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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 9, 2022 10:30pm-10:46pm GMT

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eastwards but with that will way eastwards but with that will come a lot of cloud, drizzle patches in the west, starting in the east with the odd bit of rain just about anywhere else for the afternoon. the rain heavierfor anywhere else for the afternoon. the rain heavier for western scotland where it will also be quite windy of the afternoon but it's across the west that will see the highest temperatures reaching highs of 13 celsius in belfast and further east above normal at 7—9 c. hello, this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment. first, the headlines. in new york, at least 19 people are dead after a fire ripped through an apartment building in the bronx area of the city. the education secretary for england backs reducing the covid isolation period, from seven days to five. the australian government did not give assurances to novak djokovic that he could enter the country without a vaccination, according to documents filed before
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tomorrow's court hearing. morrisons becomes the first supermarket to scrap "use by" dates on its milk, encouraging consumers to reduce waste by using the "sniff test" instead. an afghan baby separated from his parents in kabul during the chaos of the us withdrawal is reunited with relatives. hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are aletha adu, political correspondent at the daily mirror, and the former conservative adviser mo hussein. tonight's front pages, before we hear from them. the metro leads on the falling number of omicron cases in the uk for the fifth consecutive day.
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there's been a weekly drop of almost 10% in covid hospital admissions. the i says that the prime minister is planning to announce a "living with covid plan" by march — which could include winding down testing and the scrapping of free lateral flow tests. another of those measures is reported in the telegraph, reducing the covid isolation period from seven to five days — a measure which the chancellor supports. the mail has a warning from senior tory mps to borisjohnson that he must tackle the cost of living crisis, or face a backlash at the polls. the guardian leads on comments from fire safety campaigners, who say the housing secretary michael gove must spend more than the planned £4 billion to tackle the cladding crisis. and the ft reports on nato�*s warning to russia that it's prepared for "a new armed conflict in europe", after russia's deployment of tens of thousands of troops on the ukraine border. forgive me, i had your name written down, it has been helpfully pointed
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out to me the correct pronunciation. i shall scrap this out right now so it doesn't say that, i'm so sorry. it's lovely to have you with us, thanks forjoining us this evening. do you want to kick us off this evening and start off with the metro's front page?— metro's front page? yes, the headfine metro's front page? yes, the headline is _ metro's front page? yes, the headline is very _ metro's front page? yes, the headline is very optimistic i metro's front page? yes, the| headline is very optimistic for metro's front page? yes, the - headline is very optimistic for what we need tomorrow, but some say it's possibly too optimistic. the metro is reporting that omicron cases have been following for the last five days now, so it may seem that omicron may have peaked in the uk. but we've also got data showing that london's possibly peaked a few weeks ago also. so they could be a good sign that we are slowly moving past this omicron storm. but you must remember that we are only starting to deal with the real impact of this variant. we've also got figures shown earlier today that 178%
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increase in covid infections reported a month ago, and that's still pretty worrying. so we've still pretty worrying. so we've still got an nhs that struggling to cope at the moment.— still got an nhs that struggling to cope at the moment. absolutely, you are riaht - cope at the moment. absolutely, you are right - i — cope at the moment. absolutely, you are right - i saw— cope at the moment. absolutely, you are right - i saw figures _ cope at the moment. absolutely, you are right - i saw figures saying - cope at the moment. absolutely, you are right - i saw figures saying 300 i are right — i saw figures saying 300 plus people whose death was reported at the end of the week, so we were talking on saturday, that's the highest number of fatalities in 2a hours since last february, which would suggest there's still quite a ways to go, it's falling from a relatively high number given the situation we were enjoying, if that's the right word, before omicron was on the horizon. just on that, is their political pressure on the government? how soon could it talk about reducing or eliminating restrictions? the former conservative chief whip who effectively organised a rebellion against borisjohnson last month saying if we don't get the
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restrictions ending this month, there might be an even bigger rebellion and leadership challenge. you saw lots of pressure on the prime _ you saw lots of pressure on the prime minister, you saw that also in the 100 _ prime minister, you saw that also in the 100 conservative mps rebelling. the current restrictions will lead to even — the current restrictions will lead to even more people thinking twice about— to even more people thinking twice about supporting the government to -et about supporting the government to get them _ about supporting the government to get them through. so that pressure i think. _ get them through. so that pressure i think, alongside the other things, the unforced errors we saw from number— the unforced errors we saw from number ten, the unforced errors we saw from numberten, whether it the unforced errors we saw from number ten, whether it was christmas parties _ number ten, whether it was christmas parties or— number ten, whether it was christmas parties or wallpaper — all of this has been — parties or wallpaper — all of this has been adding to the frustrations with mp5. — has been adding to the frustrations with mps, and it's been channelled in terms _ with mps, and it's been channelled in terms of— with mps, and it's been channelled in terms of a response to the restrictions. that pressure just because — restrictions. that pressure just because there was christmas recess, i don't _ because there was christmas recess, tdon't think— because there was christmas recess, i don't think that's gone away. and if you _ i don't think that's gone away. and if you took— i don't think that's gone away. and if you look at the way that — this is a very— if you look at the way that — this is a very hopeful and optimistic headline, — is a very hopeful and optimistic headline, but you look at the reality — headline, but you look at the reality on the ground and i do think
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there _ reality on the ground and i do think there is— reality on the ground and i do think there is still some cause for concern _ there is still some cause for concern. the government will have to make _ concern. the government will have to make some _ concern. the government will have to make some decisions between, do we continue _ make some decisions between, do we continue this path which, some might say the _ continue this path which, some might say the government has been vindicated because people are protecting it to be a lot worse than it is, _ protecting it to be a lot worse than it is, do— protecting it to be a lot worse than it is, do we — protecting it to be a lot worse than it is, do we go from pandemic to endemic— it is, do we go from pandemic to endemic and try to normalise this? or do— endemic and try to normalise this? or do we _ endemic and try to normalise this? or do we still keep and reserve the ability— or do we still keep and reserve the ability to— or do we still keep and reserve the ability to act if things go wrong? that decision will have to be taken, political— that decision will have to be taken, political pressure or not. a that decision will have to be taken, political pressure or not.— political pressure or not. a good oint on political pressure or not. a good point on that. — political pressure or not. a good point on that, as _ political pressure or not. a good point on that, as you _ political pressure or not. a good point on that, as you said, - political pressure or not. a good point on that, as you said, in . political pressure or not. a good i point on that, as you said, in terms of the continuing pressures, we talked about the pressure on the health service — i was interested in the latest figures out, 61% is still a long ways short of where the government was hoping to be stopped and that must affect, given all the emphasis that's been put on vaccinations as the qa out, that must still limit them with the government can do in terms of removing restrictions. doing to take us through the front page of the
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guardian? this was a story that was pretty much leaked over the weekend, even before tomorrow morning's papers. they've tried to move it, they have moved on by saying the campaigners don't think this £4 billion figure that michael gove is talking about getting the developers to offer — presumably used to offer to offer — presumably used to offer to pay for the protection money to al capone generously, because the alternative was rather worse. they'll offer this money, but it's not enough. they'll offer this money, but it's not enough-— not enough. yes, this is michael gove saying _ not enough. yes, this is michael gove saying the _ not enough. yes, this is michael gove saying the leaseholders . not enough. yes, this is michael - gove saying the leaseholders should not have _ gove saying the leaseholders should not have to face these huge costs for replacing combustible clattering, and he is directing his fire in the — clattering, and he is directing his fire in the direction of the developers, and i think he has said if the _ developers, and i think he has said if the offer— developers, and i think he has said if the offer is not made, then legislation passed will force them to pay— legislation passed will force them to pay this. but this just covers combustible clattering, it doesn't
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cover— combustible clattering, it doesn't cover other fire risks such as balconies _ cover other fire risks such as balconies or fire doors, which campaigners understandably now are raising _ campaigners understandably now are raising as _ campaigners understandably now are raising as well in terms of a risk on properties bought against any other— on properties bought against any other fire mitigation measures. this does troil— other fire mitigation measures. this does boil down to the government is putting _ does boil down to the government is putting a _ does boil down to the government is putting a significant amount of nroney— putting a significant amount of money into this clearly for the people — money into this clearly for the people affected, that doesn't quite cover— people affected, that doesn't quite cover everything, it's not enough. what _ cover everything, it's not enough. what does — cover everything, it's not enough. what does this fall to the taxpayer or the _ what does this fall to the taxpayer or the developers, or somewhere in between? _ or the developers, or somewhere in between? i— or the developers, or somewhere in between? i think a combination of both, _ between? i think a combination of both, we will see in the end. this is the problem, _ both, we will see in the end. this is the problem, it's _ both, we will see in the end. try 3 is the problem, it's all well to threaten legislative they don't cooperate, but legislation will delay this process and not remove the anxiety on leaseholders by friday night, that many leaseholders have been feeling ever since that fire? with all the extra fire... people sometimes still have sleepless nights in those properties, don't they, never mind
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the financial problems it's created, the financial problems it's created, the ability to move and all the rest of it? ~ , , the ability to move and all the rest ofit? ~ , ., ., ., of it? absolutely, the amount of stress these _ of it? absolutely, the amount of stress these leaseholders - of it? absolutely, the amount of stress these leaseholders have i of it? absolutely, the amount of- stress these leaseholders have been under the past few years — you must member the tragedy took place in 2017, and since michael gove took office, we've heard not much from him on this cladding scandal. recently the mercedes people were getting into a scandal of allegedly hiring people who were involved in some sort of scheme. but people pay bills of up to £200,000 — for the guardian highlights this, and many of these blocks have combustible cladding, but also problems with fire doors and balconies, there's so many loopholes yet to be addressed by the government, and it's distinctly not enough for michael gove to simply turn up after years now and say they've got some money — how will it be helping his people
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facing a cost—of—living crisis now, and other people still facing issues with their homes that have been going on for years? it'sjust not enough. i going on for years? it's “ust not enou:h. ., ., ., , ., enough. i wonder how long before --eole enough. i wonder how long before peeple start _ enough. i wonder how long before people start saying, _ enough. i wonder how long before people start saying, this - enough. i wonder how long before people start saying, this is - enough. i wonder how long before people start saying, this is all - people start saying, this is all very well for this particular case, let's say he gets his objective met, but there's a bigger question about the culture of self—regulation that's taken hold, particularly in safety sensitive industries. i've heard of people talk of people in aircraft maintenance, self certifying rather than self—regulating, people saying they've done the work and somebody checks the work, but nobody externally checks it. that's a bigger cultural thing, and a lot of businesses cost less because we take that approach?— that approach? absolutely, and “ust to hiuuhliht that approach? absolutely, and “ust to highlight that fl that approach? absolutely, and “ust to highlight that this i that approach? absolutely, and “ust to highlight that this tragedy h to highlight that this tragedy happened in 2017 — why has it taken five years? it's not good enough,
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britain deserves better than this. abs, britain deserves better than this. a copy that's flashed up from the reuters news agency that says the fire commissioner in new york city says the fire there in the bronx that we were reporting on this evening started in a malfunctioning space heater. the result of that is 19 people are dead, nine of them children because the person who lived in the apartment kept the door open, so the smoke from the heater — presumably they died or were overcome by smoke — went out into the building. a reminder ofjust how vulnerable people can be in a high occupancy building, and that's nothing to do with cladding. rather alarmist language here from the secretary general of nato. "nato stands ready for conflict in europe," war of some kind, if talks
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fail with moscow? europe,�* war of some kind, if talks fail with moscow?— europe," war of some kind, if talks fail with moscow? you're absolutely riaht, fail with moscow? you're absolutely right. certainly _ fail with moscow? you're absolutely right, certainly an _ fail with moscow? you're absolutely right, certainly an alarming - right, certainly an alarming headline — what stands out for me is conflict, economy in europe and my heart is racing already. the nato chief is warning us of the risk of conflict, potentially saying the risk of conflict is definitely real. he's made some scathing remarks, saying to the financial times that he's aware of russia's history, and for years they've experienced conflict with their neighbours. he is also urging russia to engage in some talks over this week, planning to set up their efforts to re—engage. but we've got to remember that people have denied —— they have denied plans to invade ukraine. whether they mean that are not, i'll leave that to the viewers. but in the last weeks and months, actually, russia has around hundreds of thousands of troops that are combat ready, they've got medical supplies
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around the ukraine border. it's quite worrying to the ukrainians and people around the world because we just simply don't need any sort of conflict, let alone a war right now. and we've got this trust, who's been trying to step up her efforts as the iron lady of this, she's been put across that in the last few weeks. but itjust across that in the last few weeks. but it just seems across that in the last few weeks. but itjust seems she's too busy articulating her image of being an iron lady, instead ofjust acting and really ensuring that russia stepped down any sort of rhetoric or motives to possibly invade ukraine. it's a war of words more than anything else, and i think this is nato _ anything else, and i think this is nato setting out its stall ahead of these _ nato setting out its stall ahead of these crunch talks, it would appear, with russia — these crunch talks, it would appear, with russia. and of course, they do have _ with russia. and of course, they do have to _ with russia. and of course, they do have to say — with russia. and of course, they do have to say if diplomacy fails, if talks _ have to say if diplomacy fails, if talks fail. — have to say if diplomacy fails, if talks fail, then they reserve the right— talks fail, then they reserve the right to — talks fail, then they reserve the right to react. because that is the
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entire _ right to react. because that is the entire point of nato existing. but as ever. — entire point of nato existing. but as ever. it— entire point of nato existing. but as ever, if you take a step back and look as ever, if you take a step back and took at _ as ever, if you take a step back and took at what — as ever, if you take a step back and look at what rusher are actually calling for, they're calling for reassurances and nato will not be carrying _ reassurances and nato will not be carrying out exercises in the countries _ carrying out exercises in the countries near russia dashed russia, or ukraine _ countries near russia dashed russia, or ukraine will not be able tojoin these _ or ukraine will not be able tojoin these - _ or ukraine will not be able tojoin these - i— or ukraine will not be able tojoin these — i don't think these are reasonable requests at all, so they'll— reasonable requests at all, so they'll have to discuss these in detait— they'll have to discuss these in detail and _ they'll have to discuss these in detail and will probably find a way where _ detail and will probably find a way where russia can go back and claim a victory, _ where russia can go back and claim a victory, and _ where russia can go back and claim a victory, and nato can go back and claim _ victory, and nato can go back and claim a _ victory, and nato can go back and claim a victory, as well. because this feels— claim a victory, as well. because this feels like brinkmanship, there's— this feels like brinkmanship, there's talk of economic sanctions and traded — there's talk of economic sanctions and traded caps with the us, which will affect— and traded caps with the us, which will affect russia's economy. so i don't _ will affect russia's economy. so i don't think— will affect russia's economy. so i don't think anyone wants to fall over— don't think anyone wants to fall over the — don't think anyone wants to fall over the edge on this one. but you do always— over the edge on this one. but you do always see the briefing, the rhetoric— do always see the briefing, the rhetoric before these talks hit btows~ — rhetoric before these talks hit blows. ., , , , ., ., rhetoric before these talks hit blows. ., ,, , ., ., , blows. pointlessly together a couple stories, if blows. pointlessly together a couple stories. if we _ blows. pointlessly together a couple stories, if we may. _ blows. pointlessly together a couple stories, if we may. we've _ blows. pointlessly together a couple stories, if we may. we've got - blows. pointlessly together a couple stories, if we may. we've got a - stories, if we may. we've got a paragraph on the left of the ft,
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about a small hotel owner whose energy company went under because of the traumatic rise in wholesale energy prices, gas prices — and they've energy prices, gas prices — and they've been energy prices, gas prices — and they've been told their bill can go from 2000 a month to as much as £10,000 a month in one go. it's a story that really lies behind what the daily mail front page says, "save us from cost—of—living crisis, boris." louw yes, and this will now be the defining issue for the government to get to grips with and tackle quite urgently, because the energy crisis is just getting worse. i've heard anecdotally from so many people _ i've heard anecdotally from so many people about their bills going up by astronomical amounts, this case in the astronomical amounts, this casein the ft_ astronomical amounts, this case in the ft today, and its businesses having _ the ft today, and its businesses having a — the ft today, and its businesses having a huge impact, as well,
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inflation —

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