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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 28, 2021 7:00pm-7:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the world. i'm jane hill. the headlines — new covid infections in england and wales hit a record daily high as the government defends its decision not to introduce further restrictions in england before january. we want to party all night long! the move is described as a "huge relief" by the owner of this leeds nightclub. we'll be speaking to him this hour. the us halves the covid isolation period for people without symptoms to five days. shouting in russian. protests outside court as the kremlin bans one of russia's oldest and best—known human rights organisations. and unwrapping the secrets
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of an ancient egyptian pharoah — we hear from the researcher who peeled off the bandages using modern technology. the government says it will keep "under very close review" its decision not to bring in further coronavirus restrictions in england as infections rise to a level not seen before in the pandemic. there are restrictions on socialising in the rest of the uk. the early indications are that the omicron variant is not leading to the same level of hospitalisations as previous waves, but ministers say they're watching the data and will act if there's a large increase in the coming weeks. it comes as latest government figures show a record number of covid cases reported in the last
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day — 129,471. but this data does not include figures for scotland and northern ireland due to the christmas holidays. meanwhile in the us, health officials have halved the recommended isolation time for people with asymptomatic covid—19 from ten to five days amid a surge in cases. elsewhere in europe, also amid a record number of covid cases, france has announced that remote working will become compulsory for anyone who can do so and public gatherings will be limited to 2000 people for indoor events. and there have been demonstrations in eastern germany against new coronavirus restrictions. they include a limit on private gatherings to ten vaccinated people and the closure of night clubs. first, let's get more on the situation here in the uk from our health correspondent sophie hutchinson.
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a vaccination centre in lambeth in london, among the boroughs worst affected by 0micron in the uk. staff here say there's no shortage of demand for the jabs. i'm a schoolteacher. i've got to go back. there are zero mitigation in class. and i don't want to get sick, you know? i'm 57 years old, so i'm quite frightened of that and i don't want to pass it on to my loved ones. it's really important because i'm a recently retired senior head of education at university college, so i preach it to my staff, so i have to jolly well do it as well. unlike the rest of the uk, which has increased restrictions, the government in england is relying on vaccinations to get the country through the latest wave of covid. we do watch very carefully- all of the data, and we have had some good news that it does seem to be a bit milder— in terms of severity. but we do watch the _ hospitalisations, and we do watch the number of people in hospitals
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all the time _ the data the government in england are monitoring in particular are for hospitalisations, which are increasing, but are still far from the peaks of previous waves. and in london, which has been worst hit by 0micron, the number of patients in icu beds at hospitals like this and others are still well below worrying thresholds. and some scientists say that the spread of the virus in england seems to be slowing. cases are still rising. i think suggestions a few days ago that we might�*ve actually started to peak, i think, was probably not borne out yesterday, but on the other hand, cases aren't increasing as rapidly as they were a week or so ago. i think we can be fairly certain that they're not doubling every couple of days now. but the virus in wales is now growing exponentially, mirroring what happened over the last few weeks in england. our rates were quite stable,
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around the 500 per 100,000 mark, until a week or days ago. it's now heading towards the 1000 per 100,000 mark. this data that we published today isjust before christmas, so we still have to watch and see what the christmas mixing and the new year mixing is going to produce. back in england, the decision not to add further restrictions has been described as a lifeline for pubs, bars and clubs by the hospitality sector. it also says allowing people to go out on new year's eve signals better times ahead. it's not just about - new year's eve for us. i mean, it's bigger than that. it's the start of a recovery, - and we believe that we've created safe environments for people to come out and socialise _ and we think it's the best i scenario given the fact that if we'd have closed, - we potentially would've seen more house parties and illegal events, - which would have been counter—productive. i but there are concerns about the wider impact
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of 0micron on the nhs. hospital leaders say while many people are coming into hospital with covid but not because of covid, staff are also getting infected. it's very clear that as soon as you get 0micron circulating significantly amongst the community, of course it will be circulating amongst nhs staff. we are now having to redeploy staff to fill the gaps that are being left in critical and essential services by staff who are off with covid—related absences. along with vaccinations, the government in england is urging people to remain cautious and, if possible, to celebrate outside on new year's eve. it will assess whether more restrictions are injanuary. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. we will talk both politics and health issues we will talk both politics and health issues in we will talk both politics and health issues in a we will talk both politics and health issues in a moment. well, let's look at the latest government data now. some of the figures are still being affected by delays over the holiday period, and some data has not yet been published. there were 129,101 new infections recorded
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in the latest 24—hour period. those figures are just for england and wales only. 18 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test. 0n vaccinations, more than 200,000 people had their booster, bringing the total number of vaccinated people to more than 32.5 million. just as i am talking, we have got figures they have just come through for scotland. the figures for scotland have not been included in the main uk officialfigures, but have been published separetly. they show that a total of 9360 new positive cases have been confirmed in the last 2a hours, according to the latest scottish government data. with me is our political correspondentjonathan blake.
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still we talk about these big figures and we still are in this slightly curious situation where rules are different in the uk depending on which part of the uk you live in. depending on which part of the uk ou live in. , , , depending on which part of the uk you live in-— you live in. yes, because we know the devolved _ you live in. yes, because we know the devolved governments - you live in. yes, because we know the devolved governments in - you live in. yes, because we know- the devolved governments in england, wales, north of ireland and scotland have response ability for public health. so there is not for the first time in this pandemic a pretty start difference between england and the other. you could care interest governments and scotland, wales and northern ireland at this moment as taking a more precautionary approach, putting restrictions in place to hope to fend off a big increase in hospitalisations as a result of the increase in cases that we are seeing throughout. whereas at westminster, the prime minister holding out and holding firm against imposing any new measures at this point and he is doing that in the face of quite severe political pressure on him from many in his own party whojust don't
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pressure on him from many in his own party who just don't want to see any more restrictions imposed at all. and that is one factor in the decision as he weighs up what is obviously a very difficult and delicate balancing act. of course there is a response ability to protect public health and the responsibility to keep the economy going as well. so all that is in the mix but it is precarious because we know things can change and change quickly as they have done some of the pandemic. we don't know a lot yet about the 0micron very although there are early indications it is less severe. and if you figure in the rise in absences of staff in the hs, that could make things worse very quickly and that in addition to what we will going to hospital with a virus at this point could end up having a big impact on what has to happen further down the line. but for now, until the new year at least, nothing new in england. thank ou ve least, nothing new in england. thank you very much _ least, nothing new in england. thank you very much for — least, nothing new in england. thank you very much for now, _ least, nothing new in england. thank you very much for now, jonathan - you very much for now, jonathan blake. i'm joined now by matthew taylor, chief executive of nhs confederation, the membership
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organisation for the whole health care system in england, wales and northern ireland. your thoughts now that you have heard much of the data for the last 2a hour period. we heard much of the data for the last 24 hour period.— 24 hour period. we need to be cautious about _ 24 hour period. we need to be cautious about the data. - 24 hour period. we need to be cautious about the data. we i 24 hour period. we need to be i cautious about the data. we know that the _ cautious about the data. we know that the infection rate massively underestimates what is going on in the community. that is the rate of the community. that is the rate of the tests— the community. that is the rate of the tests and reporting and sadly i think— the tests and reporting and sadly i think the _ the tests and reporting and sadly i think the death figure is also refunding the fact we have been in this christmas period was what we do know is_ this christmas period was what we do know is hospitalisation rate is going — know is hospitalisation rate is going uu _ know is hospitalisation rate is going up. now it seems to be that the people with covid—19 and hospitals may not be suffering from a level— hospitals may not be suffering from a level of— hospitals may not be suffering from a level of acuity that we have seen in the _ a level of acuity that we have seen in the past — a level of acuity that we have seen in the past and less need to use intensive — in the past and less need to use intensive care but do recall that if you have — intensive care but do recall that if you have covid hospital, you are still subject to infection control so that— still subject to infection control so that is— still subject to infection control so that is the demand on the health service _ so that is the demand on the health service leaders, doctors and nurses to mischievous patients are not infecting — to mischievous patients are not infecting other people. we basically need infecting other people. we basically heed to— infecting other people. we basically need to keep the situation under
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very close — need to keep the situation under very close scrutiny because we won't know _ very close scrutiny because we won't know until _ very close scrutiny because we won't know until the next few days how those _ know until the next few days how those figures are going to turn out. also to _ those figures are going to turn out. also to what extent our health service staff, whatever their role, affected by this as well, whether they have covid or are self isolating, what is the impact there? we need to remember it we are starting — we need to remember it we are starting with an hsa has an estimated 100,000 vacancies and that is a long—term effect of poor workforce planning and lack of funding — workforce planning and lack of funding. then you add in sickness absence _ funding. then you add in sickness absence and the problem was that his absence _ absence and the problem was that his absence is— absence and the problem was that his absence is that it's comfortable enough — absence is that it's comfortable enough to say that it does not occur across _ enough to say that it does not occur across the _ enough to say that it does not occur across the whole system in the same way. across the whole system in the same way one _ across the whole system in the same way. one person becomes infected and it's one _ way. 0ne person becomes infected and it's one of— way. one person becomes infected and it's one of the others who become infected — it's one of the others who become infected. also the hospitals, the health— infected. also the hospitals, the health service complex are ink interconnected so if certain people interconnected so if certain people in the _ interconnected so if certain people in the hospital are not able to perform — in the hospital are not able to perform their function, it has knock on effects— perform their function, it has knock on effects on the whole system so if you are _ on effects on the whole system so if you are in _ on effects on the whole system so if you are in hs manager, your body can run the clock— you are in hs manager, your body can run the clock at the moment try to
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figure _ run the clock at the moment try to figure out— run the clock at the moment try to figure out how to use your resources and respond — figure out how to use your resources and respond to the fact that every day people are not able to come into work _ day people are not able to come into work. �* , ., day people are not able to come into work. �* i. .. ., day people are not able to come into work. �* i. ., ., work. and given your caution and the sort of say a — work. and given your caution and the sort of say a tory _ work. and given your caution and the sort of say a tory tells _ work. and given your caution and the sort of say a tory tells you _ work. and given your caution and the sort of say a tory tells you have - sort of say a tory tells you have outlined there, how would your members and people you represent, how would they want all of us to behave as the festive season continues?— behave as the festive season continues? ,., ., , continues? the important thing is that we are _ continues? the important thing is that we are responsible, - continues? the important thing is that we are responsible, that - continues? the important thing is that we are responsible, that we | continues? the important thing is l that we are responsible, that we try to avoid _ that we are responsible, that we try to avoid a _ that we are responsible, that we try to avoid a necessary risk and that is from _ to avoid a necessary risk and that is from early about getting this virus _ is from early about getting this virus under control but also other risks _ virus under control but also other risks the — virus under control but also other risks. the sad reality is the health service facing winter pressures that we all— service facing winter pressures that we all face — service facing winter pressures that we all face always and facing the rising _ we all face always and facing the rising number of micro and the number— rising number of micro and the numberof— rising number of micro and the number of those absence, the nhs is not able _ number of those absence, the nhs is not able to— number of those absence, the nhs is not able to provide the kind of service — not able to provide the kind of service that we want to provide. and we just— service that we want to provide. and we just have — service that we want to provide. and we just have to be aware of that. we have been working flat out for two years so — have been working flat out for two years so i — have been working flat out for two years. so i was at a people is by all nreans— years. so i was at a people is by all means celebrate because the nhs
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and left _ all means celebrate because the nhs and left the party are notjust anybody _ and left the party are notjust anybody else but all celebrate brightness of the government to determine the balance between public health— determine the balance between public health on— determine the balance between public health on the one hand and the interest— health on the one hand and the interest in— health on the one hand and the interest in business on the other to do something in a way that minimizes unnecessary— do something in a way that minimizes unnecessary risk because the health service _ unnecessary risk because the health service will— unnecessary risk because the health service will do everything it can and all— service will do everything it can and all waste us to get through these _ and all waste us to get through these difficult times closer we should — these difficult times closer we should not put any and pressures on our national — should not put any and pressures on our national health service at this tinre _ our national health service at this time. �* , ., , our national health service at this time. �* , ., ., our national health service at this time. �* ,. ., time. and winter is always a tricky time. and winter is always a tricky time for health _ time. and winter is always a tricky time for health services _ time. and winter is always a tricky time for health services anyway i time for health services anyway without covid. where are we in terms of routine operations, the things we've always forgotten to talk about the people who need the hip replacements and the replacements and what is happening in that regard? and what is happening in that reaard? ,, ., ., , ., and what is happening in that reaard? ,, ., ., ., ~ regard? those nhs managers a talk about are burning amid idle and try| about are burning amid idle and try to work— about are burning amid idle and try to work out— about are burning amid idle and try to work out how to re—deploy and use to work out how to re—deploy and use to try— to work out how to re—deploy and use to try to— to work out how to re—deploy and use to try to keep things going and inevitably they had to focus on what is most _ inevitably they had to focus on what is most urgent or what is most important _ is most urgent or what is most important and that probably means in nrany— important and that probably means in many cases— important and that probably means in many cases that we are not able to act for— many cases that we are not able to act for example on that enormous
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backlog _ act for example on that enormous backlog of— act for example on that enormous backlog of patients waiting for operations, build up record long walts— operations, build up record long waits and — operations, build up record long waits and we have to be realistic about _ waits and we have to be realistic about the — waits and we have to be realistic about the extent to which the health service _ about the extent to which the health service can _ about the extent to which the health service can do that work for the next few— service can do that work for the next few weeks of assembly the case that the _ next few weeks of assembly the case that the nhs reaches peak demand in the middle ofjanuary and what is worrying — the middle ofjanuary and what is worrying is — the middle ofjanuary and what is worrying is that all the it is great news _ worrying is that all the it is great news that— worrying is that all the it is great news that it omicron patients and for a _ news that it omicron patients and for a lower— news that it omicron patients and for a lower acuity that if these cases— for a lower acuity that if these cases continue to rise we could be hitting _ cases continue to rise we could be hitting the — cases continue to rise we could be hitting the kind of bigot this way the same — hitting the kind of bigot this way the same time as we normally reach the same time as we normally reach the peak— the same time as we normally reach the peak of— the same time as we normally reach the peak of winter pressures on the nhs and _ the peak of winter pressures on the nhs and nhs staff and managers will do what _ nhs and nhs staff and managers will do what they always do and pull out the stops to try to keep the service going _ the stops to try to keep the service going but— the stops to try to keep the service going but it is as you implied the to mean that some other priorities, for example — to mean that some other priorities, for example that record waiting list of people on the back burner for a while _ of people on the back burner for a while. ., ~' ,, of people on the back burner for a while. . ,, i. ., ., ., _, while. thank you for an outcome ahead of the _ while. thank you for an outcome ahead of the nhs _ while. thank you for an outcome | ahead of the nhs confederation, thank you. just when i spoke to matthew taylor, we had a few more figures through from france and in fact we are hearing france has
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reported a new high of confirmed coronavirus cases. very nearly 180,000 is the figure, the daily figure there in france and latest 24 hour period and by far the highest number since the start of the pandemic. so the situation in france, let's take a look at other european countries. and there have been demonstrations in eastern germany against new coronavirus restrictions. they include a limit on private gatherings to ten vaccinated people and the closure of nightclubs. students of all ages will have to wear masks in school, and sports competitions will be held behind closed doors. unvaccinated people are already banned from much of public life, and only two people are allowed to meet in private. us health authorities have halved the recommended isolation period for people who test positive for covid, but don't exhibit symptoms. they've previously warned of a half a million cases a day in the coming weeks as the omicron variant takes hold. that isolation time goes
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from ten to five days. officials insist this is being guided by the science. so, why is this step being taken now? we put that question to david edwards, an aerosol scientist and a harvard university professor and bioengineer. i think i understand the logic. it's important for people to understand that the omicron variant, like previous variants, infects us initially in the upper airways. there's nothing about vaccination that prevents that from happening. what's cleary true, as time goes on and more of the population has been infected or has been vaccinated, is that our immune resistance against infection and against severity of symptoms is going up. one of the things that the authorities are clearly reacting to is the fact that while hospitalisation rates are going up relatively slowly relative to case rates, case rates are climbing at a very high rate.
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and so, there's both a pressure to react, but also an awareness that very likely our immune systems are coming to our defence. it is true that we have increasing numbers of both drugs and vaccines to defend ourselves, but i think the immune system is the primary defence we have right now and that's arguing for a relaxation of the regulations by the american authorities. i would also point out that the... ..the risks that we're facing right now are being both measured in terms of hospitalisation, but also economic and other collateral damages. and i think that the government of the us and other countries right now are trying to balance a holistic strategy here, and in my view, what the americans are doing is probably the right thing to be doing right now.
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the supreme court in russia has banned one of the country's best—known and oldest human rights organisations, memorial, accusing it of violating a law requiring groups to register as foreign agents. it comes at the end of a year in which the kremlin has cracked down vigorously on its critics. our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg reports. more and more, it feels as if russia is turning the clock back. liquidate, the judge says, as she orders one of russia's oldest civil rights groups, international memorial, to shut down. the ngo was found to have broken russia's draconian foreign agents law. "disgraceful decision," the reaction from the gallery. it's100% a political thing. and the substance of this political
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decision is just one more step from authoritarian regime to totalitarian. for more than 30 years, memorial has been shining a light on one of the darkest chapters of russian history. what became known as the great terror. it's been painstakingly cataloguing the victims ofjosef stalin's mass repressions. up to 20 million soviet citizens are believed to have been sent to the gulag, to stalin's prison camps. hundreds of thousands were executed. memorial was set up to keep the memory alive. the founding of memorial in the late 1980s was a symbol, a symbol of the soviet union opening up and facing up to its past, to the crimes ofjosef stalin. the shutting down of memorial is a symbol, too. of how in russia today the past is being reshaped, rewritten,
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and how civil society is under attack. vladimir putin has been using history to try to foster patriotism. so he focuses on the glories of russia's past. like the victory in world war ii. through this annual reading of names of the victims of political repression, memorial has tried to remind russians of their tragic past. now, though, it's being silenced. steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow. let's take a brief look at some of today's other news. utility company bosses have suggested ways the uk government could stop household heating and electricity bills rising by big amounts this winter as the wholesale price of gas continues to spike. representatives of the energy industry met ministers yesterday. among the ideas was a reduction in vat on energy bills and a loan from the treasury
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to the energy industry. china says its new space station has twice narrowly avoided collisions with satellites operated by the american entrepreneur elon musk. the complaints were lodged with the un's space agency, although the incidents have not yet been independently verified. at least 20 people have died in severe flooding in north—eastern brazil. heavy rain in the state of bahia has forced 60,000 people to leave their homes and caused two dams to give way. the state's governor has described it as the worst disaster in its history. a mummified body of an ancient eyptian pharaoh has been examined for the first time after being digitally unwrapped using high—tech scanners. dr sahar saleem led the project, and she told us how her team was able to solve the mystery of what happened to king amenhotep. this mummy is the only mummy
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from the royal kings of ancient egypt, of the new kingdom, that has not been unwrapped in the modern time, so the mummy is totally wrapped with the wrappings put on it 3000 years ago. so, we didn't want to disturb this beauty of the mummy, this precious object or figure, so we did a digital unwrapping of the mummy using the ct scan and the advanced technology, so we would remove the layers of the wrapping to have a glimpse on the face of the king and his condition and the amulet, jewellery he's wearing, but without actually touching the mummy or destroying it.
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more now on our main story, the uk government has defended its decision not to introduce further restrictions in england before january. it is good news of course for many hospitality businesses. i'm joined now by terry george, a nightclub owner. hejoins us from his bar, fibre, in leeds. thank you for being with us. your thoughts about to what extent this helps your business.— helps your business. hello, jane. you caught _ helps your business. hello, jane. you caught me — helps your business. hello, jane. you caught me in _ helps your business. hello, jane. you caught me in a _ helps your business. hello, jane. you caught me in a good - helps your business. hello, jane. you caught me in a good mood, | helps your business. hello, jane. | you caught me in a good mood, a happy mood in actual fact because this mood is what we've been praying for. we have had a rough time up to chris because of cancellations and we've had people unsure whether to come out. people actually getting the virus weather conditions we've been suffering with and this week we are being told that new year's day we can go ahead as planned. and that is great news because people have been reserving themselves, not wanting to come out and not wanting to buy tickets and not wanting to
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commit themselves and this is the best news we have had in a long time. �* , ., , ., best news we have had in a long time. �* , ., i. �* best news we have had in a long time. , ., ~ time. big smile from you. are people bu in: time. big smile from you. are people buying lots of — time. big smile from you. are people buying lots of tickets _ time. big smile from you. are people buying lots of tickets now, _ time. big smile from you. are people buying lots of tickets now, has that l buying lots of tickets now, has that changed things?— buying lots of tickets now, has that changed things? ultimately today we have seen people _ changed things? ultimately today we have seen people starting _ changed things? ultimately today we have seen people starting to - changed things? ultimately today we have seen people starting to buy - have seen people starting to buy their tickets was that we have people in the past buy tickets within asking for refunds and wanted to know what the policy was if they did not turn out but i have that confidence again know they can come out on new year's eve and celebrate. we have seen an influx and we have been very nervous because not knowing whether to get staff in an order or stock so we did not know what to do so we have not been frantic try to make sure everything will be planned for the big night, new year's eve night. bud will be planned for the big night, new year's eve night.— will be planned for the big night, new year's eve night. and what he demand of — new year's eve night. and what he demand of those _ new year's eve night. and what he demand of those people _ new year's eve night. and what he demand of those people who - new year's eve night. and what he demand of those people who are i demand of those people who are coming? what you want vaccine passports? if you think about your staff, how you protect them and what measures are in place. brute staff, how you protect them and what measures are in place.— measures are in place. we have been runnina measures are in place. we have been running this — measures are in place. we have been running this as _ measures are in place. we have been running this as the _ measures are in place. we have been running this as the government - measures are in place. we have been running this as the government have | running this as the government have guided us was that we have asked people to show their vaccine passports upon entry of our venues and coming earlier than at 1am to
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give them a stamp to make sure they have got a vaccine passports was they go to the bar theyjust show their staff the confidence of as well. and that's with the government have told us to do and what we do, we follow the rules. surprisingly able to follow the rules all the way through but you know what it's been really hard and for them to be able to work the business to all these difficult things we've had to jump through. almost impossible but thankfully we are still here. i’m thankfully we are still here. i'm deliahted thankfully we are still here. i'm delighted to — thankfully we are still here. i'm delighted to see you smiling but you must have lost so much business during christmas and i guess you've got a lot to make up still. i must've lost a lot of weight as i have been actually but not a christmas but yet a lot but you get to do and we been playing catch—up since we were reopened injuly. and going to take this five years together and the only reason i'm smiling is because i want to stay positive and know that coming into the new year public going to be changes if the government is talking about. but i feel that we need to wrap up what we have the moment to
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mention people can enjoy themselves but certainly be safe at the same time. it the biggest thing you mentioned is we have to... thank you very much- — mentioned is we have to... thank you very much- terry _ mentioned is we have to... thank you very much. terry george _ mentioned is we have to... thank you very much. terry george in _ mentioned is we have to... thank you very much. terry george in leeds - mentioned is we have to... thank you very much. terry george in leeds and you can watch a bbc news. good afternoon. west ham have gone fifth in the premier league after a big win over watford, who took the lead at vicarage road in the fourth minute, but lost 4—1. it's west ham's first premier league victory since december the 4th. watford are just a place above the bottom three so needed a good start, and they got it from a high—quality eighth goal of the season from emmanuel dennis. but there were plenty of holes at the other end in the watford defence. jarrod bowen spotted one and set up tomas soucek for the equaliser. and the turnaround was complete two minutes later. said benrahma's deflected effort
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made it 2—1 to west ham. mark noble added a third from the penalty spot before bowen played the perfect pass for nikola vlasic to make it 4—1, his first for west ham. west ham have gone above spurs, who were held to a 1—1 draw by ten man southampton at st mary's. james ward—prowse tends to get his goals from set pieces, but this one came in open play to give southampton the lead. harry kane equalised with a penalty awarded for a foul by mohamed salisu, who was sent off. spurs dominated the second half and had two goals disallowed, so it finished all square. norwich remain bottom of the premier league after they were beaten 3—0 at crystal palace. odsonne edouard had given palace the lead from a penalty before two further goals before half—time from jean—philippe mateta and jeffrey schlupp gave them a comfortable win. it sends crystal palace tonight.
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chelsea defender ben chilwell could miss the rest of the season as he undergoes knee surgery this week. the england left—back suffered anterior cruciate ligament damage during chelsea's champions league win againstjuventus last month. the club had initially opted for the defender to begin rehabilitation work in the hope he could return without surgery. england captainjoe root has called their ashes defeat "gut—wrenching", while some of those looking on have described it as "embarrassing". their hopes of reclaiming the urn from australia ended emphatically as they lost the third test in melbourne by an innings. england were bowled out forjust 68 on day three at the mcg, that's their lowest score in australia in 117 years. and it brought about a ninth test defeat this year. they're three 3—0 in the series with two to play, and questions will now be asked of how england turn their fotunes around in the longer format of the game. we knew that going into today, we were more than capable of getting ourselves to a score with the players that were to come in at the crease. and it's bitterly disappointing
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that we didn't manage to do that. but, like i say, you've got front up, you've got to make sure that you stay strong, you keep looking to improve all areas of our games, individually and collectively, and you have to have a really strong belief to be able to come back. and we need to put some pride back into the badge. and premiership rugby are investigating allegations against leicester regarding historical image rights payments. tigers have confirmed they've met with representatives of the league to discuss the potential breach of salary cap rules, which the times reports relates to links between the club and a now defunct company, worldwide image management. leicester are top of the premiership with ten wins from ten. three—time champion michael van gerwen has said he is "really disappointed, confused and angry" after being forced to withdraw from the pdc world darts championship after testing positive for covid—19. he was scheduled to play his third—round match against chris dobey,
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who will get a bye into the last 16 at alexandra palace. van gerwen's fellow dutch players raymond van barneveld and vincent van der voort have also tested positive for coronavirus. we'll have more sport for you later on the bbc news channel. back in control. after nearly 20 years of conflict, thousands of lives lost and trillions of dollars spent, the taliban has seen off the us, nato and their afghan allies. a stunning success for them and another superpower humbled in the streets and fields of afghanistan. but to understand these events and the origins of the taliban, we need to go back to the cold war.

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