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tv   Newsday  BBC News  January 20, 2022 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

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�*welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. new images of the russian military build—up — as the us warns an incursion into ukraine will be met with a tough response. aid planes finally arrive in tonga, after a volcanic eruption and tsunami left the country in desperate need of supplies. we'll have the latest. renewed pressure on borisjohnson — as a member of his own party accuses the government of trying to blackmail its lawmakers. and — the huge coral reef — in pristine condition, discovered by scientists deep under the sea near tahiti.
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it's seven in the morning in singapore, and midnight in geneva — on the eve of key talks between us secretary of state antony blinken and his russian counterpart, sergei lavrov — as tensions grow between russia and the west over the future of ukraine. mr blinken was in berlin thursday, meeting with european foreign ministers to coordinate a strategy over a potential russian invasion. mr blinken warned that the presence of 100 thousand russian troops along the ukranian border risked dragging the region back into a cold war era. our diplomatic correspondentjames landale is in geneva for us, and has this report.
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it is notjust the russians who are conducting military exercises. these are pictures released by ukraine's defence ministry, showing their forces training close to crimea. it was annexed by russia in 2014 and the kind of incursion that ukraine and its allies are trying to deter once again. i have been absolutely clear with president putin, there is no misunderstanding, if any assembled russian units move across the ukrainian border, that is an invasion. it will be met with severe and coordinated economic response. in some of the most intensive american diplomacy for years, the us secretary of state has been touring western capitals. he was in berlin today, rallying support for ukraine and he appealed directly to the people of russia. you deserve to live with security and dignity but what really risks your security is a pointless war with your neighbours in ukraine. western allies are threatening russia with massive economic
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sanctions if there is any invasion. behind—the—scenes there are differences over what those penalties shall be, but the public message is united. translation: we are in absolutely close coordination with _ regard to joint sanctions because we have an absolutelyjoint assessment of the situation, but also of the reactions with the regard to the security of ukraine. this also applies to sanctions. fresh satellite images appear to show how russia has mastered not just troops near ukraine, but also military equipment. from the north to ukraine's eastern border and to the south in the crimea. mr blank and arrived for talks with his russian counterpart on friday. but the discussions at his hotel tomorrow may be difficult because the gap between both sides is so large. the americans want to talk
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about avoiding war in ukraine but the russians want to talk about their demands for nato to step back and allow moscow to establish a new sphere of influence across eastern europe. in eastern ukraine know what that might mean. pro—russian separatists have been fighting government forces here since 2014 and the scars are all to see. it is a miracle we stayed alive, we could have died many times that is its intention but it's a training hard close to ukraine. it is a miracle we stayed alive, we could have died many times. russia denies that that is its intention but it's a training hard close to ukraine.
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but the question now is whether all these exercises might soon become the real thing. if you want to know more about whether russia is preparing to invade ukraine. just go to our website — where there is more analysis and answers to the main questions about this developing story. the first plane loads of aid have arrived at tonga's main airport after saturday's volcanic eruption and tsunami cut the pacific island nation off from the outside world. more flights and several ships are on their way, bringing urgently—needed drinking water, food and medicines. queen elizabeth has said her thoughts and prayers are with the people of the pacific nation which is part of the commonwealth. rupert wingfield—hayes reports. for the first time since last saturday's huge eruption, we're finally getting to see what has happened to tonga's main island. along the coast, the damage from the tsunami looks extensive,
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with many buildings destroyed. in tonga's capital, nuku'alofa, there's a lot of volcanic ash, but the buildings are intact and the clean—up has begun. telephone services are also back, and that means for tongans living abroad, the agonising wait for news is finally over. it's a relief to finally hear their voices and to finally know how they are back home. my dad had told me that they're fine, no major damages to our homes. so, at the moment, i've got family over in the outer islands of ha'apai. i have heard from them, and they're doing 0k. who i haven't heard from is my father. i'm sure he's out there working hard, doing what he does. we've also learned of a remarkable survival story. this man says he was swept off a small island by the tsunami and was in the water for more than 2a hours before
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making it to land. help is now arriving. this is an australian c17 transport plane on final approach to tonga this afternoon. the crew quickly unloaded water and emergency supplies, but, because of covid, they were not allowed any contact with locals. tonga's government has decided that until the covid pandemic is over, the islanders will have to deal with the clean up of this disaster by themselves. meanwhile, on the other side of the pacific in peru, another clean—up is under way. the crude oil on these beaches was spilled from a tanker that was unloading when a tsunami hit the coast here, triggered by the eruption in tonga, more than 10,000 kilometres away. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in tokyo. still to come a bit later in the programme: we'll tell
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you about the 19 year old who has become the youngest woman to fly solo around the world. but first. the british prime minister borisjohnson�*s political troubles continue to grow. a senior member of the prime minister's own conservative party has accused members of the government of trying to blackmail colleagues who want a confidence vote in mrjohnson�*s leadership. calls for the prime minister to resign have grown after allegations that several parties took place inside downing street during the country's first pandemic lockdown. 0ur political editor laura kuenssberg has more. if it's not one thing, it turns out to be another. how will it turn out? for weeks, the prime minister has been having to explain himself. what's this... 7 and what happened in number ten during the pandemic made some of the public and his own mps mad, but there are claims now too his team have been intimidating tory backbenchers who want to speak out. i've seen no evidence, heard no evidence to support any of those allegations.
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what i'm focused on is what we are doing to deal with the number one priority of the british people, which is coming through covid, and we have made enormous progress thanks to the vaccine roll—out. back at westminster, there's nothing unusual about mps being subject to some pretty strong persuasion. in dark corners, around the corridors of power, party bosses work to keep backbenchers in line. but in front of the cameras this morning, a tory critic of borisjohnson�*s said it's gone far too far. a number of members of parliament have faced pressures and intimidation from members of the government because of their declared or assumed desire for a vote of confidence in the party leadership of the prime minister. the reports of which i'm aware would seem to constitute blackmail. the claims have raised eyebrows. william wragg's warning is probably timely, and i would very much hope that it would be heeded. in both ways. it's complete nonsense.
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it's attention—seeking behaviour, and it's disappointing. politics is not for the faint hearted. conversations behind closed doors can be brutal, but what today's argument shows is the boiling tension inside the conservative party, fighting while everyone awaits the official verdict into what really happened in number ten during lockdown. but one conclusion is perhaps already being drawn, a member of the cabinet publicly admitting today that this saga is damaging our democracy. much may stand between borisjohnson and any exit, yet, with a bright light shone on his government's conduct and character, the omens do not look good. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. in ghana, many people are feared dead after a huge explosion in a town the blast happened when a truck carrying explosives which was heading to a mine, collided with a motorcycle near the town of bogoso, in the west of ghana. the bbc world service africa editor will ross, has more. this was a huge explosion that is basically destroyed entire community
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in western ghana. the video footage is quite astonishing. showing hundreds of buildings that have just been reduced to rubble and pieces of wood, broken bricks, twisted metal, rescuers can be seen pulling bodies from the scene. the president of ghana has spoken of this tragedy and he described it is truly sad, unfortunate and tragic. he's promised a lot of help and rebuilding the community which seems pretty optimistic at the moment when you look at the state of it. the police and gone the have talked about what has caused this explosion was when a lorry carrying explosives travelling to a mine in the area, collided with another vehicle. there is a vast crater in the ground right next to the road which shows to some power for this explosion was and is still not clear how many people died, but it is
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clear that many died under the rubble. women campaigners in afghanistan have told the bbc that activists parwana ibrahimkhil and tamana paryani were reportedly abducted late on wednesday night. the two activists were at the forefront of a protest held in kabul on sunday for womens�* rights. caroline hawley has the latest. this is in video, sharing before her apparent arrest. she is inside her home and the taliban run the other side of the door. she is pleading with them. she says her sisters are at home and she begs the taliban to come back the day. but her desperate pleas seem to be in vain. she was taken by the taliban on wednesday night. and notjust her, another prominent campaignerfor night. and notjust her, another prominent campaigner for women's rights was arrested two, they say, that the taliban denied. i
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rights was arrested two, they say, that the taliban denied.— that the taliban denied. i asked them about _ that the taliban denied. i asked them about the _ that the taliban denied. i asked them about the incident - that the taliban denied. i asked them about the incident and - that the taliban denied. i asked them about the incident and he| that the taliban denied. i asked - them about the incident and he told me that he will take it up with the intelligence department and all of them said that there is no incident like this. �* ., ., ., ., like this. both of the women had been at the _ like this. both of the women had been at the forefront _ like this. both of the women had been at the forefront of - like this. both of the women had been at the forefront of a - like this. both of the women had| been at the forefront of a protest in kabul, demanding that women be allowed to study and work, demonstrating for their right, demonstrating for their right, demonstrating for their own personal bravery as they did so. figs demonstrating for their own personal bravery as they did so.— bravery as they did so. as much if i am roud bravery as they did so. as much if i am proud of _ bravery as they did so. as much if i am proud of them, _ bravery as they did so. as much if i am proud of them, how— bravery as they did so. as much if i am proud of them, how long - bravery as they did so. as much if i am proud of them, how long if - am proud of them, how long if international community does not stand _ international community does not stand with — international community does not stand with them and does not support them, _ stand with them and does not support them, i_ stand with them and does not support them, i think i'm just afraid that it will_ them, i think i'm just afraid that it will lose — them, i think i'm just afraid that it will lose momentum.- them, i think i'm just afraid that it will lose momentum. still, week after we seeing — it will lose momentum. still, week after we seeing women _ it will lose momentum. still, week after we seeing women literally - after we seeing women literally risking — after we seeing women literally risking their _ after we seeing women literally
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risking their lives _ after we seeing women literally risking their lives because - after we seeing women literally. risking their lives because women have _ risking their lives because women have been— risking their lives because women have been cured _ risking their lives because women have been cured of— risking their lives because women have been cured of these - risking their lives because womenj have been cured of these protests and tragically— have been cured of these protests and tragically over— have been cured of these protests and tragically over the _ have been cured of these protests and tragically over the past - have been cured of these protests and tragically over the past few. and tragically over the past few months — and tragically over the past few months have _ and tragically over the past few months have been— and tragically over the past few months have been out- and tragically over the past few months have been out to - and tragically over the past few months have been out to raisel and tragically over the past few- months have been out to raise their voices— months have been out to raise their voices to _ months have been out to raise their voices to demand _ months have been out to raise their voices to demand the _ months have been out to raise their voices to demand the rights - months have been out to raise their voices to demand the rights that. voices to demand the rights that have _ voices to demand the rights that have been— voices to demand the rights that have been taken _ voices to demand the rights that have been taken away— voices to demand the rights that have been taken away from - voices to demand the rights thati have been taken away from them voices to demand the rights that - have been taken away from them since the tatiban— have been taken away from them since the taliban came _ have been taken away from them since the taliban came control. _ have been taken away from them since the taliban came control. the - the taliban came control. the taliban have _ the taliban came control. the taliban have been _ the taliban came control. taliban have been to these the taliban came control— taliban have been to these protests and other women who have taken part in these protests are in hiding and other women who have taken part in these protests are in hiding in fear them too. the former pope, benedict the sixteenth, has expressed shock at the sexual abuse of children by clerics, after a report accused him of failing to take action in four cases back when he was archbishiop of munich, germany. benedict, who was then called josef ratzinger, denies any wrongdoing. victims�* groups have welcomed the report's findings. with more from berlin, the bbc�*sjenny hill. the world came to know him as pope benedict xvi. but he was archbishop in the german diocese of munich and
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they said it was there that he, in effect, failed to act in four child sex abuse cases. he allowed three priests who have convictions for crimes against children to work in the diocese and also focused on the case of another cleric who was a known paedophile when he was transferred to the diocese to carry on working as a priest. pope benedict denies all wrongdoing and it said that he knew nothing about the background of the particular man. but this is under the minutes of the meeting in which this particular man was transferred and they were all discussing this. the pope said he never was at the meeting but they looked at those meetings and is quite clear from those maintenance that he had been there for have not heard directly from the former pope by the vatican haveissued from the former pope by the vatican have issued a statement saying they're going to examine and analyse
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report that runs for 1600 beliefs, and is a lot look through. and they also express their regret at the victims and the number of the hundreds of people in the report talks about the hundreds of children who were abused at the hands of clerics within the catholic church. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme. we'll tell you more about the huge coral reef — in pristine condition, discovered by scientists deep under the sea. donald trump is now the 45th president of the united states. he was sworn in before several hundred thousand people on the steps of capitol hill in washington. it's going to be only america first! america first!
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| demonstrators waiting for the rebel| cricket team were attacked with tear gas and set upon by police talk. gas and set upon by police dogs. anti—apartheid campaigners say they will carry on the protests l throughout the tour. they called him the butcher of lyon. being held fraud charge in bolivia. the west germans want to extradite him for crimes committed in wartime france. millions came to the bathe as close as possible to this spot believed by officials who have broken all records. this is newsday on the bbc. 0ur headlines
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new images of the russian military buildup — as the us secretary of state warns an incursion into ukraine will be met with a tough response. aid planes finally arrive in tonga, after a volcanic eruption and tsunami left the country in desperate need of supplies. we've heard a lot about the perilous threat to coral reefs around the world because of climate change. but a previously unknown giant coral reef has been discovered off the coast of tahiti in "pristine" condition. a research mission, led by unesco, made the find at a depth of more than 30 metres, and it's hoped this discovery may mean there are many more coral reefs waiting to be found. 0ur science correspondent, victoria gill, has this report. "magical." that was one of the words a veteran specialist diver who led this mission used to describe this view. some of these rose—shaped corals are more than two metres wide, and the whole reef structure
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stretches three kilometres along the sea bed. its depth and its distance from the coast is thought to be a key reason for its pristine condition. the researchers say it shows no signs of damage from pollution or from warming ocean temperatures, something that poses a major threat to shallower reefs. it looks beautiful, but scientifically how important is this, as a discovery? it might be, to date, one of the largest coral reefs in the world that actually lies at that sort of depth of more than 30 metres. so, from that perspective, that is opening a new insight in science. this could suggest that we have many more large reefs in our ocean, at depths beyond 30 metres, which we simply do not know about. the depth of this reef means there is far less sunlight here than in the shallows. this part of the ocean is known as the twilight zone. there's stilljust enough light here for the algae that lives
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inside the bodies of the coral to survive and thrive. and, critically, for the health of this reef, waters at these depths are not warming as quickly. it's often said we know more about the surface of the moon than we do about the ocean floor — only about a fifth of it has so far been mapped, and coral reefs like this are the sea floor hotspots for marine life. about a quarter of known ocean species can be found around these living ecosystems. the team is now planning more investigative dives to work out exactly what lives here, and crucially, how their newly discovered remarkable habitat can be protected. victoria gill, bbc news. i'm joined now by dr laetitia hedouin who was part of the team who made this incredible discovery... it must�*ve been such a moment when you found that in the deep depths of the ocean. what went through your mind at the time?— mind at the time? yet, i think it was a very _ mind at the time? yet, i think it was a very unique _ mind at the time? yet, i think it was a very unique moment - mind at the time? yet, | think it. was a very unique moment because right now, sometimes we hear very tightly make very bad news about the coral reef and that they are dying. but you go here and just in front of
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you, you find all this coral that is just everywhere and it's giant, this amazing form and it's beautiful, it looks like art underwater. and i was very impressed with the beauty, i was impressed. it was very amazing of this first dive and the expedition.— of this first dive and the expedition. of this first dive and the exedition. , ., ., ~' of this first dive and the exedition. , ., ., ~ ., expedition. yes, indeed. looking at the beautiful _ expedition. yes, indeed. looking at the beautiful pictures _ expedition. yes, indeed. looking at the beautiful pictures that - expedition. yes, indeed. looking at the beautiful pictures that you - the beautiful pictures that you described on the screens and you can hear that enthusiasm and the impression that left on you. we often talk about coral reefs being threatened by climate change but this discovery, does he give us hope in a way? it
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this discovery, does he give us hope in a wa ? ., , ., in a way? it does give a little ho e. in a way? it does give a little house this — in a way? it does give a little hope. this coral— in a way? it does give a little hope. this coral reef - in a way? it does give a little hope. this coral reef is - in a way? it does give a little hope. this coral reef is part, | in a way? it does give a little i hope. this coral reef is part, it has been protected from climate change because of the depth. because it is a reaction to the stature but also highlight, and because this coral reef, you don't have the light intensity, so if it had the stress, it was not enough for coral mortality and if you cannot find the mortality, what that means is even if we were doing this too is a 19 for the event, you can find the site of mortality and protect them and when is so good news when we're in that area, but the species that you can also find around there. you have
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a connection from the species and you're also able to watch and this can reproduce and can bring new things to the surface to help the more degraded areas. fin things to the surface to help the more degraded areas.— more degraded areas. on the depth, on the issue — more degraded areas. on the depth, on the issue of— more degraded areas. on the depth, on the issue of depth, _ more degraded areas. on the depth, on the issue of depth, how _ more degraded areas. on the depth, on the issue of depth, how difficult l on the issue of depth, how difficult is it defined more of these reefs because of the depth? the reason that we don't _ because of the depth? the reason that we don't have _ because of the depth? the reason that we don't have a _ because of the depth? the reason that we don't have a lot _ because of the depth? the reason that we don't have a lot of- that we don't have a lot of knowledge is due to the diving because classical dives at a0 metres, you can stay like ten minutes, so you do not have time to do lung exploration, you don't have time to do scientific protocol. so, this is the main reason why we don't really know coral reefs lower than
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30 metres. and the technology that the team use, so you can stay longer and this new technology and new discoveries and potentially,, i think there is ways to discover other things. think there is ways to discover otherthings. i’m think there is ways to discover other things.— think there is ways to discover otherthinus. �* ., . other things. i'm so so to cut you off there but _ other things. i'm so so to cut you off there but i'm _ other things. i'm so so to cut you off there but i'm afraid _ other things. i'm so so to cut you off there but i'm afraid that's - other things. i'm so so to cut you off there but i'm afraid that's alll off there but i'm afraid that's all the time we have for that segment. thank you forjoining us on the programme. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines. the lower house of austria's parliament has passed a bill to make covid—19 vaccinations compulsory for adults. the bill, which is now likely to become law, will mean everyone over the age of 18 without a valid exemption must get the jab. the usjustice department has charged a second man in connection with the assassination of haitian presidentjovenel moise lastjuly.
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rodolphe jaar was charged with conspiracy to commit murder after allegedly providing guns and weapons to the colombians who carried out the attack. a federal court in miami unveiled the charges against the a9—year—old after he was arrested in the dominican republic and transferred to the us on monday. a teenage pilot has become the youngest woman to fly solo around the world. 19—year—old zara rutherford has landed in belgium, finishing herjourney, which began in august last year. she visited over 50 countries during her trip in an ultra—light plane, and hopes that her record will inspire more women to work in science and engineering subjects. when asked about where she was most frightened, she said siberia where
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it was very lovely. that is it from us. thank you so much for watching and please stay with bbc news. hello again. thursday was a fairly chilly day, temperatures about two or three degrees below average forjanuary, but for many of us, we had sparkling blue skies for most of the day. and what a beautiful weather watcher picture this is from buttermere in cumbria. slightly less beautiful were the skies in east anglia. we had a shower stream coming down the north sea. and for norfolk and, to a degree, suffolk, quite a few showers here, but they are fading away. right now, as the winds start to change direction to more of a northwesterly, that shoves the showers over towards belgium and the netherlands. 0therwise we've got clear skies for many areas. and it's a cold one for sure, temperatures at their lowest about —6, —7. southern wales, central, southern england the coldest spots. might be very cold and frosty, but it should be bright with plenty
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of sunshine to start the day for most of us. even this cloudier zone in the west will be prone to a few breaks during the morning, so you could see a few glimpses of sunshine for a time. cloud tends to thicken through the afternoon. could threaten an odd patch of light rain or drizzle for the western isles and highlands. 8 to 9 degrees in the west. 0therwise, temperatures at 6s and 7s. now, friday night is where we keep those clear skies. again, temperatures will fall away to give us some patches of frost. it is going to be patchy rather than extensive, so not as overall cold across england and wales. and the thickest cloud across northwest scotland, temperatures about 8 overnight in stornoway. this weekend, the tendency is for the weather to turn a little bit cloudier. there will be a lot of drier weather to come. some sunny spells, but we could have a bit of frost and fog to contend with as well. essentially, as we go through the weekend, high pressure's still there. we're starting to get this milder
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air recirculating back around the high and particularly moving into northern areas of the uk, where we'll see the highest temperatures, particularly for northern scotland. saturday, mist and fog could be an issue first thing in the morning. 0therwise, we've got some patchy of frost, but then we'll have some sunshine to compensate across central and eastern areas. in the west, it continues to turn milder, but that's because we've got extensive cloud, thick enough to bring some rain to western scotland, where temperatures reach 11 celsius. second half of the weekend, again, we could go into sunday with some fog patches around. some of it could be quite dense, a few frost patches as well. overall, a little bit more in the way of cloud for most areas, with some mist and hill fog patches around the coasts, a bit of drizzle for western scotland, where it'll continue to be particularly mild. that's your weather.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: joe biden has warned any russian troops entering ukraine will be treated as an invasion and be met with severe economic sanctions. new satellite images show russian troops are massing near ukraine's border. the first plane—loads of aid have landed in tonga following saturday's volcanic eruption and tsunami. they touched down at the pacific nation's main airport, which had to be cleared of volcanic ash to make it safe. many people are feared dead following a huge explosion in the west of ghana. police said the blast — near a mining town — happened when a truck carrying explosives collided with a motorcycle. a senior british mp from borisjohnson's conservative party has accused the government of trying to blackmail colleagues who have called for a vote of confidence in the prime minister's leadership. mrjohnson rejected the claims.

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