Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 28, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

1:00 pm
ministers say the evidence doesn't support the need for more covid restrictions in england. as the booster push continues, the hospitality sector calls the decision not to add further measures in england a "lifeline" for pubs, bars and clubs. a new campaign is launched calling on people to stop smoking as new figures show teenagers whose parents smoke are four times more likely start. a special report on the kids in kabul, working to survive, as afghanistan's humanitarian crisis deepens. and england's ashes hopes are over as they are crushed by australia in the third test in melbourne.
1:01 pm
good afternoon. the environment secretary, george eustice, has said the government will keep �*under very close review�* its decision not to bring in further coronavirus restrictions in england. he says the early indications are that the omicron variant is not leading to the same level of hospitalisations as previous waves but ministers will act if there's a large increase in the coming weeks. the hospitality sector say the decision not to add further measures in england is a "lifeline" for pubs, bars and clubs. but there's concern about the impact on hospitals of staff having to self—isolate. our health correspondent sophie hutchinson reports. if exhibition centre in lambeth
1:02 pm
among the bro �*s worst affected by omicron in the uk. —— a vaccination centre. staff here say there is no shortage ofjabs. centre. staff here say there is no shortage of jabs.— shortage of “abs. serious mitigations _ shortage ofjabs. serious mitigations in _ shortage ofjabs. serious mitigations in class. - shortage ofjabs. serious mitigations in class. i - shortage of jabs. serious i mitigations in class. i don't shortage of jabs. serious - mitigations in class. i don't want to get sick, you know, i am 57. i am quite frightened about passing it on to my loved ones. it’s quite frightened about passing it on to my loved ones.— to my loved ones. it's really important — to my loved ones. it's really important because - to my loved ones. it's really important because i - to my loved ones. it's really important because i am - to my loved ones. it's really important because i am a i to my loved ones. it's really - important because i am a recently retired _ important because i am a recently retired senior head of education at the university college, i preach it took my— the university college, i preach it took my staff so i had to jolly well do it as _ took my staff so i had to jolly well do it as well. took my staff so i had to “olly well do it as with do it as well. the same thing. uner do it as well. the same thing. unlike the _ do it as well. the same thing. unlike the rest _ do it as well. the same thing. unlike the rest of— do it as well. the same thing. unlike the rest of the - do it as well. the same thing. unlike the rest of the uk - do it as well. the same thing. | unlike the rest of the uk which do it as well. the same thing. - unlike the rest of the uk which has increased restrictions, the government in england is relying on vaccinations to get the country through the latest wave of covid. fist through the latest wave of covid. git the moment, we don't think the evidence supports any more interventions beyond what we have done but obviously we have to keep it under very close review because if it is the case and we start to see a big increase in hospitalisations then we would need to act further and that's why we have to keep it under close review.
1:03 pm
what is the date of the government is monitoring? in particular it is around the most vulnerable groups, london is the epicentre of the uk omicron outbreak, has seen some rises and infections in older people and hospitalisations but figures for intensive care are still below any worrying threshold.— intensive care are still below any worrying threshold. cases are still risin: , i worrying threshold. cases are still rising. i think _ worrying threshold. cases are still rising, i think suggestions - worrying threshold. cases are still rising, i think suggestions a - worrying threshold. cases are still rising, i think suggestions a few. rising, i think suggestions a few days ago that we might have actually started to peak i think was probably not borne out yesterday but on the other hand, cases are not increasing as rapidly as they were a week or so ago. i think we can be fairly certain they are not doubling every couple of days now. the hospitality sector has described _ couple of days now. the hospitality sector has described the _ couple of days now. the hospitality sector has described the decision i sector has described the decision not to add further measures as a lifeline for pubs, bars and clubs, it also says allowing people to go out on new year's eve signals better times ahead. tt’s out on new year's eve signals better times ahead-— times ahead. it's not 'ust about new year's eve times ahead. it's not 'ust about new years eve for h times ahead. it's not 'ust about new year's eve for us, — times ahead. it's notjust about new year's eve for us, it's _ times ahead. it's notjust about new year's eve for us, it's bigger - times ahead. it's notjust about new year's eve for us, it's bigger than i year's eve for us, it's bigger than that. it's the start of a recovery
1:04 pm
and we believe we have created safe environments for people to come out and socialise, we think it's the best scenario given the fact that if we were close, we would potentially have seen more house parties and more illegal events which would have been counter—productive. but more illegal events which would have been counter-productive.— been counter-productive. but there are concerns _ been counter-productive. but there are concerns about _ been counter-productive. but there are concerns about the _ been counter-productive. but there are concerns about the wider- been counter-productive. but there | are concerns about the wider impact of omicron on the nhs. hospital leaders say while many people are coming into hospital with covid but not because of covid, staff are also getting infected. tt’s not because of covid, staff are also getting infected-— getting infected. it's very clear as soon as you _ getting infected. it's very clear as soon as you get _ getting infected. it's very clear as soon as you get omicron - getting infected. it's very clear as i soon as you get omicron circulating significantly amongst the community of course it will be circulating amongst nhs staff. we are now having to redeploy staff to fill gaps left in critical and essential services ijy in critical and essential services by staff who are of with covid related absences.— related absences. along with vaccinations _ related absences. along with vaccinations the _ related absences. along with vaccinations the government | related absences. along with l vaccinations the government in england is urging people to remain cautious and impossible to celebrate outside on new year's eve. it will assess whether more restrictions are neededin assess whether more restrictions are needed in january. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. our political correspondent, ione wells, is here.
1:05 pm
we're expecting more data from around the uk today but it's clear that england is taking a different approach at this stage to the other nations. that's right. we are seeing the four nations in the uk all really interpreting the data we are seeing interpreting the data we are seeing in different ways. uk ministers have said in england while hospitalisations are rising, they are not yet at a level they think warren introducing any further curbs. scientists have said they are still relatively numbers of vaccinated people needing intensive care, stressing the need for vaccinations but experts have been warning today that the cases alone, evenif warning today that the cases alone, even if they do not translate into hospitalisations, could cause other types of chaos. the chief executive of nhs providers warning it could be those staff shortages in the nhs that start to become the bigger problem rather than the numbers of people needing care. england now on quite a diverging path with the other nations, taking precautions to curb the rising cases even if they
1:06 pm
are not necessarily translating into rising hospitalisations. if this different approach in england pays off, borisjohnson could have that news will particularly by his own mps who will welcome keeping the economy open. if it does not and admission to continue to rise in the new year or staff shortages risk overwhelming the nhs, he could face being accused of putting politics about public health by some of his critics. ione, thank you. energy company bosses have been setting out some proposals to stop household gas and electricity bills rising further, as the price of gas continues to spike. representatives of the energy industry had talks with government ministers yesterday. our business correspondent simon browning has some of the details. simon? we know gas and electricity prices are rising and that will have a big impact on customer bills. that has been caused by the sudden surge in demand for gas right across europe
1:07 pm
as economies have reopened after it locked out but there is a lot of worry about just how locked out but there is a lot of worry aboutjust how high those bills could go, right at the very start of next year. this morning, the ceo of energy uk has made a couple of recommendations to government which she believes could help keep those bills down to stubborn recommendation is that vat could be reduced or cut on consumer bills which would in effect work as a cash saving. the second idea is that the treasury would give the energy industry billions of pounds to cover this very sudden short—term spike in prices. those prices and that loan would be covered by customers on their bills over a much longer period, saving them from a sudden spike in prices on their bills at the start of next year. those suggestions have come that there could be as much is a £20 billion fund needed from the treasury. this morning the government has not commented on the proposals but it has said it is working closely with the energy industry to measure uk industry and uk consumers are protected. simon,
1:08 pm
thank ou. teenagers whose parents smoke are four times more likely to take up smoking, according to a new government campaign. doctors have urged parents and other caregivers to give up. in a new film issued by the nhs, health experts discuss the link between adult smoking and children taking up the habit. tim muffet has the story. our children are watching what we do much more than they're listening to what we say. so if we say to them "don't smoke cigarettes" and we're smoking ourselves, our behaviour is going to have a much greater impact. a new film from the nhs aimed at parents who smoke. and so, why do children seem to take up the behaviour of adults around them? despite a huge drop in smoking over the past 50 years, around one in eight adults in the uk still smoke, according to the office for national statistics. new research shows that teenagers whose parents or caregivers smoke are four times as likely to take it up.
1:09 pm
smoking as a habit is something that can be passed down through families. so the additional motivation to quit for parents will be knowing that if they do that they can substantially reduce the risk of their own children taking up smoking. this campaign is targeting conventional smoking rather than vaping. electronic cigarettes are widely seen as a safer alternative, although most do contain nicotine, which is addictive. the pandemic has also affected smoking habits. there have been higher rates of quitting but also higher rates of relapse, and signs of an increase in smoking among younger people. if you want to quit smoking, for your family or for your health, you are not alone. campaigners point out it's a new year's resolution that will also bring huge benefits to others. tim muffett, bbc news. let's take a look at some of today's other news. the supreme court in russia has banned one of the country's best
1:10 pm
known and oldest human rights organisations, memorial, accusing it of violating a law requiring groups to register as foreign agents. police arrested at least five protesters outside the court where the proceedings took place. china says its new space station has twice narrowly avoided collisions with satellites operated by the american entrepreneur elon musk. the complaints were lodged with the un's space agency — although the incidents behind them have not yet been independently verified. at least 20 people have died in severe flooding in north—eastern brazil. heavy rain in the state of bahia has forced 60,000 people to leave their homes, and caused two dams to give way. the state's governor described it as the worst disaster in its history. as the humanitarian crisis in afghanistan deepens this winter, many families are having to take drastic action just to survive. hundreds of thousands of children already had to work in the country,
1:11 pm
now even more parents are being forced to send their kids out into the streets to earn money. secunder kermani and camera journalist malik mudassir sent this report from kabul. wherever you go in this city, you see children working. wafting incense into cars... ..picking through rubbish. even when billions were pouring into this country, many children had to help provide for theirfamilies. now amidst an economic collapse, the number is growing. child coughs. it is sam, and 13—year—old pervez is getting ready for work.
1:12 pm
he and his young cousins only started polishing shoes in the last few months. his father spends his day waiting for work as a labourer on the corner of the road. in the past, he earned just enough to get by. translation: i come here every day, but don't even earn ten afghani. - i can't even afford a piece of bread for lunch. it is the same for everyone here. translation: i don't feel good that my child is working, - but the situation is bad. we have no choice but to send them to work. pervez and his cousins walk the streets, sticking together in case other boys start fights with them. business is slow.
1:13 pm
with no customers, the boys take a break at a playground in the centre of kabul. they still have big dreams for the future. what do you want to do when you are older? when school starts again, will you go back to school or will you just carry on working? the boys walk past the city's kebab vendors... ..and the displays on kabul�*s flower street, as well as civil servants demanding unpaid salaries, and huge queues outside banks. international funding was cut off
1:14 pm
after the taliban takeover, afghanistan's foreign reserves frozen and sanctions imposed. now the economy is in freefall. have you had lunch today? no. why? so what will you do now? eventually they buy a single piece of bread to share between them. soon after, they find a customer too. translation: even though i had my shoes shined in the morning, - i let them do itjust to help them. have you ever seen it this bad in afghanistan, economically? translation: from morning - to evening, most of those coming to my shop just want to shine shoes orare begging. maybe 150 people like that come here every day.
1:15 pm
the money pervez earns will help feed his family today. but food prices are rising. and the rent is overdue. are you happy you're helping yourfamily? secunder kermani, bbc news, kabul. cricket now and australia have thrashed england to retain the ashes at melbourne. the visitors were all bowled out for only 68 runs injust over 80 minutes — their lowest total in australia since march 190a. joe wilson was watching. 100,000 seats at the melbourne cricket ground. did one person give england half a chance? ben stokes can defy all the odds — sometimes. oh, he's got him, there's the comeback.
1:16 pm
the bowling here was just too good — stokes knew it — gone for ii. england's collective collapse was so painful because it was so predictable. bairstow — lbw — given. a bowler playing in his very first test match, scott boland took over — joe root out for 28. well, that's one to celebrate — and the catcher, david warner, certainly did. england's resistance vanished. never mind making australia bat again — england couldn't even keep going until lunch. boland — six wickets for seven runs. and it was australia's future who wrapped it up — 22—year—old cameron green... oh, there we go! ..dismissing 39—year—old james anderson. 68, all out. i'm absolutely gutted. bitterly disappointed. you turn up today and you walk out to bat with ben stokes and you feel like anything's possible. er...you know, we're bitterly disappointed to find ourselves in this position.
1:17 pm
the whole mystique of the ashes is the concept of the ultimate competition. well, as the two teams shook sanitised hands, the gulf between them had never seemed so wide. joe wilson, bbc news. that's it. we're back with the late news at six o'clock. now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are. goodbye. good afternoon. it's 1.15pm and here's your latest sports news. england captainjoe root has called their ashes defeat "gut wrenching" as they lost the third test in melbourne to australia, who take an unassaialable 3—0 in the five test series. 2—0 down, any hopes of a revival rested withjoe root and ben stokes who resumed this
1:18 pm
morning on 31—4. but another dismal batting collapse saw england bowled out forjust 68, their lowest score in australia in 117 years, their ninth test defeat this year. and questions will now be asked of how england turn their fotunes around in the longer format of the game. we knew that going into today we were more than capable of getting ourselves to a score with the players that were to come in at the crease. it's bitterly disappointing we didn't manage to do that. you've got to make sure that you stay strong, you keep looking to improve all areas of the game, individually and collectively, and you have to have a really strong belief to be able to come back. we need to put some pride back into the badge. everything has gone to plan.
1:19 pm
i haven't felt like one session has really— i haven't felt like one session has really got — i haven't felt like one session has really got away with us. it's just what _ really got away with us. it's just what dreams are made of, the way we've _ what dreams are made of, the way we've played. ithink what dreams are made of, the way we've played. i think outside of the actuai— we've played. i think outside of the actual results, there's so many other— actual results, there's so many other positives as well. contrasting fortunes for both teams, the aussies building a strong test team while england have a lot of work to do to become competitive again. steven finn was part of the last england team to win in australia but said this tour had been very different. there's not much that has gone right, if we are being quite honest. i think the lack of first innings runs has been a big problem for england, i think the lack of preparation time that they had in the build—up to the tour, they had less than a day's practice in the few weeks they had in australia in the build—up to the first test match because of bad weather which i think has a bit of a reason as to why they got into a bad run of form in their back—to—back test matches, by that i mean there's only three or four days in between each game so you just roll from game
1:20 pm
to game and it's easy to take the baggage from all of the bad performances into the next one. a combination of all of those things, i would say. the most disappointing thing over here from australians is they want to see their side challenged, i think, and i don't think at any stage over the three games so far have they really been challenged. england will be looking to salvage some kind of performance from the final two tests to come. there was success for one english player down under, albeit in t20 cricket. sam billings top scored for sydney thunder as they beat big basjh league leaders perth scorchers in canberra. his 67 off 35 balls helped his team to 200—7 off their 20 overs. they won by 3a runs. the busy premier league schedule continues today with four more games. two are off though, because of covid cases. a record 103 players and staff tested positive for covid in the seven days up to and including boxing day. three games kick off
1:21 pm
at three o'clock. bottom side norwich are hoping to end a run of four defeats in a row when they go to crystal palace. and then the battle for fourth place continues. sixth placed west ham are at watford, southampton host fifth placed tottenham who are hugely improved under antonio conte. we know very well that in front we are very good, they are totally involved in offence but above all defence. this is good because we are a team. the rest of the team i think has a great, to appreciate the effort of the strikers without the ball. dominic thiem has pulled out of january's australian open. the 2020 finalist has not played because of a wrist injury sincejune. the issue meant thiem could not defend the us open title he won last year. naomi osaka has landed in melbourne
1:22 pm
to prepare for the defence of her australian open title. the japanese four—time grand slam winner hasn't played since losing in the third round of the us open and taking a break from the sport. the australian open begins in just under three weeks. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. plenty of fallout from that disappointing result for england this morning as they surrendered their hopes in the ashes. the images of people desperately trying to board aircraft to flee kabul earlier this year were some of the most harrowing of 2021. since then, thousands of afghans have settled in countries around the world. our reporterjohn maguire has been to meet one of those families that has started to build a new life here in the uk. the speed and the chaotic fall of kabul, and ultimately afghanistan, shocked those who watched from a safe distance.
1:23 pm
but for those trapped, those who'd worked with the british military, and whose names were on taliban death lists, the only way to survive was to escape. when taliban took the kabul, i was in trouble because of my background. i was working with special forces unit, and i was trying to get out of afghanistan. there was no other choice for me to stay in kabul. and i tried to get out of the kabul. naveed hamidi had fought with elite units for years. he knew he was targeted by the taliban, and that the lives of his wife and five young children, including their new baby, were at risk. many people died and wounded here. he filmed these scenes at kabul airport on his phone. there was about 50,000 people, or more than, no water, no food for the kids,
1:24 pm
for the ladies, their small babies. it was horrible for me. he had served in the same unit asjohnny mercer, a veteran of three tours, and now an mp in plymouth. but it was his military — not government — contacts that managed to get naveed and his family out of harm's way. yet so many others remain. it's a fact that we employed over 4,000 interpreters alone. you know, the mod reckon they got out about 600. we reckon they got out about 120. you know, you are leaving the vast, vast majority of your people behind. and, you know, we can talk — the prime minister said we would strain every sinew for these people. and if you match that with how it actually feels, if you're an afghan, it's pretty shameful stuff, really. i got some emails from my friends. naveed now works for the mp, trying to help others who've been left behind. yes. she's got to use the arap scheme first. there are people, there
1:25 pm
are specialists that are undoubtedly being hunted by the taliban. we've seen them being killed by the taliban. do we need to get everyone out? no. but the trouble is, because our scheme was so poor, we don't even know who they were or where they were. and consequently, we're dealing every day with people who, similarly in naveed's position, or interpreters who interpreted for the british, who we've left behind in this process, and it's pretty hard to take, yeah. life couldn't be more different from the country they fled. at long last, they're safe. no need to look over their shoulder. and free to take part in the full spectrum of british life. margaret hillier. in the run up to christmas, johnny mercer gave out the raffle prizes at a veterans group, who meet up for what they call brew and banter. also there was mark ormrod, the former royal marine who spent much of this year raising hundreds of thousands of pounds for charity. he was severely injured in afghanistan on christmas eve 1a years ago.
1:26 pm
mark describes the role the interpreters played in the war as invaluable, vital. you got to imagine, you know, as a young man, you go into a country, you don't understand the culture, or the way they work, and what's normal, what's not. so in the beginning, especially in such a kinetic and dangerous area, they, for me, were that buffer. they could gauge the feeling on the ground a lot better than we could in the early days, and maybe stop you making bad decisions. you know, we're no longer out in afghanistan to protect them, like we did during that 10, 11, 12—year period. we need to keep these people safe. with the christmas gifts handed out, there's time for a run, a chance to clear the head. naveed realises he's one of the lucky ones. my two oldest kids, they are going to school now. my two youngest kids will go to nursery, and my wife also going to english course
1:27 pm
to start learning english. they're happy, we're happy still in the uk. people forget what it's like to, a, have nothing — like, literally, not even a bank account, right, ora phone line — but b, what afghanistan is truly like. these guys, they don't have electricity in the houses. it is a fundamentally different culture, but actually, a bit of empathy to see what that's like. these guys are going to fly in this country and contribute and be an amazing part of british society. we've just got to get them off the start line. and that's what lots of us are doing. in a statement, the government said... the afghan citizens resettlement scheme, which opens next month, will offer a safe and legal route to the uk for up to 20,000 people. it will prioritise those who've assisted uk efforts in afghanistan. and so far, it says around 1500 people have been helped to enter the uk since the evacuation. along with making a success of his life here, naveed remains determined to help his former colleagues to follow
1:28 pm
in his footsteps to safety. they are in a very bad situation in afghanistan. they are running out of money, because they don't have salary for four months after collapse of government. they are running out of food, out of everything, and they can't go out because of their background. taliban tracking them, because of their background. they realise they face a huge task. the documents required for the government's afghan relocation scheme have, in many cases, been lost or destroyed, to protect those who need them to secure safe passage. but everyone they help is one less person in danger, one more who can be rewarded for their service and their sacrifice. john maguire, bbc news, plymouth. time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. we've got some exceptionally mild air on the way over
1:29 pm
the next couple of days, with temperatures across parts of england set to surge as high as 17 celsius, compared with the december average, which is 8 celsius. the current england december temperature record stands at 17.7, so it is going to be really close to hitting those record levels. today, the best of the bright weather across scotland and northern ireland, still some patches of rain slow to clear away from eastern coastal counties of england, but eventually this evening that rain will clear off, and then we will start to get a band of heavy rain moving into the south—west overnight, and behind that band of rain we will start getting the exceptionally mild air with temperatures 1a degrees in plymouth by the end of the night, frosty fog patches in scotland and contrast. tomorrow, this band of rain will push its way north and east and behind this rain we will see temperatures surging, particularly in england, with highs expected to reach around 16—17.
1:30 pm
now on bbc news, producer felicity baker, who has a stammer, reveals what it is like to live with the condition. 0k. i've worked for bbc news for ten years as a producer, always behind the scenes, finding guests, setting up stories. i wondered if you had someone that might be available for an interview? but recently, during a chance conversation with the presenter sophie raworth, i revealed my secret. i have a stammer. hello. i'm calling from the bbc. i've spent my whole life trying to hide it. now, i'm discovering that i'm not alone, and i'm not the only one who struggles to say my name. and i know you can say your name. will you say it? ican. ijust have to breathe. crowd jeers there's the rugby player
1:31 pm
who says his violence on the pitch was driven by his stammer.

51 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on