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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  January 20, 2022 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the us warns russia an invasion of ukraine will have catastrophic results as international diplomacy efforts are ramped up. if any, any assembled russian units move across the ukrainian border, that is an invasion, but it will be met with severe and a coordinated economic response. new satellite images show a build up of russian troops international diplomacy is being ramped up to find a unified strategy of russia invades. moscow denies it's preparing to attack. also in the programme: pope benedict is accused of misconduct over four child abuse cases when he was archbishop of munich.
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here in the uk, a senior conservative has accused ministers of tory rebels trying to oust borisjohnson have been threatened renewed pressure on borisjohnson — as a conservative mp says — tory rebels have been threatened with damaging publicity and removal the intimidation of a member of parliament is a serious matter. moreover, the reports from which i'm aware would seem to constitute blackmail. and we're getting pictures from ghana of the aftermath of a huge explosion in bogoso. many are feared dead. american diplomacy is in high gear as the tensions on the russian ukraine guardian —— porter escalade. foreign ministers from key european countries have held talks in berlin with the us secretary of state, antony blinken. they've been trying to co—ordinate a western strategy to avoid a conflict. here's mr blinken speaking earlier.
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we have been very clear throughout, if any russian military forces moved across the ukrainian border and commit new acts of aggression against ukraine, that will be met with a swift severe united response from the united states and our allies and partners. mr blinken appeared to be clarifying controversial remarks made by us presidentjoe biden earlier, where he appeared to suggest that nato was divided over how to respond to a russian invasion. it's one thing if it's a minor incursion and we end up having a fight about what to do and not do, etc. that wasn't well received by the ukrainian president, who tweeted... so in the past few hours, mr biden said this. if any, any assembled russian units move across ukrainian border, that is an invasion, but it will be met with severe
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and a coordinated economic response. and as for moscow — it had this message for the us. translation: threatening statements i against russia with a warning that i russia will allegedly have to pay a heavy price for some hypothetical actions can be heard daily. we believe that they in no way contribute to defusing the tension that has now arisen in europe, and moreover, can contribute to the destabilisation of the situation. have a look at these satellite images. it's estimated that russia has about 100,000 troops on the ukrainian border at the moment. this is also causing concern. russia has moved troops into neighbouring belarus — forjoint military drills, it says. the ukrainian president has, in the last few hours,
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urged his western partners to act. translation: our partners need to be effective, notjust in words - _ what is important is notjust information about what russia can do, or what the world would do in this case. without the abstract, they cannot get away with it, but naming specific sanctions, measures that the whole world is prepared to take. there's some important considerations though. moscow annexed crimea in 2014. when they invaded, they faced little resistance from ukraine's military. eight years later — ukraine is much better equipped. in 2014, ukraine reportedly had 130,000 military personnel and a million reservists. that's now doubled. currently there are around 255,000 active military personnel and another 900,000 reservists. but this is still far fewer than russia, which has three million at its disposal,
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including reservists. let's hearfrom the president of the european commission. if the situation deteriorates, if there are any further attacks on the territorial integrity of ukraine, we will respond with massive economic and financial sanctions. the transatlantic community stands firm on this. russia has denied that it's planning an invasion. but at the same time, it says it could take �*unspecified military action�* unless the west agrees to its list of demands. above all it wants to ban ukraine from everjoining the nato defence alliance. it also wants nato stop its expansion eastwards. and the roll back of all of nato's military deployments in central and eastern europe. angela stent is a professor at georgetown university — and a former national intelligence officer for russia at the national intelligence council. it thank you very much indeed for
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joining us here on the bbc. we appreciated. if you were advising the west, what would you be telling them to do now?— them to do now? well, i think we have to continue _ them to do now? well, i think we have to continue doing _ them to do now? well, i think we have to continue doing what - them to do now? well, i think we have to continue doing what they | have to continue doing what they are doing. you have to hold the door open for diplomacy, and that is my link and will be leading tomorrow in geneva. i thank you have to make it very clear that there will be massive sanctions if there is russian military incursion into the ukraine. i'm glad that president biden has clarified that even if it is not that the russians go to kyiv or tried to take more of the southeastern region, there will be very severe financial sanctions. the third part of that, of course, is assisting ukraine, as he said, it's
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assisting ukraine, as he said, its military is performing much better now than it did in 2014, but it still needs a lot of help. great britain we know has been assisting the ukrainians particularly in the last couple of weeks. the us has, germany won't, but at least sending more equipment, the us hasjust promised some more military assistance, so those are really the three things to try to negotiate, be clear about the consequences that there is a military incursion,, keep there is a military incursion,, keep the ukrainian military capable of withstanding an assault stop by let's pick up on one of your recommendations there, try to negotiate, do you think that nato and the west should consider listening to the russians concerned that nato has expanded too far into the east, and that is not reasonably uncomfortable for russia. i think they have listened to those concerns, and they have discussed these things before, but nato is not going to allow russia to veto its decision—making power. if a country wants tojoin decision—making power. if a country wants to join nato, decision—making power. if a country wants tojoin nato, it decision—making power. if a country wants to join nato, it should decision—making power. if a country wants tojoin nato, it should be able to apply. now, as we all know, in reality, ukrainian membership and nato is not in the cards, that's been said quite clearly for the moment, but nato isn't going to
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close off the possibility of ukraine orany close off the possibility of ukraine or any other country, sweden and finland are talking about it again now everyjoining, and that's a nonstarter and the russians realise that. ., , , ,, ., ., that. you study russia and the west's relationship _ that. you study russia and the west's relationship with - that. you study russia and the west's relationship with that i that. you study russia and the i west's relationship with that very closely. lots of our viewers around the world are looking at this and trying to gauge how serious the possibility is of a conflict here. what would you say to them? i think it's really quite _ what would you say to them? i think it's really quite serious. _ what would you say to them? i think it's really quite serious. if— what would you say to them? i think it's really quite serious. if you i it's really quite serious. if you look at the russian military movements, all the things that you were just talking about, it's the joint exercises with belarus to the north. they looked as if they are preparing for an invasion. i think they maybe want us to think that they maybe want us to think that they are preparing for an invasion. i'm afraid the likelihood has gone up i'm afraid the likelihood has gone up even since those discussions last week because the russians have said that the discussions failed and that
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unless the west meets these demands, the ultimatum that russia has given it, they will have to take some action. i think the likelihood is very strong. i don't think it's very strong. i don't think its immediate. we have the beijing olympics coming up. people may not remember this, olympics coming up. people may not rememberthis, but olympics coming up. people may not remember this, but in 2008 when russia went to war with georgia, that was the beijing summer olympics, the chinese were not very happy about this. china and russia of coursewa re close happy about this. china and russia of courseware close partners, so there might be a few weeks window waiting here, the olympics in beijing begin on the 4th of february and on the 20th which is when the russian exercises and. so that's all by way of saying that this is not off the table, but the likelihood is quite strong and one can only hope that diplomacy will avert that. we really appreciate you joining us. thank you very much.— really appreciate you joining us. thank you very much. thank you, thank yom _ right, let's update you in uk politics. boris johnson is saying today ——
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borisjohnson says he hasn't seen any evidence to back up claims from a senior conservative mp that the government has attempted to "blackmail" colleagues who are opposing him. william wragg, who's one of those calling for the prime minister to resign over lockdown parties at downing street, said rebels had faced "pressures and intimidation". westminster is waiting for the report into lockdown parties by the senior civil servant, sue grey. ——by the senior civil servant, sue gray. here's our political editor laura kuenssberg. if it's not one thing, it turns out to be another. how will it turn out? for weeks, the prime minister has been having to explain himself. what's this... ? and what happened in number ten during the pandemic made some of the public and his own mps mad, but there are claims now too his team have been intimidating tory backbenchers who want to speak out. i've seen no evidence, heard no evidence to support any of those allegations.
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what i'm focused on is what we are doing to deal with the number one priority of the british people, which is coming through covid, and we have made enormous progress thanks to the vaccine roll—out. back at westminster, there's nothing unusual about mps being subject to some pretty strong persuasion. in dark corners, around the corridors of power, party bosses work to keep backbenchers in line. but in front of the cameras this morning, a tory critic of borisjohnson�*s said it's gone far too far. a number of members of parliament have faced pressures and intimidation from members of the government because of their declared or assumed desire for a vote of confidence in the party leadership of the prime minister. the reports of which i'm aware would seem to constitute blackmail. the claims have raised eyebrows. william wragg's warning is probably timely, and i would very much hope that it would be heeded. in both ways. it's complete nonsense. it's attention—seeking behaviour, and it's disappointing. this brand—new labour
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mp, a defector... the labour mp for barry south, christian wakeford. ..says when he was still a tory, he was warned his constituency would lose out if he didn't vote a certain way. i was threatened that i would not get the school for radcliffe if i didn't vote in a particular way. how do you feel when holding back the education of the town for a vote, it didn't sit comfortably, and that was really that kind of starting to question my place where i was. politics is not for the faint hearted. conversations behind closed doors can be brutal, but what today's argument shows is the boiling tension inside the conservative party, fighting while everyone awaits the official verdict into what really happened in number ten during lockdown. but one conclusion is perhaps already being drawn, a member of the cabinet publicly admitting today that this saga is damaging our democracy. and the doubts about borisjohnson�*s leadership run deep.
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if this particular episode passes, there are still big changes that need to happen. downing street is not being run in the way that most of us would like to see. i think there needs to be a change in both the culture and the structure of downing street. much may stand between borisjohnson and any exit, yet, with a bright light shone on his government's conduct and character, the omens do not look good. a tsunami that followed. this new zealand defence for his plane landed at the main airport and was only able to do so because the runway had been cleared of ash. it was bringing in water, shelter and communications equipment too. this aid is being unloaded from an australian defence porous plane. several ships carrying
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supplies are also in route. five days on, a better sense of the devastation taking place there. this is the island. 70 structures here including a resort. they have all been wiped out. the communication leaks were immediately affected on the weekend, but some have been restored and locals have been sharing images from the capital. you can also see a huge loss of property. some buildings have been completely destroyed. elsewhere, farmland and villages have been flattened. this is a beachfront. the buildings that used to be here are just about rebel. this image was taken by a journalist and this is her assessment.— taken by a journalist and this is her assessment. ., , ., her assessment. right now, everyone here is in the — her assessment. right now, everyone here is in the process _ her assessment. right now, everyone here is in the process from _ her assessment. right now, everyone here is in the process from the - her assessment. right now, everyone here is in the process from the dust . here is in the process from the dust of the rooftop trees, offices, vehicles, everywhere. what we are concerned now is clean drinking
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water, because most of our drinking water, because most of our drinking water has been affected by the dust from the aftermath. remember, tonga is in the south pacific. it's made up of over 170 islands. 105,000 people live there. over 80% have been affected by the eruption on saturday. experts believe it was probably the world's biggest in 30 years. the eruption lasted eight minutes — and sent ash 20 kilometres into the air. and it triggered a tsunami across the pacific , waves reached as far as alaska almost 10,000km away. and this was the tongan capital, nuku—a—lofa. waves nearly a metre high flooded buildings. these are pictures from saturday. and we have these pictures from the capital on wednesday. roads are covered in ash. and here's an update from the red cross in neighbouring fiji. on the island, they have rainwater
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harvesting, and their water sources are the rainwater and water tanks and also their tap water is has been affected by the asphalt and has been affected by the asphalt and has been affected by the saltwater. there's been saltwater inundation from the title wave that hit after the eruption. there has been, you know, on the island prior to the cyclone, we were aware that there were pre—position supplies to cater for 1200 households, and this has been kitchen sets, you know, hygiene buckets and cooking sets. we also have shelter kits so that the communities could repair their homes. meanwhile, a story about how a disabled man swam survived by floating and swimming between three islands, has gone viral. lisala folau is 57
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and he's disabled. and he's been telling a local radio station about his ordeal. the swept up to see on the evening of the eruption. that was 7pm on saturday. he says he held onto a tree trunk to keep afloat several hours later he arrived on an island 4.5 kilometres away from his home. he wasn't able to find help. on sunday morning — at ten oclock he swam for an island, five kilometres away. that took eight hours and he couldn't find help there either. when he was 24 hours into his journey, he decided to keep swimming. this time, for sopu, on the main island — which you can see on this guardian graphc. two hours later at 9pm on sunday and 27 hours since he first started swimming, he found safety. the guardian reports...
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others have also been reliving the moment that the tsunami hit. the first explosion happened, our ears were ringing, and we couldn't even hear each other. all we did was point to ourfamilies, get up, get ready to run. so that is what we did. it is like when you are in the aeroplane, but the sound, the glass was so loud, our ears were ringing. we couldn't hear anything. we evacuated and then we, our families were running away from the local area because we are right beside the seashore. communication with tonga is still difficult. tongan expatjosephine la—too
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sanf—t lives in london finally, finally, we made it through this morning after many hours of trying _ this morning after many hours of trying. medications are back up, but it's still_ trying. medications are back up, but it's still patchy. so i don't think with_ it's still patchy. so i don't think with the — it's still patchy. so i don't think with the internet, only those who have _ with the internet, only those who have access to satellite phone, but finally, _ have access to satellite phone, but finally, it _ have access to satellite phone, but finally, it seems that people are posting — finally, it seems that people are posting on social media, they been in contact — posting on social media, they been in contact with their families. i think— in contact with their families. i think the — in contact with their families. i think the mood, there is a lot of devastation, there are a lot of people — devastation, there are a lot of pe0pie in— devastation, there are a lot of people in need, but also people are in good _ people in need, but also people are in good spirits. they are thankful to he _ in good spirits. they are thankful to be alive. — in good spirits. they are thankful to be alive, they are thankful to be together— to be alive, they are thankful to be together safe and sound with their loved _ together safe and sound with their loved ones, with their families, communities. they are just really ready— communities. they are just really ready to — communities. they are just really ready to get to the business of cleaning — ready to get to the business of cleaning up and rebuilding. the we are very— cleaning up and rebuilding. the we are very resilient people. i think we can— are very resilient people. i think we can see _ are very resilient people. i think we can see this, we are thankful and grateful— we can see this, we are thankful and grateful for — we can see this, we are thankful and grateful for the help that we are going to — grateful for the help that we are going to be receiving from australia and new— going to be receiving from australia and new zealand, but even before that we _ and new zealand, but even before that we were already mobilising every— that we were already mobilising every church, every village, family
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business _ every church, every village, family business people already mobilising to help _ business people already mobilising to help each other with what they have already. the french government has set out a road map to lift covid restrictions, over the coming months. it's experiencing a huge wave of coronavirus cases, but the government thinks infections will soon peak, and start going down. they reported more than 400,000 again on thursday, that is the third day running that has happened, but the government says they are encouraging signs that the wave of omicron cases is adding. let's speak to hugh schofield live with us from paris. presumably, this calculation from the government is based on hospitalisation figures rather than
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case figures. i hospitalisation figures rather than case figures-_ case figures. i think it is both, actually. _ case figures. i think it is both, actually. and _ case figures. i think it is both, actually, and on _ case figures. i think it is both, actually, and on the _ case figures. i think it is both, actually, and on the british i actually, and on the british experience, they are very mindful here that what happens in the uk tends to happen in francejust a here that what happens in the uk tends to happen in france just a few weeks later, and in britain, as you have been reporting, we are in the middle now of an add, very clear and that of the omicron wave, and that is going to happen here and has started here because as in the uk, it's the capital, paris, which has been as london was in the uk, they are now beginning to come out as this massive wave. that plus evidence which is compiling all the time, the numbers may be brightening, but in general, the effects on individuals is much less severe is encouraging the government to set out, as you say, this plan for the weeks ahead which will see the second and to like the compulsory ring of masks outside in cities and compulsory home working. these measures were announced three weeks ago at the start of omicron,
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and it was said that they would be in place for three weeks. well, they are going to be lifted from february the 2nd, then two weeks after that, we will see discotheques being allowed to reopen, and people will be able to drink standing up in bars. you know, other restrictions will remain in place, the encouragement to do home working is still there, and above all, the vaccination passports, which is coming in from a very much part of the government strategy which comes into forests on monday, having just cleared its passage to parliament. was going to ask you about that passport as you describe it. is the idea that that is going to be in place for months even years, is there any sort of timeframe on that? now. clearly that is the question that is_ now. clearly that is the question that is looming and everyone's mind. if we that is looming and everyone's mind. if we are _ that is looming and everyone's mind. if we are all— that is looming and everyone's mind. if we are all beginning to enter a freer, happiertime, then why if we are all beginning to enter a freer, happier time, then why is this restriction on civil liberties,
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which _ this restriction on civil liberties, which is — this restriction on civil liberties, which is what it is, why is it still in place? — which is what it is, why is it still in place? the government's answer is, well, _ in place? the government's answer is, well, we — in place? the government's answer is, well, we are not there yet. and we need _ is, well, we are not there yet. and we need this— is, well, we are not there yet. and we need this passport to have access to all_ we need this passport to have access to all sorts _ we need this passport to have access to all sorts of things like travelling on a trainer going to a har~ _ travelling on a trainer going to a har~ we — travelling on a trainer going to a bar. we need that to keep people vaccinated. and there is still a constant — vaccinated. and there is still a constant percentage of the population who will not do it but are being — population who will not do it but are being drawn into it because of the pressure of this past and its predecessor which was called the health— predecessor which was called the health pass. the government says this must— health pass. the government says this must remain in place. and answer— this must remain in place. and answer the _ this must remain in place. and answer the question of when it will be answer the question of when it will he lifted, _ answer the question of when it will be lifted, the answer comes when it is safe _ be lifted, the answer comes when it is safe to _ be lifted, the answer comes when it is safe to do — be lifted, the answer comes when it is safe to do so in particular when the pressure on hospitals is quite demonstrably lower than it is now, so low— demonstrably lower than it is now, so low that— demonstrably lower than it is now, so low that normality can be said to have resumed.— have resumed. 0k, thank you very much. appreciate _ have resumed. 0k, thank you very much. appreciate you _ have resumed. 0k, thank you very much. appreciate you taking i have resumed. 0k, thank you very much. appreciate you taking us i much. appreciate you taking us direct. now, research mission has
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discovered a giant pristine coral reef off the coast of tahiti and french polynesia. the reef is 30 metres deep, which is unusualfor reef is 30 metres deep, which is unusual for a reef is 30 metres deep, which is unusualfor a tropical reef is 30 metres deep, which is unusual for a tropical reef. the reef is 30 metres deep — which is unusual for a tropical reef and might explain its "pristine" condition. our science correspondent victoria gill reports. "magical." that was one of the words a veteran specialist diver who led this mission used to describe this view. some of these rose shaped corals are more than two metres wide, and the whole reef structure stretches three kilometres along the sea bed. its depth and its distance from the coast is thought to be a key reason for its pristine condition. the researchers say it shows no signs of damage from pollution or from warming ocean temperatures, something that poses a major threat to shallower reefs. it looks beautiful, but scientifically how important is this, as a discovery? it might be to date one of the largest coral reefs in the world that actually lies at that sort of depth of more than 30 metres, so from that perspective, this is opening a new
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insight in science. this could suggest that we have many more large reefs in our ocean, at depths beyond 30 metres, which we simply do not know about. the depth of this reef means there is far less sunlight here than in the shallows. this part of the ocean is known as the twilight zone. there's stilljust enough light here for the algae that lives inside the bodies of the coral to survive and thrive. and critically, for the health of this reef, waters at these depths are not warming as quickly. it's often said we know more about the surface of the moon than we do about the ocean floor — only about a fifth of it has so far been mapped, and coral reefs like this are the sea floor hotspots for marine life. about a quarter of known ocean species can be found around these living ecosystems. the team is now planning more investigative dives to work out exactly what lives here,
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and crucially, how their newly discovered remarkable habitat can be protected. victoria gill, bbc news. i will see you in a couple of minutes' time. hello. i know it's cold, but if you've seen the sunshine where you are today, hopefully you made the most of it. more cloud more widely across the uk by the weekend. some glorious weather watcher pictures today, of course, the sunshine masking just how chilly it is out there. high—pressure moving in, a lot of settled weather to come over the next few days, although some rain at times in northern scotland. as the high—pressure moves in, we are losing the chilly wind and any of those showers that have been hitting north sea coast through the day today, so all of that easing into tonight. for northern ireland and western scotland, cloud increasing, limiting a frost here tonight. but elsewhere, largely clear skies, quite a hard frost setting in. central and southern parts of england down to —6 in the countryside, not far from —5 in the cardiff area. as tomorrow begins cold,
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frosty, yes, but sunny. plenty of sunshine continuing across southern and eastern england and eastern scotland through the day. western scotland, northern ireland with some cloud and cloud increasing through northwest england, wales and into the west midlands as the day goes on. after that cold start, it is going to feel chilly, though not as chilly without that wind along the north sea coast. a brighter day in eastern england. now, cloud continues to feed in, even a bit of rain in northwest scotland as we go through friday night and into saturday morning, limiting the extent and severity of frost, though there will still be some across central southern and eastern parts of england in particular as saturday begins. now, we know it's cold now, this hint of blue showing temperatures are at or below average for the time of year at the moment. but as i run this through the weekend, you will notice that particularly in scotland, temperatures are going to be heading higher and above average, especially the further north you are, whereas towards southern areas of the uk, you aren't going to notice too much change. here, you're closer to the centre
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of high—pressure, the air not moving very much, still the chance of frost overnight and some fog too, whereas elsewhere, around this area of high—pressure and particularly for scotland, some less cold air moving in. in fact milder air moving in on a stronger breeze with outbreaks of rain at times on saturday towards the north and northwest of scotland. and more cloud to be found elsewhere. a few sunny spells here and there, whereas temperatures aren't changing very much across eastern parts of england, we're into double figures in northern scotland, where they will stay on sunday, still some outbreaks of rain around, a lot of cloud elsewhere.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. news had to show russian queens are close to the ukraine news had to show russian queens are close to the ukraine partner. news had to show russian queens are close to the ukraine partner. if andy assembled russian units move across ukraine imported that is an invasion. but it will be met with severe and coordinated economic response. severe and coordinated economic resonse. ., ., ., response. international diplomacy ram -s u- response. international diplomacy ramps up between _ response. international diplomacy ramps up between europe - response. international diplomacy ramps up between europe and i response. international diplomacyj ramps up between europe and the response. international diplomacy i ramps up between europe and the us as they try and set a unified strategy on this issue in moscow continues to deny it is preparing an attack. also the reporting on
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benedict the former pope who was accused of misconduct over for child abuse cases from when he was archbishop. and we would have an in—depth look at china's ivo karlovic strategy and that can be maintained through 2022. a report commissioned by the catholic church accused the former pope of misconduct and over the way he dealt with priests under his management who would be his children for decades ago. pope benedict retired in 2013 and he served for eight years. the allegations in the report concerning a period much earlier in his career when he was archbishop of munich. the report was conducted by a firm of lawyers and this was one of its authors. in a total of four _ this was one of its authors. in a total of four cases _ this was one of its authors. in a total of four cases we _ this was one of its authors. in a. total of four cases we have come to
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the conclusion and the former archbishop is to be accused of misconduct in cases of sexual abuse. two of these cases involve acts of abuse committed during his tenure and sanctioned by the state under criminal law. in both cases the perpetrators ramp made active or impartial care without restrictions. the report says two of these cases involve abuses committed during benedict's tenure in munich and these priests stayed in public wells despite convictions and another case involved a priest who was allowed to transfer to munich despite the conviction for abuse outside of germany. reports also the question a statement by the former pope that he had not attended a meeting about that transfer and they said it lacks credibility as the minutes show that he was present. here is more on the story. pope benedict who denies all wrongdoing and said he did not think she knows nothing about the backbone of that particular man but the
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reports on earth minutes of a meeting where this particular man whose case was transferred where discussed and the former pope said he had never been at that meeting and the report also stating that that does minutes and it was clear from the minutes that he had been there. thank you forjoining us on there. thank you forjoining us on the bbc and i wonder what your initial thoughts are on this report. initial thoughts are it's when you look back to what happened in the 70s and 80s and even today it is quite staggering what happens for the lack of communication and mismanagement between diocese that someone was able to operate to commit these crimes and to move over into diocese with the proper coordination between civil authorities and the kind of defensiveness. what seems to be different in the supports and is part of a global trend of different churches instigating these kinds of reports is the level of detail so
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that it's not near me notices a case that it's not near me notices a case that their 2010 this priest filed and what the former pope david why did not know about this case but what surfaced now hayes has been mentioned in the package is what was he at the meeting and if he was what was mentioned about this priest was it simply that it was a sick priest coming or was there a level of detail. as facts so it's for the lawyers in the coming weeks to sift through this and setting it shows a difference approach that the church put forward and a desire to be accountable to law firms and we see this happening across the catholic church from see the 70s and 80s. getting this raises questions about how the church went about choosing pope benedict because all of this happen before he became pope, ship to church have done more to understand his role in munich before elevating him to the top? it’s
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understand his role in munich before elevating him to the top?— elevating him to the top? it's hard to look back _ elevating him to the top? it's hard to look back retrospectively i elevating him to the top? it's hard to look back retrospectively in i elevating him to the top? it's hard to look back retrospectively in the | to look back retrospectively in the report was commissioned because as their point accepts that in the image now in the case came up in 2010 the general says the chief of staff of the archbishop took full responsibility in the sense was given he was attached archbishop and of course as pope he did quite a lot to further or prioritise child sexual abuse cases in the catholic church but it's hard and clearly a sense in which there was a lack of due diligence which is why benedict the next ten and others have supported the publication of reports and clearly we need the church needs to learn the mistakes that have been made so it's good that these things are coming tonight and i think it's to be encouraged in what ways can
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commands improve with the church is the key question. commands improve with the church is the key question-— the key question. before i let you no in the key question. before i let you go in terms _ the key question. before i let you go in terms of — the key question. before i let you go in terms of this _ the key question. before i let you go in terms of this supports i the key question. before i let you go in terms of this supports in i the key question. before i let you | go in terms of this supports in this investigation what comes next or is that the end of the process. we can't really _ that the end of the process. - can't really speak in terms of outcomes at the moment but in terms of the pope —— process in the coming days and weeks be another archdiocese will have a press conference next week that's benedict who has wittingly cooperated with the process submitted 80 pages worth of submissions to the report will also say he's going to look into and respond to the report and everyone seeing this page reports today at the same time in the vatican as well because we are likely to see in the coming days and weeks much more of the story coming tonight.
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we mentionjoe we mention joe biden we mentionjoe biden in the context of tensions earlier. let us talk about him again. it's been one year since joe biden became president of the united states. at his inauguration — he promised his focus would be fighting the pandemic — the economy — healing the division in the country — and re—establishing trust with america's allies, to deal with threats abroad. it's been a year of challenges but it's also been a year of enormous progress. that is the president's verdict. before we evaluate that its go back to his election. president biden won more than 80 million votes in 2020. that's more than any other president. he started his term with a 56% approval rating. now, just 28% of americans say they want him to run for reelection in 2024. to put it another way, biden is currently the second least popular us president at this point in his term. the first one is donald trump.
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congress is just at excited as ever. it is here from one republican senator. ~ ., it is here from one republican senator. ~ . ., , ., senator. what we have seen over the course of the — senator. what we have seen over the course of the past _ senator. what we have seen over the course of the past year _ senator. what we have seen over the course of the past year has _ senator. what we have seen over the course of the past year has left i senator. what we have seen over the course of the past year has left not i course of the past year has left not just republicans down because they were very sceptical of the private administration but he let democrats down as well. when he took office, president biden made tackling coronavirus his top priority. but now, the omicron variant is ravaging the country. the share of americans who feel biden is doing a good job of dealing with the coronavirus has dropped to 44.8%. but the president stressed that the fight isn't over. some people may call what's happening now in the new normal. i call it a job not yet finished. it will get better. they're moving to at that when covid—19 wants disrupt our daily lives. our washington correspondent gary
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o'donoghuejoins me now. there was a moment in time at the beginning of the summer around the beginning of the summer around the beginning of the withdrawal from afghanistan and the that represented and it faded from peoples consciousness when it was a turning point and then he got the delta variant here which slowed down the promised opening the president had madejuly the 4th a big moment for the country in terms of getting over covid—19 and we hit delta and annakin omicron and the inflation figures have been a 40 year high which means lower prices and wages are rising prices are also rising so they're starting to feel that in their pocketbooks and you see this year of two halves in which they did pretty well in the first six months and then it turned around and now he's at that sum 41% approval rating
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now. let me ask you about this idea of heating the division of the nation and we hear this from incoming politicians that proves elusive. has the president tried to build bridges where there weren't any previously? he build bridges where there weren't any previously?— any previously? he tried to some decree any previously? he tried to some degree particularly _ any previously? he tried to some degree particularly in _ any previously? he tried to some degree particularly in congress i any previously? he tried to some | degree particularly in congress he has had republicans in and he tried to do some deals with them single —— signal and enter that yesterday saying he could no longer be president and senate there at the same time trying to broker those deals and i'm not sure there's been much reached out to the country to try to hear that and create that unity. how would you do that other than running a decent economy and a fair society i suppose but he has to try and find a way back from that because we are in the polling seeing america at its most partisan in
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years and that's not getting any better at the moment and that's really does promote and propose a problem for the country if it cannot unify around certain things otherwise things like get done and with those elections in november of course it does need some liens in the next two months to shore up the narrow majorities in congress both in the house and 50—50 in the senate. we will talk about omicron again because as a range of countries still deal with the variants we will focus on china's e—mail covid—19 strategy and its case numbers are low. can that be maintained for 2022?
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a public apology will be given in march five years after a public inquiry documented decades of harm. the report contains distressing stories. brian o'donoghue spent 20 years of writing a decades of the. he o'donoghue spent 20 years of writing a decades of the.— a decades of the. he was 'ust a bit ounuer a decades of the. he was 'ust a bit younger than i a decades of the. he was 'ust a bit youngerthan me h a decades of the. he was 'ust a bit younger than me into i a decades of the. he was 'ust a bit younger than me into thei a decades of the. he wasjust a bit younger than me into the pool- younger than me into the pool and the brother thinks it's great he can't swim. he remembers vividly how two boys were punished in front of all the others after they tried to escape. all the others after they tried to esca e. �* , ., , all the others after they tried to escae. h ., . ., escape. it's the only protection from a beating _ escape. it's the only protection from a beating would _ escape. it's the only protection from a beating would have i escape. it's the only protection | from a beating would have been escape. it's the only protection i from a beating would have been a pair of swimming trunks and they were beaten on the backside and thighs until theyjumped in the air and screamed. there was a sweat pouring off when he beat them.
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sexual abuse was also common. he recalls trying to protect himself. don't put yourself in the position where you are alone with them and then again that can be hard if he comes in and makes you out of your sleeping bag and takes you to his room. across the irish sea and be are also living with unspeakable, and she was in an institution in londonderry. i and she was in an institution in londonderry— and she was in an institution in londonder . , , ., , londonderry. i was being sexually abused by a _ londonderry. i was being sexually abused by a priest _ there and it's always you are not wanted. it's five years since a public inquiry represented an apology after generations of her it's a day of acknowledgement is coming.
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this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is? you satellite images are showing russian troops are closer to ukraine porter as america warns moscow that any invasion would have catastrophic results. every week we make an in depth report for the bbc news website and, for the those of you in the uk, for iplayer too. — this time — it's on the issue china's covid strategy — and the government's attempts to eliminate all coronavirus infections. (tx in europe there are millions of cases of covid—19 every week and in china there are very few and china's commitment to its zero covid—19 strategy remains as strong as ever.
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jayna's overall situation remains stable and cases can be controlled within a short period of time. this is what effective control means in practice. is what effective control means in ractice. , ,_, is what effective control means in ractice. , ,. ., ., practice. they discovered three a symptomatic _ practice. they discovered three a symptomatic cases _ practice. they discovered three a symptomatic cases and - practice. they discovered three a symptomatic cases and that i practice. they discovered three a symptomatic cases and that hasl practice. they discovered three a i symptomatic cases and that has led within a very short period of time to a city of over 1 within a very short period of time to a city of over1 million people being shut down.— being shut down. zero covid-19 flo ed being shut down. zero covid-19 flopped down — being shut down. zero covid-19 flopped down and _ being shut down. zero covid-19 flopped down and testing i being shut down. zero covid-19 flopped down and testing on i being shut down. zero covid-19 flopped down and testing on al being shut down. zero covid-19 i flopped down and testing on a huge scare and it means disinfecting public transport ahead of a busy travel season and it means quarantine camps for those suspected of having covid—19 as red as that officials are warning against ordering things from overseas they believe omicron may have arrived in beijing by a infected mailfrom canada and there is a hamster called appdata cases were traced to a pet shop. the virus may have been identified in china but as you can see it wants to keep it out now and so far largely it has. there have been just over so far largely it has. there have beenjust over 100,000 so far largely it has. there have been just over 100,000 cases reported in china since the start of
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the pandemic almost two years ago and compare that to the us and the uk where there have been tens of millions in the below case numbers meant a lower death toll and here you can see china compared with the uk and the us with the us heading to whites million deaths in china is in the low thousands. there has not been a covid—19 death in china for months and supporters say that's makes the case. he also points to the chinese economy and the official data shows the gdp grew by over 8% last year and that exceeded most expectations and there are caveats. mike colleague explains. china plus plus strict policy meant that some major cities static to go back into from last month due the omicron variance and we have yet to see the full impact of that. china believes this strategy has worked for the economy and for public health. but
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sooner rather than later it faces a decision. how long to stick with zero and it may have its hand forced. we know omicron is highly transmissible and they are in poses a challenge to zero covid—19 policies. we have seen the arrival of the delta variant forcing the government to face tax. the prime minister abandoned that last year saying australia would now live with the virus while visiting from overseas remains in effect the prime minister did say this last october. elimination was important because we did not have vaccines. now we do. so we can begin to change the way we do things. we can begin to change the way we do thins. ., .. , we can begin to change the way we do thins. , . we can begin to change the way we do thinus. . .. , . ., , things. vaccines are the routes out of zero covid-19. _ things. vaccines are the routes out of zero covid-19. vaccinate - things. vaccines are the routes out of zero covid-19. vaccinate the i of zero covid—19. vaccinate the population and ease restrictions.
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that is the theory and according to health officials over 1.2 billion people in china have been vaccinated that's nearly 90% of the population. we know two of the vaccines have been approved for emergency use by the who. but there is an issue. ianthem the who. but there is an issue. when it comes to — the who. but there is an issue. when it comes to omicron _ the who. but there is an issue. when it comes to omicron the _ the who. but there is an issue. when it comes to omicron the reality - the who. but there is an issue. when it comes to omicron the reality is chain it will be reliant on zero covid—19 strategy and it gives a high degree of support which was still worried about.— still worried about. there is evidence — still worried about. there is evidence that _ still worried about. there is evidence that china's i still worried about. there is i evidence that china's vaccines aren't as effective as western vaccines and a top china officially admitted if vaccines don't have very high rates of protection. the same official later said he had been misinterpreted but they say this issueis misinterpreted but they say this issue is real. it misinterpreted but they say this issue is real.—
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we have seen a number of reasons why ending erupt coded 19 is not easy for china. . .. ending erupt coded 19 is not easy for china. ,, u , for china. succeeded in minimising tax but it also _ for china. succeeded in minimising tax but it also does _ for china. succeeded in minimising tax but it also does not _ for china. succeeded in minimising tax but it also does not want i for china. succeeded in minimising tax but it also does not want to i tax but it also does not want to admit the limitations of its vaccines and interned limitations mean its population is less protected. as well as that because cases are no china has a population without any natural immunity from prior infection and because of all of these reasons and others as well a recent study concluded base. that if western strategies where adopted it would have a devastating impact on the medical system of china and cause a great disaster within the nation. keeping covid—19 out remains a priority for china and there are two other factors that are relevant to this. the first is the winter
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olympics. in beijing this february. china does not want any disruptions during this moment on the world stage. find spectators are borrowed and tickets are not being sold and such measures appeared to be popular. figs such measures appeared to be --oular. �* , �* , such measures appeared to be --oular. a �* , ., popular. as bei'ing is the capital ci that popular. as beijing is the capital city that prevention _ popular. as beijing is the capital city that prevention measures i popular. as beijing is the capital i city that prevention measures here are a bit stricter. tickets not being sold is a way of epidemic prevention so i support it. his -ictures prevention so i support it. his pictures are — prevention so i support it. his pictures are from the last 202017. this congress decides to future leadership of the chinese communist party and interned the leadership of china. the president is already the most powerful chinese military since the chairman but in 2018 he abolished presidential term limits and this often they're expecting him to be confirmed for a third term. that looks all but certain but it remains a sensitive moment and the president does not want rising cases to complicate that. he has talked of
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life beyond covid—19. brute to complicate that. he has talked of life beyond covid-19.— life beyond covid-19. we must do eve hinu life beyond covid-19. we must do everything necessary _ life beyond covid-19. we must do everything necessary to _ life beyond covid-19. we must do everything necessary to create i life beyond covid-19. we must do everything necessary to create a i everything necessary to create a shadow of the pandemic and boost economic and social recovery and development. so that the sunshine of pulp made light of the future of humanity. pulp made light of the future of humani . ., ., ., pulp made light of the future of humani. ., ., ., . ., ., humanity. how to move clear of the shadow of the _ humanity. how to move clear of the shadow of the pandemic _ humanity. how to move clear of the shadow of the pandemic when i humanity. how to move clear of the shadow of the pandemic when that l shadow of the pandemic when that will involve a link the virus in with all the uncertainty that comes with all the uncertainty that comes with that. the group can't see at this age and being taken in the short term and it concludes... bearin bear in mind what the world health organization recently said about the uk. �* ,_ .., organization recently said about the uk.�* , uk. i'm saying i can see where the mds and they _ uk. i'm saying i can see where the mds and they can _ uk. i'm saying i can see where the mds and they can see _ uk. i'm saying i can see where the mds and they can see light - uk. i'm saying i can see where the mds and they can see light at i uk. i'm saying i can see where the mds and they can see light at the l mds and they can see light at the end of the tunnel. but i really do anticipate right throughout the world a bumpyjourney ahead during 2022. light at the end of the tunnel
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says the who. he 2022. light at the end of the tunnel says the who-— says the who. he talked of the sunshine of _ says the who. he talked of the sunshine of hope _ says the who. he talked of the sunshine of hope that - says the who. he talked of the sunshine of hope that china i says the who. he talked of the | sunshine of hope that china and says the who. he talked of the i sunshine of hope that china and the rest are inc. two different places. the race has lost many more people but it's edging towards a life not dominated by the management of this virus. china with its strict lockdown and travel restrictions is not and for all the political pr and public health reasons we've considered it unlikely to make that move anytime soon. you can find more reports from me and the team, elsewhere on the bbc. if you're in the uk search for my name on iplayer — in the news category. you can listen to audio versions each week on the bbc sounds app — and on your smart speaker. our videos are on the bbc news website, as well. many people are feared dead after a huge explosion there. this happened
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when a truck carrying explosives to a mind collided with a motorcycle and it was close to the town in the west of ghana carries more. this was a hue west of ghana carries more. this was a huge explosion _ west of ghana carries more. this was a huge explosion that _ west of ghana carries more. this was a huge explosion that is _ west of ghana carries more. this was a huge explosion that is basically i a huge explosion that is basically destroyed the entire community of western ghana and that they footage is quite astonishing showing hundreds of buildings that have just been released to rebel. pieces of wood and broken break and twisted metal and rescuers can be seen putting bodies from the scene and the president of ghana has spoken of this tragedy and he described it as he's from a lot of help and he spoken about rebuilding the community which seems pretty optimistic at the moment when you look at the estate of it. the police in ghana i saying what caused this explosion was when a truck carrying
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explosives travelling to a mine in the area collided with another vehicle and there is a vast crater in the ground right next to the road which shows how powerful this explosion was but it's still not clear how many people died but it is feared that many were buried under the rubble. abs, feared that many were buried under the rubble. �* " , ., ., feared that many were buried under therubble. �* " , ., ., , the rubble. a 19-year-old has become the rubble. a 19-year-old has become the initial meant _ the rubble. a 19-year-old has become the initial meant to _ the rubble. a 19-year-old has become the initial meant to fly _ the rubble. a 19-year-old has become the initial meant to fly solo _ the rubble. a 19-year-old has become the initial meant to fly solo around i the initial meant to fly solo around the initial meant to fly solo around the world. sarah rutherford has landed in belgium at the end of her journey which began in august last year and she flew across more than 50 countries on her own. a smooth landing after a long journey. it takes time to fly around the world in kilo micro lights. what was your scariest moment? i in kilo micro lights. what was your scariest moment?— scariest moment? i got close to a thunderstorm _ scariest moment? i got close to a thunderstorm in _ scariest moment? i got close to a thunderstorm in singapore i scariest moment? i got close to a thunderstorm in singapore and i scariest moment? i got close to a i
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thunderstorm in singapore and there was a lightning strike and that was pretty scary but otherwise the mental challenges where mostly over siberia because i have to fight for hundreds of kilometres with nothing human and i realise if the engine way to stop that would be a problem. both parents are pilots and she faced serious weather delays along the way but she also saw the sites. i am in alaska right now and now in creating and flying from indonesia. korea to taiwan. in greece. russia. it's pretty cold. she korea to taiwan. in greece. russia. it's pretty cold-— it's pretty cold. she wants to encourage — it's pretty cold. she wants to encourage more girls - it's pretty cold. she wants to encourage more girls and i it's pretty cold. she wants to i encourage more girls and women it's pretty cold. she wants to - encourage more girls and women into aviation and her dream is to become an astronaut, this guy is not even minutes. the us secretary of state is whining that a russian invasion of ukraine would have catastrophic results just to reiterate the russians are saying
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they have no intention of invading. thanks for watching. i know it is cold but if you see the sunshine where you are today hopefully you make the most of it. some glorious weather watcher pictures across masking just how cold it is out there. high—pressure moving in with a lot of settled letter to come over the next few days with some rain in night in scotland as the high—pressure moves and we are losing the cold dreams and we are losing the cold dreams and any of the show is hitting the coastal areas so all of that is eating tonight. for less in scotland the crowd increasingly making frosty tonight but elsewhere clear skies and the hard frost setting in with central and southern parts of
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england by 4—5 in the cardiff area as tomorrow begins but sunny with plenty of sunshine and continuing across southern and eastern england and eaten scotland through the day with placed scotland not in ireland with placed scotland not in ireland with cloud through northwest england and wales and into the west midlands as the day goes on. after the cold start it will feel chilly but not as chilly without the wind along the north sea coast. the crowd will continue to feeding even a bit of rain in northwest scotland as to friday night into saturday morning mimicking the extent of the frost and they will be some across eastern parts of england in particular as saturday begins. we know it is cold now with this hints of blue temperatures below average for the time of year and at the moment as i run this through the weekend you will notice in scotland temperatures are going to be heading higher and above average especially the further north you are rest to white southern
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areas he will not notice too much change. the air is not moving very much with a chance of frost overnight rest elsewhere into scotland some less cold air moving in with mother air moving in and the strong breeze with outbreaks of rain at times on saturday towards the north and northwest of scotland. macleod elsewhere with a few sunny spells here and there with is not changing very much or it's a double figures in northern scotland where they will stay on sunday with outbreaks of rain with a lot of crowd elsewhere.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the prime minister says he has "no evidence" of blackmail in his party after claims by one of his own mps. the intimidation of a member of parliament as a serious matter. moreover, reports that i'm aware of seem to constitute blackmail. i see no evidence, heard no evidence to support any of those allegations. back to the office and no masks in classrooms as england's covid measures ease. and as countries response to covid differ around the world coming up 8.45 ros atkins take an indepth look at china's zero coronavirus strategy military drills in ukraine as the united states warns russia of grave consequences if any of its troops cross the border.

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