity-— of our humanity. he to us is south african because _ of our humanity. he to us is south african because he _ of our humanity. he to us is south african because he is _ of our humanity. he to us is south african because he is the - of our humanity. he to us is south african because he is the light - of our humanity. he to us is south african because he is the light and the icon_ african because he is the light and the icon of— african because he is the light and the icon of this country. he used to be a father to us. his wife used to be a mother to us.
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it was desmond tutu, known affectionately as the arch, coined the phrase rainbow nation to describe south africa's ethnic diversity, often preaching peace and unity in the face of adversity. he was one of the greatest people i've ever met. he and nelson mandela of the two leaders who ended apartheid, but he was a teacher, he was a moral leader, he was a campaigner. several memorial services are expected to be held in honour of desmond tutu in the next few days. for people here in soweto, they remember the arch as a unifying figure who played a prominent role in south africa becoming a democracy. flowers were also laid in cape town, where he died at his home, surrounded by family and friends. she was with him this morning when arch said goodbye to us, and she was lying next to him in bed, and she was still touching
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him, you know, my baby. a seven—day sendoff is being planned, including lying in state and a mass to be held by the anglican church. us presidentjoe biden and first ladyjill biden said they were "heartbroken" to discover archbishop tutu had died. in a statement, they said... let's speak to the reverend michael battle, director of the desmond tutu center and author of desmond tutu: a spiritual biography of south africa's confessor. he was also ordained by mr tutu.
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thank you forjoining us this evening. i would like first off to get your thoughts on the sad news today. get your thoughts on the sad news toda . ~ , ., ., ., today. well, you deal with death, ou think today. well, you deal with death, you think you _ today. well, you deal with death, you think you can _ today. well, you deal with death, you think you can handle - today. well, you deal with death, you think you can handle it - today. well, you deal with death, you think you can handle it until l today. well, you deal with death, | you think you can handle it until it comes. i am just also, like the clips that you put in, trying to navigate and negotiate the death of someone i consider a saint. can you tell us, someone i consider a saint. can you tell us. take — someone i consider a saint. can you tell us, take us _ someone i consider a saint. can you tell us, take us back— someone i consider a saint. can you tell us, take us back to _ someone i consider a saint. can you tell us, take us back to how- someone i consider a saint. can you tell us, take us back to how it - someone i consider a saint. can you tell us, take us back to how it is - tell us, take us back to how it is you came to know each other and what sort of man he was away from the church? i sort of man he was away from the church? ~ ., �* , sort of man he was away from the church? ~ . �* , ., church? i think that's the great e--ihan church? i think that's the great epiphany i _ church? i think that's the great epiphany i had. _ church? i think that's the great epiphany i had, when - church? i think that's the great epiphany i had, when i- church? i think that's the great epiphany i had, when i was. church? i think that's the great - epiphany i had, when i was writing my phd dissertation at duke university in the united states, i had the opportunity to try and figure out who to write about, and i felt like i was inspired to write on the theology of desmond tutu and, as
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providence would have it, he was only about six hours away on sabbatical, and so i went to him with my hand in my hand, hoping that he would approve this dissertation and, lo and behold, the next thing i knew, i was able to live with him in cape town, and so i got to see him behind—the—scenes and, trust me when i say this, his integrity behind—the—scenes is just as powerful as his charisma in front of cameras and in front of large global audiences. i cameras and in front of large global audiences. ., , ., ., _ audiences. i was going to say, he was a global— audiences. i was going to say, he was a global celebrity _ audiences. i was going to say, he was a global celebrity at - audiences. i was going to say, he was a global celebrity at the - audiences. i was going to say, he was a global celebrity at the end | audiences. i was going to say, he i was a global celebrity at the end of the day, as well as a man of the church. in your phd research and also spending time with him, what was it about him that surprised you the most? i was it about him that surprised you the most? ~ ., , was it about him that surprised you the most? ~ . , ., , ., . the most? i think, as i was watching and listening — the most? i think, as i was watching and listening to _ the most? i think, as i was watching and listening to the _ the most? i think, as i was watching and listening to the descriptions - and listening to the descriptions you heard of the arch, the affectionate term we call him by,
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most descriptions are like moral leader, moral compass, that sort of thing, but what i learned about him was that he was a deeply spiritual man, similarto the was that he was a deeply spiritual man, similar to the trappist monks. he paid about seven times a day. i think it was from that kind of centredness and contempt of life that he enjoyed the longevity of 90 years. —— well as being able to say the right thing at the right time in pivotal moments of history. find the right thing at the right time in pivotal moments of history. and yet he didn't shy _ pivotal moments of history. and yet he didn't shy away _ pivotal moments of history. and yet he didn't shy away from _ pivotal moments of history. and yet he didn't shy away from politics. - he didn't shy away from politics. how does he reconcile the church and politics? how does he reconcile the church and olitics? , ., , politics? often times, we have this false dichotomy _ politics? often times, we have this false dichotomy between _ politics? often times, we have this false dichotomy between politics i politics? often times, we have this i false dichotomy between politics and spirituality. 0ne false dichotomy between politics and spirituality. one of false dichotomy between politics and spirituality. 0ne ofjesus's famous quotes, which i think also fits with politics, is, wherever there are two or three, politics, is, wherever there are two orthree, i politics, is, wherever there are two or three, i am politics, is, wherever there are two orthree, iam in politics, is, wherever there are two or three, i am in the midst of that. politics is basically the gathering
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of people and the control of affinity groups and self interested groups. i don't think you can really separate them. often times politics and surcharging, politics and religion go hand in hand. i know we need to do that in the face of trying to get people from killing each other, but i think archbishop tutu's price and genius, especially under an apartheid government, which saw itself as religious, he was able to talk through the false dichotomy, especially the dysfunctional kind of politics, as well as dysfunctional religion, and i think that was one of the great legacies he will leave behind. �* , ., ., ., behind. and he is a man who looked after himself. _ behind. and he is a man who looked after himself, wasn't _ behind. and he is a man who looked after himself, wasn't he? _ behind. and he is a man who looked after himself, wasn't he? there - behind. and he is a man who looked after himself, wasn't he? there are| after himself, wasn't he? there are lots of stories about his dedication to his fitness, even a story of him taking on michelle obama at press ups. taking on michelle obama at press u s. ., taking on michelle obama at press u . s, ., ., taking on michelle obama at press u s, ., ., ., , , ., , taking on michelle obama at press
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ups. yeah, i had the opportunity to .0' ups. yeah, i had the opportunity to “on with ups. yeah, i had the opportunity to jog with the — ups. yeah, i had the opportunity to jog with the arch. _ ups. yeah, i had the opportunity to jog with the arch. he _ ups. yeah, i had the opportunity to jog with the arch. he would - ups. yeah, i had the opportunity to jog with the arch. he would go - ups. yeah, i had the opportunity to i jog with the arch. he would go about 5am, and the area where the archbishop lives in cape town is beautiful, so we would jog at 5am, we could hear these animals as they were coming and waking up, and his genius of keeping these schedules was amazing. genius of keeping these schedules was amazing-— genius of keeping these schedules was amazinu. , ., ., ., ., was amazing. there is a lot made of his timekeeping _ was amazing. there is a lot made of his timekeeping as _ was amazing. there is a lot made of his timekeeping as well. _ was amazing. there is a lot made of his timekeeping as well. in - was amazing. there is a lot made of his timekeeping as well. in terms i was amazing. there is a lot made of his timekeeping as well. in terms of his timekeeping as well. in terms of his country, south africa, obviously coined the term rainbow nation. did you ever have conversations with him, did he ever reflect on the state of his country today? yeah, archbishop _ state of his country today? yeah, archbishop tutu _ state of his country today? yeah, archbishop tutu had _ state of his country today? yeah, archbishop tutu had the - state of his country today? yeah, archbishop tutu had the same i archbishop tutu had the same integrity that he had against apartheid. he wasjust integrity that he had against apartheid. he was just as much a person who spoke truth to power on the anc control as he was in the apartheid national party control. i
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think one of the big things he always loved to talk about and have conversations about was the concept of an african way of seeing interdependence and defining humanity is basically a cooperative enterprise. that was one of the big things we had conversations about, but i also think the arch was someone who wanted to embrace difference. he did not see a colour—blind world. he didn't think god saw the world in that kind of way. he was was about embracing that which is different, because difference is what keeps us alive in this biological world. did difference is what keeps us alive in this biological world.— this biological world. did he ever seak this biological world. did he ever s - eak to this biological world. did he ever speak to you _ this biological world. did he ever speak to you about _ this biological world. did he ever speak to you about what - this biological world. did he ever. speak to you about what happened following the trc hearings, because many black south africans, not everyone was happy with the outcome and some of the comments he made?
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perhaps that burden of expectations... i perhaps that burden of expectations. . .- perhaps that burden of expectations... perhaps that burden of exectations. .. ~ ., perhaps that burden of exectations... ~ ., , expectations... i think part of his lea expectations... i think part of his legacy will _ expectations... i think part of his legacy will be _ expectations... i think part of his legacy will be his _ expectations... i think part of his legacy will be his chairing - expectations. .. i think part of his legacy will be his chairing of- expectations... i think part of his legacy will be his chairing of the l legacy will be his chairing of the truth and reconciliation commission. he was deeply aware of the controversies and often times saddened by the ways especially the younger generation saw his leadership. you have to keep in mind the truth and reconciliation commission was basically a commission that provided recommendations and one of the biggest recommendations they provided was reparations, and many of the young people did not understand that, and they saw this as a kind of strawman argument to keep those in power and the status quo. but archbishop tutu was profound in his leadership in trying to help south africa move out of the possibilities of many current states in the world that are stuck in cycles of abuse, and i think the
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great transition that archbishop tutu gave the world is the difference between retributive justice and restorative justice. thank you very much for your time and your thoughts, reflecting on archbishop desmond tutu. thank you for havin: archbishop desmond tutu. thank you for having me- _ new covid restrictions have come into force in scotland, wales and northern ireland, to try to halt the surge in infections of the 0micron variant. curbs have been introduced on the hospitality and leisure industry, including social distancing rules and limits on the size of gatherings. boris johnson hasn't announced any further restrictions in england. tomos morgan has this report. another winter and another set of restrictions. social life will be curtailed yet again in wales, scotland, and northern ireland as the devolved governments have brought restrictions in again as an attempt to slow the spread of the 0micron variant, to ease pressure on the nhs and to give more people the opportunity to be boosted
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at mass vaccination centres. having only reopened less then six months ago, nightclubs will have to turn their lights off once again in both wales and northern ireland from today. some industry bosses feel like they're being made scapegoats in this latest round of rules. we've essentially had four and a half months of trade and we're back here again. and the issue is, we are not clear when this will be lifted. we have not been provided yet with any data on why this sector particularly has been closed and what conditions will need to be met for the sector to be reopened again. restrictions on large events will apply from today in two of the nations. spectators are banned from large events and sporting venues in wales. the premier league brought forward their break in scotland due to measures limiting fan attendance. across all hospitality venues the rule of six is back in wales as is social distancing. smaller tables mean smaller profits
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and two metres means fewer guests. the two—metre rule has a massive effect. new year's eve, we have full capacity but with the two—metre rule we have lost 20% of capacity. we have had to phone a few people and unfortunately cancel people for new year's eve. while restrictions in northern ireland and its scottish pubs and restaurants come into force tomorrow, the stormont executive said they would keep the measures under review. whilst first minister nicola sturgeon told the public theirs would be in place for at least three weeks. meanwhile, her counterpart further south mark drakeford said rules would be reviewed frequently. his next three weekly assessment is due at the end ofjanuary. with large events due to be attended by thousands of people across the uk called off, it looks like this new year's eve will be just as subdued as the last. tomos morgan, bbc news. the bodies of 16 iraqi kurds who drowned when their inflatable boat sank last month in the channel while trying to reach england have been returned to northern iraq. burial services have
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taken place in irbil. the majority of the 29 people who died in the incident were iraqi kurds. an estimated 40,000 people from the region left for europe in the past year alone, using clandestine routes. with me is soran qurbani from bbc�*s persian service. who took part in the bbc investigation into the channel drowning incident and the identification of the bodies. thank you forjoining us. could you let us know what happened today? i was in one of the iraqi kurdish cities today and iraqi kurdistan was morning for 16 bodies today, and these bodies were supposed to arrive two days and about, due to weather conditions, they were delayed, and some relatives were at the airport for the past two days, desperately waiting for the body of their
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beloved one to arrive and be buried. many people are gathering and were drawn to at least seven towns, different towns in iraqi kurdistan. the heartbreaking story, they were all equally important, but the story of the man who lost his entire family, his wife had three young children, it was heartbreaking to see him, that 30 people tried to be next to him and from the footage i have seen, it was very dramatic and eventful in iraqi kurdistan.- eventful in iraqi kurdistan. remind us what happened _ eventful in iraqi kurdistan. remind us what happened last _ eventful in iraqi kurdistan. remind us what happened last month. - us what happened last month. according to our investigation, around 10pm, at least 32 migrants set off from france, close to dunkirk, and after five or six hours, according to the communication they had with their
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families through whatsapp and other messaging apps, they were in the waterfor messaging apps, they were in the water for five hours and after that they had problems with the dinghy. it was losing air and they were desperate to seek help. in our interview, because too much remains about that incident, one of them that we have interviewed said that they were desperate to get help from either side and before they sent their location to french and uk authorities, it was too late and the boat had capsized, and all passengers lost their lives except these two people. so far, 27 bodies had been recovered by french authorities, and at least three others are missing. we authorities, and at least three others are missing.— authorities, and at least three others are missing. we have also been hearing _ others are missing. we have also been hearing from _ others are missing. we have also been hearing from some - others are missing. we have also been hearing from some of - others are missing. we have also been hearing from some of the i been hearing from some of the relatives that have been speaking in iraq. translation: we iraqis and kurds
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have nobody _ translation: we iraqis and kurds have nobody here _ translation: we iraqis and kurds have nobody here who _ translation: we iraqis and kurds have nobody here who is _ translation: we iraqis and kurds have nobody here who is at - translation: we iraqis and kurds have nobody here who is at peace. | have nobody here who is at peace. everyone _ have nobody here who is at peace. everyone on — have nobody here who is at peace. everyone on iraqi soil is not at all at ease _ everyone on iraqi soil is not at all at ease with _ everyone on iraqi soil is not at all at ease with their lives. kurdish government at iraqi government should _ government at iraqi government should stop this exodus. youth should — should stop this exodus. youth should not be pushed to risk their lives _ should not be pushed to risk their lives like — should not be pushed to risk their lives like this. translation: , , ., , translation: yes, this was a family of four, the mother _ translation: yes, this was a family of four, the mother and _ translation: yes, this was a family of four, the mother and her - translation: yes, this was a family of four, the mother and her three - of four, the mother and her three children— of four, the mother and her three children wanted _ of four, the mother and her three children wanted to _ of four, the mother and her three children wanted to migrate - of four, the mother and her three children wanted to migrate for. of four, the mother and her three children wanted to migrate for a i children wanted to migrate for a better— children wanted to migrate for a better life _ children wanted to migrate for a better life. it's— children wanted to migrate for a better life. it's a _ children wanted to migrate for a better life. it's a tragedy- children wanted to migrate for a better life. it's a tragedy they i children wanted to migrate for a . better life. it's a tragedy they met their end — better life. it's a tragedy they met their end at — better life. it's a tragedy they met their end at sea. _ better life. it's a tragedy they met their end at sea.— better life. it's a tragedy they met their end at sea. could you explain? we heard them _ their end at sea. could you explain? we heard them say _ their end at sea. could you explain? we heard them say that _ their end at sea. could you explain? we heard them say that the - their end at sea. could you explain? we heard them say that the youth i we heard them say that the youth should not be put to risk their lives. what are the reasons? because mainly sociopolitical _ lives. what are the reasons? because mainly sociopolitical and _ lives. what are the reasons? because mainly sociopolitical and some - mainly sociopolitical and some financial, because most of these people at other migrants we have interviewed blame the leaders, that they fail them, the promises they made in the past 20 years, and most of these people are young, they don't remember saddam hussein have any memory of the past, and since
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there is a new iraqi government and iraqi kurdistan government, the lack ofjobs, injustice, corruption and political instability, it's those reasons that push these people away. some of them are saying, we are protesting, and it's a way of protesting, and it's a way of protest that we leave this region. we leave iraq because our political leaders can't fulfil our dream. i would say, like in iraq, in central government is the same situation in 2019. at least 300 activists were assassinated and killed. the situation politically is getting worse and worse, according to migrants that leave the region. thank you very much. sport now and, for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's olly foster. hello and thanks forjoining us. we've had a glut of goals in the premier league, nine of them at the etihad,
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where manchester city stretched their lead at the top of the table to six points. they beat leicester city 6—3. pep guardiola's side were 4—0 up at half—time, kevin de bruyne scoring in the fifth minute, and the goals followed from riyad mahrez, ilkay gundogan and raheem sterling. it should have been game over, but leicester threatened an extraordinary comeback after the break, with james maddison, ademola lookman, and kelechi iheanacho scoring in the space of ten minutes, before sterling again and laporte got them over the line. for one and two, my god, the game was over but it definitely was not over but at the end we could win the game and leicester is always difficult for us. always have been. yes, another win. chelsea came from behind to win 3—1 at aston villa. twojorginho penalties either side of a romelu lukaku goal gave them the three points, after a reece james own goal had given villa the lead.
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chelsea are in third level on points with second placed liverpool. very good reaction after the own goal, super complicated for us, but the reaction was very good. second half was very strong. when we went up, we had a bit of trouble in the next ten minutes, but we defended strong through the whole match, did not allow big chances and created many of them, so a deserved win, but it was hard work. elsewhere, fourth—placed arsenal were 5—0 winners over norwich. bukayo saka scored twice. southampton beat west ham 3—2. jan bednarek with the winner. spurs were 3—0 winners over crystal palace and are up to fifth, with lots of games in hand. brighton are beating brentford 2—0 — trossard and maupay with the first—half goals. there's been another covid postponement in the premier league.
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wolves still have a number of positive cases as well as injuries and their game at arsenal on tuesday has been called off. wolves' game against watford today was also postponed. 15 premier league matches have been called off in december so far. australia are tightening their grip on the ashes, two up in the series. they are well on top after the first day of the third test in melbourne, bowling england out for 185. australia captain pat cummins won the toss and chose to field. and having missed the last test, he certainly announced his return, taking the first three wickets — haseeb hameed for a duck, zak crawley and dawid malan. joe root made a half—century but no more before he was caught behind off mitchell starc. the recalled jonny bairstow made 35, but they were well below par. australia will resume on 61—1,121iruns behind. england know that they need a huge
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improvement if they are to get the win that they need. we have to get a bit stronger and tougher with our dismissals. we know that we have spoken about that and that has just been honesty with ourselves. we need to keep doing that, we saw in the second innings at adelaide that we batted for a period of time and put a lot on each of our wickets and when it comes to the second innings that is what we have to do. india are looking to win their first series in south africa. they've made a strong start, closing on 272—3 in pretoria in the first test. kl rahulfinishing the day unbeaten on 122. lungi ngidi took all three wickets for south africa. there are two more tests after this one. that's all the sport for now. a man who was arrested within the grounds of
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windsor castle on christmas day, while in possession of a crossbow, has been detained under the mental health act. the man entered the grounds but was not able to get into any buildings due to security. the 19—year—old man from southampton was arrested on suspicion of breach or trespass of a protected site and possession of an offensive weapon. the queen is in residence at windsor castle. the taliban say women in afghanistan seeking to travel other than short distances should not be offered transport unless accompanied by a close male relative. the taliban also directed all vehicle owners to offer rides only to women wearing islamic face coverings or hijabs. activists say the taliban's interpretation of hijab is unclear and most afghan women already wear headscarves. the islamists have also asked people not to play music in their vehicles. people in more than 100 cities in
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the philippines are without power, following typhoon rai, which ripped through the country ten days ago. disaster officials warn it may take till february to restore all electricity supplies. tens of thousands of homes were damaged and there's still a lack of food and clean water. 378 people are now known to have been killed by the typhoon and about 60 are still missing. the former bbc radio presenter janice long has died following a short illness. she was best known as a presenter on radio 1, radio 2, top of the pops and most recently on bbc radio wales. she died at home on christmas day, surrounded by her family. the bbc�*s director—general said she was a stellar presenter who was loved and respected across the industry. the motown singer wanda young, who sang the 1961 classic please mr postman, has died at the aged of 78.
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#0h # oh yes, wait a # oh yes, waita minute, mr postman... young was the lead singer of the marvelettes for several years in the nineteen sixties, before going on to have a solo career. hello, there has been some christmas snow to bring festive excitement in a few places but for parts of england, wales and northern ireland the christmas weather so far has just been about the heavy, soaking rain. through, bringing snow into the pennines and scottish hills today, turning increasingly light and patchy but yet again today the lion's share of christmas sun has been in northern scotland. in terms of the rain, it has been a very wet christmas so far, in katesbridge in county down. nearly 60 millimetres of rain. northolt in north—west london, half a month's worth of rain in that period, on the roads plenty of standing water and spray around. it's looking somewhat drier this evening and tonight, taking some patchy rain and hill
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snow further north through scotland. as the winds ease there will be plenty of low cloud, mist and fog developing and rain developing in the far south—west later. for many places, temperatures staying above freezing but hints of blue in northern england and scotland, especially where you have snow on the ground there will be a frost. into tomorrow, here comes another spell of rain across south—west england and wales. pushing further north through england but tending to turn lighter as it does so. scotland and northern ireland will stay dry, a few sunny spells around, but a cloudy day in the northern and western isles with outbreaks of rain and showers. breeziest and mildest to the south. as we go on through the evening there will be another spell of heavy downpours running along southernmost counties of england, with those brisk winds. by tuesday, another area of low pressure looks to be racing in from the atlantic bringing some rain to northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england, north wales and the midlands where we will see the heaviest rain. as that clears through the southern flank we will see the strongest winds in parts of wales and southern england, gusting up to 40—50 mph
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or so and we will see the highest temperatures in the south around 12 or 13 degrees. the mild air will become much more widespread from midweek. we see this weather front moving northwards on wednesday, that's going to come with rain, some snow into the highlands but it does open the door to this much milder air heading from a long way to the south and south—west of the uk, lifting temperatures well above average for the time of year. as we see out the year and start a new one, yes, it will be wet and windy at times. but temperatures by day and night well above average.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... tributes pour in for archbisop desmond tutu — nobel laureate and veteran of south africa's struggle against apartheid —
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who has died at the age of 90. ata time at a time when many people are celebrating with family and friends, we have lost one of the most illustrious, courageous and beloved amongst us. the bodies of 16 iraqi kurds who drowned when their inflatable boat sank last month in the channel while trying to reach the uk have been returned to northern iraq. new coronavirus restrictions come into force in scotland, wales and northern ireland — to try to limit the spread of the omicron variant. now on bbc news, it's time for our world — which was filmed in november, in the week before barbados removed the queen as its head of state and became the world's newest republic. british—barbadian daniel henry returned to his ancestral home to find out what islanders make of the move.
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for nearly 400 years, the british royal family has

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