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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 31, 2021 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with chris mason and katherine downes. our headlines today... new year's eve parties can take place tonight in england despite rising coronavirus cases. but tighter restrictions in scotland, northern ireland and wales mean celebrations will be muted. some people from scotland and wales are planning to cross the english border to avoid restrictions. we came up from bridgend to spend new year's eve in london. were hoping to come down here and some fireworks. the advice is to take a test before socialising. and today an extra eight million lateral flows should be supplied to pharmacies
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after complaints of shortages. "relieved and grateful" — the victims of ghislaine maxwell have been speaking after she was convicted of grooming girls to be abused byjeffery epstein — her family say they can't accept the verdict. good morning. ending the so—called loyalty premium. new rules means existing customers will pay the same price or car and home insurance as he once and it could save them billions over the next few years. manchester united ring out the year with a win. their unbeaten run under ralph rangnick continues with victory over burnley at old trafford. and with temperatures 15 degrees in parts of the uk, it is set to be the warmest temperature on record. more in 15 minutes. it's friday, the 31st of december. our main story. the prime minister has urged people
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to take a covid test before attending new year's eve parties this evening. no new restrictions have been introduced in england, but in scotland, wales and northern ireland tighter rules are now in place for hospitality venues and indoor gatherings. it comes amid concerns over the availability of coronavirus tests, as the government pledges to deliver eight million additional kits to pharmacies by today. matt graveling reports. this is how london rang in 2020. but this year, like last, will feel very different for many people. for the second year running, london's famous new year's eve fireworks celebrations have been cancelled because of the coronavirus pandemic. in comparison this year, restrictions have eased. there are vaccinations and tests also available. with coronavirus infections in record numbers, how will people choose to celebrate? that does depend on where you are. no new restrictions have been introduced in england
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but the government is urging people to take a lateral flow test and celebrate outdoors, if possible. we are not as stressed about it as we used to be. also the club where we're going, you have to have a covid pass. i feel pretty safe going there, to be honest. i've been a little bit worried. i have asthma, so it's a little bit like that's it. be careful. would you have gone out had it not been for covid? yeah, 100%. in scotland, new rules mean many hogmanay events are cancelled. mixing is limited to three households and social distancing measures are in place in hospitality venues. it's looking 0k. it's not looking anything like we would be hoping to have at this time of year. this is when we hope, as well as the bells ringing, the tills are ringing. that isn't happening this year. in northern ireland, only three households will be able to mix. nightclubs are closed and dancing is banned in hospitality venues. groups of no more than six can meet in pubs in wales. nightclubs are closed and indoor gatherings
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limited to 30 people. for some, they are taking their celebrations on the road, crossing the border into england. we've come up from bridgend to spend new year's eve in london and we're hoping to come down here and see some fireworks. it's all banned in wales, so we've come here to enjoy it. crossing the border for new year's is legal and while the welsh government is asking people to act conscientiously, the scottish government has urged people not to travel to england to party. there are still concerns over the availability of lateral flow tests but the government has pledged that 8 million additional tests will be delivered to pharmacies by today. wales has already loaned 4 million tests to england. health secretary sajid javid has pledged the uk supply will be tripled early next year to 300 million per month. so the message for tonight... take a test before any celebrations and kick off the new year in a cautious and sensible way. matt graveling, bbc news.
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health leaders are warning that people are failing to attend up to 40% of booked vaccination appointments. the nhs confederation say that some vaccination sites were only a third full, despite cases continuing to rise. it comes as the government claims to have met its target of offering every eligible adult in england a boosterjab by today. victims of ghislaine maxwell have been speaking of their relief at the guilty verdicts in her sex trafficking trial in new york. she now faces a lengthy prison sentence after being convicted for grooming underage girls to be abused by the disgraced financier, jeffrey epstein. her family are backing an appeal against her conviction. simonjones has this report. described in court as partners in crime, running a pyramid scheme of abuse, the british former socialite ghislaine maxwell would groom underage girls for american financier jeffrey epstein.
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he killed himself injail while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges. she could spend the rest of her life behind bars, to the relief of the victims. we have a lot of work to do in this country in terms of holding people accountable, and educating about things like grooming. i didn't know when i was 16. i had no idea, i'd never heard that term — i didn't understand what was happening to me, this combination of being given gifts and positive attention and also having this abuse and these boundary violations. ghislaine maxwell's victims say her conviction shows perpetrators of sexual abuse will face justice no matter how much power and privilege they have. in an interview with the bbc, her brother said the maxwell family supports an appeal against her conviction. i'm not saying that they are lying. i mean, it may well be they were victims ofjeffrey epstein but i do not accept they were victims of ghislaine. that is my position,
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and that's also her position. in court, the jury decided the women were telling the truth, that ghislaine maxwell was notjust passive bystander to the crimes ofjeffrey epstein but a sexual predator in her own right. her trial is just one of the court cases in the us arising from the activities of epstein. another is a civil lawsuit by virginia giuffre, formerly known as virginia roberts, against prince andrew, alleging sexual assault. prince andrew has always strongly denied her claims. mr maxwell, can we have a statement on behalf of the family, please? lawyers for ghislaine maxwell say they have already started work on her appeal. simon jones, bbc news. train passengers are being advised to alter their new year's eve plans due to planned strike action. cross country has cancelled services across england, scotland and wales and will be operating a "very limited timetable" on other routes. southern has also announced none of its trains will run to or from london victoria until 10th january because of staff shortages caused by covid.
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mourners in south africa have been paying their respects to the late archbishop desmond tutu, who is lying in state for a second day ahead of his funeral tomorrow. the anti—apartheid campaigner died on sunday at the age of 90. we can speak now to our south africa correspondent, nomsa maseko, who is at st georges cathedral in cape town. nomsa — large crowds expected there again today? indeed. large crowds are expected at the st george's cathedral. you can hearin the st george's cathedral. you can hear in the background a brass band already playing. clerics and clergy have now formed a guard of honour while waiting for the remains of archbishop desmond tutu to arrive sometime this morning. we do expect large crowds to file past the
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remains of the late archbishop. this will now be a second day in which he will now be a second day in which he will be lying in state here at saint george's cathedral. there are large numbers that are expected to attend the funeral but the government has made provision for public viewing areas to ensure as many people as possible are able to pay their last respects to the man who was responsible for south africa's reconciliation process. as you know, desmond tt was a larger than life figure but he did say he did not want any lavish spending for his funeral, he wanted the cheapest coffin available. you see the coffin that was chosen was a simple pine wooden coffin that was chosen. he said he did not want a military parade, so the government and family has said it will do all they can to
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ensure his wishes are followed to the letter. �* , , ., ., the letter. bringing us up-to-date with the latest _ the letter. bringing us up-to-date with the latest on _ the letter. bringing us up-to-date with the latest on the _ the letter. bringing us up-to-date with the latest on the funeral- the letter. bringing us up-to-date with the latest on the funeral of. with the latest on the funeral of desmond tutu. no doubt more across the weekend. and here's some good news for those of us who like to see in the new year with a bona fide big ben bong — or 12. big ben strikes midnight. that was the famous bell ringing in the start of 2018. but it's been largely silent for the last four years because of restoration work on the elizabeth tower. thankfully, the huge bell and its four quarter bells are back in action tonight, using a temporary mechanism. this trial run was filmed yesterday. all four dials of the clock will also be on display, having been restored to their original colour scheme.
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do you rely on big ben to bring in your new year? i sometimes rely on it to —— to meetings in westminster as well. so long has it been without the conventional bongs, it is quite something now. in the first few months when it stopped, you are relying on the bongs. you used to think, it hasn't bonged, i will be fine. it is a temporary mechanism. it is not regularly bonging. it is like having its arm in a pod. the whole site is being renovated. huge discussions about the cost and whether parliament has to relocate. it is something of a building site. it is something of a building site.
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it is something of a building site. it is brilliant for that iconic moment, to see that moment... i love how we have turned bong into a verb. let's get some new year's eve weather from matt. morning to you. good morning. what a day it will be today! new year's eve. the current record as far as temperatures are concerned, 111.8 celsius recorded in 2011. today is already 15 degrees in liverpool and parts of flintshire as well. in braemar in aberdeenshire it is on the chilly side. heavy rain through parts of central scotland. lively bursts of rain moving out of wales and into the south of england. sd went with it. you cannot rule out
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the odd rumble of thunder. for some that first glimpse of sunshine into weeks as we see the cloud break—up more readily. quite a breeze blowing. lighterwinds more readily. quite a breeze blowing. lighter winds further north into central northern scotland. temperatures in single figures, still above where we should be. 16, 17 in the east. as we head towards midnight there will be outbreaks of rain in the west. the heavier bass in the north—west. these are the temperatures to in new year's day. temperatures still in double figures across most parts of the country. rain pushing across northern england and parts of scotland. on new year's day itself a lot of dry weather with sunshine. blustery but there will be batches of showers working their way east. elsewhere a brief hit of rain, gusty winds and sunshine in between. that is how it is looking. more for
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you later. see you later. warm out there, isn't it? warm walking in. four o'clock in the morning and it will be in double figures. very weird. from tomorrow, new rules will mean people who stick with their home or car insurance provider won't get a worse deal than new customers. ben has been finding out more. morning. lovely and warm at the end london, i should morning. lovely and warm at the end london, ishould imagine. you do have your big coat on. london, i should imagine. you do have your big coat on.— london, i should imagine. you do have your big coat on. what he did not say was _ have your big coat on. what he did not say was it _ have your big coat on. what he did not say was it is _ have your big coat on. what he did not say was it is raining. _ have your big coat on. what he did not say was it is raining. it - have your big coat on. what he did not say was it is raining. it is - not say was it is raining. it is warm but it is raining. good morning. yes, this is all about the so—called "loyalty penalty." this is where if you had been with your car or home insurance firm for a number of years he find you are paying much more than new customers. that is because the financial regulator, the fca, found new customers were being yielded with
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cheaper deals at the expense of people who had been loyal and with that company for quite a long time. they were paying hundreds of pounds more every year. the rules will change from tomorrow. that affects people like sean's mum, who has been with her car insurer for ten years. take a listen. my with her car insurer for ten years. take a listen.— take a listen. my mum's car insurance — take a listen. my mum's car insurance was _ take a listen. my mum's car insurance was due _ take a listen. my mum's car insurance was due for- take a listen. my mum's car. insurance was due for renewal. take a listen. my mum's car- insurance was due for renewal. when she said _ insurance was due for renewal. when she said what she was paying, i was amazed, _ she said what she was paying, i was amazed, especially in comparison with what— amazed, especially in comparison with what i— amazed, especially in comparison with what i was paying. we talked about _ with what i was paying. we talked about comparison websites. i said, -et about comparison websites. i said, get the _ about comparison websites. i said, get the laptop out and have a look. when _ get the laptop out and have a look. when we _ get the laptop out and have a look. when we still have the quotes and saw how— when we still have the quotes and saw how much smaller the amounts work and _ saw how much smaller the amounts work and saw how much smaller the immense _ work and saw how much smaller the immense work she was gobsmacked. she hearty— immense work she was gobsmacked. she hearty fell_ immense work she was gobsmacked. she nearly fell off the chair. she did not believe it at first. she felt she had — not believe it at first. she felt she had done something wrong on the quotes _ she had done something wrong on the quotes yes. — she had done something wrong on the quotes. yes, it was a huge, huge difference — quotes. yes, it was a huge, huge
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difference. if quotes. yes, it was a huge, huge difference-— difference. if you get a notification _ difference. if you get a notification from - difference. if you get a notification from your. difference. if you get a i notification from your car difference. if you get a - notification from your car or difference. if you get a _ notification from your car or home ensure it is up for renewal and you click on menu, you could find you are paying hundreds of pounds more. let's have a look at how the numbers actually stack up. for car insurance, the fca found new customers were paying on average £285 a year. loyal customers were paying way more, £370 on average a year. when it comes to home insurance, are very similar picture. new customers were paying £165 on average every year and loyal once 287, a whopping £120 morecambe adjustable sticking with the company that they have always shopped with. from tomorrow the regulator wants to change that. they want to stop firms charging new and existing customers different prices. they think that could say people for 2p over the next ten years. that is all well and
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good if you are prepared to shop around and try to find the different deals but what about everyone else? take a listen. it's hard to know exactly what is going to happen but it's expected the overall cost of insurance will increase. even if you have been a loyal customer and you see some fresh reductions, and if you are a new customer you might see some price increases, the overall cost is actually going to go up. there's a couple of other factors going on here as well and that's the fact the number of claims that are happening in car insurance, for example, and the cost of claims in both car insurance and home insurance are going up. the reason —— name is an expectation that prices could go up across the board. it is still definitely worth shopping around because that is how you can access the better deals, evenif you can access the better deals, even if the rules do change. so what can we do to make sure we get the best deal? shopping around is always the way to
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play companies of against each other to try to get a cheaper price. do not be afraid to haggle. give them a call and ask if they will reduce how much you will pay. some firms have flexibility and they might be able to offer you a cheaper deal. also worth thinking about how you buy it. do not do it in the same way. you might find it is cheaper if you go on a price comparison website or a broker or go directly to the insurance company itself. have a think about different ways of being able to buy but do not be afraid to haggle. always useful advice. the changes come into full tomorrow, the start of a new year. —— into force stop that is a new year's resolution to bear in mind by some haggling.
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let's reflect on all things new year. the actor and singer, 0lly alexander, will be joined by kylie minogue and the pet shop boys to ring in the new year tonight on bbc one. he may be watching it this evening with a glass of something fizzy. the years & years singer is following in the footsteps of robbie williams and alicia keys to host the concert. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been speaking to 0lly, and given us a little sneak peak of what's to come tonight. # sanctify the love that you crave.# 0lly alexander, when you get the call saying do you want to do the bbc new year's eve show, how did you react? isaid yes! oh, my gosh, i can't believe... i feel very lucky to be doing it. i can't tell you. it's such an honour to be bringing in the new year's with everyone watching. quite a responsibility, because there will be a lot of people at home this year. that's true, actually, yeah. i am actually quite nervous, so
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thanks for making me more nervous. so what are you planning, then? well, obviously, i'll be doing my own hits. but also some really exciting collaborations with kylie minogue, pet shop boys. because this is the thing, it is going to be a very wide audience that is watching this, so you need to play songs that people can sing and dance along to. 0h, don't worry, you can sing and dance along to every single song. # i'm chasing after midnight. # show me the way to your heart. kylie minogue, you have worked with her a couple of times. the kylie minogue, global icon, superstar, legend. i first met her in 2015. we supported her, supported her show. over the years, i wheedled my way in there, so now i'm like actually her friend. what is the secret to doing that? just don't give up. if you dream big! the pet shop boys. # everywhere i'm going to. # it's a sin.# neil tennant and chris lowe. oh, my gosh, two legends. the stories they have and people they've worked with over the years, and just being able to call myself one of those people is very, very cool. do they give you advice,
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do they try and look after you in the industry? yeah, well, i really value the conversations i've had with the pet shop boys, with kylie, so much because i still get so nervous and feel like my confidence takes a knock. like i have these days. and they do, as well. kylie telling me about how she feels that, sometimes. and neil, so, you know, it's encouraging to know that they are still like that. they are human beings! with the pet shop boys, will it be it's a sin you do? yeah, well... yes, it will. i was like, maybe you will have to wait and see, but i've spoilt it. yes, we are going to do it. you get all these stories and all these rumours and all these nightmares, because that's what they want you to think — that lot. it's almost hard to believe that was this year. because it was january. what kind of impact as it had on you, that show? being able to play that character was incredible, because i am a gay man, i got to get a link to my past, in a way, by playing something that was set in the �*80s, but that has... the aids crisis directly impacts me
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today and so many of us, so learning all of that has been hugely profound for me. # then you're telling me you can't breathe. # well, you should set me free. # baby, if you're over me. 2022 is almost upon us. new year's resolutions, what are you going for? my new year's resolution last year was not to search my name on the internet. i have managed a whole year, so i'm just going to keep that one going, as well. well, congratulations, 0lly alexander. thank you very much for speaking to us right to the end of 2021. thank you for speaking to me. # only got a second to midnight.# it's going to be good fun, isn't it? the big new years & years eve party starts tonight on bbc one at 11.25pm in england,
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wales and northern ireland. you can see in the new year. terrific. now for the sport. dancing for no reason. if you started to party now commit you with the going a bit early. i am back here tomorrow. the party might start at seven o'clock in the morning and finish by midday. manchester united into the top six. they have not been outside the top six by new year in 32 years. it is a risky business. had they not won last night it would be a concern. manchester united's unbeaten run under new manager
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ralf rangnick continues. united beat burnley 3—1 at old trafford to move up to sixth in the premier league. 0ur sports correspondent andy swiss reports. 0n the eve of sir alex fergusson's 80th birthday, could the current manchester united give him the perfect present? seven minutes in against burnley, and scott mctominay duly obliged. he certainly enjoyed it, but he wasn't alone. burnley�*s night soon got even worse. first jadon sancho's deflected effort doubled united's lead. and when mctominay�*s shot rebounded to cristiano ronaldo, it was 3—0 and it was surely game over. not quite, as aaron lennon pulled one back for burnley at the end of a breathless first half. after the break, it was united that threatened once more. burnley keeper wayne hennessey denying first mctominay and then edison cavani — his brilliance matched only by his bravery. but united held on for a 3—1 victory, which moves them up to six
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and which ends their year on a winning note. andy swiss, bbc news. norwich's visit to leicester tomorrow has been postponed due to a covid outbreak and injuries at carrow road. leicester will have to make do without jamie vardy for up to a month. he aggravated a hamstring injury in tuesday's victory over liverpool. novak djokovic is unsure if he'll be able to make the australian open, according to his fellow serbian player dusan lajovic. djokovic has already withdrawn from the serbian team at the atp cup in sydney. the world no 1 is aiming for a men's record 21st grand slam title and a 10th crown in melbourne. he's repeatedly declined to say whether he's been vaccinated. he said, "i'm not coming, guys, to the atp cup. we will see about the australian open." he did not specify if he is coming or not, but that he is waiting for a decision. he kept in touch with all of us. it's a last—minute decision.
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the australian open is still uncertain for us. i don't know the information, so i think that will come in the next couple of days, or whenever is the deadline, or whatever it is. so we don't know right now. england are expecting to have captain 0wen farrell available for the beginning of rugby's six nations. he needed surgery on an ankle injury which he picked up in the win over australia in november. hookerjamie george and centre manu tuilagi are also hoping to be fit for england's opening game against scotland at murrayfield at the start of february. a dramatic night at alexandra palace, where quarterfinal places were up for grabs in the pdc world darts championship. there was a thrilling battle between two former champions. scotland's gary anderson eventually saw off englishman rob cross, winning by four sets to three. peter snakebite wright is into the last 8. the scottish 2020 champion beat england's ryan searle by 4—1 sets.
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england's james wade is also through. the world number 4 thrashed martjn kleermaker of the netherlands by 4—0 sets. australian batter travis head has tested positive for covid and will miss the fourth ashes test against england in sydney, which starts late tuesday evening uk time. he'll remain in melbourne and isolate for seven days in line with health requirements. head is australia's leading run—scorer in the ashes, a series they've already won with two matches still to play. imean, not i mean, not great england. australia, they were pretty happy with themselves. steve smith put up on instagram yesterday, he got stuck in and left for nearly an hour. —— in and left for nearly an hour. —— in the left.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london and bbc south east today. a murder investigation has been launched after a teenage boy was stabbed to death in a park in south london. the met police said the victim, a 15—year—old boy, was found injured in ashburton park in croydon just after 7pm. no arrests have been made. the victim is the 29th teenager to be killed in london this year — the highest level since 2008. bins will go uncollected today in eastbourne as refuse workers strike over pay and conditions. further walk—outs are planned forjanuary the 7th and 10th. eastbourne council have described the action as wholly unnecessary, and say they'll continue talks with the gmb union to try to resolve the dispute as quickly as possible. the union says workers are tired of substandard conditions at the depot.
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ambulance services are urging people to be cautious and well prepared as they celebrate the new year tonight. south east coast ambulance service said anyone heading out to parties should think about the risks of mixing with large groups. they say a home covid test should be carried out beforehand and anyone with symptoms is advised to stay at home. if people are planning to go out, then they need to plan ahead — so where they are going to go, how they are going to get home and how can they be sure they are as safe as possible while they are out. now, we know that the 0micron variant is spreading rapidly, so thinking about where you are going to go and what risk that might put you at, and how that might translate into risks for members of yourfamily. the home office has confirmed that part of lydd airport in kent is now being used to triage migrants who land on beaches nearby. it says people will be given food, dry clothes and a covid test at the airport site before being transported to
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a largerfacility in dover. southern rail has said it won't run services into london victoria until january the 10th. the rail company says it's because of the ongoing effect of coronavirus isolation and sickness among staff. there will be no gatwick express trains, and other services from sussex will be diverted into london bridge. time now for the weather forecast with kate kinsella. good morning, it's another exceptionally mild start this morning and end to 2021. morning and mild end to 2021. the cloud is a little more ready to break today so we will see sunny spells and temperatures up to 16 celsius. the win strengthens a
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little into new year's day. double figures across the board between 10-12. figures across the board between 10—12. forthe figures across the board between 10—12. for the first day of 2022 another mild one. quite cloudy for sum and showers potentially, especially along the south coast. drier further north with sunny spells. that's all for now. we're back in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and katherine downes. now we will reflect on the year in science. it was a year shaped by the globalfight against the coronavirus pandemic, but with significant developments in climate change and space exploration. science correspondent pallab ghosh gives his analysis of the year.
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2021 was the year that world leaders agreed on a new plan to save the planet. hearing no objections, it is so decided. scientists warned that it was now or never to stop damaging climate change. the difference between 1.5 and 2.4 is really survival of millions and millions of people and species in the planet. environmentalists chopped down trees to save the planet. nasa's perseverance rover landed on mars. and there was a discovery of what might be another fundamental force of nature.
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welcome to the year in science. the earth's climate dominated this year in science. for a long time, scientists have warned that our current way of life would lead to dangerous and possibly irreversible damage to the earth's ecosystems. world leaders gathered at the un climate change conference were told now is the time to act. ready to start. world leaders gathered in glasgow in november to hammer out a deal to reduce carbon dioxide levels to stop dangerous global warming. and one of the biggest disputes was over the future of coal. for a while, it looked like negotiators couldn't reach a deal.
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then, the man at the centre of the talks, alok sharma, had to appeal to all the parties to cooperate. this is the moment of truth for our planet and it's a moment of truth for our children and our grandchildren. it did the trick. an agreement was reached. by the end of 2022, countries will have to update their climate pledges at a faster pace than before. by 2024, a package of long—term financial aid for the poorest nations have to be agreed. and then, by 2030, to avoid the worst of global warming, carbon emissions should be halved. but that will be made harder by china and india's insistence that coal should be phased down rather than phased out. so, as things stand, polar ice will still melt faster
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than ever, raising sea levels, and, together with heavier rain, threatening millions of people with flooding. we've already warmed by 1.1 degrees since pre—industrial times. world leaders said that limiting the rise to 1.5 was still possible, but projections suggest that we're headed for at least 1.8 — and that's only if every promise is kept. more realistically, we're on course for 2.4 degrees — a really dangerous level. the difference between 1.5 and 2.4 is really the survival of millions and millions of people and species in the planet. this is what is particularly true for the islands. but, according to a government adviser at the heart of the talks, the worst outcomes can be averted. we have kept 1.5 alive, but on the basis of delivering on those commitments, and that'll be our next task for us as the presidency
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but for all the countries, and it's on us to make sure that this is real in action. and sir david attenborough said the richest nations had a moral responsibility to help the most vulnerable. it would be really catastrophic if the developed nations - of the world, the more powerful- nations of the world, simply ignored these problems. if we say, "well, it's . nothing to do with us," and cross our arms — we caused it. thousands of men, women and children who have lost everything — _ lost everything — can we just go - by and say it's no business of ours? an assessment by the environment agency said that the uk was not yet ready for the impact of climate change. in october, a street in cardiff became a dangerous river after a massive downpour. there was a similar scene in newcastle after torrential rain there.
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in america, europe, south america and siberia, there were raging wildfires. the biggest shock came in germany injuly as a surge of water tore through communities. 200 people were killed. the weather events that we saw in europe this summer could happen here in england, and we need to be ready. to save lives. we need to recognise that it's adapt or die. chanting: stop deforestation! young people were involved in protests across the world, as they have the most to lose if we fail to get the impact of climate change under control.
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they're also the ones who can fix the problem. 5,000 of them were involved in a scheme to understand and help solve the environmental crisis. we want to know how clean the air is in our school. we're measuring plants to see how they're growing outside. we've been learning about worms. this is mustard powder. you're going to mix the mustard powder into the water. this one is about understanding the role of worms. these are babies, 0k? you can hold that. baby worms! these are the scientists of tomorrow. they've got to think about their future and their children's future and it's a long—term game. this is not something for a single generation. we've all got to play our part. other projects involve growing nature—friendly food. it's so important to me. it's a matter of our lives now and i think it should be important to everyone, and this is why we've started the outdoor learning area so that we can protect the environment and try
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and combat climate change. the young researchers took what they discovered and presented their work to the politicians at cop26. there was a new award for those trying to save the planet, called the earthshot prize. we have lift—off. its name is a reference to america's moonshot — an ambitious programme to get an astronaut on the lunar surface. but, more than 50 years on, prince william told the bbc that saving the earth
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was an even bigger challenge. we need some of the words greatest brains and minds fixed on trying to repair this planet, not trying to find the next place to go and live. but many space scientists say the choice between earth or space is a false one. the science museum gallery celebrates the heyday of space travel in the 19605 and �*70s when humans went to the moon. and it was that effort, they say, that helped draw attention to the planet's environmental plight. but, for many, it's the beautiful images from space that most inspires — no more so than the pictures from the hubble space telescope. for more than 30 years, it's captured distant galaxies, stars being born and dying. images that have been as uplifting to the soul as they have been to the mind.
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hubble's successor is nasa's james webb telescope. unlike hubble, the £7.5 billion spacecraft will go beyond earth's orbit — 930,000 miles into deep space. once in space, it unfurls its sunshield and deploys its giant mirror and instruments. the space telescope is much more powerful than hubble. it'll be able to analyse the atmospheres of worlds orbiting distant stars to see if there are signs of life. it'll also be able to witness the birth of the very first stars.
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this is a simulation of that critical moment. the purple areas are clouds of hydrogen gas becoming ever denser until they form stars, blazing like fireworks. james webb is expected to capture images of this really happening. i'm so excited! why are you so excited? isn't that just fantastic that as humanity, a tiny little civilisation on planet earth, that we can create a telescope that we can send up into space and peer back to the universe as it was just a couple of hundred million years after the big bang? and some incredible views from space were obtained from these aerials planted in a small field in hampshire. these pick up radio waves from distant galaxies. they may not look like much,
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but astronomers have connected 52 sites just like this one spread all across europe. together, they've captured some of the most detailed pictures from space ever taken. in this image, the galaxy is in the middle. shooting out either side are jets of material across the expanse of space. it's because of a gigantic black hole inside of it. astronomers can now see things they've never been able to see before. this is a picture of a galaxy seen through a normal telescope. and here is a standard radio image of it. although it's a lot brighter, a lot of the detail has been lost. now compare it with one of the new high—definition images, which is much sharper, showing features inside in unprecedented detail. the brightest area at the bottom shows the location of a gigantic black hole inside this galaxy. it's bright because of the energy released as it's sucking in material around it.
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meanwhile, in the deserts of chile, a telescope was able to see the universe as it really is — filled with a mysterious substance called dark matter. it can't be seen, but this instrument detected dark matter by the way it distorts starlight. this is a map of matter in the universe. astronomers produced this map of how it spread across the cosmos. it permeates space, accounting for most of the mass of the universe. the bright areas are where dark matter is most clumped together. it's here that galaxies form. it's our reality shining like gems on an unseen, tangled cosmic web. but the map is not what astronomers expected. according to einstein's theories, the matter should be slightly more clumped together. instead, it's smoother and more spread out.
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building on the work of einstein, carlos frank was among the scientists who developed the current theory of cosmology. hearing now that there may be something not quite right with the theory, well, it's very disconcerting, it's very alarming, and, in a way, frightening, to see that maybe my whole life's work might crumble in front of me. but, at the same time, it is immensely exciting. back in our own solar system, nasa's perseverance rover landed on mars. first look at the surface. these pictures are from the spacecraft during the final few minutes of its descent. as it nears the surface, clouds of dust and grit are thrown around as its thrusters are fired. and, from another camera angle, we can see the vehicle lowered to the ground. perseverance safely . on the surface of mars! these were the scenes
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at mission control. shortly after, a thoughtful tweet from the rover — "i'm safe on mars. perseverance will get you anywhere." it's been drilling into the surface and storing some of the rocks for a future mission to bring back. some of the samples may contain fossilised evidence of life. i am not talking about martian little green men. probably not even fish. we're looking for microbial life or maybe microbes that have made a little mat or a slime of sorts that you might find at the bottom of a pond. those are the type of things that are likely to — well, they did exist on earth three billion years ago. the question is, did they exist on mars at the bottom of lakes? on board is a small helicopter, ingenuity. which carried out the first ever
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powered flight on another planet. star trek theme. back on earth, and boldly going where hundreds of people had gone before... glasses clink. william shatner. ..star trek�*s captain kirk, william shatner, blasted off from a launch site in texas. it was a ten—minute flightjust 60 miles above the earth, but enough time to float in zero gravity. waiting for him on his return, amazon founderjeff bezos, whose company developed the rocket system. what you have given me is the most profound experience i can imagine. i'm so filled with emotion about whatjust happened, ijust... it's extraordinary.
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at the age of 90, william shatner finally reached the final frontier. in physics, there was what could be one of the biggest steps forward for a generation. scientists believe that there are four fundamental forces of nature. one for gravity, another for electricity, and two nuclear forces which control the behaviour of atoms. together, they explain the way the world works. but, in recent years, astronomers began noticing things in space that can't be explained by the four forces, such as galaxies spinning faster than they should. and they can't explain why the stars and planets and everything on them, including us, exist at all. the new results suggest there might be a fifth force which could explain some of these mysteries. the result was from fermi lab, a particle accelerator just outside chicago.
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scientists accelerated particles inside this giant ring close to the speed of light. and they found something that cannot be explained by the current theory of physics at the subatomic level. i think it's quite mind—boggling, and it has the potential to turn physics on its head. we have a number of mysteries that remain unsolved, and this could give us the key answers to solve those mysteries. you've heard of electrons — well, there are similar particles called muons, which are much heavier and spin like tops. in the experiment, they were made to rotate using magnets. the current theory states that they should rotate at a certain rate. instead, they rotated faster. this might be caused by a mystery force — a fifth force that in turn is created by another, yet to be discovered, particle. in february, a meteorite blazed across the night sky over the rooftops across the uk.
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a large chunk of it landed in the driveway of the wilcock family living in winchcombe in gloucestershire. i came out, and we looked at this pile of what looked like crushed coal. and so i started even then thinking perhaps it's come down from space. security camera footage captured the flight of the meteorite as it flew over nuneaton, somerset, wigan, before it ended up at the natural history museum for study. winchcombe is very special because it is one of the most pristine materials that we have available on earth to study, and the thing that's really good about this particular case is that we saw it fall, and so we can use that fireball to, kind of, track back the trajectory, work out where in the solar system it came from. a study from the natural history museum found that the uk is losing biodiversity so quickly that it's now one of the most nature—depleted places in the world.
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that's important because there are rare, long—lost species that could be better suited to the extreme conditions caused by global warming. many of the crops we depend on, such as this coffee plant, won't thrive under the increased temperatures predicted by climate change. but these beans from 1873 could provide an answer. they were found in the collection at kew gardens here. not only are they more heat—resistant, but they make an excellent brew, with tones of honey and blackcurrant, apparently. it's just one example of many of how science, rather than taking us away from the natural world, is bringing us closer to solutions for some of humanity's greatest problems. millions of tonnes of sand were shifted to a stretch of coastline in north norfolk to see if a natural barrier could hold back rising sea levels. it seems to have worked. the homes and businesses
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are on the front line of rising sea levels. the sand barrier idea is cheaper than building a concrete seawall. this more natural solution could be used to protect more coastal communities. in a way that making space for water, so allowing natural processes to come back in places where we can do this, i think that's the attitude we need to have, and that we're not going to be able to keep building sea walls and defend, defend, defend. in 2021, nearly 60 acres of trees were cut down in northumberland — to reduce carbon emissions. it sounds strange, but it was done to save an ancient peat bog, which traps far more carbon than trees ever could. the building blocks of the peatland are the sphagnum mosses which themselves, like this one, are absolutely full of water. they're about 90% water.
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and that water is why bogs are better at slowing climate change than trees. when plants die in a bog, they don't release all their carbon into the atmosphere because they don't rot completely. which is why this... chainsaw whirrs. ..is good for the environment. there's greater diversity among science students than ever before. but an analysis in march by the royal society showed that there was an unacceptably low number of black people among academic staff. 6.3% drop out of their postgraduate studies. that compares with 3.8% of white students. black people account forjust 1.7% of research staff in the uk,
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whereas they make up 3.5% of the population. and out of 22,745 professors in academia, 155 are black. we know something's happening within the university. it's that culture that can be quite toxic. it's due to racism — all the statistics show that it's not due to class, it's not due to what school they went to — and that environment and that culture is carried on all the way through the student life cycle and into careers as well. in an effort to attract more ethnic minorities, a series of projects were launched across england to encourage them to do phds and to support them throughout their research careers. there was a surprising discovery
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at canterbury cathedral. inside, its stunning windows depict symbolic religious scenes. this series was thought to have been made in the 13th century. but researchers discovered that some of the panels, including this one of the prophet nathan, were made much earlier. it's only come to light now because of this device, called a windolyser. it may not look like much, but it was developed by scientists to be used on location without damaging the glass. it shines a beam onto the surface, which causes material inside to radiate. this radiation contains a chemicalfingerprint from which the researchers worked out their age. we've been working on this detective story for some time, putting all the pieces in place, and then we finally get an answer, something new that brings together science and art into one story. it's fantastic.
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these are all stories that were recorded at the time they happened here. the discovery astonished leonie seliger, who looks after the stained glass windows here. she believes the redated panels could go back to the mid—1100s and were in place during the great historical events at the cathedral, including the assassination of the then archbishop thomas becket, who features in many of the windows. they would have witnessed the murder of thomas becket. henry ii come on his knees begging for forgiveness. they would have witnessed the conflagration of the fire that devoured the cathedral in 1174. and then they would have witnessed all of british history. there's a lot more in store next year in science. the large hadron collider will restart at its highest power ever. the james webb telescope will send
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back its first data, which may include pictures of the first starlight in the universe. and europe and russia will send a rover to the martian surface to search for signs of life. but it's the earth we'll need to focus on. its changing climate means that the planet's fate hangs in the balance, but science can provide some of the solutions and give us hope for the future. good morning. all the headlines on the way. time now to get the news where you are. good morning from bbc london and bbc south east today. a murder investigation has been launched after a teenage boy
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was stabbed to death in a park in south london. the met police said the victim, a 15—year—old boy, was found injured in ashburton park in croydon yesterday evening. the victim is the 29th teenager to be killed in london this year — the highest level since 2008. bins will go uncollected today in eastbourne as refuse workers strike over pay and conditions. further walk—outs are planned forjanuary the 7th and 10th. eastbourne council have described the action as "wholly unnecessary" and say they'll continue talks with the gmb union. the union says workers are tired of substandard conditions at the depot. the home office has confirmed that part of lydd airport in kent is now being used to triage migrants who land on beaches nearby. it says people will be given food, dry clothes and a covid test at the airport site, before being transported to a largerfacility in dover. ambulance services are urging people to be cautious and well—prepared as they celebrate the new year tonight.
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south east coast ambulance service said anyone heading out to parties should think about the risks of mixing with large groups. they say a home covid test should be carried out beforehand and anyone with symptoms is advised to stay at home. if people are planning to go out, then they need to plan ahead — so where they are going to go, how they are going to get home and how can they be sure they are as safe as possible while they are out. now, we know that the 0micron variant is spreading rapidly, so thinking about where you are going to go and what risk that might put you at, and how that might translate into risks for members of yourfamily. the world famous new year's day parade in london has been reimagined this year due to covid. the event, that usually attracts crowds of over 500,000 and features a parade through the capital's streets, will instead be an in—person ticketed event forjust 600 and include stage performances. 0rganisers are encouraging
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those without tickets to watch the televised event from home instead. time now for the weather forecast with kate kinsella. good morning, it's another exceptionally mild start this morning and a very mild end to 2021. we've got a spell of rain. there's a cold front moving through very quickly. could be quite heavy for a time but blown through on that rather dusty, blustery south, through on that rather gusty, blustery south, south—westerly breeze. the cloud, a little more ready to break today so we will see sunny spells and temperatures getting up to 16 celsius. of course, it is new year's eve. this evening will be dry and mild, the winds that bit lighter as well. we will see some cloud overnight and the wind strengthens a little into new year's day. the minimum temperature again, double figures across the board between 10—12 celsius. for the first day of 2022, another mild one. quite cloudy for some and showers potentially, especially along the south coast. drier further north with sunny spells. temperatures 15—16c.
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that's all from us for now, we're back in half an hour. good morning, welcome to breakfast with chris mason and katherine downes. 0ur headlines today... new year's eve parties can take place tonight in england despite rising coronavirus cases. but tighter restrictions in scotland, northern ireland and wales mean celebrations will be muted. people are being urged by the scottish and welsh governments not to cross the english border to avoid restrictions. we came up from bridgend to spend new year's eve in london. we're hoping to come down here and some fireworks. the advice is to take a test before socialising. and today an extra eight million lateral flows should be supplied to pharmacies after complaints of shortages.
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"relieved and grateful" — the survivors of ghislaine maxwell have been speaking after she was convicted of grooming girls to be abused byjeffery epstein — her family say they can't accept the verdict. manchester united ring out the year with a win. their unbeaten run under ralph rangnick continues with victory over burnley at old trafford. with temperatures already 15 degrees in a few spots, it is set to be the warmest new year's eve on record. the details to get you to the midnight hourand the details to get you to the midnight hour and beyond right here on breakfast. from the midnight hour to the seven o'clock hour. it's friday, the 31st of december. our main story. the prime minister has urged people to take a covid test before attending new year's eve parties this evening. no new restrictions have been introduced in england but in scotland, wales and northern ireland tighter
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rules are now in place for hospitality venues and indoor gatherings. it comes amid concerns over the availability of coronavirus tests, as the government pledges to deliver eight million additional kits to pharmacies by today. matt graveling reports. this is how london rang in 2020. but this year, like last, will feel very different for many people. for the second year running, london's famous new year's eve fireworks celebrations have been cancelled because of the coronavirus pandemic. in comparison this year, restrictions have eased. there are vaccinations and tests also available. with coronavirus infections in record numbers, how will people choose to celebrate? that does depend on where you are. no new restrictions have been introduced in england but the government is urging people to take a lateral flow test and celebrate outdoors, if possible. we are not as stressed about it as we used to be. also the club where we're going,
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you have to have a covid pass. i feel pretty safe going there, to be honest. i've been a little bit worried. i have asthma, so it's a little bit like that's it. be careful. would you have gone out had it not been for covid? yeah, 100%. in scotland, new rules mean many hogmanay events are cancelled. mixing is limited to three households and social distancing measures are in place in hospitality venues. it's looking 0k. it's not looking anything like we would be hoping to have at this time of year. this is when we hope, as well as the bells ringing, the tills are ringing. that isn't happening this year. in northern ireland, only three households will be able to mix. nightclubs are closed and dancing is banned in hospitality venues. groups of no more than six can meet in pubs in wales. nightclubs are closed and indoor gatherings limited to 30 people. for some, they are taking their celebrations on the road, crossing the border into england. we've come up from bridgend to spend new year's eve in london and
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we're hoping to come down here and see some fireworks. it's all banned in wales, so we've come here to enjoy it. crossing the border for new year's is legal and while the welsh government is asking people to act conscientiously, the scottish government has urged people not to travel to england to party. there are still concerns over the availability of lateral flow tests but the government has pledged that 8 million additional tests will be delivered to pharmacies by today. wales has already loaned 4 million tests to england. health secretary sajid javid has pledged the uk supply will be tripled early next year to 300 million per month. so the message for tonight... take a test before any celebrations and kick off the new year in a cautious and sensible way. matt graveling, bbc news. breakfast'sjohn maguire is at a pub in bristol this morning.
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it is going to be a long day.. john, how are preparations going for tonight? a very long day. the owner is a ready and away, giving an idea of some of the preparations. this is the cloak and dagger. this is a live music and entertainment venue. let's take you to one of the larger rooms to give you an idea of the type of things they have been doing. vaccination status will be checked on the way in by door staff. points to use and sanitiser, through to where daisy is showing you, another room. a door to the back, a door to the left into an open air courtyard. the legal capacity is 375. that is being reduced tonight to 200 to try
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to encourage people to space out. in terms of what we were talking about earlier with people not being asked to cross the border, the owner is saying they have had enquiries from people in wales. in recent times, when different uk nations have had different levels of restrictions, he has found people travelling across. they are doing their best they can tonight. it has been such an uncertain time for the night—time economy over the last 18 months, to years really. they are struggling to do their best. fingers crossed. it is a very difficult environment to run a business like this. they are hoping for a better year next year, we had this year or even last year. thank you very much. back with you in bristol later in the programme. political leaders will release their new year's messages today,
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our political correspondent iain watson joins us now. morning tea year. it is all about covid, isn't it? == morning tea year. it is all about covid, isn't it?— covid, isn't it? -- to you. boris johnson — covid, isn't it? -- to you. boris johnson is— covid, isn't it? -- to you. boris johnson is using _ covid, isn't it? -- to you. boris johnson is using his _ johnson is using his new year message to boast about boosters. everyone who is eligible to get the jab had been offered. 0nly everyone who is eligible to get the jab had been offered. only seven out of ten have beenjabbed. leaders are expecting as many as four out of ten are not turning up for appointments that have been booked. that is because some people have caught covid, it is alleged. there is a less cheery side to the new year message as well. he is warning if you are notjabbed at all you could end up needlessly suffering in intensive care, so happy new year. he is urging people to be cautious in new year celebrations. nicola sturgeon says this perhaps is not
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the hogmanay we all wanted. that is because in scotland, wales and northern ireland there are more restrictions than in england. she still hopes for a brighter future. the lib dems, ed davey says nhs workers have been very resilient during the course of last year and praises and, as does keir starmer, the labour leader. the labour messages, party is ahead in the polls. he realises he will had to give people a reason to vote for labour. in his message he says he will set out labour's plans for the country in detail in 2022. they are campaigning for secure employment and secure communities.— campaigning for secure employment and secure communities. happy new year to you- — and secure communities. happy new year to you- and _ and secure communities. happy new year to you. and to _ and secure communities. happy new year to you. and to you. _ survivors of ghislaine maxwell have been speaking of their relief at the guilty verdicts in her sex trafficking trial in new york.
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she now faces a lengthy prison sentence after being convicted for grooming underage girls to be abused by the disgraced financier, jeffrey epstein. her family are backing an appeal against her conviction. simonjones has this report. described in court as partners in crime, running a pyramid scheme of abuse, the british former socialite ghislaine maxwell would groom underage girls for american financier jeffrey epstein. he killed himself injail while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges. she could spend the rest of her life behind bars, to the relief of the victims. we have a lot of work to do in this country in terms of holding people accountable, and educating about things like grooming. i didn't know when i was 16. i had no idea, i'd never heard that term — i didn't understand what was happening to me, this combination of being given gifts and positive attention and also having this abuse and these boundary violations. ghislaine maxwell's victims say her conviction shows perpetrators of sexual abuse will face justice no matter how much power and privilege they have.
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in an interview with the bbc, her brother said the maxwell family supports an appeal against her conviction. i'm not saying that they are lying. i mean, it may well be they were victims ofjeffrey epstein but i do not accept they were victims of ghislaine. that is my position, and that's also her position. in court, the jury decided the women were telling the truth, that ghislaine maxwell was notjust a passive bystander to the crimes ofjeffrey epstein but a sexual predator in her own right. her trial is just one of the court cases in the us arising from the activities of epstein. another is a civil lawsuit by virginia giuffre, formerly known as virginia roberts, against prince andrew, alleging sexual assault. prince andrew has always strongly denied her claims. mr maxwell, can we have a statement on behalf of the family, please? lawyers for ghislaine maxwell say they have already started work on her appeal. simon jones, bbc news.
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mourners in south africa have been paying their respects to the late archbishop desmond tutu, who is lying in state for a second day ahead of his funeral tomorrow. the anti—apartheid campaigner died on sunday at the age of 90. we can speak now to our south africa correspondent, nomsa maseko, who is at st georges cathedral in cape town. nomsa, large crowds expected there again today? yes. more people are expected to pay their last respects when they file past the remains of archbishop desmond tutu. this is the second day where his remains will be lying in state here at saint george's cathedral. this is also where he will be buried. the numbers from the government intends to people that came yesterday to pay their last
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respects is just under 2000 came yesterday to pay their last respects isjust under 2000 people were here. it is expected that many others will be here today but we do that his wife is now sitting next to the coffin. she is being allowed a moment with her husband. after she is done, the members of the public will be allowed to file past the body of archbishop desmond tutu. we expect that the service, the funeral service tomorrow will start at ten o'clock local time. guests will arrive from around eight o'clock. it is a state funeral which means there is a state funeral which means there is a state funeral which means there is a chance the president of south africa will also be speaking and delivering the eulogy of the archbishop. the archbishop will be cremated and his remains will be interred here at st george's cathedral. they will be placed right next to the altar at a prominent place. this is the cathedral where
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he served as south africa's first black archbishop.— he served as south africa's first black archbishop. thank you very much. coverage _ black archbishop. thank you very much. coverage of _ black archbishop. thank you very much. coverage of the _ black archbishop. thank you very much. coverage of the funeral i black archbishop. thank you very j much. coverage of the funeral on black archbishop. thank you very - much. coverage of the funeral on the bbc news channel tomorrow. and here's some good news for those of us who like to see in the new year with a bona fide big ben bong — or 12. big ben bongs. that was the famous bell ringing in the start of 2018 — but it's been largely silent for the last four years because of restoration work on the elizabeth tower. thankfully, the huge bell and its four quarter bells are back in action tonight, using a temporary mechanism. this trial run was filmed yesterday. all four dials of the clock will also be on display, having been restored to their original colour scheme. the year only really starts when you
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hear the bongs of ben. there will be something wrong if you can actually see them. parties around the country, oh, guys, it is past midnight, happy new year, everyone! 0nly big ben has the right time. it's 7:15am. here's matt with a look at the new year's eve weather. it has been very mild and lots of places. very good morning. it is going to be the warmest new year's eve on record here in the uk. at the moment we already have temperatures around 15 degrees to the west of chester. the opposite end of the scale, a fear spots a good deal cooler. they are the exception rather than the rule this morning. the weather front is across
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essential parts of scotland at the moment. watch out in the south and east of the country. we are going to see a short burst, an hour or so of heavy rain and gusty winds going east. that will help to break the cloud app in its wake. for some of you who have barely seen the sunshine, more in the way of plaid breaks. temperatures will go up in the east around 16, maybe 17 this afternoon. very unusual for the end of december. the persistent rain will fizzle out and push its way north. further outbreaks in the west towards midnight itself. the temperatures as big ben will be bonging, around 13 celsius. for new year day itself, not a bad day if you are heading out for a walk. the odd splash of rain and a batch of
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showers working east. more showers in the west later. temperatures for new year's day down a bit on today but still above where we should be. we will speak to you in a bit. see you then. we have had there has been a supply and demand issue with lateral flow tests. eight million lateral flow tests have been promised to pharmacies by today after recent demand left many with short supply, or none at all. there's also been limited availability for pcr test slots. we're joined now by chair of the national pharmacy association, andrew lane — along with chris hughes, the managing director of perkinelmer which distributes tests. morning to you. where shall we start? let's start with lateral flow
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and a challenge for pharmacies. we are all familiar with signs that your colleagues have had to pin up in pharmacy doors, saying do not ask us, we do not have any right now. how are things now given what we have been hearing from the government about having a push to get more tests in your direction in pharmacies? taste get more tests in your direction in pharmacies?— get more tests in your direction in pharmacies? we polled quite a few members yesterday _ pharmacies? we polled quite a few members yesterday on _ pharmacies? we polled quite a few members yesterday on the - pharmacies? we polled quite a few| members yesterday on the subject. many are now starting to have test kits coming. there was a hiatus in the early part of the week. we understand that mackay spoke to the managing director of alliance health care and she assured me that they are putting out 2 million a day into the network and we are starting to see that coming through. it is still very patchy. i will say not every pharmacy perhaps today will have a box that most pharmacies in the
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country will be having a box. we just ask the public to persevere. also to treat us with respect. we have had a lot of abuse over the last couple of weeks when the test had not been there. they are doing the very best, the teams met to help the very best, the teams met to help the public with this. share the very best, the teams met to help the public with this.— the public with this. are you anticipating _ the public with this. are you anticipating a _ the public with this. are you anticipating a bit _ the public with this. are you anticipating a bit of- the public with this. are you anticipating a bit of a - the public with this. are you anticipating a bit of a rash? | the public with this. are you - anticipating a bit of a rash? people have been waiting to get their tests. given that the advices do not go out on new year's eve unless he had had a i are expecting their tests to fly back at the door again? absolutely? that is what has been happening all week. a box will contain 54 tests. many of our members reporting that box is gone within the first couple of hours of riding in a pharmacy. fin within the first couple of hours of riding in a pharmacy.— riding in a pharmacy. on the practicality _ riding in a pharmacy. on the practicality terms, _ riding in a pharmacy. on the practicality terms, i - riding in a pharmacy. on the practicality terms, i was - riding in a pharmacy. on the i practicality terms, i was talking about the notices you have had to
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put up in your door saying you are currently out of lateral flows. do you know when you will be getting the next batch? i wonder how the whole supply chain works, given the extent which has had to be scaled up so rapidly. extent which has had to be scaled up so raidl . . , extent which has had to be scaled up so raidl. ., , , extent which has had to be scaled up soraidl. ., , ,. , so rapidly. certainly it is patchy. alliance health _ so rapidly. certainly it is patchy. alliance health care _ so rapidly. certainly it is patchy. alliance health care has - so rapidly. certainly it is patchy. alliance health care has been i alliance health care has been getting about 2 million kits per day over the last few days and they go straight out to our network. so uk health security agency past the 2 million into the network and alliance health care delivered them out. we had to daily deliveries coming from alliance health care. we are the nation's medicines as well. that is what we were doing in the dayjob. the same logistics are operating for the medicines as they were for their kits. that operating for the medicines as they were for their kits.— were for their kits. that is the icture were for their kits. that is the picture with — were for their kits. that is the picture with the _ were for their kits. that is the picture with the lateral - were for their kits. that is the picture with the lateral flow i were for their kits. that is the i picture with the lateral flow tests. you deal with
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into the lab and being processed. there has been enormous demand for pcr tests because cases have gone up so much. ., , , . so much. how is the picture in the lab? so much. how is the picture in the tab? demand _ so much. how is the picture in the lab? demand is _ so much. how is the picture in the lab? demand is higher _ so much. how is the picture in the lab? demand is higher than i so much. how is the picture in the lab? demand is higher than ever. | lab? demand is higher than ever. capacity has been scaled by ourselves and also the general light has lab network. they are running flat—out at the moment the 24/7. we are doing everything we can to process the samples. you are doing everything we can to process the samples. you have with ou what process the samples. you have with you what would _ process the samples. you have with you what would be _ process the samples. you have with you what would be a _ process the samples. you have with you what would be a sample - process the samples. you have with you what would be a sample is i process the samples. you have with j you what would be a sample is done in a testing centre, sm and went along to do a pcr test. —— if someone went along. talk us through thejourney of a someone went along. talk us through the journey of a test like this once it has been done in a testing centre, between that point and some are getting a result. first centre, between that point and some are getting a result.— are getting a result. first thing to the distribution _ are getting a result. first thing to the distribution team _ are getting a result. first thing to the distribution team who - are getting a result. first thing to the distribution team who will. are getting a result. first thing to| the distribution team who will look at the load on the network to ensure they have the right number of
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samples to run at capacity. at that point dozens of these samples will arrive at our lab in the morning. we will scan the part code on the cheap. the first thing we will do is kill the live virus to make it safe to work on. we will clean and wash the sample. we appreciate where the swab has been and we have to make sure it is pure genetic material we will be looking at. we have liquid handling robots to assure we meet their targets to identify covid. it is complicated. it _ their targets to identify covid. it is complicated. it has _ their targets to identify covid. it is complicated. it has been i their targets to identify covid. it i is complicated. it has been around for ears is complicated. it has been around for years and _ is complicated. it has been around for years and something _ is complicated. it has been around for years and something the i is complicated. it has been around for years and something the lab i for years and something the lab network is used to doing. [30 for years and something the lab network is used to doing. do you antici ate network is used to doing. do you anticipate problems _ network is used to doing. do you anticipate problems in _ network is used to doing. do you anticipate problems in the i network is used to doing. do you | anticipate problems in the future? lots of people mixing over christmas and new year. it is likely more people will be going for pcr test if they catch covid when they are socialising. is it possible to scale
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up socialising. is it possible to scale up your operation quickly to meet that demand? are you concerned about increased demand over the coming weeks? we increased demand over the coming weeks? ~ ., , ., ., ~' increased demand over the coming weeks? ~ ., , ., , weeks? we have been looking at this all the way through _ weeks? we have been looking at this all the way through the _ weeks? we have been looking at this all the way through the year. - weeks? we have been looking at this all the way through the year. we i weeks? we have been looking at this all the way through the year. we had j all the way through the year. we had gone from a couple of dozen cases to 6—figure numbers. we will add more capacity next week so we can ramp up in january. capacity next week so we can ramp up injanuary. limiting factors are the people, people with a certain set of skills who are given very specific training in the lab. it takes weeks to get someone fully competent. i must return your sample as well. thank you for talking us through the journey for what is full so many of us unseen. happy new year to you both. thank you very much. thank you for speaking to us about the pcr tests and lateral flow tests and supply and demand problems over the next weeks. parkrun has announced its cancelling all of its adult running
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events in wales from tomorrow because of the country's covid restrictions which limit outdoor gatherings to 50 people. thejunior parkrun events will still go ahead as numbers aren't capped for children. we've spoken to some regular runners in wales, who aren't happy with the decision. steady, go! it is disappointing not being able to meet up. this time of year is quite often where people are thinking about kind of darting a fitness journey and picking up a fitness journey. so it is disappointing. now that parkrun is on hold in wales for the foreseeable, i'll be missing not only a regular amount of exercise but also the social and community aspect. a spokesperson from the welsh government has said: let's speak to tom williams, who's the chief operating officer
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of parkrun global. good morning to you. good morning. was this a difficult decision or was it. upon you by the rules you have to abide by in wales? it it. upon you by the rules you have to abide by in wales?— to abide by in wales? it was a ainful to abide by in wales? it was a painful and — to abide by in wales? it was a painful and disappointing i to abide by in wales? it was a i painful and disappointing decision that the anyone to make with a couple —— with up to 50 people at one event. couple -- with up to 50 people at one event-— couple -- with up to 50 people at one event. ., .., ., :: ., , ., one event. you could have 50 and you could have tickets _ one event. you could have 50 and you could have tickets for _ one event. you could have 50 and you could have tickets for the _ one event. you could have 50 and you could have tickets for the event. i could have tickets for the event. you could run them but you chose not to. ~ , .., ., . ., to. we genuinely could not. we have been operating _ to. we genuinely could not. we have been operating for _ to. we genuinely could not. we have been operating for over— to. we genuinely could not. we have been operating for over ten - to. we genuinely could not. we have been operating for over ten years. i been operating for over ten years. it simply is not possible when you operate in an open public space where people can come and go as they please in any direction. if you are
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a volunteer in a park trying to turn away people, it would not be possible. i would disagree. we cannot operate with a limit of 50 people. cannot operate with a limit of 50 --eole. ~ . cannot operate with a limit of 50 ..eole, . ., ., ,., cannot operate with a limit of 50 --eole. ~ ., ., i. .«r cannot operate with a limit of 50 n-eole. . ., ., ., people. what do you make of the decision from _ people. what do you make of the decision from the _ people. what do you make of the decision from the welsh - people. what do you make of the i decision from the welsh government? disappointing. it is not based on any evidence at a. the important thing with park run and many activities like it, they are public health initiatives. they have never been more needed than they are now. the decision to close to do was be based on evidence and based on science public health. it outweighs the risk of them operating. it is clear the benefits of opening things like this is significant to public health. the risks of opening things like parkrun is minimalfor
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transmission if anything that'll. you do not know how many people will turn up and you could not impose a limit of 50. given you do not know how many would turn up, is there not a potential issue around covid safety? the welsh government making the argument they face a very serious situation at the moment. fine serious situation at the moment. one thin we serious situation at the moment. one thing we can — serious situation at the moment. que: thing we can do serious situation at the moment. iez thing we can do very well as forecast how many people will turn up. they developed a covid framework which delivers parkrun events really safely. since we have reopened post covid, 1 million people had taken part by .5 million times. we work with track and trace authorities all around the world. actually there has not been a single reported case of virus transmission at a parkrun anywhere during that time. they think the evidence is very clear that parkruns are incredibly safe.
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the events are outdoors and there are lots of mitigations in place. [30 are lots of mitigations in place. do ou are lots of mitigations in place. do you have an indication from the welsh government, i know you had beenin welsh government, i know you had been in touch with them, when you might be able to get back up and running again, literally? unfortunately not. while there are no restrictions at the moment in england, scotland and northern ireland, in wales there is a limit of 50 people. we have no end date as far as we can see at the moment. what is important and we heard about it in an interview before their split, a lot of people take part in physical activity for the first time across january and february each year. if they do not to lose that opportunity they are much less likely to be active throughout the remainder of the year. injanuary and february we would expect thousands and thousands of people to register and dozens of people to take up activity for the first time and be active. by keeping parkrun" we are not only doing short—term
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damage but also long—term damage. this is the window, isn't it? this is a window with resolutions when people are promising themselves a better self into 2022 and lowering people off the settee and into the park. now is the time to do it and it is tricky if people cannot to it and i worried about doing it. i would like to assure people parkrun events are really important. in summer like wales where it is not possible, please do what you can to be active. —— in somewhere. do what ever you plan to be active. be active. -- in somewhere. do what ever you plan to be active.— ever you plan to be active. thank ou for ever you plan to be active. thank you for talking — ever you plan to be active. thank you for talking to _ ever you plan to be active. thank you for talking to us _ ever you plan to be active. thank you for talking to us this - ever you plan to be active. thankl you for talking to us this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london
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and bbc south east today. a murder investigation has been launched after a teenage boy was stabbed to death in a park in south london. the met police said the victim, a 15—year—old boy, was found injured in ashburton park in croydon yesterday evening. the victim is the 29th teenager to be killed in london this year — the highest level since 2008. ambulance services are urging people to be cautious and well—prepared as they celebrate the new year tonight. south east coast ambulance service said anyone heading out to parties should think about the risks of mixing with large groups. they say a home covid test should be carried out beforehand and anyone with symptoms is advised to stay at home. if people are planning to go out, then they need to plan ahead — so where they are going to go, how they are going to get home and how can they be sure they are as safe as possible while they are out. now, we know that the 0micron variant is spreading rapidly, so thinking about where you are going to go and what risk
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that might put you at, and how that might translate into risks for members of yourfamily. bins will go uncollected today in eastbourne as refuse workers strike over pay and conditions. further walk—outs are planned forjanuary the 7th and 10th. eastbourne council have described the action as "wholly unnecessary" — and say they'll continue talks with the gmb union. the union says workers are tired of substandard conditions at the depot. southern rail has said it won't run services into london victoria until january the 10th. the rail company says it's because of the ongoing effect of coronavirus isolation and sickness among staff. there will be no gatwick express trains and other services from sussex will be diverted into london bridge. the world famous new year's day parade in london has been reimagined this year due to covid. the event, that usually attracts crowds of over 500,000 and features a parade through the capital's streets, will instead be an in—person ticketed event for 600 people and include stage performances.
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0rganisers are encouraging those without tickets to watch the televised event from home instead. time for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning, it's another exceptionally mild start this morning and a very mild end to 2021. we've got a spell of rain. there's a cold front moving through very quickly. could be quite heavy for a time but blown through on that rather gusty, blustery south, south—westerly breeze. the cloud, a little more ready to break today so we will see sunny spells and temperatures getting up to 16 celsius. of course, it is new year's eve. this evening will be dry and mild, the winds that bit lighter as well. we will see some cloud overnight and the wind strengthens a little into new year's day. the minimum temperature again, double figures across the board between 10—12 celsius. for the first day of 2022, another mild one. quite cloudy for some and showers potentially, especially along the south coast.
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drier further north with sunny spells. temperatures 15—16c. that's all for now, we're back in an hour. hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and katherine downes. after accidentally paying out £130 million to individuals and businesses in a christmas day blunder, high—street bank santander is now trying to retrieve the cash. the error occured when payments from 2,000 business accounts were made twice. so what are you supposed to do if you're one of the people affected? let's speak to personal finance analyst, sarah coles. good morning. 0n the face of it, it is a bit of a funny story, santander
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accidentally paying out £130 million but it is pretty serious. hour accidentally paying out £130 million but it is pretty serious.— but it is pretty serious. how does this error occurred? _ but it is pretty serious. how does this error occurred? they - but it is pretty serious. how does this error occurred? they are i but it is pretty serious. how does i this error occurred? they are saying it was a scheduling error which sounds like somebody pressed the wrong button at the wrong moment so a horrible technical glitch that has happened to banks over the years. they have paid out the money and are now in the complicated process of clawing it back. is it now in the complicated process of clawing it back.— clawing it back. is it likely to be an individual— clawing it back. is it likely to be an individual error _ clawing it back. is it likely to be an individual error or _ clawing it back. is it likely to be| an individual error or something clawing it back. is it likely to be i an individual error or something to do with a system, a coding issue? that do with a system, a coding issue? git the moment, they are not saying. they are focused now on encouraging people in order to pay the money back. the problem they have is it is easy for a bank to claw money back from santander customers but they paid money to all sorts of banks that they will have to work with them to get the money back from those customers. i think that will be the focus and then working out how the error happened. it
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be the focus and then working out how the error happened.— how the error happened. if you received money _ how the error happened. if you received money in _ how the error happened. if you received money in error, i how the error happened. if you received money in error, are i how the error happened. if you i received money in error, are you likely to get a phone call from santander to say can we have it back, please? santander to say can we have it back. please?— santander to say can we have it back, please? you are likely to be contacted by _ back, please? you are likely to be contacted by your _ back, please? you are likely to be contacted by your own _ back, please? you are likely to be contacted by your own bank i back, please? you are likely to be contacted by your own bank who i back, please? you are likely to be i contacted by your own bank who will take the money back. what the banks have said is they will work with santander to get money back to santander. the question comes when people have spent the money, so they do not want to put people in an overdraft because they spent money that did not belong to them. it is more likely santander will get in touch with you personally and come up touch with you personally and come up with an arrangement to pay it back, and there has been an urban myth that you do not realise it is in error, you can keep the cash. that is not true. if you have the money you absolutely have to pay it back. if you keep it, it is theft. do not get sidetracked, when you are asked to return the money you have
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to return it. asked to return the money you have to return it— to return it. what if you have spent it and cannot _ to return it. what if you have spent it and cannot give _ to return it. what if you have spent it and cannot give it _ to return it. what if you have spent it and cannot give it back _ to return it. what if you have spent it and cannot give it back because l it and cannot give it back because your bank account is empty? you are not auoin your bank account is empty? you are not going to — your bank account is empty? you are not going to get _ your bank account is empty? you are not going to get immediately - not going to get immediately attacked, they will work with you in the same way if you have money you owe to the bank, they will work with you if you cannot afford to repay it and they will find a repayment schedule. there are few cases where people have absolutely refused enormous sums of cash and that is when they go down the line of going to court. and it becomes a criminal case at that stage. it is not something to worry about if you work with the bank. but you cannotjust say i cannot afford to pay it. what say i cannot afford to pay it. what would be the _ say i cannot afford to pay it. what would be the advice _ say i cannot afford to pay it. what would be the advice to _ say i cannot afford to pay it. what would be the advice to somebody who found the irregular payment in their account? is it to say i have this extra money, it has come from this place, i know it is a mistake, or spend it quickly and see if you can hang on to a bit of it a bit longer?
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absolutely contact your bank. they will want the money back. if you spend it you will end up owing more money and in more financial trouble. it will take a while for banks to get in touch so it is worth being proactive and getting in touch first. the longer you have money in your account the more tempting it is to spend it. get onto your bank and explain you have been affected and making sure you are part of the process to take the cash back. be sensible, that is the advice. thanks for talking to us about that blunder by santander. whoever was by sa ntander. whoever was responsible by santander. whoever was responsible is probably feeling sheepish. imagine frantic phone calls on christmas day between various staff trying to work out. 0h, trying to work out. oh, it has happened! 130 million is no mean a map. if you're a regular breakfast viewer, you'll know we spent a lot of time this year with the 3 dads —
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tim, andy and mike — who became friends after losing their daughters to suicide. they took on a 300—mile walk to raise awareness of the issue. alison freeman was there when they were reunited for the first time since that mammoth challenge. if we look around the corner. here they come. because we'd spent the previous 15 days walking, we really had no idea what we were going to walk into. to walk around the corner to find hundreds of people waiting for us in not finishing shoot. it was just stunning. so odd, just really surreal. you start picking up faces of people
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you recognise and start thinking about why you're there, why they're there. and it's an incredibly powerful experience. evie, my 10—year—old at the time, she came and kind of accompanied us across the line at the end. she tucked her arm in my arm and i got a photograph of emily and the poles, and to have her, you know, wanting to be part of the story was lovely because she wouldn't have done that five, six months ago. it was just a variety of people that all wanted to come and be there to support us and start those conversations with their kids as well. tim, andy and mike — 3 dads walking. they didn't even know each other at the start of 2021, but by the middle of october, they'd raised almost £1 million for a suicide prevention charity and got everyone talking about that often taboo subject. they'd been brought together by unthinkable tragedy.
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each had a daughter who had taken their own life. it was back in september they told us their stories of loss, the motivation behind the challenge they had planned and how they hoped it would stop others going through the same thing. devastation is too small a word. you know, you literally are plunged into a surreal world of complex grief. # we've got our issues. # we have got our faults. mike's daughter beth, an aspiring musician, wasjust 17 when she took her own life as lockdown loomed in march of last year. andy lost his 29—year—old daughter sophie, who was a nurse, just before christmas 2018. the world suddenly fell apart around us. there was suddenly nothing to hold onto. nothing felt real. just a sickness in the
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pit of your stomach. and tim's daughter emily, a talented artist, was 19 when she died at the family home, also in march of 2020. and you just feel as if you're in free fall and you don't know where you're going. just devastating, absolutely devastating. and you just don't know how you'll ever recover from it. the three daughters inspired their dads to walk 300 miles between their three homes. their route was to take them from andy's home in morland, in cumbria, to mike's in sale in greater manchester and finally to tim's village of shouldham in norfolk. their epic challenge began on october the 9th. crowds are here to say goodbye. there they go — andy, mike and tim walking 300 miles over the next 15 days to raise money and awareness about suicide prevention. good luck to them. it was clear from the start that their story had struck
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a chord with so many. every day, people with their own stories of tragedy turned up to join them on the route. these stories are still fresh in their minds when we meet later to reflect on what happened. unfortunately, mike couldn'tjoin us in person at the time we were filming. so, mike, you can't be with us. what's happened ? um, looks as though i've got covid. slight cough, slight sniff. how are you feeling? gutted i can't be there, but andy and tim are doing a sterling job. mike, we know you met loads and loads of different people while you were on the walk. we've seen and heard from some of them. is there anyone who stands out in your mind, particularly? a mum that i met beside the road who had not long lost her daughter and she gave me her order of service to carry with me. i think that set the tone for the walk, just
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seeing her and feeling her pain. were you surprised by that openness, mike? in some ways, yes. but we didn't realise how many people our walk would affect. but i think our openness encouraged other people to talk. and i think it helped them. this chap got out of the car and joined us. and he was a lancashire farmer who had lost his daughter four weeks before, and decided to come along to talk to us to find out how we got from where we were then, after losing our daughters, to where we were now. i recently lost my. daughter to suicide. and ijust need to understand why. and there's loads of. unanswered questions. it really was a privilege to allow people to be with us, people to be open with us, because you could see how much it was helping them. it wasn't going to bring
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back their loved ones, but just that sense of relieving themselves of a lot of pain. we were like a magnet. i thought we might get one or two people and i thought we'd get people, you know, oh, you're off track, which i got quite a lot, especially off my dad! "you're off track again." but i had no idea that we would be attracting people from the moment we set off to the very end. all the way along. and it was hundreds — it was literally hundreds of people as we counted them up as we went down. we were engaged in conversation from eight o'clock in the morning to whenever we went to bed at night. the aim of the walk had been to get people talking about suicide and it became apparent that they had. and on top of that, as media interest in the story gathered momentum, so did the number of donations to a suicide prevention charity. three fathers who all lost their daughters to suicide are nearing the end of a boo—mile walk to raise money for charity i in memory of their children. their story was even catching the eye of hollywood stars like daniel craig,
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who was the first to donate £10,000. and after meeting the dads, former manchester united player lou macari, who lost his own son to suicide, decided he couldn't be beaten by 007. i don't want to see - james bond outdoing us! the macari foundation will give you 10,000, as well. _ i haven't got it on me. nicole kidman was the next star to give £10,000, saying in a statement that she had been profoundly moved by the dads' extraordinary undertaking and dedicated her donation to the three daughters. that's just incredible. you know, nicole kidman putting a tribute out to our three daughters. you what? incredible. and following us on instagram. yeah. there's a thing! wonderfully generous of these stars, but it helped us, it raised our profile. did you ever expect that amount?
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because i know you started off with, what was it, three grand each or something? no, never. we were walking for a reason, but we didn't realise how big it was all going to get. and neither did the charity they were raising money for — papyrus, based in warrington. hi, how are you doing? andy and tim were given the chance to meet some of the people who answer the calls at the charity's helpline, which is called hopeline uk. sophie. kelly. tim. andy. we know! it's absolutely incredible to meet you because we've all been - following your journey i and your story for so long. and to see you. | i kept saying to the comms team, j i was like, when are they coming? please let us know. dying to meet them! we're two old men! absolutely. it's lovely to meet you. you are at the sharp end. and we just like blokes walking.
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rae, sophie and kelly had been following the dads' walk closely and were keen to talk about the influence they'd had on callers. the fact that you just i by doing what you've been doing, raising awareness, l sharing your story, so many more people have had those conversations —| about how to have a conversation, |a safe conversation about suicide. i the impact genuinely that you have has been unbelievable. _ we're still taking calls this week where you guys are mentioned like the celebrities that you are. and we know as well that, - you know, more dads have been ringing with concernsi for their own children. and for you guys to turn that - tragedy into hope for other people is absolutely wonderful and completely - immeasurable, isn't it? we're getting more and more people calling ourselves. we've had our busiest ever month in the history of papyrus and hopeline uk. so that in itself is just amazing. and the three dads have definitely played their part in that. are you at the post?
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papyrus has been by the side of the three dads throughout the challenge. the charity's boss, one of the first to congratulate them at the finishing line. you are lifesavers. we can't do our work. without people like you. it's the ordinariness - becoming extraordinary. that was the line that i think — three ordinary dads, _ as they call themselves. there's nothing ordinary about them, really. - they've done something incredible. that powerful message of this has happened. i suicide is real. young people do die i and my child has died — it just cuts through. the mustard, really. and you'll have heard from our team the number of people who've said i they've referenced the three dads, they've referenced that ability - that they've felt now - to speak about their story, because the three dads have shared theirs. - it is incalculable. you are a relatively small charity. they have raised far more than they ever expected. what does that mean in real terms to you? it's a game changer for us.
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it accelerates our plan as we enter our 25—year anniversary year. - there's lots that we'll be telling the world about. i so with the dads' effect being felt in more ways than they'd ever hoped for, their minds are now turning to the future. it was your idea. you had the map with the lines drawn on it. is there anything — any mike—shaped ideas that are about to pop up? oh, this is an interesting question. nothing has properly formed, but i have a little idea maybe that could take in london and maybe taking the message to downing street, maybe. are you glad you did it? looking back now. what we actually achieved was way beyond our expectations and imagination. we set off from a horrible place. none of us chose to be here.
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but now we're in it, we can make the most of it. and actually, we managed to have quite a lot of fun while doing it. i would rather not know them, you know, i'd rather we weren't here. but now we are, let's see what we can do next. when your daughter decides they don't want to be with you any longer, it's their decision to make. and that is absolutely crushing. we felt as though we had to pull something positive out of the ashes. we've raised the awareness, we need to do something with that awareness, something positive. we've written to the government to try and get suicide prevention incorporated into the syllabus. so we're working with the charity on that. so that would have more of a legacy than us doing another 300—mile walk. so that's the sort of stuff we need to concentrate on so that all of our children across the country have that basic foundation in suicide prevention. because if you are taught about suicide prevention when you're11,12,13, that's going to stay with you for the rest of your life. so that will have a knock—on
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effect to reducing adult suicide figures, i'm sure. the dads and papyrus want people to realise it's ok to ask someone, if they're thinking about suicide. do you wish that you had been able or known that that was something you needed to ask? oh, i look back and i know that there was... beth gave out some signs in language and behaviour. and i believe if i had more knowledge, i understood more. if i asked those questions, she could well be here now.
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and thank you to the three dads, tim, andy and mike for talking to us and we wish you the very best for the new year. what an incredible trio. from wally the walrus to strong numbers of humpback whales, it was a good year for spotting wildlife at sea according to a marine review of 2021. the wildlife trusts' annual report represents the richness of the creatures living in our oceans. let's look at some of the year's most exciting sightings. gentle guitar music.
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what a cracking set of pictures. the report does also warn about the continuing impact climate change and human activity is having on our coastlines and creatures in our seas. let's now speak to lissa
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batey, who is the head of marine conservation at the wildlife trusts, and to nathaniel barry, a wildlife photographer. good morning. nathanial, you have been well acquainted with moley the walrus. == been well acquainted with moley the walrus. ~ ., , been well acquainted with moley the walrus. ~ . , . , been well acquainted with moley the walrus. ~ ., , been well acquainted with moley the walrus. ~ . , ., walrus. -- wally. i was lucky to catch photographs _ walrus. -- wally. i was lucky to catch photographs of _ walrus. -- wally. i was lucky to catch photographs of him - walrus. -- wally. i was lucky to catch photographs of him as - walrus. -- wally. i was lucky to catch photographs of him as he | catch photographs of him as he passed — catch photographs of him as he passed down our coastline last may and since _ passed down our coastline last may and since then have kept track of him and — and since then have kept track of him and hopefully he is now back where _ him and hopefully he is now back where he — him and hopefully he is now back where he belongs.— him and hopefully he is now back where he belongs. could you believe oure es where he belongs. could you believe your eyes when _ where he belongs. could you believe your eyes when you _ where he belongs. could you believe your eyes when you spotted - where he belongs. could you believe your eyes when you spotted a - where he belongs. could you believej your eyes when you spotted a walrus off the coast of cornwall? ihlat your eyes when you spotted a walrus off the coast of cornwall?— off the coast of cornwall? not at all. i off the coast of cornwall? not at all- i never _ off the coast of cornwall? not at all. i never thought _ off the coast of cornwall? not at all. i never thought there - off the coast of cornwall? not at all. i never thought there would | off the coast of cornwall? not at i all. i never thought there would be something — all. i never thought there would be something that big or unusual down here _ something that big or unusual down here i_ something that big or unusual down here i had — something that big or unusual down here. i had heard of the one that was spotted in tenby which were wally— was spotted in tenby which were wally and — was spotted in tenby which were wally and i had a holiday booked to see hirn _ wally and i had a holiday booked to see him. and a week before my holiday— see him. and a week before my holiday i— see him. and a week before my holiday i got the opportunity to see
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him in _ holiday i got the opportunity to see him in cornwall, which was incredible.— him in cornwall, which was incredible. . , ., incredible. lisa, are we seeing a creater incredible. lisa, are we seeing a greater range — incredible. lisa, are we seeing a greater range of _ incredible. lisa, are we seeing a greater range of beasts - incredible. lisa, are we seeing a greater range of beasts from - incredible. lisa, are we seeing a | greater range of beasts from the deep around the coastline and is it because of climate change? how much can we detect it is because of climate change?— can we detect it is because of climate change? can we detect it is because of climate chance? , , . ., , climate change? this year has been absolutely fantastic _ climate change? this year has been absolutely fantastic for _ climate change? this year has been absolutely fantastic for marine - absolutely fantastic for marine life. we have had creatures from the deep. wally the walrus from the arctic, humpback whales which would have been a rare sight previously, we have had 75 sightings of cornwall in the past couple of years. we have had delights such as swimming adders. unusually encountered. and puffins on the isle of man. the restoration of sea grouse and also a sea slug that has only been seen in this country 400 times, which sounds a lot but is not. it is called the
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highland dancer. and bringing exotic images to life. it is fantastic we are getting sightings. it is brilliant people are getting out and enjoying the coast. climate change is having an impact and it might bring different species to our shores, but we have to ensure we celebrate those and also protect and do what we can to mitigate climate change. i do what we can to mitigate climate chance. ., . ., . , change. i love the idea of a slug called a highland _ change. i love the idea of a slug called a highland dancer. - change. i love the idea of a slug called a highland dancer. whatl change. i love the idea of a slug i called a highland dancer. what can you tell us about this slug? it measures about seven centimetres. it has orange flex. it has a mantle, like a skirt, part of its body that overlaps the foot of the slug. when it is disturbed, it undulates, or 12 is the skirt in a dancing formation and will swim away. rather than
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crawling away like a garden slug, it leaps off into the water and swims away from any disturbance. we were very excited when it was reported. you mentioned that climate change is definitely having an effect and may be increasing the temperature of the water which means more species coming into waters off our shores. is there anything else helping to attract creatures that would not normally be here? you mentioned that sea grass is being conserved and replanted. what about water quality? there are a number of other factors. climate change is undoubtedly a huge impact. but we must not forget we are still seeing damaging fishing practices and development at sea. we have pollution from agricultural run—off and we have to do everything
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to halt nature's decline. this past year has given us a glimmer of hope we are seeing recovery of stocks and species. the humpback whale sightings, is possibly a glimmer of hope of a return of those species after historic whaling off the shores. but we have to ensure we tackle these challenges head on. if we are going to tackle climate change we have to ensure we do not allow global warming to rise above 1.5. one way we can do that is by protecting seas, sea life and sea bed because they sequester carbon, which means they store it and lock it away and if we perpetually disturb that habitat with development and fishing practices, it means we release carbon. and we
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are exacerbating the problem. healthy seas and sea life will help us tackle climate change. this healthy seas and sea life will help us tackle climate change.- healthy seas and sea life will help us tackle climate change. as we look ahead to the — us tackle climate change. as we look ahead to the new— us tackle climate change. as we look ahead to the new year, _ us tackle climate change. as we look ahead to the new year, i _ us tackle climate change. as we look ahead to the new year, i wonder- us tackle climate change. as we look. ahead to the new year, i wonder what you might be hoping to capture, nathanial. , . . ., nathanial. there is so much around. some special— nathanial. there is so much around. some special kind _ nathanial. there is so much around. some special kind of _ nathanial. there is so much around. some special kind of owl _ nathanial. there is so much around. some special kind of owl in - some special kind of owl in cornwall, the short eared, which i would _ cornwall, the short eared, which i would love — cornwall, the short eared, which i would love to photograph. and there was a _ would love to photograph. and there was a humpback whale sighting so i would _ was a humpback whale sighting so i would love — was a humpback whale sighting so i would love to get a photo of it, even _ would love to get a photo of it, even if — would love to get a photo of it, even if it — would love to get a photo of it, even if it is— would love to get a photo of it, even if it is a distance one. we are heading _ even if it is a distance one. we are heading into— even if it is a distance one. we are heading into spring now which is when _ heading into spring now which is when life — heading into spring now which is when life comes back. so much wildlife — when life comes back. so much wildlife around with dolphins, and there _ wildlife around with dolphins, and there will— wildlife around with dolphins, and there will be puffins and guillemots, razorbills. so much wildlife, — guillemots, razorbills. so much wildlife, i— guillemots, razorbills. so much wildlife, i cannot wait to get out and photograph again. that wildlife, i cannot wait to get out and photograph again.— wildlife, i cannot wait to get out and photograph again. that is the sirit, and photograph again. that is the spirit. heading — and photograph again. that is the spirit, heading into _ and photograph again. that is the spirit, heading into spring - and photograph again. that is the spirit, heading into spring on - and photograph again. that is the j spirit, heading into spring on new year's eve. i like it! thank you and
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happy new year. lovely to see those images of the wildlife. stay with us, headlines coming up. good morning, welcome to breakfast with chris mason and katherine downes. our headlines today... new year's eve parties can take place tonight in england despite rising coronavirus cases. but tighter restrictions in scotland, northern ireland and wales mean celebrations will be muted.
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people are being urged by the scottish and welsh governments not to cross the english border to avoid restrictions. we came up from bridgend to spend new year's eve in london. we're hoping to come down here and some fireworks. the advice is to take a test before socialising. and today an extra eight million lateral flows should be supplied to pharmacies after complaints of shortages. "relieved and grateful" — the survivors of ghislaine maxwell have been speaking after she was convicted of grooming girls to be abused byjeffery epstein. her family say they can't accept the verdict. good morning. ending the loyalty penalty. new rules from tomorrow means firms cannot charge existing customers more than new ones. manchester united ring out the year with a win. their unbeaten run under ralph rangnick continues with victory over burnley at old trafford. and it is already 15 degrees in some
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parts of the uk. set to be the warmest new year's eve on record. the full forecast here on breakfast. it's friday, the 31st of december. our main story. the prime minister has urged people to take a covid test before attending new year's eve parties this evening. no new restrictions have been introduced in england, but in scotland, wales and northern ireland tighter rules are now in place for hospitality venues and indoor gatherings. it comes amid concerns over the availability of coronavirus tests, as the government pledges to deliver eight million additional kits to pharmacies by today. matt graveling reports. this is how london rang in 2020. but this year, like last, will feel very different for many people. for the second year running,
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london's famous new year's eve fireworks celebrations have been cancelled because of the coronavirus pandemic. in comparison this year, restrictions have eased. there are vaccinations and tests also available. with coronavirus infections in record numbers, how will people choose to celebrate? that does depend on where you are. no new restrictions have been introduced in england but the government is urging people to take a lateral flow test and celebrate outdoors, if possible. we are not as stressed about it as we used to be. also the club where we're going, you have to have a covid pass. i feel pretty safe going there, to be honest. i've been a little bit worried. i have asthma, so it's a little bit like that's it. be careful. would you have gone out had it not been for covid? yeah, 100%. in scotland, new rules mean many hogmanay events are cancelled. mixing is limited to three households and social distancing measures are in place in hospitality venues. it's looking ok. it's not looking anything like we would be hoping to have
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at this time of year. this is when we hope, as well as the bells ringing, the tills are ringing. that isn't happening this year. in northern ireland, only three households will be able to mix. nightclubs are closed and dancing is banned in hospitality venues. groups of no more than six can meet in pubs in wales. nightclubs are closed and indoor gatherings limited to 30 people. for some, they are taking their celebrations on the road, crossing the border into england. we've come up from bridgend to spend new year's eve in london and we're hoping to come down here and see some fireworks. it's all banned in wales, so we've come here to enjoy it. crossing the border for new year's is legal and while the welsh government is asking people to act conscientiously, the scottish government has urged people not to travel to england to party. there are still concerns over the availability of lateral flow tests but the government has pledged that 8 million additional tests will be delivered to pharmacies by today. wales has already loaned 4 million tests to england.
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health secretary sajid javid has pledged the uk supply will be tripled early next year to 300 million per month. so the message for tonight... take a test before any celebrations and kick off the new year in a cautious and sensible way. matt graveling, bbc news. political leaders across the uk will release their new year's messages today, and many are reflecting on another year dominated by the pandemic. our political correspondent iain watson joins us now. it iain watsonjoins us now. is it iain watson joins us now. is all about the pandemin guess, it is all about the pandemic, i guess, and how we eventually shake it off. ., , , guess, and how we eventually shake it off. . , _ ., guess, and how we eventually shake it off. . , _ . ., guess, and how we eventually shake itoff. . it off. happy new year to you when it off. happy new year to you when it comes. it off. happy new year to you when it comes- we _ it off. happy new year to you when it comes. we had _ it off. happy new year to you when it comes. we had all— it off. happy new year to you when it comes. we had all hoped - it off. happy new year to you when it comes. we had all hoped the - it comes. we had all hoped the pandemic would be a thing of the past in 2022 but it has been a common theme. borisjohnson is
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boasting about the booster programme offering everyone in england who is eligible an appointment to get a bit step by the end of the year. nhs leaders are pointing out that four out of ten people are not turning up for the appointment. many of them have actually ended up catching covid. there is a less cheery aspect to the prime minister's message saying if you do not getjabbed you could end up needlessly suffering an intensive care. he also says people should be cautious during new year celebrations. nicola sturgeon acknowledges this is not the hogmanay many of us would have wanted. as we have been hearing there have been more restrictions in scotland, wales and northern ireland than in england. the lib dems leader praises the courage and passion, similar to the message from keir starmer about the nhs. he has promised to set out his party's
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plans in detail. labour is pushing ahead in the polls and he knows he has to give people positive reasons for voting for the party rather than relying on them being a bit miffed with the government. he says he will campaign on issues of security and compassion. i think there will be an awful lot of politics for us to report on in the new year, won't there? survivors of ghislaine maxwell have been speaking of their relief at the guilty verdicts in her sex trafficking trial in new york. she now faces a lengthy prison sentence after being convicted for grooming underage girls to be abused by the disgraced financier, jeffrey epstein. her family are backing an appeal against her conviction. simonjones has this report. described in court as partners in crime, running a pyramid scheme of abuse, the british former socialite ghislaine maxwell would groom underage girls for american financier jeffrey epstein.
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he killed himself injail while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges. she could spend the rest of her life behind bars, to the relief of the victims. we have a lot of work to do in this country in terms of holding people accountable, and educating about things like grooming. i didn't know when i was 16. i had no idea, i'd never heard that term — i didn't understand what was happening to me, this combination of being given gifts and positive attention and also having this abuse and these boundary violations. ghislaine maxwell's victims say her conviction shows perpetrators of sexual abuse will face justice no matter how much power and privilege they have. in an interview with the bbc, her brother said the maxwell family supports an appeal against her conviction. i'm not saying that they are lying. i mean, it may well be they were victims ofjeffrey epstein but i do not accept they were victims of ghislaine.
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that is my position, and that's also her position. in court, the jury decided the women were telling the truth, that ghislaine maxwell was notjust a passive bystander to the crimes ofjeffrey epstein but a sexual predator in her own right. her trial is just one of the court cases in the us arising from the activities of epstein. another is a civil lawsuit by virginia giuffre, formerly known as virginia roberts, against prince andrew, alleging sexual assault. prince andrew has always strongly denied her claims. mr maxwell, can we have a statement on behalf of the family, please? lawyers for ghislaine maxwell say they have already started work on her appeal. simon jones, bbc news. mourners in south africa have been paying their respects to the late archbishop desmond tutu, who is lying in state for a second day ahead of his funeral tomorrow. the anti—apartheid campaigner died on sunday at the age of 90. earlier, our south africa correspondent, nomsa maseko,
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told us what is expected to happen today. more people are expected to pay their last respects when they filed past the remains of archbishop desmond tutu. this is the second day where his remains will be lying in state at st george's cathedral. this is also where he will be buried. the numbers from the government, in terms of people that came yesterday to pay their last respects, is just under 2000 people were here. we expect that the service, the funeral service tomorrow will start at ten o'clock local time. guests will arrive from around eight o'clock. it is a state funeral which means there is a state funeral which means there is a state funeral which means there is a chance the president of south africa will also speak and deliver the eulogy of the archbishop stopped the eulogy of the archbishop stopped the archbishop will be cremated and his remains will be interred here at the st george's cathedral. they will
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be placed right next to the altar at a prominent place. this is the cathedral where he served as south africa's first black archbishop. shall we check—in on the weather this morning and indeed this evening? it does not feel like late december this morning if you have already been out. it will not be as we head into the start of 2022. even at seven o'clock in the morning we had temperatures around 15 in wales. it is set to be a record—breaker. at the opposite end of the scale, scotland is a few degrees above freezing. it is the exception rather than the rule. this rain is heavy and persistent in central areas. in east anglia and the south—east is a band of heavy rain, which should be a lively short burst of rain with gusty winds. as a small chance of
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sunshine. cloudy in the south and west and fairly blustery. the lightest wind in scotland. the rain will fizzle out into something light and patchy. we could see 15, 16, maybe 17 degrees across central and eastern areas later. the towards midnight we could see rain. just note the temperatures, well above where we should be by day, never mind by night. a warm start to new year's day. another line of working its way east. slowest moving across the south. it is here we could see the south. it is here we could see the rain lasting the bulk of the rain —— there could be rain but it
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should be dry. a full forecast later. thank you very much. speak to you later. the corks will be popping and auld lang syne will be playing at midnight tonight, but for many people it won't be the new year's eve celebration they were hoping for. new coronavirus restrictions in some parts of the uk mean that families and friends have had to rethink how they'll ring in 2022. we've been hearing from people in manchester about their plans. some friends might be meeting up in a local pub. i'm a little dubious as to whether i will want to. more likely i will end up spending it at home, to be honest. we have been invited to a house party. we are trying to decide whether to go or not. it's just with athe and neighbours. —— it's just with a few neighbours. spending it with a couple of friends, probably a - takeaway, that sort of thing. certainly not going into town. we would obviously test before we go. we keep doing lateralflow tests every few days. other than that i don't know what else we can do, really?
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we got this little one. we were just planning to stay in, stay—at—home, stay safe. everyone we seem to know seems to have covid at the moment, so we're trying to avoid getting it ourselves. so yes, that's it, really. we would love to get together with one more family, my- sister's family, but we are just waiting to see if anybody is ill. it's just covid, it is covid. covid is the one that is stopping us. he is speaking for us all. people in manchester look like they are going to be very sensible later this evening. breakfast�*sjohn maguire is at a pub in bristol this morning. people being sensible in bristol as well. what other measures like in that pub? i well. what other measures like in that ub? ~ well. what other measures like in that ub? ,, , , that pub? i think so. this is the cloak and _ that pub? i think so. this is the cloak and dagger. _ that pub? i think so. this is the cloak and dagger. they're - that pub? i think so. this is the | cloak and dagger. they're going that pub? i think so. this is the i cloak and dagger. they're going to have a big new year's eve party tonight open from 9pm until five o'clock in the morning. lots of work has been done to get the venue ready for tonight. has been done to get the venue ready fortonight. it has been done to get the venue ready for tonight. it is a fascinated building, an old victorian bakers
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shop. you have a temperature gauge, hand sanitiser is absolutely everywhere, in amongst all of the bottles. there are four bars in this venue, to permanent bars and to p°p�*up venue, to permanent bars and to pop—up bars. the idea is to try to spread people around. the door is open at the back to encourage ventilation throughout the building. this pub is on to levels. the normal legal capacity is 375. what they had done tonight is restricted to 200. they will be checking covid passes at the door to make sure people have been vaccinated or they had an negative lateral flow test. they are encouraging people to test before they come out tonight. this is one of the other main areas. there is a courtyard at the back and another room behind. doors open, that dog will be open. the big idea, keep
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people spaced out as best as they possibly can and keep the ventilation flowing through the building. this is the second of the main bars here. sebastien, you have been frantically cleaning everything this morning, getting everything ready. in england, night clubs are open tonight. such a tough time for the night—time economy. what are your thoughts ahead of tonight? ladle your thoughts ahead of tonight? we are hoping it will be like any other new year's — are hoping it will be like any other new year's eve to be honest with you _ new year's eve to be honest with you we're — new year's eve to be honest with you. we're hoping there will be lots of people _ you. we're hoping there will be lots of people are having a good time, enjoying _ of people are having a good time, enjoying themselves, obviously safely~ — enjoying themselves, obviously safely. we are hoping to have as close _ safely. we are hoping to have as close as — safely. we are hoping to have as close as we _ safely. we are hoping to have as close as we can a normal new year's eve as _ close as we can a normal new year's eve as possible. i close as we can a normal new year's eve as possible-— eve as possible. i expecting people to come across _ eve as possible. i expecting people to come across the _ eve as possible. i expecting people to come across the border? - eve as possible. i expecting people to come across the border? they . eve as possible. i expecting people i to come across the border? they are being asked not to. what to come across the border? they are being asked not to.— being asked not to. what are your thou . hts? being asked not to. what are your thoughts? why — being asked not to. what are your thoughts? why wouldn't - being asked not to. what are your thoughts? why wouldn't be - being asked not to. what are your i thoughts? why wouldn't be surprised if people _ thoughts? why wouldn't be surprised if people come across—the—board. bristol— if people come across—the—board. bristol is — if people come across—the—board. bristol is very close to the border anyway _ bristol is very close to the border anyway and people come over to use a
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hospitality— anyway and people come over to use a hospitality venue that we have anyway — hospitality venue that we have anyway. just because there are restrictions then they cannot go out in wales— restrictions then they cannot go out in wales does not mean they will not cross— in wales does not mean they will not cross the _ in wales does not mean they will not cross the bridge and coming to bristol— cross the bridge and coming to bristol or— cross the bridge and coming to bristol or any other town or city close _ bristol or any other town or city close to — bristol or any other town or city close to the border. he bristol or any other town or city close to the border.— bristol or any other town or city close to the border. he had taken extraordinary _ close to the border. he had taken extraordinary steps _ close to the border. he had taken extraordinary steps to _ close to the border. he had taken extraordinary steps to make - close to the border. he had taken extraordinary steps to make sure| close to the border. he had taken - extraordinary steps to make sure you are open tonight and you are safe as possible. —— you have taken. was it a difficult decision to take, to open tonight? taste a difficult decision to take, to open tonight?— a difficult decision to take, to open tonight? a difficult decision to take, to oentoniuht? ~ . ., open tonight? we were always going to 0 en open tonight? we were always going to open provided _ open tonight? we were always going to open provided we _ open tonight? we were always going to open provided we were _ open tonight? we were always going to open provided we were allowed i open tonight? we were always going | to open provided we were allowed to. we had _ to open provided we were allowed to. we had the _ to open provided we were allowed to. we had the day and the event booked into our— we had the day and the event booked into our diaries. we started to buy stock _ into our diaries. we started to buy stock track— into our diaries. we started to buy stock back at the beginning of december to make sure we were ready. we were _ december to make sure we were ready. we were always planning to go ahead with tonight. as soon as they made the announcement on the 28, as it were, _ the announcement on the 28, as it were, we _ the announcement on the 28, as it were, we hit— the announcement on the 28, as it were, we hit the floor running, really~ — were, we hit the floor running, reall . �* , , , ., really. all the very best for tonight- — really. all the very best for tonight- as _ really. all the very best for tonight. as we _ really. all the very best for tonight. as we keep - really. all the very best for i tonight. as we keep repeating really, it is all about making sure
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everybody is safe initially. let's hope the people have a good time tonight and bring hope the people have a good time tonightand bring in hope the people have a good time tonight and bring in 2022. anna d worse than 2021, can it? —— it cannot be worse. test before you go out and do whatever you can. night—time venues in england that are open to us saying they will do everything they can to keep people safe. ., . ., . ,, safe. you had me going. talking about cloak _ safe. you had me going. talking about cloak and _ safe. you had me going. talking about cloak and dagger, - safe. you had me going. talking about cloak and dagger, it - safe. you had me going. talking about cloak and dagger, it was l safe. you had me going. talking about cloak and dagger, it was a safe. you had me going. talking i about cloak and dagger, it was a bit cloak and daggerfrom about cloak and dagger, it was a bit cloak and dagger from you. about cloak and dagger, it was a bit cloak and daggerfrom you. the about cloak and dagger, it was a bit cloak and dagger from you. the club needs a new battery in it. it was the whole mirror trick. get me on my toes. ., the whole mirror trick. get me on my toes. . ., , ., toes. leaving no stone unturned. cheers stop _ toes. leaving no stone unturned. cheers stop l _ toes. leaving no stone unturned. cheers stop i am _ toes. leaving no stone unturned. cheers stop i am worried - toes. leaving no stone unturned. cheers stop i am worried that i toes. leaving no stone unturned. l cheers stop i am worried that john cheers stop i am worried thatjohn may have jinxed 2022 now, saying cheers stop i am worried thatjohn may havejinxed 2022 now, saying it cannot possibly be worse. let's hope he is right. new year's eve comes as record
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numbers of infections are reported, as well as concerns over a shortage of lateral flow and pcr tests. we're joined now by professor peter openshaw, who is a member of nervtag — the government's advisory group on emerging viruses — but he's speaking to us today in a personal capacity. good morning to you stop morning. how worried are you ahead of the night where at least in england a lot of people will be heading for pretty crowded places? we sell that pub in bristol. on the face of it, however many mitigations there are, i guess there is real potentialfor the virus to spread. i guess there is real potential for the virus to spread.— i guess there is real potential for the virus to spread. omicron is so infectious- — the virus to spread. omicron is so infectious. we _ the virus to spread. omicron is so infectious. we were _ the virus to spread. omicron is so infectious. we were lucky - the virus to spread. omicron is so infectious. we were lucky really i the virus to spread. omicron is so infectious. we were lucky really itj infectious. we were lucky really it was not infectious when it first moved into human—to—human transmission. we have had several iterations of the virus, going through different stages of its evolution. it has ended up being so infectious that it almost needs just a whiff of infected breath and he can get infected. —— you can get. we
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are in a good position in the uk but in many parts of the world because vaccination rates are only about 5%. they are being exposed to this very infectious virus with very little protection. infectious virus with very little protection-— infectious virus with very little rotection. , protection. given as you say, you only need — protection. given as you say, you only need to _ protection. given as you say, you only need to be _ protection. given as you say, you only need to be exposed - protection. given as you say, you only need to be exposed to i protection. given as you say, you only need to be exposed to a i protection. given as you say, you. only need to be exposed to a west protection. given as you say, you i only need to be exposed to a west of someone else's breath. are the rules or lack of them in england up to it? this is really a political decision. i think of as a scientist, as advisers, we have to lay out the evidence as we see it and try to make some sort of forward projection based on the signs as we see it. it is a political decision really how many restrictions are going to be put into place. i do not envy those who are having to make those very tough decisions.— tough decisions. there is no doubt the pandemic— tough decisions. there is no doubt
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the pandemic will _ tough decisions. there is no doubt the pandemic will highlight i tough decisions. there is no doubt the pandemic will highlight how i the pandemic will highlight how difficult governing is. you were talking about projections. what does it look like into the new year with mixing that has taken place over christmas and new year as to where we are likely to end up? given that omicron is spread so easily.- omicron is spread so easily. latest fiuures omicron is spread so easily. latest figures show _ omicron is spread so easily. latest figures show extraordinary - omicron is spread so easily. latest figures show extraordinary rises i omicron is spread so easily. latest figures show extraordinary rises in | figures show extraordinary rises in infection rates. this is before we have really had time to see the full effect of what has happened over christmas. remember, the people currently who are very sadly dying of covid were probably infected on average something like 35 days ago. this is really before omicron started to transmit. it is too early to say what the impact of omicron is going to be on the more severe end of the disease. it has mostly been circulating in children, in people in contact with children and it will now spread into older adults at much higher risk of severe disease and those with pre—existing illnesses. i
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am very glad that very large majority of those have now been triple vaccinated because that gives you very good of protection. admittedly probably not for good but at least for a while. there are of course quite a large number of people who have not been vaccinated at all. for various reasons. it is this older, more susceptible population who have not been vaccinated we are very concerned about. ., ., , ., , about. how worried should we be civen the about. how worried should we be given the lag _ about. how worried should we be given the lag between _ about. how worried should we be given the lag between salmon i given the lag between salmon patching coronavirus and turning up at hospital? —— between someone catching coronavirus. how worried should we be about that in the early weeks of the new year? i ink should we be about that in the early weeks of the new year?— should we be about that in the early weeks of the new year? i ink we have not cuite weeks of the new year? i ink we have not quite reach _ weeks of the new year? i ink we have not quite reach the _ weeks of the new year? i ink we have not quite reach the threshold - weeks of the new year? i ink we have not quite reach the threshold that i not quite reach the threshold that was set by government in terms of the nhs being overwhelmed. it looks like that will be reached quite
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quickly. what i am very concerned about is nhs staff, my dear colleagues in the nhs, who have worked so hard all through the repeated waves of this infection. how are they going to paper? we need to really extend our care to them and give every support and do everything we can to make the nhs a great place to work. —— going to cope. it is in the name that i am very concerned indeed for nhs staff. looking ahead to the next year can do you find grounds for optimism? many of us might have been surprised had we been told this time last year we would be having this conversation along these lines 12 months on. how do you see things panning out in the next 12 months?— next 12 months? prediction is so hard, chris. _ next 12 months? prediction is so hard, chris- i— next 12 months? prediction is so
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hard, chris. i do _ next 12 months? prediction is so hard, chris. i do think— next 12 months? prediction is so hard, chris. i do think that i next 12 months? prediction is so hard, chris. i do think that the l hard, chris. i do think that the green shoots of good news are that in terms of the way in which the virus is evolving probably becoming less able to cause a severe acute disease. i think what worries me particularly, what will be the long—term consequences of this infection which may take years to emerge, particularly in those who are unvaccinated and do not have protection against the more subtle long—term consequences of the infection. i think it is fantastic that vaccines were developed so quickly and that these vaccines were so much more effective than we ever anticipated they would be in the very early stages of the pandemic. it is nice to talk to you. we wish you a happy new year and all the best with your work in 2022. thank you. almost 25 past eight on new
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year's eve. from tomorrow, new rules will mean people who stick with their home or car insurance provider won't get a worse deal than new customers. good news for lazy people, like me. people who cannot be bothered to switch quite like me. ben has been finding out more. you have constantly said haggling is the way forward.— the way forward. yes, you need to learn to do — the way forward. yes, you need to learn to do it. _ the way forward. yes, you need to learn to do it. shopping _ the way forward. yes, you need to learn to do it. shopping around i the way forward. yes, you need to | learn to do it. shopping around has always been the way to get a cheaper deal. from tomorrow new rules come into full sun after an investigation into full sun after an investigation into their loyal premium or loyalty penalty. if you are a loyal customer and he had been with your home or power insurance provider for quite a few years and click renew every time they send a renewal quote. you could find you are paying hundreds of pounds to match. they offer new customers cheaper deals. we often
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see, only available to new customers. they get a cheap deal and everyone else pays more. the regulator says it wants to clamp down on that because people are paying hundreds of pounds too much. including people like sean's mum, who has been with the same car insurance providerfor ten who has been with the same car insurance provider for ten years. take a listen. my mum's car insurance was due for renewal. when she said what she was paying, i was amazed, especially in comparison with what i was paying. we talked about comparison websites. i said, "get the laptop out and have a look." when she saw the quotes and saw how much smaller the amounts were and saw how much smaller the amounts were she was gobsmacked. she nearly fell off the chair. she did not believe it at first. she felt she had done something
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wrong on the quotes. yes, it was a huge, huge difference. there is a lot of money at stake. there is a lot of money at stake. the show you how they stack up. let's talk about car insurance. an investigation found new customers would pay £285 a year for their policy. if you are a loyal customer, someone who had inat for a while, you are paying £370 on average a year. that is for car insurance. with home insurance, a similar picture with new customers paying £165 yet loyal customers paying nearly £290 a year, £120 extra. and from tomorrow, therefore, the new rules will come into force. that means you cannot charge different customers different prices. everyone will be charged the same. the fca says that could save customers full 2p over the next ten years. all well and good if you are prepared to look
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around, shop around and change provider. what about everyone else? what help is bad for them? take a lesson. it's hard to know exactly what is going to happen but it's expected the overall cost of insurance will increase. even if you have been a loyal customer and you see some fresh reductions, and if you are a new customer you might see some price increases, the overall cost is actually going to go up. there's a couple of other factors going on here as well and that's the fact the number of claims that are happening in car insurance, for example, and the cost of claims in both car insurance and home insurance are going up. some people may find that premium does go up. if you have been particularly good at shopping around, getting new customer deals, you might find they disappear and you might find they disappear and you might find prices going up. it is still worth shopping around. different companies have different prices and it is worth needing if you are not happy with the one you are with. let me show you their top tips from the regulator about how
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you might be able to get a better deal. the first one is shopping around. look at different providers. different levels of cover, some things may cover what you need and it means you don't have to pay for stuff that you do not need. haggle. i know and we are terrible at haggling but if the meikle if your premium is up for renewal and ask whether there is any flexibility on the price. some firms may be able to and if they are not threatened to go elsewhere. if you have always got your insurance in the same way may be perhaps try using a broker. or use a price comparison website. in some cases when the company itself. cut out the middleman and he might find you can get a cheaper deal. the new rules come into. from tomorrow after the investigation from the
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regulator. you may see your premiums move round a little bit as it heads down. as always, haggle, shop around, you will get a better deal. —— as it beds down. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london and bbc south east today. a murder investigation has been launched after a teenage boy was stabbed to death in a park in south london. the met police said the victim, a 15—year—old boy, was found injured in ashburton park in croydon yesterday evening. the victim is the 29th teenager to be killed in london this year — the highest level since 2008. ambulance services are urging people to be cautious and well—prepared as they celebrate the new year tonight. south east coast ambulance service said anyone heading out to parties should think about the risks of mixing with large groups.
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they say a home covid test should be carried out beforehand and anyone with symptoms is advised to stay at home. if people are planning to go out, then they need to plan ahead — so where they are going to go, how they are going to get home and how can they be sure they are as safe as possible while they are out. now, we know that the omicron variant is spreading rapidly, so thinking about where you are going to go and what risk that might put you at, and how that might translate into risks for members of yourfamily. bins will go uncollected today in eastbourne as refuse workers strike over pay and conditions. further walk—outs are planned forjanuary the 7th and 10th. eastbourne council have described the action as "wholly unnecessary" — and say they'll continue talks with the gmb union. the union says workers are tired of substandard conditions at the depot. southern rail has said it won't run services
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into london victoria untiljanuary the 10th. the rail company says it's because of the ongoing effect of coronavirus isolation and sickness among staff. there will be no gatwick express trains and other services from sussex will be diverted into london bridge. the world famous new year's day parade in london has been reimagined this year due to covid. e event, that usually attracts crowds of over 500,000 and features a parade through the capital's streets, will instead be an in—person ticketed event for 600 people and include stage performances. organisers are encouraging those without tickets to watch the televised event from home instead. time now for the weather. good morning, it's another exceptionally mild start this morning and a very mild end to 2021. we've got a spell of rain. there's a cold front moving through very quickly. could be quite heavy for a time but blown through on that rather gusty, blustery south, south—westerly breeze.
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the cloud, a little more ready to break today so we will see sunny spells and temperatures getting up to 16 celsius. of course, it is new year's eve. this evening will be dry and mild, the winds that bit lighter as well. we will see some cloud overnight and the wind strengthens a little into new year's day. the minimum temperature again, double figures across the board between 10—12 celsius. for the first day of 2022, another mild one. quite cloudy for some and showers potentially, especially along the south coast. drier further north with sunny spells. temperatures 15—16c. that's all from us for now, we're back with your lunchtime news at 1.30. hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and katherine downes. "a major step forward in the fight forjustice" — that's how one survivor of ghislaine maxwell reacted after the british 60—year—old was found guilty of six trafficking young girls.
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she now faces a lengthy prison sentence after being convicted for grooming teenagers to be abused by the disgraced financier jeffrey epstein. we can speak now tojill greenfield, a lawyer who represented british accusers ofjeffrey epstein in the civil case for compensation. good morning, thank you for speaking to us. the good morning, thank you for speaking to us. , ., , to us. the news of the five guilty verdicts and _ to us. the news of the five guilty verdicts and six _ to us. the news of the five guilty verdicts and six counts _ to us. the news of the five guilty verdicts and six counts against i verdicts and six counts against virginia —— ghislaine maxwell yesterday. how did you feel? just a sense of relief for victims. how i sense of relief for victims. how brave they were to stand up in court. a massive sense of relief. a huge sense ofjustice for victims around the world. every woman should look at that and stand up and say i
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can challenge. look at that and stand up and say i can challenge-— can challenge. four women gave evidence in _ can challenge. four women gave evidence in court, _ can challenge. four women gave evidence in court, but _ can challenge. four women gave evidence in court, but many i can challenge. four women gave | evidence in court, but many more affected by the abuse. the women you represented, do they feel heard, represented, do they feel heard, represented by the verdict? thea;r represented by the verdict? they have been given _ represented by the verdict? they have been given a _ represented by the verdict? tia: have been given a voice. represented by the verdict? t'ta: have been given a voice. they represented by the verdict? tt91 have been given a voice. they were not involved in the trial. the point is that i also acted for victims of harvey weinstein, and now maxwell. you look at how it unfolded in court, the dynamics of power, and to see what happened and how it unfolded has been a tremendous sense of the law at work and working to help victims and that is huge. no one is above the law and i think that came through loud and clear. you mentioned the abuse happened in the 1990s. justice has been a long time coming. how have the lives of
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your clients been affected by this abuse and waiting forjustice? t abuse and waiting forjustice? i cannot talk about my clients individually, but i have been acting for many victims over the years of sexual abuse. for many victims over the years of sexualabuse. it for many victims over the years of sexual abuse. it is devastating what happens. and the sense of power over them. it is interesting, often it is many years after an assault people are able to speak, because they are terrified by what happened. so the perpetrator has benefited, causing the terror to the victim and keeping them silent. to now have it publicly talked about, this is massive all around the world. a, talked about, this is massive all around the world. a tremendous step forward. around the world. a tremendous step forward- the — around the world. a tremendous step forward. the metropolitan _ around the world. a tremendous step forward. the metropolitan police, i forward. the metropolitan police, having reviewed materialfrom the us civil courts and media, they said they are not taking action over allegations of criminality in the uk
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relating to jeffrey allegations of criminality in the uk relating tojeffrey epstein. do you think in the face of this guilty verdict they should reconsider opening the case? the verdict they should reconsider opening the case?— verdict they should reconsider opening the case? verdict they should reconsider oenin: the case? ~ . . opening the case? the met had a look aaain opening the case? the met had a look again recently- _ opening the case? the met had a look again recently. they _ opening the case? the met had a look again recently. they said _ opening the case? the met had a look again recently. they said they - opening the case? the met had a look again recently. they said they did i again recently. they said they did not feel they could. i do not know what evidence might come forward. they might have more people coming forward to speak to the met police about it now. a fear for any victim in high—profile cases is the perpetrator is being found not guilty. i suspect what we will find that now she has been found guilty you will find more people reporting to the police. you will find more people reporting to the police-— to the police. what do you think it would take _ to the police. what do you think it would take for— to the police. what do you think it would take for them _ to the police. what do you think it would take for them to _ to the police. what do you think it would take for them to reconsideri would take for them to reconsider reopening an investigation? i5 would take for them to reconsider reopening an investigation? is it a case of more _ reopening an investigation? is it a case of more evidence? _ reopening an investigation? is it a case of more evidence? i - reopening an investigation? is it a case of more evidence? i suspect| reopening an investigation? is it a i case of more evidence? i suspect so. you are asking the wrong person, ask the met police. they looked at this
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carefully, i get the impression. you may find more come forward. i think there will be other high profile individuals where the police will decide they wish to investigate things. it is bound to happen that people will feel they have more of a voice and can speak openly. ghislaine maxwell's family said they cannot accept the verdict. they have not said victims of lide they have said perhaps they were not victims of ghislaine maxwell. do you think it takes away some of the triumph and victory of the verdict for victims, is it disrespectful? when harvey weinstein was found guilty, _ when harvey weinstein was found guilty, he — when harvey weinstein was found guilty, he could not believe it. i .et guilty, he could not believe it. i get it — guilty, he could not believe it. i get it i— guilty, he could not believe it. i get it. i think the rest of the world — get it. i think the rest of the world is— get it. i think the rest of the world is looking at this and can see it for—
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world is looking at this and can see it for what— world is looking at this and can see it for what it — world is looking at this and can see it for what it is. they will have heard — it for what it is. they will have heard the _ it for what it is. they will have heard the evidence and seeing what happened _ heard the evidence and seeing what happened in court. the evidence in court _ happened in court. the evidence in court is _ happened in court. the evidence in court is a _ happened in court. the evidence in court is a snippet of what happened. there _ court is a snippet of what happened. there are _ court is a snippet of what happened. there are numerous reports in the press _ there are numerous reports in the press of— there are numerous reports in the press of other victims of what happened to them. the shout out is enormously— happened to them. the shout out is enormously loud. i do not think it does _ enormously loud. i do not think it does i_ enormously loud. i do not think it does. i think it is the reaction i would — does. i think it is the reaction i would expect to see.— does. i think it is the reaction i would expect to see. thank you for s-ueakin would expect to see. thank you for speaking to — would expect to see. thank you for speaking to us _ would expect to see. thank you for speaking to us and _ would expect to see. thank you for speaking to us and sharing - would expect to see. thank you for speaking to us and sharing your. speaking to us and sharing your thoughts. who has been representing some of the accusers in the civil case. holly is here with the sport and you start with goals at old trafford. manchester united want to start the new year in the top six because they always do. 32 years the last time they did not go into january not in they did not go into january not in the top six, which is remarkable.
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extraordinary. forall the top six, which is remarkable. extraordinary. for all of the ups and downs, that is consistency. a club in crisis and there you go. the last time they were in that pickle sir alex ferguson was in charge. we might go full on this. last night it was happy birthday to sir alex ferguson, his 80th. manchester united's unbeaten run under new manager ralf rangnick continues. united beat burnley 3—1 at old trafford to move up to sixth in the premier league. our sports correspondent andy swiss reports on the eve of sir alex ferguson's 80th birthday, could the current manchester united give him the perfect present? seven minutes in against burnley, and scott mctominay duly obliged. he certainly enjoyed it, but he wasn't alone. burnley�*s night soon got even worse. first jadon sancho's deflected effort doubled united's lead. and when mctominay�*s shot rebounded to cristiano ronaldo, it was 3—0 and it was surely game over.
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not quite, as aaron lennon pulled one back for burnley at the end of a breathless first half. after the break, it was united that threatened once more. burnley keeper wayne hennessey denying first mctominay and then edison cavani — his brilliance matched only by his bravery. but united held on for a 3—1victory, which moves them up to sixth and which ends their year on a winning note. andy swiss, bbc news. it's all about energy for me. it is about passion, about energy, and if we show that, especially if we play at home, i think we have a good team. it is not so easy to play against us. this is about sustainably delivering that kind of performance. norwich's visit to leicester tomorrow has been postponed due to a covid outbreak and injuries at carrow road. leicester will have to make to do without jamie vardy for up to a month. the 34—year—old aggravated a hamstring injury in tuesday's victory over liverpool.
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manchester city defender joao cancelo says he suffered cuts to the face after attempting to fight off a gang of robbers at his home. he posted an image of his injuries on instagram, claiming "four cowards" took all his jewellery and left him with a facial injury. in a club statement manchester city said... a dramatic night at alexandra palace where quarter—final places were up for grabs in the pdc world darts championship. there was a thrilling battle between two former champions. scotland's gary anderson eventually saw off englishman rob cross, winning by 4 sets to three.
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peter "snakebite" wright is into the last 8. the scottish 2020 champion beat england's ryan searle by 4 sets to one. england's james wade is also through. the world number 4 thrashed martjn kleermaker of the netherlands by 4 sets to nil. there are doubts about whether cricket's big bash league in australia can continue following multiple positive covid cases. today's adelaide strikers v sydney thunder game is going ahead, despite four thunder players testing positive. meanwhile, seven players and eight support staff at the melbourne stars have tested positive, putting their next match onjanuary 2nd in serious doubt. australia batter travis head has tested positive for covid and will miss the fourth ashes test against england in sydney, which starts late tuesday evening uk time. he'll remain in melbourne and isolate for seven days in line with health requirements.
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head is australia's leading run—scorer in the ashes, a series they've already won with two matches still to play. so it's all going well for australia isn't it? well, england cricket fans might enjoy this. star batsman steve smith stuck in a lift for nearly an hour. take a look. not quite the night that i had planned. i am currently stuck in a lift. just taking a seat. what else do you do when you are stuck in a lift, you know? i could be here for a while. oh, what have you got? is it some food for me? what have we got here? a few m&ms. that's naughty. it's been 50 minutes. i'm still here. thanks, buddy. it is the small victories that matter. he stayed very calm. an hour is a long time. he would have got out more quickly if he was
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an england batter. crucially, just the gap for suites to be delivered. there are very few food items that could fit through. eminem is probably a good one. sausage roll, you would have lost the pastry. a sausage, maybe. —— m&ms is probably a good one. things not to eat in an elevator. just do not drink because you do not want to be caught short. sorry about ending on that note. the actor and singer olly alexander will be joined by kylie minogue and the pet shop boys to ring in the new year tonight on bbc one. the years and years singer is following in the footsteps of robbie williams and alicia keys to host the concert. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been speaking
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to olly, and given us a little sneak peak of what's to come tonight. # you don't have to be straight with me. # i see what's underneath your mask. # i'm a man like you, i believe the rituals of the dancer's dance.# olly alexander, when you get the call saying do you want to do the bbc new year's eve show, how did you react? isaid yes! oh, my gosh, i can't believe... i feel very lucky to be doing it. i can't tell you. it's such an honour to be bringing in the new year's with everyone watching on the bbc. so i feel very privileged and excited. it is going to be such a good show. quite a responsibility, because there will be a lot of people at home this year. that's true, actually, yeah. i am actually quite nervous, so thanks for making me more nervous. but it's good, it's good. the more people, the better. it is going to be so fun. so what are you planning, then? well, obviously, i'll be doing my own hits. but also some really exciting collaborations with kylie minogue and the pet shop boys.
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we are doing some surprise covers. there's an amazing group of dancers we have on stage with us. it is a real show. i cannot wait for people to see it. because this is the thing, it is going to be a very wide audience that is watching this, so you need to play songs that people can sing and dance along to. oh, don't worry, you can sing and dance along to every single song. # i'm chasing after midnight. # show me the way to your heart. you mentioned a couple of guest performances. kylie minogue, you have worked with her a couple of times. the kylie minogue, global icon, superstar, legend. i first met her in 2015. we supported her, supported her show. over the years, i wheedled my way in there, so now i'm like actually her friend. what is the secret to doing that? just don't give up. if you dream big! and you're persistent. so, yeah, we worked together earlier in the year on my song starstruck.
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shejumped on it and then, of course, we did our collaboration a second to midnight, which is just perfect for new year, so we are going to be doing it right before midnight. the pet shop boys. # everything i ever done. # everything i ever do. # every place i've ever been. # everywhere i'm going to. # it's a sin.# neil tennant and chris lowe. oh, my gosh, two legends. i first met them a few years ago and we made a song together called dreamland. the stories they have and people they've worked with over the years, and just being able to call myself one of those people is very, very cool. do they give you advice, do they try and look after you in the industry? yeah, well, i really value the conversations i've had with the pet shop boys, with kylie, so much, because i still get so nervous and feel like my confidence takes a knock. like i have those days. and they do, as well. kylie's telling me about how she feels that, sometimes. and neil, so, you know, it's encouraging to know that they are still like that. they are human beings!
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and we are all the same. we all still feel insecure and get nervous and unsure of ourselves. so that has been a really good lesson to learn. with the pet shop boys, will it be it's a sin you do? yeah, well... yes, it will. i was like, maybe you will have to wait and see, but i will do, yes. we are going to do it. and i'm so excited, because we haven't done it. obviously, it is their iconic song. i have performed that song a few times, but we have never done it together. you get all these stories and all these rumours and all these nightmares, because that's what they want you to think — that lot. they want to scare us! according to them. how does it work, this aids thing? it's almost hard to believe that was this year. because it was january. what kind of impact as it had on you, that show? honestly, making the show, we filmed it two years ago now, butjust making it was so profound because i got to work with all those amazing people, the incredible cast. the crew, russell davies. i loved the story so much and just being able to play that character was incredible. because i am a gay man, i got to get a link to my past, in a way, by playing something that was set in the �*80s,
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but that has... the aids crisis directly impacts me today and so many of us, so learning all of that has been hugely profound for me. and since the show has come out, i have heard all these conversations about hiv and aids and testing, and what we can do, what prep is, and helping spread that awareness has just been amazing. i am so happy to kind of keep it going, if i can. # then you're telling me you can't breathe. # well, you should set me free. # baby, if you're over me. 2022 is almost upon us. new year's resolutions, what are you going for? my new year's resolution is to keep up with my diary, because i have always kept a diary, but the past few months, i have not been keeping up with it. so i want to keep up with writing my diary more. will i get a mention for today? of course, i will be like, "had a great interview." get in! my new year's resolution last year was not to search my name on the internet. i have managed a whole year, so i'm just going to keep that one going, as well. well, congratulations, olly alexander.
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thank you very much for speaking to us right to the end of 2021. thank you for speaking to me. # 0nly got a second to midnight.# brilliant. the big new years & years eve party starts tonight on bbc one at 11.25pm in england, wales and northern ireland. and the celebrations continue. from club tropicana to freedom — george michael's hits are sure to feature on many a new year's eve playlist tonight. it was five years this christmas since the singer died, and 40 since first hitting the charts with wham. and tomorrow radio 2 will countdown the star's 40 best tracks — voted for by listeners. here's some of the contenders. # wake me up before you go—go. # don't leave me hanging
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on like a yo—yo. # wake me up before you go—go. # i don't want to miss it when you hit that high. # club tropicana, drinks are free. # fun and sunshine, there's enough for everyone. # all that's missing is the sea. # but don't worry, you can suntan. # should have known better than to cheat a friend. # a wasted chance that i'd been given. # so i'm never going to dance again the way i danced with you. # cos i've got to have faith. # i've got to have faith. # i got to have faith, faith, faith. # freedom, freedom. # you've got to give what you take. # freedom...
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# freedom, freedom. it is impossible not to sing along. we were singing to those. scott mills will be hosting the radio 2 marathon and hejoins us now. are you a big fan yourself? i am not here a day early, i am doing radio this morning as well. a massive fan of george. we are celebrating 40 years of his music by doing the ultimate george michael chart. if you are a fan, it is a must listen tomorrow at 1pm, three hours of george's best songs. this tomorrow at1pm, three hours of george's best songs.— tomorrow at 1pm, three hours of george's best songs. this is about his writing. _ george's best songs. this is about his writing, crucially? _ george's best songs. this is about his writing, crucially? it _ george's best songs. this is about his writing, crucially? it has i george's best songs. this is about his writing, crucially? it has to i george's best songs. this is about his writing, crucially? it has to be | his writing, crucially? it has to be sonus he his writing, crucially? it has to be songs he composed. _ his writing, crucially? it has to be songs he composed. listeners i his writing, crucially? it has to be i songs he composed. listeners have been voting for a couple of months
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now. certain songs will not be in there, like the amazing duet with aretha franklin. all the eltonjohn track don't let the sun go down on me. , :, track don't let the sun go down on me. , . :, , , :, me. these have to be george compositions. _ me. these have to be george compositions. you _ me. these have to be george compositions. you have i me. these have to be george compositions. you have not l me. these have to be george i compositions. you have not seen the voting because you want to know at the same time as the listener is the most popular tracks? i will the same time as the listener is the most popular tracks?— most popular tracks? i will imagine i will know most popular tracks? i will imagine i will know a _ most popular tracks? i will imagine i will know a bit _ most popular tracks? i will imagine i will know a bit before _ most popular tracks? i will imagine i will know a bit before but - most popular tracks? i will imagine i will know a bit before but i i most popular tracks? i will imagine i will know a bit before but i askedl i will know a bit before but i asked not to see the chart because i wanted it to be a surprise to me. if you think about last christmas, two weeks ago it was the most streamed track in the uk so that could be the number one. it could be one of his solo songs, careless whisper. freedom. then you have the wham stuff, as well. i freedom. then you have the wham stuff. as well-— stuff, as well. i don't know. i hear ou did stuff, as well. i don't know. i hear you did not _ stuff, as well. i don't know. i hear you did not meet _ stuff, as well. i don't know. i hear you did not meet him _ stuff, as well. i don't know. i hear you did not meet him but - stuff, as well. i don't know. i hear you did not meet him but you i stuff, as well. i don't know. i hear i you did not meet him but you nearly did. , . , , . ,
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you did not meet him but you nearly did. , , .y did. yes, it was my really early da s at did. yes, it was my really early days at radio — did. yes, it was my really early days at radio one. _ did. yes, it was my really early days at radio one. i _ did. yes, it was my really early days at radio one. i had i did. yes, it was my really early days at radio one. i had only i did. yes, it was my really early i days at radio one. i had only been there a month and i could see george michael in the studio next door three feet away. if it was now, i would barge in and say hello. i was new and scared and did not. but i saw him really close by, but i didn't. ,, saw him really close by, but i didn't. , :, :, . didn't. do you live to regret that move? i didn't. do you live to regret that move? i do _ didn't. do you live to regret that move? i do a — didn't. do you live to regret that move? i do a bit. _ didn't. do you live to regret that move? i do a bit. i— didn't. do you live to regret that move? i do a bit. i have - didn't. do you live to regret that move? i do a bit. i have seen i | didn't. do you live to regret that| move? i do a bit. i have seen him | didn't. do you live to regret that i move? i do a bit. i have seen him in concert three _ move? i do a bit. i have seen him in concert three or— move? i do a bit. i have seen him in concert three or four _ move? i do a bit. i have seen him in concert three or four times. - move? i do a bit. i have seen him in concert three or four times. i i move? i do a bit. i have seen him in concert three or four times. i am i concert three or four times. i am annoyed now i was that close and did not do it but i was really scared. new year resolution, always try to meet your heroes. you will talk to people who knew him well as part of the show? , . . :, :, the show? yes, we have a lot of --eole the show? yes, we have a lot of people he _ the show? yes, we have a lot of people he collaborated - the show? yes, we have a lot of people he collaborated with. i i the show? yes, we have a lot of i people he collaborated with. i don't want to tell you too much. people that love george, as well. and we
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are after your stories. maybe you are after your stories. maybe you are after your stories. maybe you are a super fan, are after your stories. maybe you are a superfan, maybe are after your stories. maybe you are a super fan, maybe you met are after your stories. maybe you are a superfan, maybe you met him, maybe he was your first concert. please come and we will try to include them in the show, send your memories to my e—mail at the bbc. a host of stars and listener stories tomorrow afternoon.— host of stars and listener stories tomorrow afternoon. some people sa in: he tomorrow afternoon. some people saying he was _ tomorrow afternoon. some people saying he was a — tomorrow afternoon. some people saying he was a bit _ tomorrow afternoon. some people saying he was a bit of— tomorrow afternoon. some people saying he was a bit of a _ tomorrow afternoon. some people saying he was a bit of a practical. saying he was a bit of a practical joker. saying he was a bit of a practical “oker. :, . :, joker. you will hear some of those stories tomorrow. _ joker. you will hear some of those stories tomorrow. there _ joker. you will hear some of those stories tomorrow. there is - joker. you will hear some of those i stories tomorrow. there is someone i know he was on the faith tour with george and you will hear about some of the pranks he enjoyed playing on the crew tomorrow afternoon. tell us more about — the crew tomorrow afternoon. tell us more about his _ the crew tomorrow afternoon. tell us more about his writing. _ the crew tomorrow afternoon. tell us more about his writing. this - the crew tomorrow afternoon. tell us more about his writing. this is i the crew tomorrow afternoon. tell us more about his writing. this is a i more about his writing. this is a celebration, part of a series celebrating songwriting. so many will know his songs and singing. but the will know his songs and singing. bit the writing is quite something. he
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was a fantastic lyricist and composer. a lot of artists now do not write their own songs but all of the songs you will hear tomorrow were george compositions. i am really looking forward to it. he did so much away _ really looking forward to it. he did so much away from _ really looking forward to it. he did so much away from music. - really looking forward to it. he did so much away from music. you i really looking forward to it. he did | so much away from music. you will hear more about the person he was and his legacy beyond the tunes. yes. you may have seen this story recently that he did not want it to be known, but where his house was in highgate, his estate still fund the christmas lights in highgate every year, which he never talked about. it was never said. but he had been doing for years and it continues. a lot of charity work. i know the thing now may be is to announce you do charity work on instagram. but it was a different time. there is still
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so much as a state helps with now that he never announce. back so much as a state helps with now that he never announce.— so much as a state helps with now that he never announce. back to the sonus that he never announce. back to the son . s and that he never announce. back to the songs and his _ that he never announce. back to the songs and his writing, _ that he never announce. back to the songs and his writing, if— that he never announce. back to the songs and his writing, if you - that he never announce. back to the songs and his writing, if you had i songs and his writing, if you had been voting yourself.— songs and his writing, if you had been voting yourself. maybe you have. i been voting yourself. maybe you have- i am _ been voting yourself. maybe you have. i am not _ been voting yourself. maybe you have. i am not allowed. - been voting yourself. maybe you have. i am not allowed. strictlyl have. i am not allowed. strictly impartial- _ have. i am not allowed. strictly impartial. what _ have. i am not allowed. strictly impartial. what are _ have. i am not allowed. strictly impartial. what are your i have. i am not allowed. strictly i impartial. what are your favourite? you cannot — impartial. what are your favourite? you cannot deny — impartial. what are your favourite? you cannot deny careless _ impartial. what are your favourite? you cannot deny careless whisper. impartial. what are your favourite? | you cannot deny careless whisper is a great love song but i read recently that george, in later life, was not a massive fan of the sun. he wrote it when he was 17 and said he did not know what he was doing and had not been in love at that point so he did not relate. it was not his favourite. i imagine that would be “p favourite. i imagine that would be up there. i love the early wham stuff. club tropicana. they are fun. you should not discount all of his great solo stuff. the older album.
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all the tracks on that. you will hear them all tomorrow. really lookin: hear them all tomorrow. really looking forward _ hear them all tomorrow. really looking forward to _ hear them all tomorrow. really looking forward to it. _ hear them all tomorrow. really looking forward to it. a - hear them all tomorrow. really i looking forward to it. a fascinating thought that someone grows out of one of their own songs. happy new year. the george michael chart will be on tomorrow between 1—4pm on bbc radio 2. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news — the headlines... the government says all adults across the uk have now been offered a coronavirus booster, but there are concerns that many people aren't turning up for their appointments. in his new year's message, borisjohnson has urged people to take a covid test before celebrating tonight. the scottish and welsh governments are urging people not to cross the english border to avoid new year's eve covid restrictions. we've come up from bridgend to spend new year's eve in london and we're hoping to come down here and see some fireworks. firefighters are battling one of the most destructive ever wildfires in the us state of colorado. hundreds of homes have been destroyed and more than 30,000 people have been forced to evacuate the area. "relieved and grateful" — the victims of ghislaine maxwell

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