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tv   The Papers  BBC News  December 26, 2021 10:30pm-11:01pm GMT

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he laughed, he cried, and that is what he was, he was always a man of tremendous joy. the one thing that helps desmond tutu stand out and occupy this unique place in south african history is that he was there at every step of the way through this country's tortuous journey from apartheid to democracy and beyond, with that clear, moral, often angry, sometimes laughing voice, a man defined above all by his sense of hope. flags will fly at half—mast across south africa and a week of tributes is being organised to remember archbishop tutu. his funeral will take place on the 1st of january. many south africans have been gathering outside his homes
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in cape town and soweto to lay wreaths and light candles. our correspondent nomsa maseko reports from soweto. paying their last respects, people from all walks of life dropped off flowers here at desmond tutu's soweto home, demonstrating what the 90—year—old stood for. he was the voice of reason, the face of reconciliation and south africa's moral compass. this is a dark day to us south africans because he is the light and the icon of this country. he used to be a father to us, his wife used to be a mother to us. it was desmond tutu, known affectionately as "the arch", who coined the phrase "rainbow nation" to describe south africa's ethnic diversity. more than any other, you know sometimes when you have some problems you just go to him and he willjust give you a prayer
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and you go to the chapel and hear him pray for us every day when we have problems. several memorial services are expected to be held in honour of desmond tutu over the next few days. for people here in soweto they remember the arch as a unifying figure who played a prominent role in south africa becoming a democracy. flowers were laid in cape town too where he died at his home surrounded by family and friends. a seven—day sendoff is being planned, including a lying in state and a mass to be held by the anglican church. nomsa maseko, bbc news, soweto. a man who was arrested within the grounds of windsor castle on christmas day while in possession of a crossbow has been detained under the mental health act. police responded to the security breach at 8:30am yesterday morning while the queen was in residence. the metropolitan police say the 19—year—old man from southampton is currently undergoing a mental health assessment. tighter covid restrictions
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are now in force in wales, scotland and northern ireland, with more changes due to come into force tomorrow. the measures include curbs on the hospitality industry and a reinforcement of social distancing rules. no further restrictions have been announced for england. tomos morgan reports. another festive holiday and another set of restrictions. social life will be curtailed yet again in wales, scotland, and northern ireland as the devolved governments bring back measures in an attempt to slow the spread of the omicron variant. and almost two years into the pandemic, this latest set of rules has been met with a mixed response in cardiff. generally i'm on board with them. i think at the moment they make sense, bearing in mind what we know. people just want to be able to live their lives now. we are going to have to learn to live with covid. it's here to stay. having only reopened a few months ago, nightclubs have had to turn their lights off once again in wales and northern ireland. we've essentially had four and a half months of trade and we're back here again. and the issue is, we are not clear when this will be lifted.
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across hospitality venues the rule of six and social distancing measures are back in force from today in wales. thatjust lessens our capacity, so we are almost half of where we were before, without restrictions. but what it does mean is staffing, if not stays the same, but also increases, because of the table service. spectators will be banned from large events and professional sports in wales, with a limit on attendances in scotland. and when it comes to household mixing, all three have guidance in place, not laws. while restrictions in northern irish and scottish pubs and restaurants come into force tomorrow, the stormont executive has said they will keep the measures under review. whilst first minister nicola sturgeon told the public theirs would be in place for at least three weeks. the welsh government's next three—weekly review into these restrictions is due at the end of january. but first minister mark drakeford has said that they will be looking at these rules frequently, leaving the gates open for a potential easing
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of restrictions sooner rather than later, if the spread of omicron is not as severe as originally thought. tomos morgan, bbc news, cardiff. well, there's been no new government data on coronavirus in the uk over the christmas weekend. but the surge in cases around the world has created travel disruption with a big rise in flights being cancelled or delayed. since friday, more than 7,000 flights have been cancelled according to the flightaware tracking website. flight operators said many pilots and crew had tested positive. chinese and us airlines appear to be the hardest hit, with further delays and cancellations announced for tomorrow. cricket, and england have it all to do when day 2 of the third ashes test gets under way in a little under two hours�* time. another batting collapse saw them bowled out for 185 on boxing day. at the close of play, australia, who lead the series 2—0, were 61—1. joe wilson reports. captaining australia
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will challenge pat cummins, some time, some place, but melbourne, it's a breeze. cummins took three early wickets himself having won the toss himself. still, england's captain looked like he could take on australia on his own. joe root�*s timing and placement were impeccable, until on 50 he got out. the most telling reaction is root�*s, furious with himself, and then he had to watch the rest. ben stokes had tried all sorts of shots. this was the last one he played, into australian hands. now did jos buttler�*s approach match the occasion? straight to the fielder. it all gave the impression that it was all too easy for australia. jonny bairstow made 35 on his return before he was surprised and caught. but 185 all out, no longer really a shock, is it? it's just the familiar pattern. there is feasibly just this coming day for england to act before it's too late. they've at least already got rid of david warner, who was dismissed for 38.
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but every opportunity must now fall england's way, and of course they very rarely do. ashes cricket becomes impossible with a series of false starts. joe wilson, bbc news. the bbc radio presenterjanice long, who was the first woman to have her own daily show on radio i, has died at the age of 66. in a broadcasting career that spanned five decades, she was also the first woman to present top of the pops. 0ur entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba, looks back at her life. it's with a band who have been together for a year, they come from leighton buzzard. it's their first appearance on top of the pops, it's kajagoogoo with too shy. janice long making history. the first regular female host on top of the pops. it's u2 in at number 23 and new year's day. she ended nearly 20 years of men dominating the presenting line—up. i was absolutely thrilled to bits with the fact that i was introducing u2.
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and that doesn't get, you know, your first top of the pops! # all is quiet... show business ran in the family. herfirst tv appearance was alongside her younger brother, keith chegwin, on the children's show multi—coloured swap shop. hello, and welcome to the show. a year later shejoined radio i, the first woman to have a daily show on the pop music station. the stadium was filled with 72,000 people. as well as being a voice recognised by millions on the radio, she was one of the presenters of the live aid charity concert. of which state is edward kennedy a senator? and over the years appeared on a huge range of different tv shows. next week's hit parade with peterjames barnard powell and gary davies. she'll be remembered as a female trailblazer
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and as someone with an infectious passion for music. janice long, who has died at the age of 66 after a short illness. you can see more on all of today's stories on the bbc news channel. that's all from me. goodnight. hello there. it was too mild for snow. a lot of mist and murk and some outbreaks of rain. this cloud on the satellite picture brought some rain in some hell snow in the north during boxing day. marcotte and rain waiting in the wings down to the southwest, but i think the big story for this week will be this surge of very, very mild air wafting
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up surge of very, very mild air wafting up from the south, affecting all parts of the uk as we move towards the end of 2021. it will be turning increasingly mild this week, but with some wind and rain at times. now many of us will start off monday with some cloud, mist and fog, murky conditions again. rain into the southwest of england which will push northwards towards wales, midlands, east anglia, tending to weaken as it goes. elsewhere, some of the mist and fog and crab will tend to lift and break and we will cease and send back data spells of sunshine in northern ireland and scotland, albeit with some showers in the far north. temperatures ranging from 6 degrees in aberdeen to 12 in plymouth through the afternoon. then through monday night, a bit marine potentially down towards the south, another lump of wet weather starting to patients northern ireland, parts of northern england, southern scotland, the winds will start to pick up down towards the south and west as well, very mild in the south. a little bit chilly up towards the north. as we go through
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tuesday, this area of wet weather will spread out of northern ireland into southern scotland, northern england, parts of wales and into the midlands as well. we will see some sunny spells to the far north into the far south, but it would be really quite windy across england and wales. some of these western coasts could see costs of 40—50 mph. quite mild in the south and the 12 degrees, further north, a little bit cooler, but those temperatures is still quite respectable for the time of year. however, even milder weather on the way. as we move it up tuesday and wednesday, we see this next frontal system pushing into the southwest, a band of rain that will drive its way north east rates. some snow for a time over high ground in scotland, but this will mostly be rain because that mild air will be working its way, temperatures down towards the south on wednesday afternoon up to 16—17 celsius. still
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afternoon up to 16—17 celsius. still a little bit chilly for some northern areas, but as we move towards the end of the weekend the end of the year, that mild weather spreads for all parts and will still be some rain at times.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are political commentatorjo phillips and nigel nelson political editor of the people and sunday mirror. may christmas to both of you. a quick look at the front pages with our guests. the daily telegraph front page looks at plans for schools to send whole year groups home amid growing concern of the 0micron variant. the i — says borisjohnson�*s poll lead "collapses", as leave supporters abandon the prime minister following what it calls chaos at number ten. the guardian says there's widespread concern over the state
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of the nhs according to poll. the daily express reports says new year's eve parties will be given a cautious green light by the prime minister. the times says family events are spared from "covid curbs" if any tougher measures are brought in. the daily mail — leads with the online video which has been linked to the crossbow raid at windsor castle. that's a little flavour of what our front pages are saying. let's take an in—depth look and chat. we will start off with the guardian. jo, i wonder if he could kick us off please. a picture there of the archbishop desmond tutu who sadly passed away today aged 90. —— tutu. has photograph is on every single paperas has photograph is on every single paper as far as the ones that i have seen so far. it is quite astonishing that a man who was so small, he was under five foot six, but he was such
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a giant, you know, he's been called the moral conscious of south africa. he's had tributes paid to him from everybody from... the most extraordinary man. and i think in all of the footage that we have seen since this sad news broke this morning, what we see is simply passionate, absolutely dedicated, but that wonderful infectious laugh and that real warmth. their real love of life, love of people, the passion for what's right, and absolute giant for the world. i think that is absolutely right. desmond tutu embodied everything that it _ desmond tutu embodied everything that it means to be a precious dashed — that it means to be a precious dashed christian leader. so many people _ dashed christian leader. so many people have said the great thing about_ people have said the great thing about him was that he always had hope~ _ about him was that he always had hope~ if_ about him was that he always had hope. if you can remember the kind
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of times_ hope. if you can remember the kind of times as — hope. if you can remember the kind of times as south africa began to change. — of times as south africa began to change, desmond tutu was ever present— change, desmond tutu was ever present and working with people like fw dick_ present and working with people like fw dick clark. he was the last white president— fw dick clark. he was the last white president and he could see that change — president and he could see that change was coming. the question was how to _ change was coming. the question was how to make — change was coming. the question was how to make that change work without any bloodshed. it was extraordinary time, _ any bloodshed. it was extraordinary time, roughly the same period that you where — time, roughly the same period that you where seeing doing similar things— you where seeing doing similar things for— you where seeing doing similar things for the soviet union. with all of— things for the soviet union. with all of these people working together, and brought about a bit of south _ together, and brought about a bit of south africa, the sad part was desmond _ south africa, the sad part was desmond tutu was critical of the anc towards _ desmond tutu was critical of the anc towards the end and was a bit disappointed that south africa hadh't — disappointed that south africa hadn't come together in the way he hadn't come together in the way he had always— hadn't come together in the way he had always hoped. you hadn't come together in the way he had always hoped.— hadn't come together in the way he had always hoped. you mean sad that the one thing — had always hoped. you mean sad that the one thing he'd _ had always hoped. you mean sad that the one thing he'd fought _ had always hoped. you mean sad that the one thing he'd fought for - had always hoped. you mean sad that the one thing he'd fought for and - the one thing he'd fought for and dreamt of had perhaps failed or not delivered fully? i dreamt of had perhaps failed or not delivered fully?— delivered fully? i don't think failed, delivered fully? i don't think failed. just _ delivered fully? i don't think failed, just not _
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delivered fully? i don't think failed, just not delivered, i delivered fully? i don't think- failed, just not delivered, because the anc, — failed, just not delivered, because the anc, which he had high hopes and originally— the anc, which he had high hopes and originally towards the end, he began to come _ originally towards the end, he began to come quite critical of it, and began — to come quite critical of it, and began to— to come quite critical of it, and began to fall out with them, but the disappointment side effect was that he had _ disappointment side effect was that he had looked forward to a kind of united _ he had looked forward to a kind of united south africa really coming together, and he didn't feel that it had fulfilled that promise. gk, together, and he didn't feel that it had fulfilled that promise.- had fulfilled that promise. 0k, jo, sta in: had fulfilled that promise. 0k, jo, staying with _ had fulfilled that promise. 0k, jo, staying with the _ had fulfilled that promise. 0k, jo, staying with the front _ had fulfilled that promise. 0k, jo, staying with the front page - had fulfilled that promise. 0k, jo, staying with the front page of - had fulfilled that promise. 0k, jo, staying with the front page of the | staying with the front page of the guardian from the others story we are covering is the paper is certainly coming into poll revealing widespread concern over the state of the nhs. , , ., , ., the nhs. this is appalled at the guardian has _ the nhs. this is appalled at the guardian has done, and - the nhs. this is appalled at the guardian has done, and it's - the nhs. this is appalled at the | guardian has done, and it's quite alarming actually, because says that one in for fear they would not get adequate care going to the nhs. now, this is not in any way... none of this is not in any way... none of this is not in any way... none of this is about the quality of the staff, the people who are working in
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the nhs. it's based on either anecdotal or real evidence that people have experienced since covid. and we know that prior to co—bed, there were staff shortages within there were staff shortages within the nhs and social care, obviously that's been exacerbated over the last two years. so, many people will have had operations delayed, they will have had difficulty seeing their gpa or their primary care providers, so, you know, it doesn't really take us anywhere other than the fact that people are, it's another thing for people to be extremely concerned about, and you know covid hasn't gone away. nigel? the one thing — know covid hasn't gone away. nigel? the one thing i— know covid hasn't gone away. nigel? the one thing i think _ know covid hasn't gone away. nigel? the one thing i think we _ know covid hasn't gone away. nigel? the one thing i think we need - know covid hasn't gone away. nigel? the one thing i think we need to - the one thing i think we need to think— the one thing i think we need to think about with the nhs is actually how it _ think about with the nhs is actually how it goes forward once we've got through— how it goes forward once we've got through co—bed. the response has been _ through co—bed. the response has been absolutely magnificent in the same _ been absolutely magnificent in the same way— been absolutely magnificent in the same way that when you actually get
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treatment, it's usually superb, so asjoe _ treatment, it's usually superb, so asjoe says, it's nothing against the scale — asjoe says, it's nothing against the scale and dedication of the staff — the scale and dedication of the staff the _ the scale and dedication of the staff. the question really is whether— staff. the question really is whether or not a structure that is basically— whether or not a structure that is basically based on the national health — basically based on the national health service created in 1948 still works _ health service created in 1948 still works in— health service created in 1948 still works in the 21st century, can you, for instance. — works in the 21st century, can you, for instance, carry on with free universal— for instance, carry on with free universal health care the way that we have _ universal health care the way that we have always been getting into? it may we have always been getting into? it ntay be _ we have always been getting into? it may be that certain changes will be needed _ may be that certain changes will be needed. obviously all of that is up for consideration after covid, certainty— for consideration after covid, certainly not during it. the front .ae. certainly not during it. the front -ae~ of certainly not during it. the front page of the _ certainly not during it. the front page of the times _ certainly not during it. the front page of the times from - certainly not during it. the front page of the times from our - certainly not during it. the frontj page of the times from our neck strength and the weddings and funerals set to be spared from covid curbs, the paper reports.— curbs, the paper reports. tomorrow boris johnson _ curbs, the paper reports. tomorrow boris johnson will _ curbs, the paper reports. tomorrow boris johnson will be _ curbs, the paper reports. tomorrow boris johnson will be meeting - curbs, the paper reports. tomorrow boris johnson will be meeting with l borisjohnson will be meeting with patrick vallance and chris whitty, that two scientific and medical adviser is to have a look at the data, the latest data on omicron. because, you know, everything hangs
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in the balance as to whether or not they're going to be more curbs are more restrictions. the general sense is that borisjohnson doesn't want restrictions and he's got a lot of very vociferous backbenchers and cabinet members who are furious at the prospect of any further lockdown or restrictions. meanwhile, we see restrictions coming into force in scotland and wales and northern ireland tonight, you know, other countries around europe are thinking about what to do. this story in the times is basically saying if the rules are tightened, i think the general consensus is if the prime minister wants to make further precautionary measure is, it will be very much in the lines of guidance rather than legislation because then it doesn't need parliamentary approval and weddings and funerals, which were so heavily criticised last time around for being included in the very, very strict lockdown which we know that people could not
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attend funerals and weddings, these would be spared, but you know, it then raises the question if you are going to spare weddings and funerals and you are going to spare some things, why are you not cracking down on other things? getting to me you know, again, it's lots of mixed messages. this you know, again, it's lots of mixed messaues. �* , p, you know, again, it's lots of mixed messages— messages. as a return to the front .a i e messages. as a return to the front -ae~ of messages. as a return to the front page of the — messages. as a return to the front page of the express, _ messages. as a return to the front page of the express, saying - messages. as a return to the front page of the express, saying that l page of the express, saying that parties are on, the prime minister is all set to give the green light according to the express. the ex - ress according to the express. the express is _ according to the express. the express is optimistic about what might— express is optimistic about what might happen tomorrow than the other papers _ might happen tomorrow than the other papers seem to be. i think that it is quite _ papers seem to be. i think that it is quite right that it is much more likely— is quite right that it is much more likely we — is quite right that it is much more likely we are going to get advice if we get _ likely we are going to get advice if we get anything at all. of course, even _ we get anything at all. of course, even if— we get anything at all. of course, even if it— we get anything at all. of course, even if it does come tomorrow, boris johnson _ even if it does come tomorrow, boris johnson is _ even if it does come tomorrow, boris johnson is looking at the data tomorrow, there is no cabinet meeting — tomorrow, there is no cabinet meeting planned at the moment, and on the _ meeting planned at the moment, and on the basis _ meeting planned at the moment, and on the basis of that, we may not actually— on the basis of that, we may not actually hear anything until tuesday anyway, _ actually hear anything until tuesday anyway, but if it is advisory, it
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will mean _ anyway, but if it is advisory, it will mean that the way that the express— will mean that the way that the express puts it is go and enjoy your new year's — express puts it is go and enjoy your new year's parties, but do so with caution _ new year's parties, but do so with caution the — new year's parties, but do so with caution. the one point to make obviously— caution. the one point to make obviously is because of boris johnson's advice, an awful lot of christmas — johnson's advice, an awful lot of christmas parties are cancelled, the hospitality— christmas parties are cancelled, the hospitality trade lost £5 billion so far this _ hospitality trade lost £5 billion so far this month, so the advice actually— far this month, so the advice actually seems to keep people away anyway _ actually seems to keep people away an a . , ., , actually seems to keep people away an ,. anyway. daily telegraph, jo, schools lanned to anyway. daily telegraph, jo, schools planned to send _ anyway. daily telegraph, jo, schools planned to send home _ anyway. daily telegraph, jo, schools planned to send home whole - anyway. daily telegraph, jo, schools planned to send home whole year. planned to send home whole year groups. head teachers are warning the prime minister. this groups. head teachers are warning the prime minister.— the prime minister. this again is showin: the prime minister. this again is showing the _ the prime minister. this again is showing the mixed _ the prime minister. this again is showing the mixed reaction, - the prime minister. this again is showing the mixed reaction, the mixed messages. this is head teachers, leaders of the head teachers, leaders of the head teachers group saying that school particularly rural schools and schools in small towns that haven't got a large number of staff are already have plans to send home year groups, this is because of staff shortages. of course, you know, as
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nigeljust said, borisjohnson will be looking at the data tomorrow, but what we haven't gotten and won't have by tomorrow is that fake areas that are directly related to the mixing and mingling over christmas, you know, and we know there is a sort of catch up here in about a week to ten days if somebody is going to end up in hospital. there is an awful lot of data and stuff to sift through which is why we have to be so reliant on modelling, which is why papers like the express don't like because it often paints a worse case scenario, but this is what the head teachers are talking about, and to go back to the other story we were talking aboutjust now but the national health service, whilst we are dealing with the sand where there is an apparent lull, we need to be preparing for it the next thing, notjust going, oh, that's great, it's all well, we need to be working at how we deal with the next wave or the next variant or what else comes out of the closet. irate
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else comes out of the closet. we are auoin to else comes out of the closet. we are going to go. — else comes out of the closet. we are going to go. just _ else comes out of the closet. we are going to go. just very _ else comes out of the closet. we are going to go, just very quickly, - going to go, just very quickly, nigel, your thoughts on this, quickly. i nigel, your thoughts on this, cuickl . p, nigel, your thoughts on this, cuickl . . , , ., ., quickly. i mean, it seems to me that schools are — quickly. i mean, it seems to me that schools are in _ quickly. i mean, it seems to me that schools are in the _ quickly. i mean, it seems to me that schools are in the same _ quickly. i mean, it seems to me that schools are in the same sort - quickly. i mean, it seems to me that schools are in the same sort of - schools are in the same sort of position. — schools are in the same sort of position. if— schools are in the same sort of position, if you like, as hospitals are _ position, if you like, as hospitals are. hospitals are losing 1000 medicat— are. hospitals are losing 1000 medical staff a day to omicron. schoots— medical staff a day to omicron. schools will face the same kind of thing _ schools will face the same kind of thing. what's been happening in schools as they have been epic neglected, the kind of measures that shoutd've _ neglected, the kind of measures that should've been put in place, like proper— should've been put in place, like proper ventilation, should've been put in place, like properventilation, even should've been put in place, like proper ventilation, even portable ventilators, proper masks in common area5, _ ventilators, proper masks in common areas. it— ventilators, proper masks in common areas, it hasn't been done. so all of those — areas, it hasn't been done. so all of those things need looking at, but yes, i_ of those things need looking at, but yes, i can _ of those things need looking at, but yes, i can see that there could be a huge _ yes, i can see that there could be a huge staff— yes, i can see that there could be a huge staff shortage of teachers once schoots _ huge staff shortage of teachers once schoots go _ huge staff shortage of teachers once schools go back. we huge staff shortage of teachers once schools go back-— schools go back. we are going to go to the eye. — schools go back. we are going to go to the eye, and the _ schools go back. we are going to go to the eye, and the peril of- schools go back. we are going to go
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to the eye, and the peril of polls - to the eye, and the peril of polls being reported on the front of that page, leave voters abandon the prime minister in protest at number ten kass, jo. , , ,, , kass, jo. this is sirjohn curtis, the election _ kass, jo. this is sirjohn curtis, the election guru. _ kass, jo. this is sirjohn curtis, the election guru. he _ kass, jo. this is sirjohn curtis, the election guru. he does - kass, jo. this is sirjohn curtis, the election guru. he does this| kass, jo. this is sirjohn curtis, - the election guru. he does this pull of polls every year, he has looked at 12 polls over the last... 12 different companies, and what it shows is that the tory started the year and what it shows is that the tory started the year on 39%, in the wake of the vaccine roll—out, but not the end of the year, that collapsed 237% in november and 33% in december. what is interesting is that since the general election, the conservative party has picked up in a small number is, the proportion of the lever is backing the party has fallen from 74 two years ago for just 53% now. so you can spend the next hour and a half talking about polls and going through and chewing over the bones of it, but i think
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what is interesting is it's very much the collapse of the tories as opposed to the rise of labour, because labour although they are ahead of the tories at the moment, they haven't gone up in leaps and bounds from where they were, you know, at the beginning of the year, and mrjohn curtis says that labour has got to make a significant advance in their own popularity. it's all very well people turning their back on the tories, but they haven't yet decided whether they will vote for a labour or liberal democrats or someone else. nigel, the head of— democrats or someone else. nigel, the head of labour _ democrats or someone else. nigel, the head of labour struggling - democrats or someone else. nigel, the head of labour struggling to - the head of labour struggling to make much of an impression as far as the pole goes. he make much of an impression as far as the pole goes-— the pole goes. he has got to do more in this coming — the pole goes. he has got to do more in this coming year, _ the pole goes. he has got to do more in this coming year, but _ the pole goes. he has got to do more in this coming year, but we _ in this coming year, but we are talking — in this coming year, but we are talking about an election that is possibly— talking about an election that is possibly only two years away now. a lot possibly only two years away now. a tot can _ possibly only two years away now. a lot can change in those two years anyway — lot can change in those two years anyway i— lot can change in those two years anyway. i think that he is now, he's sorted _ anyway. i think that he is now, he's sorted out — anyway. i think that he is now, he's sorted out his power base, he has sorted _ sorted out his power base, he has sorted out — sorted out his power base, he has sorted out the party, the important thing _ sorted out the party, the important thing now— sorted out the party, the important thing now is to capture the voters, and that— thing now is to capture the voters, and that means getting their confidence and then getting their
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trust _ confidence and then getting their trust. ., ., ., ., trust. 0k, we are going to leave it there for now. _ trust. 0k, we are going to leave it there for now. another _ trust. 0k, we are going to leave it there for now. another addition i there for now. another addition coming up at half past 11 p:m.. hopefully looking at a couple of other stories making different pages, but for now, thank you very much. i will see you later. thank you for watching the papers this hour. jo phillips and nigel nelson will be back at half past eleven for another look at the papers asi as i said. more coming up shortly. hello. it was a white christmas for some but a wet christmas for many more. there is more rain in the forecast for the final week of 2021, but i think the biggest story will be about the feel of the weather. it is going to be turning increasingly and eventually exceptionally mild. now, we start monday with a lot of cloud, mist and fog. some rain pushing in across southern england, wales, the midlands, east anglia. further north, some of the cloud, mist and fog will tend to break up to give some sunny spells,
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a few showers in northern scotland, temperatures ranging from 6 degrees in aberdeen to 12 in plymouth and in saint—hellier. now, through monday night, there is the potentialfor more rain to affect the south and another lump of wet weather spreading into towards northern ireland, southern scotland, parts of northern england and north wales by the end of the night. a little bit chilly in the north. very mild down towards the south. and let's look at the forecast for the rest of the week, because those temperatures are set to climb for all of us, maybe up to 16—17 celsius in places from mid—week onwards. but there will be more wind and rain at times.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. tributes pour in for archbishop desmond tutu, nobel laureate and veteran of south africa's struggle against apartheid, who has died at the age of 90. at a time when many people are celebrating with family and friends, we have lost one of the most illustrious, courageous and beloved amongst us. israel approves plans for a huge expansion of settlements in the golan heights, which most of the world doesn't recognise as israeli territory. new coronavirus restrictions come into force in scotland, wales and northern ireland to try to limit the spread of the omicron variant. and omicron causes
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chaos for travellers — 7000 flights cancelled around the world over

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