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tv   The Papers  BBC News  December 28, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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new covid infections in england and wales have hit a record daily high, as the british government defends its decision not to introduce further restrictions in england before january. greater restrictions have come into force in scotland, wales and northern ireland. a record number of covid infections in france as well — almost one hundred and eighty thousand in a single day. the french government has already announced new measures there. in the united states, people without covid symptoms can end their self—isolation period earlier — after 5 days rather than 10, amid a surge in cases. critics of the change say they're concerned testing wasn't recommened to end isolation. russia's supreme court has banned one of the country's oldest human rights organisations. the court ruled that memorial must be disbanded for breaking the law on foreign agents.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are george eaton, senior online editor of the new statesman and rosamound urwin, media editor of the sunday times. and rosamound urwin, tomorrow's front pages, starting with... the i reports that the number of covid—19 patients in hospital is climbing — but serious illness from omicron remains lower. the daily telegraph writes that the nhs test and trace is incorrectly telling people to isolate for ten days, despite official guidance cutting it to one week. the guardian reports that uk households are being warned of the �*year of the squeeze�* as cost of living soars. the daily mirror writes
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�*new year, new hope�* — adding that there is a growing belief that omicron will not swamp the nhs, despite the huge surge in cases. the financial times reports that is was a �*blockbuster year�* for markets as companies raised a record $12 trillion by selling stock and issuing debt and loans. the daily mail leads on scientists calling for the self—isolation period to be cut to five days — from the current seven. and the times also leads on this — saying that the prime minister is being urged to stave off an nhs staffing crisis by reducing the self isolation period for workers. so let�*s begin... george and rosamound, lovely to have you back. george, iwonder if george and rosamound, lovely to have you back. george, i wonder if you can kick us off, please? were going to start off with the front page of the daily mirror. the virus fight still rages but there is a new year
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and a new hope.— still rages but there is a new year and a new hope. yes, so this is some rare optimism. _ and a new hope. yes, so this is some rare optimism, rare _ and a new hope. yes, so this is some rare optimism, rare hope _ and a new hope. yes, so this is some rare optimism, rare hope during - and a new hope. yes, so this is some rare optimism, rare hope during this| rare optimism, rare hope during this pandemic. there was a lot of concern about comic con given how transmissible it is and cases have already reached record highs. but the cause for hope is that the virus is not at present causing the levels of hospitalisation that the delta variant did or that the original variant did or that the original variant dead. and that is partly because so many more people are vaccinated. and partly because it does seem to be inherently less severe than delta. so the hope is that you won�*t see hospitalisations and deaths return to the horrific peaks that we saw during the first and second waves. and we may be coming to the end perhaps of the crisis stage of the pandemic put up
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where instead we learn to live with covid and you�*ll see spikes for some periods but we will learn to manage it through a mixture of restrictions and voluntary responsibility. bosman,. rosamound, nice to have optimism. bosman,. rosamound, nice to have otimism. ., ., , ., ., optimism. there are notes of caution here and i think _ optimism. there are notes of caution here and i think one _ optimism. there are notes of caution here and i think one of— optimism. there are notes of caution here and i think one of those - optimism. there are notes of caution here and i think one of those we - here and i think one of those we see discussed _ here and i think one of those we see discussed on — here and i think one of those we see discussed on the other front pages is this— discussed on the other front pages is this massive problem the nhs has is this massive problem the nhs has is that— is this massive problem the nhs has is that because this virus is spread so quickly— is that because this virus is spread so quickly lots and lots of workplaces dealing with this huge number_ workplaces dealing with this huge number of people, the nhs included. they usually have quite a high rate of illness — they usually have quite a high rate of illness. unsurprisingly they are ill people — of illness. unsurprisingly they are ill people who meet l people and treat— ill people who meet l people and treat iii— ill people who meet l people and treat ill people. it's extraordinarily high at the moment and it's— extraordinarily high at the moment and it's creating a big problem because — and it's creating a big problem because wards are understaffed. the
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nhs was _ because wards are understaffed. the nhs was stretch pre—pandemic. they've — nhs was stretch pre—pandemic. they've had a really ridiculously difficult — they've had a really ridiculously difficult two years. and now they are having — difficult two years. and now they are having very high rates of illness— are having very high rates of illness and self isolation. and it still creating massive problems. yes, _ still creating massive problems. yes. there — still creating massive problems. yes, there is a bit of a note of optimism _ yes, there is a bit of a note of optimism here.— yes, there is a bit of a note of otimism here. ., , ., ., ., ., optimism here. rosamound, i want to add a dose of — optimism here. rosamound, i want to add a dose of reality _ optimism here. rosamound, i want to add a dose of reality to _ optimism here. rosamound, i want to add a dose of reality to this. - optimism here. rosamound, i want to add a dose of reality to this. there - add a dose of reality to this. there is a sentence on this front page that says but with a record number of covid cases yesterday new year revelers were urged to be cautious at parties. because i don�*t quite tie up revelers, parties and caution. . tie up revelers, parties and caution. , ., �*, ., ., , caution. yes. that's not really words we _ caution. yes. that's not really words we stick together, - caution. yes. that's not really words we stick together, is i caution. yes. that's not really| words we stick together, is it? caution. yes. that's not really - words we stick together, is it? when people _ words we stick together, is it? when peddle put— words we stick together, is it? when people put their hair down don't exactly— people put their hair down don't exactly tend to respect social distancing rules or whatever it is. absolutely. of course it would be great _ absolutely. of course it would be great if— absolutely. of course it would be
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great if it— absolutely. of course it would be great if it was summer and we get all the _ great if it was summer and we get all the outside but we know it's a bit harder for the virus to spread because — bit harder for the virus to spread because people will be inside and getting _ because people will be inside and getting close to each other. yes, we would _ getting close to each other. yes, we would expect a rise in after cases new year's — would expect a rise in after cases new year's eve, of course. i�*m would expect a rise in after cases new year's eve, of course. i'm sure. will turn to _ new year's eve, of course. i'm sure. will turn to the _ new year's eve, of course. i'm sure. will turn to the front _ new year's eve, of course. i'm sure. will turn to the front page _ new year's eve, of course. i'm sure. will turn to the front page of- new year's eve, of course. i'm sure. will turn to the front page of i. - will turn to the front page of i. i�*m sure borisjohnson and the health secretary will be keeping their fingers crossed that when those figures do rise and i probably will that it doesn�*t amount to serious illness. which is what the i is concentrating on. i serious illness. which is what the i is concentrating on.— is concentrating on. i should think ou could is concentrating on. i should think you could do _ is concentrating on. i should think you could do a _ is concentrating on. i should think you could do a two _ is concentrating on. i should think you could do a two word _ is concentrating on. i should think you could do a two word summary is concentrating on. i should think i you could do a two word summary of this said language is that vaccines work. so although hospitalisations are rising you are not seeing the level of severe cases that you did earlier in the pandemic because the overwhelming majority of people are double jabbed. and getting on for the majority have had their boosters. so that�*s made a huge difference. i don�*t think there was
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any guarantee that with discovered vaccines that work as well as the ones we have do. so that�*s a great tribute to the work that scientists and others have done. this is cause for hope. although a rise in a week is worrying. i think we will obviously come out of this later. but the fear is that this collides with a large number of staff being off sick or being forced suicide isolate. it comes at a time when the nhs is under more pressure than other times in the year. so you don�*t need to use some number of hospitalisations in earlier waves of covid to cause the nhs service problems. that is why, calm although it appears that the virus, the variant is not a surveyor it needs to be watched very carefully as does the data. �* .
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to be watched very carefully as does the data. �* , ., ., the data. let's turn to the front .a . e the data. let's turn to the front -a~e of the data. let's turn to the front page of the _ the data. let's turn to the front page of the daily _ the data. let's turn to the front page of the daily mail. - the data. let's turn to the front | page of the daily mail. actually, i should add on those that although the figures are going up the i does point out that there is less use of ventilators which is important to point out. that is the indicator of serious illness. the front page of the daily mail, rosamound. the?c serious illness. the front page of the daily mail, rosamound. they are talkin: the daily mail, rosamound. they are talking about — the daily mail, rosamound. they are talking about cutting _ the daily mail, rosamound. they are talking about cutting the _ the daily mail, rosamound. they are talking about cutting the number - the daily mail, rosamound. they are talking about cutting the number of i talking about cutting the number of days you _ talking about cutting the number of days you have to self—isolate to 'ust days you have to self—isolate to just five — days you have to self—isolate to just five days. that's people calling — just five days. that's people calling for it is not happen here. but it— calling for it is not happen here. but it has— calling for it is not happen here. but it has happened in the us. in the us. _ but it has happened in the us. in the us. if— but it has happened in the us. in the us, if you test positive, as long _ the us, if you test positive, as long as — the us, if you test positive, as long as you _ the us, if you test positive, as long as you have no symptoms you only have _ long as you have no symptoms you only have to — long as you have no symptoms you only have to self—isolate now for five days with what we have seen here _ five days with what we have seen here last — five days with what we have seen here last week is the number of days you have _ here last week is the number of days you have to— here last week is the number of days you have to cite isolate come down from _ you have to cite isolate come down from ten _ you have to cite isolate come down from ten to — you have to cite isolate come down from ten to seven. so they are calling — from ten to seven. so they are calling here for a further reduction in that _ calling here for a further reduction in that the — calling here for a further reduction in that. the point that is made in this piece — in that. the point that is made in this piece is— in that. the point that is made in this piece is that most
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transmissions although of course not all happen— transmissions although of course not all happen in the two days before symptoms develop or the three days after _ symptoms develop or the three days after. hence why they are calling for a _ after. hence why they are calling for a short— after. hence why they are calling for a short time. they are saying by day six _ for a short time. they are saying by day six or— for a short time. they are saying by day six or seven you shouldn't be that likely— day six or seven you shouldn't be that likely to spread it. of course, that likely to spread it. of course, that is— that likely to spread it. of course, that is a _ that likely to spread it. of course, that is a risk. we are all bouncing all these — that is a risk. we are all bouncing all these risks. there will be plenty— all these risks. there will be plenty of— all these risks. there will be plenty of people who think that is a bit of— plenty of people who think that is a bit of a _ plenty of people who think that is a bit of a risky thing to call for, frankly — bit of a risky thing to call for, frankly. that's by mps and business leaders _ frankly. that's by mps and business leaders. ~ , ., ., leaders. when your hearing held chief say that — leaders. when your hearing held chief say that medics _ leaders. when your hearing held chief say that medics are - leaders. when your hearing held i chief say that medics are dropping like flies you can see why they�*re calling for this change to self can shoot george?— calling for this change to self can shoot georue? , i. .., ~ shoot george? yes, you can. i think throughout— shoot george? yes, you can. i think throughout the _ shoot george? yes, you can. i think throughout the pandemic _ shoot george? yes, you can. i think throughout the pandemic we - shoot george? yes, you can. i think throughout the pandemic we should j shoot george? yes, you can. i think. throughout the pandemic we should be guided by evidence and by scientific and medical expertise. obviously you have to balance that against the risks to the nhs. i think it�*s worth pausing to study this in depth was of the self isolation. it is only
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just been cut to seven days with up think having it to five does raise the risk confusion. some people what�*s next? going to get you three days? you have to make sure you emphasise the importance of self isolation and then the importance of regular testing before you leave self isolation. at present you can leave after seven days if your lateral flow test is negative. if not you have to continue to self—isolate. i think it�*s important that message isn�*t lost and people assume once they�*ve done seven days they can automatically leave. it�*s quite understandable why particularly at this stage of the pandemic people are asking rightly whether everyone has to isolate for “p whether everyone has to isolate for up to seven days when it hurts the nhs and other public services was hurts businesses and obviously hugely disruptive to people�*s daily and family lives was up there is a little more detail on the front page
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of the times. little more detail on the front page of the times-— of the times. they bring in the fact that adding — of the times. they bring in the fact that adding the _ of the times. they bring in the fact that adding the new— of the times. they bring in the fact that adding the new school- of the times. they bring in the fact that adding the new school term i of the times. they bring in the fact i that adding the new school term will bring to managing the start of the new year. bring to managing the start of the new ear. . . bring to managing the start of the new ear. , , ., , , new year. yes. the times has this extraordinary _ new year. yes. the times has this extraordinary figure _ new year. yes. the times has this extraordinary figure that - new year. yes. the times has this extraordinary figure that is - new year. yes. the times has this extraordinary figure that is up - new year. yes. the times has this extraordinary figure that is up to l extraordinary figure that is up to 800.000 — extraordinary figure that is up to 800,000 people estimated to be in isolation _ 800,000 people estimated to be in isolation in the uk. obviously, were seeing _ isolation in the uk. obviously, were seeing that— isolation in the uk. obviously, were seeing that his services for the ben collection. — seeing that his services for the ben collection, rail services, businesses. of course schools reopening and they will be an awful lot of— reopening and they will be an awful lot of teachers having to isolate as well _ lot of teachers having to isolate as well the — lot of teachers having to isolate as well. the difficulty when were talking — well. the difficulty when were talking about nhs staff is that we don't _ talking about nhs staff is that we don't want people who have the virus going _ don't want people who have the virus going into _ don't want people who have the virus going into hospitals clearly that would _ going into hospitals clearly that would be the worst of both worlds. if would be the worst of both worlds. if they _ would be the worst of both worlds. if they were so infectious. i think around _ if they were so infectious. i think around the — if they were so infectious. i think around the nhs you want to be particularly careful where you're talking — particularly careful where you're talking about cutting the number of days for— talking about cutting the number of days for people to self—isolate for. and staff _ days for people to self—isolate for. and staff would not want to be going into an _ and staff would not want to be going into an environment where they felt they were _ into an environment where they felt they were at risk to patients
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either~ — they were at risk to patients either. and schools going back means lots of _ either. and schools going back means lots of children will be mixing and that creates a risk of course was up and they— that creates a risk of course was up and they bring the virus home to their— and they bring the virus home to their families as well. not to worry about— their families as well. not to worry about still~ — their families as well. not to worry about still. . ., their families as well. not to worry about still. , ., ., their families as well. not to worry about still-— about still. george, what did you make of the _ about still. george, what did you make of the comment _ about still. george, what did you make of the comment from - about still. george, what did you make of the comment from paul| about still. george, what did you - make of the comment from paul hunter in this piece saying that covid would become effectivelyjust another cause of the common cold? i another cause of the common cold? i think this has been the hope of many scientists for some time. that it will become an endemic, as they say. where is no longer something that causes severe illness and most cases it will become like the flu, perhaps. obviously there�*s a winter flu jab every year and it may be that we all have a covid job every year. some years the spike will be worse than others was up and there are precautions you take. it�*s
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interesting to think about it is comparable to flu because probably many people won�*t necessarily aware that you can get a flu jab. or so aware of how viruses are transmitted. the goal of this in some ways it could lead to greater awareness of illness in general and people taking the precautions that seem sensible to them. i think it has undoubtedly raised public awareness of illness in general. and how to cope with it. i think that could actually be something that is very useful in years to come. i can imaaine very useful in years to come. i can imagine from _ very useful in years to come. i can imagine from the _ very useful in years to come. i can imagine from the prime _ very useful in years to come. i can imagine from the prime minister gordon brown screaming that will happen endemic if we vaccinate the world. otherwise we will carry on getting variance, what we? the front page of the guardian. the year of the squeeze. page of the guardian. the year of the squeeze-— the squeeze. this is a very depressing _ the squeeze. this is a very depressing story. - the squeeze. this is a very depressing story. this - the squeeze. this is a very depressing story. this is i the squeeze. this is a very depressing story. this is a | the squeeze. this is a very - depressing story. this is a piece of research _ depressing story. this is a piece of research by— depressing story. this is a piece of research by the resolution
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foundation looking at the hit to households and next year. there's a number _ households and next year. there's a number of _ households and next year. there's a number of factors all coming together so wages stalling despite all the _ together so wages stalling despite all the promises we've had that were going _ all the promises we've had that were going to _ all the promises we've had that were going to get for the baha'i wage economy. — going to get for the baha'i wage economy, rising taxes next year. the new social _ economy, rising taxes next year. the new social care levy, national insurance _ new social care levy, national insurance comes in, plus the freezing _ insurance comes in, plus the freezing of the personal income tax. plus we've _ freezing of the personal income tax. plus we've read a lot about the last couple days but actually for the past few — couple days but actually for the past few months this problem of massively rising energy bills affecting lots of countries and lots of places — affecting lots of countries and lots of places across the world. in all of places across the world. in all of these — of places across the world. in all of these things coming together in the uk _ of these things coming together in the uk and being a very big political headache for the government because the promise that we are _ government because the promise that we are all— government because the promise that we are all going to have our brexit dividend _ we are all going to have our brexit dividend doesn't feel like it's going — dividend doesn't feel like it's going to _ dividend doesn't feel like it's going to be delivered for households if this— going to be delivered for households if this all— going to be delivered for households if this all comes to pass. of course lots of inflationary pressures that we are _ lots of inflationary pressures that we are already suffering from but
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economists believe will get worse in 2022~ _ economists believe will get worse in 2022. ~ , ., economists believe will get worse in 2022. ~ ., ., 2022. when you read here that the founder of oval _ 2022. when you read here that the founder of oval energies _ 2022. when you read here that the founder of oval energies that - founder of oval energies that household bills will certainly double in april without government intervention that doesn�*t ring alarm bells. intervention that doesn't ring alarm bells. . r . intervention that doesn't ring alarm bells. , ~ , , . , bells. yes. april is the cruellest month it is _ bells. yes. april is the cruellest month it is said. _ bells. yes. april is the cruellest month it is said. it _ bells. yes. april is the cruellest month it is said. it will - bells. yes. april is the cruellest month it is said. it will certainly feel that way for people with higher energy bills, higher prices in general, inflation, tax rises, most people, everyone in work whether self—employed or work will be paying higher insurance including those whose below £10,000. you�*re also seeing continued wage stagnation as we�*ve seen since the 2008 crisis. if fact for most people wages are still below the level they were then. so this creates an atmosphere of political and economic discontent
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thatis political and economic discontent that is always dangerous for governments. it�*s interesting that the guardian has made this their main story above covid. i think if you want to help 2020 will unfold or will be covid or the living standards greed i think will be the living standard squeeze because people that potentially had the potential to affect their lives more dramatic ways then covid has. this sto is dramatic ways then covid has. this story is making _ dramatic ways then covid has. this story is making many of the front pages. it�*s on the front page of the independent, family space £1200 hold independent, family space £1200 hold in household budgets for the front page of the daily telegraph as well. the cost of living to jump by 1200 in april. eric quickly, just to wrap up in april. eric quickly, just to wrap up this particular story, what exactly could the government do? that�*s the million—dollar question, that's the million—dollar question, isn't it? _ that's the million—dollar question, isn't it? if— that's the million—dollar question, isn't it? if i'd been paid by the government i have some great
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solutions— government i have some great solutions in my household they can end up— solutions in my household they can end up bailing out the energy companies which will be incredibly expensive. yes, they can look at tax changes— expensive. yes, they can look at tax changes that are coming in but they are baked _ changes that are coming in but they are baked in now. the point about this being — are baked in now. the point about this being on the telegraph is this is going _ this being on the telegraph is this is going to — this being on the telegraph is this is going to cut through to tory voters and is going to affect everybody, right? is notjust going to be _ everybody, right? is notjust going to be a _ everybody, right? is notjust going to be a problem for people who don't vote conservative was up george, what — vote conservative was up george, what did _ vote conservative was up george, what did you make of the school story— what did you make of the school story on — what did you make of the school story on the front of the telegraph was back— story on the front of the telegraph was back to prioritising holidays over— was back to prioritising holidays over learning is the headline. it�*s over learning is the headline. it's i think a over learning is the headline. it�*s i think a slightly unfair headline. because taken at face value it makes it sound as if pupils are getting less education and getting more time off. that might sound good to the children perhaps but may be some parents. but it�*s not, if you actually read to the story it says all schools still have to stick to the statutory requirement for 190
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days teaching a year. and this two week holiday and after is actually designed to give teachers, many of who are suffering burn—out time to recuperate. because it�*s not in the children�*s interest to have teachers that are overworked and stressed. it doesn�*t lead to a good learning environment. so i think being guided by the evidence and if it actually leads to better outcomes that i don�*t think there�*s anything to be worried about. it�*s too simple to say they are prioritising holidays over teaching.— say they are prioritising holidays over teaching. yes, you've got to read into the _ over teaching. yes, you've got to read into the article. _ over teaching. yes, you've got to read into the article. i _ over teaching. yes, you've got to read into the article. i was - over teaching. yes, you've got to read into the article. i was taken | read into the article. i was taken by the lie that it could be a retention strategy. if by the lie that it could be a retention strategy.- by the lie that it could be a retention strategy. by the lie that it could be a retention strate: . , ., ., ., retention strategy. if you are more likel to retention strategy. if you are more likely to hang _ retention strategy. if you are more likely to hang onto _ retention strategy. if you are more likely to hang onto teachers - retention strategy. if you are more likely to hang onto teachers it's - likely to hang onto teachers it's good _ likely to hang onto teachers it's good for— likely to hang onto teachers it's good for pupils. likely to hang onto teachers it's good for popils-_ likely to hang onto teachers it's good for pupils. absolutely. thank ou ve good for pupils. absolutely. thank you very much _ good for pupils. absolutely. thank you very much indeed. _ good for pupils. absolutely. thank you very much indeed. george - good for pupils. absolutely. thankj you very much indeed. george and enjoy your week. happy new year to
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both of you as well. thank you. thank you forjoining us here on the papers. back again tomorrow evening with my colleagues from us here at bbc news this evening have a very good evening. bye— bye. liverpool have lost forjust the second time in the premier league this season. giving manchester city the chance to go nine points clear tomorrow. they were beaten 1—nil at leicester who won the game despite having an injury—hit squad. mo salah had the chance to give liverpool the lead but kasper schmeichel saved the penalty and then watched on as the rebound hit the bar. after spurning more
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opportunities at nil—nil. leicester substitute ademola lookman rounded off a sweeping move to get the only goal of the game. liverpool failed to score for the first time in 35 games and stay six points off the top. definitely the best win of our season. i think we showed that spirit and mentality and i�*m pretty sure the headlines were written already before the game. i said to the players, "the beauty of this game is that you write your own headlines." and this was just for us to do that today. the reason for the defeat is clear on our side tonight. is it to everybody from leicster team were in a situation now they have to play two days ago, they had to fight through there is really intense period. and it did well. really well. if we play better, if we play like we are able
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to play i think we would be still the winner. if anyone is not really interesting tonight. earlier, west ham went up to fifth in the table after a big win over watford who took the lead at vicarage road in the fourth minute but lost 4—1. it�*s west ham�*s first premier league victory since december fourth. watford are just a place above the bottom three so needed a good start and they got it from a high—quality eighth goal of the season from emmanuel dennis. but there were plenty of holes at the other end in the watford defence — jarrod bowen spotted one and set up tomas soucek for the equaliser and the turnaround was complete two minutes later — said benrahma�*s deflected effort made it 2—1 to west ham. mark noble added a third from the penalty spot before bowen played the perfect pass for nikola vlasic to make it 4—1 — his first for west ham. to be talked about is chance of the top four. we have a long way to go. we have to maintain it,
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we have to get our standards back. our performances are still not close to where they should be, but hopefully we can get ready and be the good teams and get better in the second half. west ham have gone above spurs who were held to a 1—all draw by ten man southampton at st mary�*s. james ward prowse tends to get his goals from set pieces but this one came in open play to give southampton the lead. harry kane equalised with a penalty awarded for a foul by mohamed salisu who was sent off. spurs dominated the second half and had two goals disallowed, so it finished all square. it is not easy to play after only 44 hours. for sure, we felt a bit of fatigue and may be our decision wasn�*t so right. but i think that at the end of the game, we could win,
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we didn�*t do this, and we are to be disappointed. crystal palace�*s second win in four games has taken them into the top ten, a place the team they beat can only dream of. odsonne edouard had given palace the lead against norwich from a penalty, before two further goals before half time from jean—philippe mateta and jeffrey schlupp gave them a comfortable win. 3—nil it finished, leaving norwich bottom of the league. and there has been even more disruption to the festive football schedule everton�*s home premier league game with newcastle has been postponed because of coronavirus cases and injuries in the visiting side�*s camp. the game was due to take place on thursday but the premier league were satisfied that newcastle couldn�*t field the requisite number of players. it�*s the 16th top flight match to be postponed in recent days while in the football league only 1a games are still on over the next two days. dominic thiem has pulled out of january�*s australian open. the 2020 finalist has not played sincejune
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because of a wrist injury. the issue meant the austrian could not defend the us open title he won last year. but naomi osaka has landed in melbourne to prepare for the defence of her australian open title. the japanese four—time grand slam winner hasn�*t played since losing in the third round of the us open and taking a break from the sport. the australian open begins in just under three weeks. premiership rugby are investigating allegations against leicester regarding historical image rights payments. tigers have confirmed they�*ve met with representatives of the league to discuss the potential breach of salary cap rules, which the times reports relates to links between the club and a now defunct company, worldwide image management. leicester are top of the premiership with ten wins from ten. 2018 champion rob cross has reached the last 16 of the pdc world darts — sealing his win over daryl gurney
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with a 170 checkout. the finish of treble 20 treble and bullseye is a rarity in any context but cross hit them with what proved to be his final three darts of a tight third round match. it went to a deciding set with the 11th seed winning 4—3. anotherformer champion also went through in dramatic fashion. 2020 winner peter wright was two sets down to australia�*s damon heta but switched back to an old set of darts and immediately won four in a row to make the last 16. earlier, three—time champion michael van gerwen was forced to withdraw after testing positive for covid—19. he was due to play chris dobey, who gets a bye into the last 16. fellow dutch players raymond van barneveld and vincent van der voort have also tested positive for coronavirus. and that�*s all the sport for now. the run up to the new year is going to be really exceptionally mild, near record breaking in fact.
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and notjust on one or two days but really quite a prolonged spell of very mild weather, some four days or so. it�*s not really going to cool off until around the third or 4th of january. but this is the map showing the warmth in the atmosphere. if you look at the subtropical atlantic here, just to the west of the canaries, south of the azores, there is a current across western parts of europe and then deeper into more central and eastern parts of europe. in england, for example, this is how mild or warm it could actually get, 17 degrees. compare that to the average of eight celsius. now, at the moment, it�*s not quite so mild. in fact, in scotland with the clear skies in some eastern areas quite a nippy start to the day and not desperately cold for this time of the year. but still temperatures, i think, around freezing or below in some of the glenns, five degrees and some of the eastern parts of england.
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but 1a degrees in plymouth at 6am, so that�*s the mild air which is following this warm front here which will be moving across the uk bringing a spell of rainy weather for many of us. then that weather front will clear to the north, the skies should also brighten up a little bit. and temperatures mid teens, mid teens widely across england, wales, a little bit fresher in the north, but they could max out at around 17 celsius in the southeast of the country on wednesday and also on thursday. now here�*s another weather front that�*s coming in from the south, some wet weather particularly reaching parts of wales. in fact, that warmer weather moves further north too. we are talking about 16 degrees in hull, 17 degrees in the east and the southeast of the country. now, here�*s new year�*s eve, and it does look as though we are on track for one of the mildest new year�*s eves on record. i mean, it remains to be seen how mild it will be, but by day, we are talking around 15—16 degrees.
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you get the sense that it�*s notjust the one day that�*s going to be mild. we are talking about multiple days here with mid teens across many parts of the country. so a near record—breaking, i think, new year�*s eve on the way. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. i�*m lukwesa burak. protests outside court, as the kremlin bans one of russia�*s oldest and best known human rights organisations. new covid infections in the uk hit a record daily high, as the british government defends its decision not to introduce further restrictions in england. a huge increase in the number of young children having to work on the streets in afghanistan — we have a special report from kabul. translation: my dad lost his job. _ no—one else at home was working, so i started shoe—shining. and — china says its
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astronauts are being put in danger of a collision —— with satellites

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