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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 26, 2022 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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i'm ben brown, live in downing street on another difficult day for the prime minister. as westminster awaits the report of a senior civil servant into lockdown parties in government, borisjohnson faces mps in a rowdy house of commons. the labour leader has called on him to step down. the ministerial code says that ministers who knowingly mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation. does the prime minister believe that applies to him? mr speaker, of course. let me tell the house that i think he's inviting a question about an investigation which is as you know, mr speaker, i can't comment.
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the house of commons has finished for the day so it's now highly unlikely we will get to know the findings of sue gray's report this evening. and more controversy for the prime minister — foreign office emails leaked by a whistleblower appear to show the prime minister did approve the evacuation of pen farthing and his animals from afghanistan in august — which mrjohnson denied at the time. i'll be bringing you all the latest developments on that report into downing street parties as they happens. the as they happens. us embassy in the ukraine urges citizens the us embassy in the ukraine urges citizens to consider departing now as russia maintains a large military presence on the border with ukraine. it comes as advisers from russia, ukraine and germany and france continue talks to try to diffuse tensions. pcr test of around 100,000 volunteers in their react study also
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showed that one in 23 people had covid in the first three weeks of january. i'm ben brown live in downing street, where officials say they still haven't received the report by senior civil servant sue gray into lockdown parties at number ten and elsewhere in whitehall. the house of commons has finished for the day — so it's now highly unlikely we will get the findings of sue gray's report this evening. at a raucous prime minister's questions in the commons this lunchtime, the labour leader sir keir starmer said the conservatives had done immense damage to public trust, and called again on mr johnson to resign. and there's another big headache for the prime minister — whistleblower emails published
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by the foreign affairs select committee seem to show that borisjohnson did personally authorise the evacuation from afghanistan of cats and dogs from an animal charity run by a former marine pen farthing in august last year. in the past the prime minister has categorically denied he gave the go ahead for such an operation and he dismissed claims that the government was effectively prioritising animals over people. more on that shortly but first here's our political correspondent jonathan blake. westminster is waiting. the prime minister left downing street this morning with his fate hanging in the balance. expectations could not be higher as he arrived at the house of commons to face prime minister's questions. but for now, the questions and the answers sounded like more of the same. the ministerial code says that ministers who knowingly mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation. does the prime minister believe
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that applies to him? prime minister. mr speaker, of course — but let me tell the house i think he's inviting a question about an investigation which, as you know, mr speaker, i can't comment. borisjohnson was challenged to make public the results of the inquiry into events that may have broken covid rules. can the prime minister confirm he will publish the full sue gray report as he receives it? mr speaker, i can tell him that we have got to leave that to the independent investigators, as he knows, and then of course, when i receive it, of course i will do exactly what i said. labour trying to paint a picture of a prime minister on borrowed time. whatever he says in his statement later today or tomorrow won't change the facts — isn't this a prime minister and a government that have shown nothing but contempt for the decency, honesty and respect
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that define this country? borisjohnson was defiant, sounding intent on staying put. we have taken the tough decisions. we have got the big calls right, and i am getting on with the job. after the first accusations emerged of a christmas party during the first covid lockdown, the denialfrom boris johnson was firm. what i can tell the right honourable gentleman is that all guidance was followed completely during numberten. from then on, it emerged that in may 2020 around 100 staff were invited to drinks in the downing street garden. the prime minister said he thought was a work event. the following month, staff gathered in the cabinet room of number ten to celebrate boris johnson's birthday with cake and picnic food when social gatherings were banned, and in april last year, the night before the queen sat alone at prince philip's funeral, two leaving parties were held at number ten.
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the prime minister's senior adviser turned fierce critic dominic cummings has given his account in writing to the sue gray inquiry. for those still working in number ten, the scrutiny has been intense, the consequences uncertain. the wait won't last much longer, for what's been promised as a definitive version of events. jonathan blake, bbc news. we are hoping the weight doesn't get much longer than that. we are hoping the weight doesn't get much let's speak to our political correspondent nick eardley in central lobby in the houses of parliament. we have been waiting and waiting and waiting. we are told the ssoo gray report is complete.— report is complete. what is the dela ? i report is complete. what is the delay? i wish — report is complete. what is the delay? i wish i— report is complete. what is the delay? i wish i could _ report is complete. what is the delay? i wish i could give - report is complete. what is the delay? i wish i could give you l delay? i wish i could give you concrete words on what might happen. we are sort of in the dark because we know that number ten doesn't have the final thing. my understanding is that there are some checks still
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going on with lawyers and with the met police about what exactly can and can't be published. so that's why sue gray as an breast on the final version of her report. —— pressed. the commons has adjourned for the night. it seems very unlikely that were going to get the big crescendo to this story which we are expecting at some point today. it seems unlikely if not impossible that the prime minister would come and give that statement to parliament today. and it all leaves more space for the discussion to continue in the car doors and in the tea rooms around here about what's going to happen next. there is a process question, let's not forget though, there is a lot of pressure on the prime minister. there are a lot of conservative mps or waiting to see that report, some with a view to see that report, some with a view to calling for the prime minister to go once that report is out. some who are waiting to see what the contents are waiting to see what the contents are before they make up their mind. so i suspect borisjohnson is very
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keen to see the final version as well hook up but as yet, and the downing street inbox that report is not there. ~ . , ., ., not there. what is the mood among the tory mps _ not there. what is the mood among the tory mps because _ not there. what is the mood among the tory mps because boris - not there. what is the mood among j the tory mps because boris johnson the tory mps because borisjohnson will be particularly worried about them and how many might send in letters of no confidence to the 1922 committee. because the governments argument has been there are bigger things to worry about. there's a potential russian invert delete laid—back invasion of ukraine, across a living crisis and so on. that's exactly the argument the government is going to make. that we were hearing from borisjohnson�*s allies earlier in the day that there are other things to worry about, quite frankly and debate about who did and didn't have cake as one np but it isn't one issued to be dominating. i suspect were going to hear whenever boris johnson dominating. i suspect were going to hear whenever borisjohnson comes out to give his defence he will say exactly that, let's talk about ukraine, let's talk about russia, let's talk about the cost of living
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crisis was up that said, don't be under any illusions that our conservative mps are still nervous about what's going on, really nervous about borisjohnson�*s leadership and are still wondering if he is the right man to lead the party. if he is the right man to lead the .a . ., ~' if he is the right man to lead the la . ., " if he is the right man to lead the party. thank you but stayed with us. i want to talk— party. thank you but stayed with us. i want to talk to _ party. thank you but stayed with us. i want to talk to you _ party. thank you but stayed with us. i want to talk to you again _ party. thank you but stayed with us. i want to talk to you again about - i want to talk to you again about another story, another problem, another story, another problem, another headache for boris johnson which is that... whistleblower emails raise further questions over borisjohnson�*s insistence he did not intervene to assist the evacuation of around 170 stray dogs and cats from afghanistan last summer. is the animal charity nowzad, run by pen farthing, appealed for help in flying out the animals as the taliban seized control of the afghan capital last year. 0ne foreign office email, released today by the foreign affairs committee of mps, says the prime minister did intervene to authorise the evacuation of the charity's staff and animals.
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mrjohnson has previously dismissed claims that he prioritised animals over people during the operation. the foreign affairs select committee has heard from an official who says the response to the situation in kabul was chaotic and has suggested that you yourself intervened to try and get the nowzad animals out, and they got priority over some afghan people. did you intervene in that way? no, that is complete nonsense. what i can tell you is that the operation, 0p pitting, to airlift 15,000 people out of kabul in the way that we did over the summer, was one of the outstanding military achievements of the last 50 years or more. that was the prime minister speaking about that in december. in the last hour, the defence secretary ben wallace has strongly denied that the prime minister ordered the evacuation of the charity's team and its pets.
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nothing to do with the prime minister, never at any stage did he get in touch with me about it, so the claims that have been made in e—mails from the foreign office, who were not responsible for the actual evacuation operation, i don't know where they've come from, but they certainly don't show the reality, which was i was in charge, the prime minister never asked me, it was nonsense. that's the defence secretary. while this is another headache, is in it for borisjohnson? as well as the whole reporting to parties that we are still waiting for her, this leaked e—mailfrom a are still waiting for her, this leaked e—mail from a whistle—blower about that evacuation. just explain to us why this is politically significant. if to us why this is politically significant.— to us why this is politically significant. to us why this is politically siunificant. i. , i. significant. if you cast your mind back to august _ significant. if you cast your mind back to august when _ significant. if you cast your mind back to august when the - significant. if you cast your mind back to august when the tally i significant. if you cast your mind i back to august when the tally band was on the advance in afghanistan, there was a lot of controversy over
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a animals were airlifted out of kabul airport with the authorisation of the uk government. as you are not clipped, the prime minister has always denied that he was involved in it, you are the defence secretary say that he still denying that that's the case at this e—mail which is from a member of staff in the foreign office, a minister they're saying that the prime minister had given the go—ahead for others. i think it creates another difficult question for the prime minister. i got a member of the foreign affairs committee with me, the prime minister continues to deny and continually denied that he had any role in getting pen far things animals out of afghanistan. your position as a member of the committee that you can believe in? it's very difficult to believe him because — it's very difficult to believe him because it's there in black and white — because it's there in black and white. certainly in a special working _ white. certainly in a special working in the office said that the
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prime _ working in the office said that the prime minister head authoriser. i don't _ prime minister head authoriser. i don't think— prime minister head authoriser. i don't think in official would write that, _ don't think in official would write that, they— don't think in official would write that, they would know that they would _ that, they would know that they would get themselves into very deep hot weter— would get themselves into very deep hot water if they were lying about what _ hot water if they were lying about what the — hot water if they were lying about what the prime minister had done. so either— what the prime minister had done. so either there _ what the prime minister had done. so either there is a complete chaos in the foreign— either there is a complete chaos in the foreign office over this issue or the _ the foreign office over this issue or the prime minister is lying. either— or the prime minister is lying. either way— or the prime minister is lying. either way the prime minister is that to — either way the prime minister is that to clear it up. why does this matter? — that to clear it up. why does this matter? first of all because every single _ matter? first of all because every single mp — matter? first of all because every single mp i know had constituents and people who are stuck in afghanistan who were in real danger when _ afghanistan who were in real danger when the _ afghanistan who were in real danger when the taliban took over. i know of at _ when the taliban took over. i know of at least — when the taliban took over. i know of at least two people still hiding in afghanistan, terrified for their lives, _ in afghanistan, terrified for their lives, we — in afghanistan, terrified for their lives, we wanted to get those people out. lives, we wanted to get those people out my— lives, we wanted to get those people out. my anxiety was at the wrong priority— out. my anxiety was at the wrong priority was given or there was no priority— priority was given or there was no priority given to the right people. and the _ priority given to the right people. and the second reason is, i hear the argument _ and the second reason is, i hear the argument from lots of conservative mps about, we should be talking about _ mps about, we should be talking about the — mps about, we should be talking about the cost of living crisis, talking — about the cost of living crisis, talking about ukraine, moscow and all that, _ talking about ukraine, moscow and all that, i_ talking about ukraine, moscow and all that, i was in ukraine last week, — all that, i was in ukraine last week, we _ all that, i was in ukraine last week, we were 80 metres away for russian _ week, we were 80 metres away for russian troops, i am very, very focused on — russian troops, i am very, very focused on what we need to do in
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ukraine _ focused on what we need to do in ukraine and have been arguing for a lon- ukraine and have been arguing for a long time _ ukraine and have been arguing for a long time about russian dirty money in the _ long time about russian dirty money in the uk _ long time about russian dirty money in the uk. the problem is, to deal with any— in the uk. the problem is, to deal with any of— in the uk. the problem is, to deal with any of those issues and the cancer back—up problems and so on, 6 million _ cancer back—up problems and so on, 6 million people a waiting list, you need _ million people a waiting list, you need a _ million people a waiting list, you need a prime minister with moral authority — need a prime minister with moral authority. and every single one of these _ authority. and every single one of these stories isjust yet authority. and every single one of these stories is just yet another erosion — these stories is just yet another erosion of— these stories is just yet another erosion of the prime ministers moral authority _ erosion of the prime ministers moral authority. and why that makes me angry— authority. and why that makes me angry is— authority. and why that makes me angry is because we've got to deal with these — angry is because we've got to deal with these issues. we can't deal with these issues. we can't deal with these — with these issues. we can't deal with these issues. we can't deal with these issues until he's gone. it's with these issues until he's gone. it's my— with these issues until he's gone. it's my very— with these issues until he's gone. it's my very strong opinion. what he does _ it's my very strong opinion. what he does always— it's my very strong opinion. what he does always is he... he equips himseif— does always is he... he equips himself in— does always is he... he equips himself in the court of his own opinion — himself in the court of his own opinion. well, ithink himself in the court of his own opinion. well, i think public opinion, _ opinion. well, i think public opinion, the court of public opinion has found — opinion, the court of public opinion has found very differently for some we now _ has found very differently for some we now need to see the full sue gray rebort~ _ we now need to see the full sue gray rebort~ he's— we now need to see the full sue gray report. he's also answer questions and also _ report. he's also answer questions and also answer questions about has he been _ and also answer questions about has he been lying about pen far then? can i_ he been lying about pen far then? can i bush— he been lying about pen far then? can i push a — he been lying about pen far then? can i push a bit more on afghanistan? we have the defence secretary saying this didn't happen, the prime minister wasn't involved
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in this, then wallace's been on the airwaves, he was saying that this afternoon. at the same time... boris seems very — afternoon. at the same time... boris seems very angry — afternoon. at the same time... boris seems very angry about _ afternoon. at the same time... boris seems very angry about it. _ afternoon. at the same time. .. boris seems very angry about it. i - afternoon. at the same time... boris seems very angry about it. i got the impression — seems very angry about it. i got the impression that ben wallace was angry— impression that ben wallace was angry that he had been overwritten by somebody. who could he have been overwritten— by somebody. who could he have been overwritten by other than the prime minister? _ overwritten by other than the prime minister? the overwritten by other than the prime minister? , . ,, . ., , minister? the defence secretary sa in: this minister? the defence secretary saying this afternoon _ minister? the defence secretary saying this afternoon that - minister? the defence secretary saying this afternoon that he - minister? the defence secretary i saying this afternoon that he wasn't told by the prime minister to do this. yet we have these e—mails it as you say in the forest tonight for an office in black and white. the prime minister authorises with what can your committee do next to try and get to the bottom of what actually went on?— and get to the bottom of what actually went on? first thing is, i ho -e actually went on? first thing is, i hone somebody _ actually went on? first thing is, i hope somebody will— actually went on? first thing is, i hope somebody will come - actually went on? first thing is, i hope somebody will come from l actually went on? first thing is, i l hope somebody will come from the government tomorrow to answer. i prefer— government tomorrow to answer. i prefer the _ government tomorrow to answer. i prefer the prime minister, government tomorrow to answer. i preferthe prime minister, i government tomorrow to answer. i prefer the prime minister, i told government tomorrow to answer. i prefer the prime minister, itold is gone _ prefer the prime minister, itold is gone to— prefer the prime minister, itold is gone to wales tomorrow but who knows peoples _ gone to wales tomorrow but who knows peoples diary change rapidly at the moment _ peoples diary change rapidly at the moment. somebody should come to the house _ moment. somebody should come to the house of— moment. somebody should come to the house of commons and explained. if there _ house of commons and explained. if there is— house of commons and explained. if there is a _ house of commons and explained. if there is a legitimate explanation fine, _ there is a legitimate explanation fine, i_ there is a legitimate explanation fine, i chaired the committee on standards. — fine, i chaired the committee on standards, i want to be fair to hear both sides — standards, i want to be fair to hear both sides of the argument. on the face of— both sides of the argument. on the face of it. _ both sides of the argument. on the face of it. at— both sides of the argument. on the face of it, at the moment, the prime minister—
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face of it, at the moment, the prime minister has lied. that's official has basically said in the e—mail. where'd — has basically said in the e—mail. where'd that come to us? because some _ where'd that come to us? because some people are sick and tired of the ties — some people are sick and tired of the lies. ., , ., , , some people are sick and tired of the lies. . , ., , , the lies. finally and briefly, you said the you _ the lies. finally and briefly, you said the you think— the lies. finally and briefly, you said the you think the _ the lies. finally and briefly, you said the you think the prime - said the you think the prime ministers go to wales tomorrow, when do you think we might hear from ministers go to wales tomorrow, when do you think we might hearfrom him about this sue gray report does not you know what's going on in parliament. if you know what's going on in parliament.— you know what's going on in parliament. ., , ~ ~ you know what's going on in parliament. ., , ,, . ., parliament. if only i knew. we are livin: in a parliament. if only i knew. we are living in a cloud _ parliament. if only i knew. we are living in a cloud of _ parliament. if only i knew. we are living in a cloud of unknowing - parliament. if only i knew. we are living in a cloud of unknowing at i living in a cloud of unknowing at the moment, it's very difficult to teii~ _ the moment, it's very difficult to teii~ i_ the moment, it's very difficult to teii~ ithink— the moment, it's very difficult to tell. i think lots of people in the public— tell. i think lots of people in the public in — tell. i think lots of people in the public in essence have made up their mind _ public in essence have made up their mind every— public in essence have made up their mind. every single time of tori goes on television to defend about the indefensible, the parties and try to downplay— indefensible, the parties and try to downplay them, all they're saying to the british— downplay them, all they're saying to the british people is that they're stupid — the british people is that they're stupid. my mother in laws birthday is the _ stupid. my mother in laws birthday is the 20th— stupid. my mother in laws birthday is the 20th of may, one of the days that the _ is the 20th of may, one of the days that the prime minister was at a party, _ that the prime minister was at a party, we were able to celebrate in any way, _ party, we were able to celebrate in any way, nobody was ambushed by a cake _ any way, nobody was ambushed by a cake we _ any way, nobody was ambushed by a cake. we had to stand by another side of— cake. we had to stand by another side of the — cake. we had to stand by another side of the wall to wave to her for her birthday. there are people who aren't— her birthday. there are people who aren't able — her birthday. there are people who aren't able to go to funerals. i
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know— aren't able to go to funerals. i know i'm repeating a thing that is been _ know i'm repeating a thing that is been said — know i'm repeating a thing that is been said many, many times but this has such— been said many, many times but this has such strong residence with people — has such strong residence with people because the whole point of a pandemic, _ people because the whole point of a pandemic, the first bit means were all in _ pandemic, the first bit means were aii in it— pandemic, the first bit means were all in it together, i've never known all in it together, i've never known a time _ all in it together, i've never known a time when — all in it together, i've never known a time when government has been so involved _ a time when government has been so involved in— a time when government has been so involved in so many peoples lives, restricting — involved in so many peoples lives, restricting their freedoms and then it turns _ restricting their freedoms and then it turns out — restricting their freedoms and then it turns out this was another set of rules— it turns out this was another set of rules for— it turns out this was another set of rules for them. it's beggars belief. that's_ rules for them. it's beggars belief. that's why— rules for them. it's beggars belief. that's why his moral authority is shot. _ that's why his moral authority is shot. he — that's why his moral authority is shot, he cannot lead us, he cannot leave _ shot, he cannot lead us, he cannot leave the _ shot, he cannot lead us, he cannot leave the country let alone lead the conservative party.— conservative party. thank you so much for coming _ conservative party. thank you so much for coming to _ conservative party. thank you so much for coming to talk- conservative party. thank you so much for coming to talk to - conservative party. thank you so much for coming to talk to us. i conservative party. thank you so - much for coming to talk to us. we've been asking that question of people all day, when we get a get that report? nobody knows the answer. i think without another a0 minutes earlier. i'll do my best to come up with a bit more that time. worth noting, i'vejust come with a bit more that time. worth noting, i've just come from where mps have offices, a lot of people are leaving for the weekend now, wednesday is the big day in parliament when everybody is here. it's 81 lion whip which means most
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mps will go home to their constituencies. if we do hear from the prime minister and the next couple of days on that sue gray report it may be less than busy comments was that will have to wait and see. if we get any updates i'll bring them straight to you.- bring them straight to you. thank ou ve bring them straight to you. thank you very much — bring them straight to you. thank you very much indeed. _ in the house of parliament. i will be back shortly after half past with more discussion on this. for now i'm getting energy back to read it in the studio. thank you ben. the united states has urged its citizens to �*consider departing now�* from ukraine because of an increase in tensions on the russian border. today — ukraine's foreign minister has played down concerns that a russian invasion might be imminent. dmytro kuleba said moscow had not yet massed enough forces for an invasion, but he acknowledged that the risks were high. talks are taking place in paris between france, germany, russia and ukraine to try to defuse the situation. here, the foreign secretary, liz truss, said the government would not rule out imposing personal
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sanctions against vladimir putin if russia were to invade ukraine. here's our diplomatic correspondent, caroline hawley. new russian military manoeuvres amid escalating tensions. this is western russia close to ukraine. moscow now has around 100,000 troops massed on the borders of the former soviet republic, with more still arriving. the ukrainian government says russia's aim is to sow panic. it poses a threat to ukraine, a direct threat to ukraine. however, at the moment, as we speak, this number is insufficient for the full—scale offensive against ukraine along the entire ukrainian border. still, as the russian build—up continues, alarm is growing in western capitals. fears of what could be the most serious confrontation in the region since the cold war.
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these fighterjets are heading to moscow's ally, belarus. and western warnings to russia, threats of punishment, are getting louder. there would be severe economic costs to russia if they were to stage an incursion into ukraine. we are also helping ukraine with the supply of defensive weapons and we are strengthening our support to nato as well. russia claims its the west that escalating the crisis. translation: the us and its allies have abandoned diplomatic rules i and have been seeking to undermine our country with unilateral sanctions as well as increasing military pressure on russia with manoeuvres along the russian borders. they are trying to draw kyiv into making provocations against russia. near the capital, kyiv, ukrainians prepare for the worst. the civilians are part of the country's defence plan, if russia does invade.
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it his normal life, this man works in logistics, but every saturday he trains as a soldier. he has wanted to do this, he says, since russia's invasion in 201a of crimea. and now a new danger looms. translation: i am ready to fight back. | i am confident the enemy will not reach kyiv. we ukrainians have always been good at self organisation. and we will be the first to support the ukrainian army. they've said they'll defend their capital street by street if they have to do — if diplomacy to deter an invasion fails. caroline hawley, bbc news. two—thirds of people recently infected with the omicron variant of coronavirus say they've had covid before, according to research. the findings come from the react—1 study which also found that earlier this month, 1 in 23 people in england would have tested positive — that's the highest rate ever recorded. here's our health correspondent, anna collinson.
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unprecedented amounts of covid — that's how scientists behind one of england's largest infection studies have described the start of 2022, with the delta variant all but wiped out by the more transmissible omicron. the react study collected more than 100,000 swabs from volunteers during the first weeks in january. its findings suggest around one in 23 people in england would have tested positive for covid, the highest rate ever recorded. researchers also found around two in three people, 65%, who had recently been infected with covid had also reported a past infection. further work is needed to understand how many of these cases were true reinfections, but it's thought certain groups like key workers or parents are more at risk. they are more likely to be the types of people who are meeting other people and who might get infected. for example, people who live in large households are coming into contact with more people
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at home, and certainly we see the people from large households do have a higher infection rate. while adult infection rates have been falling, having pupils back in the classroom after the christmas break may explain the rise amongst children. prevalence in the north east is said to be particularly high. the situation in school at the moment is a nightmare. we've got more staff testing positive every week, and i'm dreading tonight, because we test twice a week, and i'm expecting more staff to go down with it tonight. we've got children off across the school, i think in the high 205 now of children who've tested positive, but on top of that, we've got staff whose children are testing positive so they are trying to juggle childcare with their partners. it's really difficult. high levels of covid among children can then be passed on to adults, including the hundreds of thousands of people who are at higher risk of serious illness. it's thought that's what happened to tom, who has immunodeficiency
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and required hospital treatment after catching covid, despite isolating. plan b measures are being dropped in england from tomorrow, but health advice for people like tom remains. while he understands people's need for normality, he's anxious. i think it's a massive step, and i think arguably things could be slowed down to protect people like myself where the vaccine hasn't given us a response. so from tomorrow, face coverings will not be compulsory, what would be your message to people watching about whether they should wear them or not? putting a mask on may restrict you for the one minute you are in the shop, or the two minutes you do your grocery shopping, but actually, it will make the individual feel better, it will allow them to live a more normal life, and it will definitely reduce their anxiety, so just awareness of others would be amazing. anna collinson, bbc news.
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newest numbers show there were more than 102,000 292 new cases on average per day in the last week. the number of people in hospital with covid is just over 16 and a half thousand. another 300 and a6 deaths were reported and that is of people who died within 28 days of a positive test. on average in the past week there were 262 deaths per day. on vaccinations just over 37 million people have had a booster jab. that's nearly 60 for a half percent of those aged 12 and percent of those aged 12 jab. that's nearly 60 for a half percent of those aged 12 and over. more and i a top story and officials at number ten say they still haven't received the report from gray on parties on downing street and elsewhere in white halls. it stopped the report has been completed. in another headache for the prime minister, whistle—blower e—mails publix by the foreign select committees seem to show that boris
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johnson did personally authorise the speculation from afghanistan of katzen dogs from an annual charity. let's speak to our political correspondent nick eardley in central lobby in the houses of parliament we've been trying to find out all day when will see that report. i just checked in with last couple of minutes and they still haven't received it as we've been reporting this afternoon, there are still some checks going on and some legal issues and the met police about what exactly can and can't be said. so no sign of it yet. the house of commons has adjourned for the night so we are not going to hearfrom has adjourned for the night so we are not going to hear from the has adjourned for the night so we are not going to hearfrom the prime minister here. let's try and figure out what happens next. and that the leader of the house of commons with me. thanks so much for coming to speak with us. what is going on, when is the next point at which we could hearfrom when is the next point at which we could hear from the when is the next point at which we could hearfrom the prime minister on this? could hear from the prime minister on this? ., , , ., ., ., on this? the house will sit tomorrow from 930, on this? the house will sit tomorrow from 930. it — on this? the house will sit tomorrow from 930, it will— on this? the house will sit tomorrow from 930, it will be _ on this? the house will sit tomorrow from 930, it will be possible - on this? the house will sit tomorrow from 930, it will be possible to i from 930, it will be possible to have _ from 930, it will be possible to have a — from 930, it will be possible to have a statement tomorrow. and
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actuaiiy — have a statement tomorrow. and actually friday is a sitting friday. so the _ actually friday is a sitting friday. so the business of the house carries on. the _ so the business of the house carries on, the important statement of this can comes — on, the important statement of this can comes to the house with its considerable flexibility. it can comes to the house with its considerable flexibility.- considerable flexibility. it could be thursday — considerable flexibility. it could be thursday or _ considerable flexibility. it could be thursday or friday _ considerable flexibility. it could be thursday or friday potential| considerable flexibility. it could i be thursday or friday potential into next week as well? i’m be thursday or friday potential into next week as well?— next week as well? i'm very reluctant — next week as well? i'm very reluctant to _ next week as well? i'm very reluctant to make _ next week as well? i'm very reluctant to make the i next week as well? i'm very reluctant to make the time | next week as well? i'm very - reluctant to make the time because i have no— reluctant to make the time because i have no idea when miss gray will produce — have no idea when miss gray will produce a — have no idea when miss gray will produce a report. and quite rightly so because — produce a report. and quite rightly so because she is independent and she must— so because she is independent and she must complete her work at their own pace _ she must complete her work at their own ace. ~ ., ., , own pace. when that report does come, own pace. when that report does come. how _ own pace. when that report does come. how long _ own pace. when that report does come, how long are _ own pace. when that report does come, how long are you - own pace. when that report does come, how long are you going i own pace. when that report does come, how long are you going to | come, how long are you going to give opposition parties to look at it, to die the? they are worried that they won't get much time it all before hearing from the prime minister. the issue here is, how do you give the opposition— issue here is, how do you give the opposition parties proper time to consider— opposition parties proper time to consider it— opposition parties proper time to consider it without taking the risk that it _ consider it without taking the risk that it leaks before parliament gets to hear— that it leaks before parliament gets to hear about it? it is constitutionally proper that the house — constitutionally proper that the house of commons should here ist. but to— house of commons should here ist. but to have — house of commons should here ist. but to have a proper discussion the opposition— but to have a proper discussion the opposition parties need to have a time _ opposition parties need to have a time to— opposition parties need to have a time to have a look at it so starting _ time to have a look at it so starting trying to get that balance right _ starting trying to get that balance right i'm — starting trying to get that balance right. i'm not going to say how many minutes— right. i'm not going to say how many minutes per— right. i'm not going to say how many minutes per page depending on the
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length _ minutes per page depending on the length of— minutes per page depending on the length of the government will observe — length of the government will observe the normal courtesies we've been speaking to an empty earlier and he— been speaking to an empty earlier and he suggested an hour to look at it. is. and he suggested an hour to look at it. , ., and he suggested an hour to look at it. , . ., , , , and he suggested an hour to look at it. is that in a sensible timescale? i think it depends _ it. is that in a sensible timescale? i think it depends on _ it. is that in a sensible timescale? i think it depends on the - it. is that in a sensible timescale? i think it depends on the length i i think it depends on the length of the report — i think it depends on the length of the report. we don't know how long it's proportionate to seeing it. on the it's proportionate to seeing it. the broader it's proportionate to seeing it. q? the broader issue about what is going on in downing street and what the prime minister is all the comments, do you think it's possible to match up his comment on the 8th of december that he wasn't aware of any parties and he had been told that all the rules have been followed and what's transpired sense that he was at at least two gatherings which appear to have been in breach of the covid rules? we will have to _ in breach of the covid rules? we will have to wait and see what the report _ will have to wait and see what the report says. yes, isaac it's very easy— report says. yes, isaac it's very easy to _ report says. yes, isaac it's very easy to work— report says. yes, isaac it's very easy to work out how these statements completely compatible. the prime minister has said have we obey the _ the prime minister has said have we obey the rules, summaries and yes, the prime _ obey the rules, summaries and yes, the prime minister accepted that as you would _ the prime minister accepted that as you would if that's the information that you _ you would if that's the information that you receive. and we know the invent _ that you receive. and we know the invent on—
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that you receive. and we know the invent on the 20th of may seem to be a work— invent on the 20th of may seem to be a work of— invent on the 20th of may seem to be a work of a _ invent on the 20th of may seem to be a work of a vent to the prime minister. and he sold the house that ithink— minister. and he sold the house that i think that's complete compatibility but we must see what the report— compatibility but we must see what the report says about the overall pattern _ the report says about the overall pattern of— the report says about the overall pattern of events. the the report says about the overall pattern of events.— pattern of events. the issue that many people _ pattern of events. the issue that many people have, _ pattern of events. the issue that many people have, even - pattern of events. the issue that many people have, even if i pattern of events. the issue that many people have, even if you i pattern of events. the issue that l many people have, even if you can somehowjustify many people have, even if you can somehow justify these as work events, there was clearly a social element to them. it was at the exact same time that many of our viewers, people around the country were cancelling events because they had been told to do so by the government. are you worried that this seems hypocritical? the issue here is that _ this seems hypocritical? the issue here is that people _ this seems hypocritical? the issue here is that people had _ this seems hypocritical? the issue here is that people had to - this seems hypocritical? the issue here is that people had to be i here is that people had to be working _ here is that people had to be working in downing street. the country— working in downing street. the country had to carry on being governed, people had to come together. governed, people had to come touether. ~ , �* ., ., together. while they didn't have to sto for together. while they didn't have to stop for cake _ together. while they didn't have to stop for cake or— together. while they didn't have to stop for cake or drinks. _ together. while they didn't have to stop for cake or drinks. if- together. while they didn't have to stop for cake or drinks. if people . stop for cake or drinks. if people are working _ stop for cake or drinks. if people are working all _ stop for cake or drinks. if people are working all day, _ stop for cake or drinks. if people are working all day, they've i stop for cake or drinks. if people are working all day, they've gotl stop for cake or drinks. if people l are working all day, they've got to eat, they've got have lunch. they must _ eat, they've got have lunch. they must be — eat, they've got have lunch. they must be allowed to have a cup of coffee _ must be allowed to have a cup of coffee during the course of the day. so we _ coffee during the course of the day. so we are _ coffee during the course of the day. so we are then getting into very nuanced — so we are then getting into very nuanced areas amongst people who are naturally— nuanced areas amongst people who are naturally coming together. are you telling _ naturally coming together. are you telling me — naturally coming together. are you telling me that in the bbc one people —
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telling me that in the bbc one people are working together they didn't— people are working together they didn't have any food all day? they didn't— didn't have any food all day? they didn't never say much, and he cups of coffee? — didn't never say much, and he cups of coffee? so when people are coming to gather— of coffee? so when people are coming to gather for work they will inevitably also have to have some form _ inevitably also have to have some form of _ inevitably also have to have some form of food and drink, won't they? that's_ form of food and drink, won't they? that's unreasonable. i think some people will take the point that you have to have your lunch or glass of water during the day but they were questioned whether you need to have a bottle of wine in the garden in the evening or a cake in the cabinet room. , , , the evening or a cake in the cabinet room. , ,, ., ., the evening or a cake in the cabinet room. ,,, ., .,, room. this issue about do people have a drink _ room. this issue about do people have a drink when _ room. this issue about do people have a drink when they _ room. this issue about do people have a drink when they are i room. this issue about do people i have a drink when they are working is one _ have a drink when they are working is one that — have a drink when they are working is one that i — have a drink when they are working is one that i think it is not absolutely set in stone one way or the other — absolutely set in stone one way or the other i— absolutely set in stone one way or the other. i went on a sister programme of yours, and i was being briefed _ programme of yours, and i was being briefed about what i was going to say before hand and my office briefed — say before hand and my office briefed me and i gave them a glass of wine _ briefed me and i gave them a glass of wine because it was nine o'clock in the _ of wine because it was nine o'clock in the evening. i didn't have on my cell because — in the evening. i didn't have on my cell because isaac it's unwise to a broadcast — cell because isaac it's unwise to a broadcast where you have a drink. so
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ithink— broadcast where you have a drink. so i think these — broadcast where you have a drink. so i think these circumstances need to be set _ i think these circumstances need to be set out — i think these circumstances need to be set out clearly in the report to understand whether it was a normal of work— understand whether it was a normal of work or— understand whether it was a normal of work or whether there were two rules were — of work or whether there were two rules were in fact breach. he of work or whether there were two rules were in fact breach.- rules were in fact breach. he also said when — rules were in fact breach. he also said when you — rules were in fact breach. he also said when you are _ rules were in fact breach. he also said when you are a _ rules were in fact breach. he also said when you are a news - rules were in fact breach. he also said when you are a news look. rules were in fact breach. he also i said when you are a news look night last night that you thought there would have to be a general election is boris johnson's would have to be a general election is borisjohnson's no longer prime minister. so if... should we be selling her audience that if there is a noble look that confidence both they should expect election to? i they should expect election to? i actually looked up what i said as a fact on— actually looked up what i said as a fact on september 2010 and i spoke on that— fact on september 2010 and i spoke on that debate, i'd only been newly elected _ on that debate, i'd only been newly elected to— on that debate, i'd only been newly elected to parliament and i said then— elected to parliament and i said then probably what i said last night, — then probably what i said last night, i— then probably what i said last night, i think the mood of the constitution has changed, i think it changed _ constitution has changed, i think it changed quite strongly with gordon brown _ changed quite strongly with gordon brown to— changed quite strongly with gordon brown to a feeling that a new leader reguired _ brown to a feeling that a new leader required a _ brown to a feeling that a new leader required a new mandate because the mandate _ required a new mandate because the mandate is— required a new mandate because the mandate is very personal. our
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constitution is not codified and therefore you have to operate within its mood _ therefore you have to operate within its mood rather than its specific rules _ its mood rather than its specific rules but — its mood rather than its specific rules. but my feeling about the mood of the _ rules. but my feeling about the mood of the constitution is that because the mandate has become personal, and art reguires _ the mandate has become personal, and art requires a _ the mandate has become personal, and art requires a general election. and i art requires a general election. and i know— art requires a general election. and i know some people have been saying i know some people have been saying i 'ust i know some people have been saying ijust said _ i know some people have been saying ijust said this because of the current— ijust said this because of the current circumstances, actually this is been _ current circumstances, actually this is been my— current circumstances, actually this is been my constitutional view for over a _ is been my constitutional view for over a decade. is been my constitutional view for over a decade-— is been my constitutional view for over a decade. you are one of boris johnson's most _ over a decade. you are one of boris johnson's most prominent - over a decade. you are one of boris johnson's most prominent backersl over a decade. you are one of borisl johnson's most prominent backers in the cabinet at the moment, you been about a lot over the last couple of weeks talking about why he should stay imposed. as things stand now, how confident are you that the prime minister would get through this crisis? �* , ., , ., minister would get through this crisis? �* , ., ., crisis? i'm very glad you come to that because _ crisis? i'm very glad you come to that because i _ crisis? i'm very glad you come to that because i thought _ crisis? i'm very glad you come to that because i thought the i crisis? i'm very glad you come to i that because i thought the headline in the _ that because i thought the headline in the daily mail was really important, we are losing the sense of proportion and discussion whether or not— of proportion and discussion whether or not some — of proportion and discussion whether or not some cake was eaten. what was going _ or not some cake was eaten. what was going on— or not some cake was eaten. what was going on was— or not some cake was eaten. what was going on was that the government managed — going on was that the government managed to deliver the best vaccine programme and the world, a furlough programme _ programme and the world, a furlough programme that saves people jobs and
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businesses, the bounce back loans, £500 _ businesses, the bounce back loans, £500 billion or taxpayer money to support— £500 billion or taxpayer money to support her economy which is now back to _ support her economy which is now back to where it was before the crisis _ back to where it was before the crisis started. we have reopened earlier— crisis started. we have reopened earlier than most countries because the prime _ earlier than most countries because the prime minister got the decisions i’ili'it the prime minister got the decisions right and _ the prime minister got the decisions right and he also incidentally, delivered brexit. i noticed some remainders are now saying that they might— remainders are now saying that they might be _ remainders are now saying that they might be able to reverse it under certain— might be able to reverse it under certain two— might be able to reverse it under certain two certain circumstances was think— certain two certain circumstances was think the prime ministers done a superb— was think the prime ministers done a supeerob _ was think the prime ministers done a superbjob of the was think the prime ministers done a superb job of the country, was think the prime ministers done a superbjob of the country, is was think the prime ministers done a superb job of the country, is that the big _ superb job of the country, is that the big decisions right and we need to focus— the big decisions right and we need to focus on— the big decisions right and we need to focus on what really matters, we need to _ to focus on what really matters, we need to get — to focus on what really matters, we need to get a sense of that comes in in april. someone told me you told the cabinet you wanted that to be reversed. is that still your position?— reversed. is that still your osition? �* ., ., �* , reversed. is that still your osition? ., ., �* _ g position? i'm afraid i'm very stuffy in many ways. _ position? i'm afraid i'm very stuffy in many ways, but _ position? i'm afraid i'm very stuffy in many ways, but particularly i position? i'm afraid i'm very stuffy in many ways, but particularly on i in many ways, but particularly on cabinet _ in many ways, but particularly on cabinet conversations. they are confidential. you may find out in 30 years. _ confidential. you may find out in 30 years. but _ confidential. you may find out in 30
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years, but by then, i shall probably call~~~ _ years, but by then, i shall probably call... �* years, but by then, i shall probably call... . , ., years, but by then, i shall probably call... . ., call... are you comfortable with what's about — call... are you comfortable with what's about to _ call... are you comfortable with what's about to happen - call... are you comfortable with what's about to happen was i call... are you comfortable with i what's about to happen was mount call... are you comfortable with - what's about to happen was mount --? what's about to happen was mount ——? do you really think it's a good time to be putting people's taxes up? i’m to be putting people's taxes up? i'm very pleased people are talking about _ very pleased people are talking about cost of living, because that is where — about cost of living, because that is where the government needs to focus _ is where the government needs to focus. ., ., ., , ., . focus. national insurance up? taxation as — focus. national insurance up? taxation as a _ focus. national insurance up? taxation as a matter- focus. national insurance up? taxation as a matter for- focus. national insurance up? taxation as a matter for the l taxation as a matter for the chancellor. so taxation as a matter for the chancellor.— taxation as a matter for the chancellor. ., ., ., chancellor. so no view at all? that is a matter— chancellor. so no view at all? that is a matter for— chancellor. so no view at all? that is a matter for the _ chancellor. so no view at all? that is a matter for the chancellor. i chancellor. so no view at all? that is a matter for the chancellor. just j is a matter for the chancellor. just to be clear. _ is a matter for the chancellor. just to be clear. in _ is a matter for the chancellor. just to be clear, in terms of everyone waiting for this report, your view is very much tomorrow or friday, the prime minister will be welcome to the comments. the prime minister will be welcome to the comments.— prime minister will be welcome to the comments. ., ., , , ., the comments. the commons is here to do what members _ the comments. the commons is here to do what members want. _ the comments. the commons is here to do what members want. members i the comments. the commons is here to do what members want. members want | the comments. the commons is here to. do what members want. members want a statement _ do what members want. members want a statement. underlying your question is a thought i know when the document is coming, and i don't, but of course, _ document is coming, and i don't, but of course, when it does, the house of course, when it does, the house of commons, mr speaker, is the key person— of commons, mr speaker, is the key person in— of commons, mr speaker, is the key person in all— of commons, mr speaker, is the key person in all of this.—
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person in all of this. jacob rees-moog. _ person in all of this. jacob rees-mogg, thanks i person in all of this. jacob rees-mogg, thanks for i person in all of this. jacob i rees-mogg, thanks for clearing person in all of this. jacrrg rees—mogg, thanks for clearing some of that all. we've asked all day whether it's coming and as i say, the latest from downing street is they still don't have sue gray's report, so the question now is when that will land in the downing street inbox, when they will publish it, when the prime minister will be here in the comments. as you just heard, that could be thursday or friday. i'm even hearing it could be monday, but anyway, thank you very much indeed. we can't say he didn't try to answer the questions. in recent weeks, we've heard her name an awful lot. who exactly is sue gray. bbc northern ireland political correspondent gareth gordon has interviewed her in the past and has this profile of the woman who has been investigating downing street.
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they used to call sue gray the most powerful civil servant you've never heard of. not any more appeal though all i ask is that sue gray be allowed to inflate her inquiry. taking place by sue gray. sue gray. so, who taking place by sue gray. sue gray. so. who is — taking place by sue gray. sue gray. so. who is she _ taking place by sue gray. sue gray. so, who is she and _ taking place by sue gray. sue gray. so, who is she and what makes i taking place by sue gray. sue gray. so, who is she and what makes her| so, who is she and what makes her to? forstart, she's so, who is she and what makes her to? for start, she's the only whitehall civil servant whose ever run a pop and nursery with her husband. # it's a slow road that winds... he hated the pub, and most of the customers— hated the pub, and most of the customers didn't like him either because — customers didn't like him either because he was quite miserable in it. so, _ because he was quite miserable in it so. after— because he was quite miserable in it. so, after six to eight weeks, it
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was making — it. so, after six to eight weeks, it was making him a bit set up, sol sent— was making him a bit set up, sol sent him— was making him a bit set up, sol sent him back to london and carried on running _ sent him back to london and carried on running the bar on my own. she returned it — on running the bar on my own. she returned it to _ on running the bar on my own. sue: returned it to run the on running the bar on my own. 5u9: returned it to run the pub on running the bar on my own. 5u9 returned it to run the pub in the finance in belfast, but thejob she really wanted was head of the northern ireland civil service. loath? northern ireland civil service. why didn't i northern ireland civil service. why didn't i get — northern ireland civil service. why didn't i get the _ northern ireland civil service. why didn't i get the job? i'm not sure i'llever— didn't i get the job? i'm not sure i'll ever know, but i suspect people may have _ i'll ever know, but i suspect people may have thought that i perhaps too much _ may have thought that i perhaps too much of _ may have thought that i perhaps too much of a _ may have thought that i perhaps too much of a challenger or a disrupter. i am _ much of a challenger or a disrupter. i am both — much of a challenger or a disrupter. lam both. perhaps much of a challenger or a disrupter. i am both. perhaps i would bring about— i am both. perhaps i would bring about too— i am both. perhaps i would bring about too much change. she i am both. perhaps i would bring about too much change.- i am both. perhaps i would bring about too much change. she has a much bigger— about too much change. she has a much biggerjob. _ about too much change. she has a much biggerjob, so _ about too much change. she has a much biggerjob, so how- about too much change. she has a much biggerjob, so how will- about too much change. she has a much biggerjob, so how will she i much biggerjob, so how will she cope? we were asked the man who knows her from cope? we were asked the man who knows herfrom his time? j cope? we were asked the man who knows her from his time?— cope? we were asked the man who knows her from his time? i think we will find this — knows her from his time? i think we will find this very, _ knows her from his time? i think we will find this very, very _ will find this very, very uncomfortable. she is not the sort of person who, as you know, enjoys being in the spotlight. but she will think it is her duty, and those are four very important letters for her.
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her duty to do this honestly to the best of her ability and to present the truth. but best of her ability and to present the truth. �* ~ ~ best of her ability and to present the truth. �* ~ ,, , :, , the truth. but mike should be limited in _ the truth. but mike should be limited in what _ the truth. but mike should be limited in what she _ the truth. but mike should be limited in what she can i the truth. but mike should be limited in what she can do, i the truth. but mike should be . limited in what she can do, given she's investigating her own boss? she somebody who as a civil servant is about— she somebody who as a civil servant is about as _ she somebody who as a civil servant is about as close _ she somebody who as a civil servant is about as close to _ she somebody who as a civil servant is about as close to being _ is about as close to being independent _ is about as close to being independent as— is about as close to being independent as it - is about as close to being independent as it is - is about as close to being. independent as it is possible is about as close to being - independent as it is possible to get. _ independent as it is possible to get. mainly— independent as it is possible to get, mainly because _ independent as it is possible to get, mainly because she's- independent as it is possible to get, mainly because she's at. independent as it is possible to. get, mainly because she's at the independent as it is possible to - get, mainly because she's at the end of her_ get, mainly because she's at the end of her career. — get, mainly because she's at the end of her career, so _ get, mainly because she's at the end of her career, so she's— get, mainly because she's at the end of her career, so she's not— of her career, so she's not worried about— of her career, so she's not worried about climbing _ of her career, so she's not worried about climbing the _ of her career, so she's not worried about climbing the ladder- of her career, so she's not worried about climbing the ladder any- about climbing the ladder any furtben — about climbing the ladder any furtben she _ about climbing the ladder any further. she has _ about climbing the ladder any further. she has so _ about climbing the ladder any further. she has so much - about climbing the ladder any- further. she has so much experience, so much _ further. she has so much experience, so much clout, — further. she has so much experience, so much clout, she's— further. she has so much experience, so much clout, she's been— further. she has so much experience, so much clout, she's been at- further. she has so much experience, so much clout, she's been at the - so much clout, she's been at the heart for— so much clout, she's been at the heart for so _ so much clout, she's been at the heart for so long _ so much clout, she's been at the heart for so long that _ so much clout, she's been at the heart for so long that she - so much clout, she's been at the heart for so long that she wouldl heart for so long that she would be very difficult — heart for so long that she would be very difficult for— heart for so long that she would be very difficult for anyone _ heart for so long that she would be very difficult for anyone to - very difficult for anyone to treat improperly. _ very difficult for anyone to treat impmperly-_ very difficult for anyone to treat im--roerl. ., , ., ., improperly. there was only one other auestion improperly. there was only one other question for — improperly. there was only one other question for sue _ improperly. there was only one other question for sue gray _ improperly. there was only one other question for sue gray which - improperly. there was only one other question for sue gray which could - question for sue gray which could not be avoided. i've had someone put it to me that you are a spy. i not be avoided. i've had someone put it to me that you are a spy.— it to me that you are a spy. i know ou have it to me that you are a spy. i know you have that _ it to me that you are a spy. i know you have that. and _ it to me that you are a spy. i know you have that. and i _ it to me that you are a spy. i know you have that. and i think - it to me that you are a spy. i know you have that. and i think if - it to me that you are a spy. i know you have that. and i think if i - it to me that you are a spy. i know you have that. and i think if i was | you have that. and i think if i was a spy. _ you have that. and i think if i was a spy. i'd be _ you have that. and i think if i was a spy, i'd be a pretty poor survive. -- 5py~ i_ a spy, i'd be a pretty poor survive. -- spy. ithink— a spy, i'd be a pretty poor survive. —— spy. i think people a spy, i'd be a pretty poor survive. —— spy. ithink people here have put a lot— —— spy. ithink people here have put a lot of— —— spy. ithink people here have put a lot of trust — —— spy. ithink people here have put a lot of trust in me, and they put a lot of faith — a lot of trust in me, and they put a lot of faith in —
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a lot of trust in me, and they put a lot of faith in me, and we have worked really well together and i dhint— worked really well together and i didn't think i'd be working externally in the way i am. you have that big job. — externally in the way i am. you have that big job, would _ externally in the way i am. you have that big job, would you _ externally in the way i am. you have that big job, would you consider - that big job, would you consider leaving? that big 'ob, would you consider leavina ? ., that big job, would you consider leaving? hie. but she did and now the leaving? no. but she did and now the political word awaits what she will do next. fascinating interview with sue gray. it would be great to talk to her now. let's talk. with me is chief political correspondent at the independent, john rentoul. also, i'm joined by the deputy political editor of the daily express, sam lister. john, to you first of all. how damaging do you think this report will be? ~ �* ., ., ., will be? well, i'm not going to speculate _ will be? well, i'm not going to speculate what's _ will be? well, i'm not going to speculate what's in _ will be? well, i'm not going to speculate what's in it. - will be? well, i'm not going to speculate what's in it. we - will be? well, i'm not going to| speculate what's in it. we know will be? well, i'm not going to - speculate what's in it. we know what the most damaging thing is likely to be, which is the party that the prime minister himself sits shouldn't have gone ahead, but in
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hindsight, he should have gone out into the garden and ordered the civil servants to go back in. he's admitted that that work event should not have happened and it was a mistake. the question is whether it broke guidelines or broke the law. but regardless of that, i think mps have to decide now or in the next few days whether they want boris johnson to be their leader, and that's not really affected by the detailed decisions that will be contained in the report. in detailed decisions that will be contained in the report. in terms of tory backbenchers, _ contained in the report. in terms of tory backbenchers, how _ contained in the report. in terms of tory backbenchers, how many - contained in the report. in terms of tory backbenchers, how many do i contained in the report. in terms of. tory backbenchers, how many do you think will want borisjohnson out and send in letters to the committee to trigger a leadership election? well, i would rather unwisely predicts there will be the 5a needed to trigger a vote of confidence. i think conservative mps just want things, had headlines to stop, and i
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think it's not necessarily going to make everything perfectly comfortable for them overnight. i think they have decided that boris johnson is a wet rag on the party and he will not leave them next time, so they might as well leave him now. ithink time, so they might as well leave him now. i think there are enough of them to start that process in the next few days. them to start that process in the next few days— next few days. sam, do you agree with that take? _ next few days. sam, do you agree with that take? do _ next few days. sam, do you agree with that take? do you _ next few days. sam, do you agree with that take? do you think- next few days. sam, do you agree l with that take? do you think enough tory mps want borisjohnson out now? well, i think the next few days will be very— well, i think the next few days will be very crucial, but i think the mood — be very crucial, but i think the mood has— be very crucial, but i think the mood has improved slightly in the past _ mood has improved slightly in the past. while the prime minister is far from — past. while the prime minister is far from safe, he's still very much in the _ far from safe, he's still very much in the danger zone. they felt he came _ in the danger zone. they felt he came out— in the danger zone. they felt he came out well at prime minister's questions — came out well at prime minister's questions. he's had groups of conservative mps in number ten to hear the _ conservative mps in number ten to hear the concerns he discussed with
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them, _ hear the concerns he discussed with them, where they want him to go if you wont— them, where they want him to go if you won't remain in post. we're hearing — you won't remain in post. we're hearing suggestions that there might be a whatsapp group of about bit —— backbenchers as a positive support for boris _ backbenchers as a positive support for borisjohnson's backbenchers as a positive support for boris johnson's operation. backbenchers as a positive support for borisjohnson's operation. to -et for borisjohnson's operation. to get out _ for borisjohnson's operation. to get out there and try and rally around — get out there and try and rally around the prime minister. quite a shift from — around the prime minister. quite a shift from this time last week. i think there is a bit of a shift, and a lot— think there is a bit of a shift, and a lot of— think there is a bit of a shift, and a lot of the — think there is a bit of a shift, and a lot of the mps have been putting letters into colleagues, and we often _ letters into colleagues, and we often find out they haven't put much in. often find out they haven't put much in david _ often find out they haven't put much in. david davies, lateradmitted he hadn't _ in. david davies, lateradmitted he hadn't so. — in. david davies, lateradmitted he hadn't. so, it is very difficult to say _ hadn't. so, it is very difficult to say this — hadn't. so, it is very difficult to say this is _ hadn't. so, it is very difficult to say. this is a _ hadn't. so, it is very difficult to say. this is a very dangerous time for the _ say. this is a very dangerous time for the prime minister, say. this is a very dangerous time forthe prime minister, but say. this is a very dangerous time for the prime minister, but a slight mood _ for the prime minister, but a slight mood and — for the prime minister, but a slight mood and change in the party —— change in — mood and change in the party —— change in mood. is a mood and change in the party -- change in mood.— mood and change in the party -- change in mood. is a 'ust and that althouah change in mood. is a 'ust and that although labour_ change in mood. is a just and that although labour calls _ change in mood. is a just and that although labour calls for - change in mood. is a just and that although labour calls for boris -
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although labour calls for boris johnson to resign, it really want him to because they prefer to keep them there as a kind of wounded leader, wounded prime minister, rather than have somebody new taking over like rishi sunak or liz truss who can bring in a new government and start with a clean state.- and start with a clean state. again. that's the strict _ and start with a clean state. again. that's the strict that _ and start with a clean state. again. that's the strict that boris - and start with a clean state. again. that's the strict that boris johnson | that's the strict that boris johnson pulled offjust that's the strict that boris johnson pulled off just two years that's the strict that boris johnson pulled offjust two years ago —— dietrich. he presented himself as a clean break, and a new start —— the trick. but that is why i think conservative mps will get rid of borisjohnson, because i think the labour party would rather keep him, they do think he's doing damaged to they do think he's doing damaged to the conservatives, and the candidate they fear is rishi sunak. i think conservative mps know that, and they need to bring that about as soon as possible. if they've got any sense
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of defending their seats.- possible. if they've got any sense of defending their seats. sam, do ou not of defending their seats. sam, do you rrot think _ of defending their seats. sam, do you not think that _ of defending their seats. sam, do you not think that boris _ of defending their seats. sam, do you not think that boris johnson l of defending their seats. sam, do | you not think that boris johnson is you not think that borisjohnson is politically damaged in the longer term, in the sense that this whole issue of parties, whatever sue gray comes up with, it has a real residence with the voters? it does have a cut through because so many people have made so many sacrifices and they don't like to see that drone in theirface. filth and they don't like to see that drone in their face.— and they don't like to see that drone in their face. of course. it's a sub'ect drone in their face. of course. it's a subject that _ drone in their face. of course. it's a subject that is _ drone in their face. of course. it's a subject that is absolutely - drone in their face. of course. it's| a subject that is absolutely causing fury among quite a large bit of the country _ fury among quite a large bit of the country. that said, it still hinges on the _ country. that said, it still hinges on the report. i think conservative mps, _ on the report. i think conservative mps. the — on the report. i think conservative mps, the crucial point will be whether— mps, the crucial point will be whether the prime minister knowingly misted _ whether the prime minister knowingly misled parliament, and other words, lied about _ misled parliament, and other words, lied about it. that's the point where — lied about it. that's the point where even those most loyal to him will turn _ where even those most loyal to him will turn on — where even those most loyal to him will turn on him. i think it's difficult _ will turn on him. i think it's difficult to see how sue gray would make _ difficult to see how sue gray would
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make that — difficult to see how sue gray would make that assessment, so i'm not sure the _ make that assessment, so i'm not sure the report will lay out the facts. — sure the report will lay out the facts. and _ sure the report will lay out the facts, and we heard earlier, the prime _ facts, and we heard earlier, the prime minister has apologise for. it's whether he knows he misled parliament. i�*m it's whether he knows he misled parliament-— it's whether he knows he misled parliament. i'm going to have to leave it there. _ parliament. i'm going to have to leave it there. we're _ parliament. i'm going to have to leave it there. we're out - parliament. i'm going to have to leave it there. we're out of - parliament. i'm going to have to| leave it there. we're out of time. sam and john, many thanks indeed. that's the latest from downing street. i want to take you to the united states where antennae blink and is holding a press conference in. == holding a press conference in. -- anton holding a press conference in. » antony blinking. we address other areas where we see potential for progress. our interest in a follow—on agreement to the new treaty that covers all nuclear weapons, and transparency into
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ability. we put these ideas forward because they have the a potential if negotiated in good faith, to enhance our security. while also addressing russia's concerns through reciprocal consent —— my commitment. we're open to dialogue and roof prefer diplomacy. we are prepared to move forward where there is the possibility of communication and cooperation. if russia d escalates and stops the relative rick and approaches discussion in a spirit of reciprocity. our responses were fully coordinated with ukraine and our partners, with whom we've been consulting with for weeks. we sought their input and incorporated it. additionally, nato developed and will deliver its own paper with
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ideas and concerns about europe, on that paper reinforces ours and vice versa. there is no daylight among the united states on this matter. we showed a response paper with congress, and i'll be briefing leaders on this later today. there is strong by parliament interest —— bipartisan. we very much appreciate having congress as a partner. we are not releasing the document publicly because we think the diplomacy has the best chance to succeed if we have space for comp initial talks. we expect russia will have the same view and will take her proposal seriously. i expect to speak to the minister after moscow had a chance to read the paper. there should be no doubt about our seriousness when it comes to diplomacy and we are
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asking with equal focus and force to bolster ukraine's defences and prepare a swift unite in response to further russian aggression. in other... 283 times of ammunition. essential to ukraine's front line. more delivery is expected in the days to come and we provided more defensive security systems to ukraine in the past year than in any previous year. last week, i authorise us allies, including estonia, latvia and lithuania to provide equipment from their inventories for use by ukraine. also last week, we notified congress of our intent to deliver to ukraine the mi17 our intent to deliver to ukraine the mi 17 helicopters currently held in inventory. additionally, the secretary of defence announced on monday that 8500 us service members
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stationed in europe and the united states have been placed in readiness to deploy to ensure that we are able to deploy to ensure that we are able to support the nato response force quickly. to harden the allies. other nato allies have also announced steps that they are prepared to take. we expect more in the coming days. we taken the step out of prudence. we hope those forces don't have to be activated, but if they are, we will be ready. we are also continuing to co—ordinate with our allies and partners on severe economic sanctions to hold moscow accountable for its actions. we've developed a high—impact wick action response that would inflict significant cost to russian economy and finance. as part of a response, we are also prepared to export controls, denying roster products it needs. —— denying russa. ourallies
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are stepping up to provide assistance to ukraine in various ways. as we have done many times before, the alliance and individual allies are coming together to support our partners and to defend what should be in viable principles that help provide unprecedented security, stability and prosperity for decades in europe and around the world. finally, we are looking to support our allies and partners in dealing with the secondary negative consequences of russia's destabilising acts. for example, we know ukraine's economy is being affected by this crisis. just as we are bolstering their security, so too are we looking to support the economy beyond the assistance we are providing. ourallies economy beyond the assistance we are providing. our allies and partners are doing so as well. that's another matter all have an opportunity to discuss with congress. as we take steps to ensure that the global energy supply isn't disrupted, that
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too is an important focus should russia choose to weaponize 's natural gas —— met its natural gas. around the world about surging their capacity. engaged in detailed conversations about coordinating a response, including how best to deploy their existing energy stockpiles. all this effort is aimed at litigating price shocks and ensuring that people in the united states, europe and around the world have the energy they need no matter what russia decides to do. all told, our actions over the past week have sharpened the choice facing rationale. we've laid out a diplomatic path. we've laid out steep consequences —— facing rationale. we stepped forward with no support, and we and our allies are united across the board. we will continue to press forward and
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prepare. it remains up to russia to decide how to respond. we are ready either way. one final note before i take some questions. regarding american citizens in ukraine, as you know, earlier this week, american citizens in ukraine, as you know, earlierthis week, i american citizens in ukraine, as you know, earlier this week, i authorise the involuntary to partner of the limited number of us employees in order the departure. this was a decision based on one factor only. the safety and security of our colleagues. given the continued massive build—up of russian forces on ukraine borders, which has many indications of preparations for invasion, these steps are what food wants to take. i want to be clear that our embassy will be open and we continue to maintain a presence —— what's putin wants. the state department has also issued travel adviser due to the potential
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conditions to deteriorate rapidly without warning if russia invades or commits other destabilising actions. our message now for any americans in ukraine is to strongly consider leaving, using commercial or other privately available transportation options. these options remain readily available. the embassy may extend loans to those who need it. the state department will always seek to provide services wherever possible, russian military action would severely impact her ability to. if russia invades, civilians, including americans, could be caught including americans, could be caught in a conflict zone between combatant forces. the us government may not be in a position to aid individuals in these circumstances. this has long been the case in conflict zones are the world, so while we don't know whether russia will continue its aggression towards ukraine, either way, we have a responsibility to provide this notice to americans.
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with that, happy to take some questions. with that, happy to take some questions— with that, happy to take some cuestions. ., ~ questions. thank you, mr secretary. i realise that — questions. thank you, mr secretary. i realise that you _ questions. thank you, mr secretary. i realise that you don't _ questions. thank you, mr secretary. i realise that you don't want - questions. thank you, mr secretary. i realise that you don't want to - questions. thank you, mr secretary. i realise that you don't want to get l i realise that you don't want to get into the _ i realise that you don't want to get into the specifics of what is actually in this document, although i'm actually in this document, although i'm sure i_ actually in this document, although i'm sure i am my colleagues will to continue to— i'm sure i am my colleagues will to continue to cry to get them. can you say more _ continue to cry to get them. can you say more broadly, when you say there are more _ say more broadly, when you say there are more principles to uphold and defend. _ are more principles to uphold and defend, does that mean in this document, you told the russians point—blank in writing that, no, that's— point—blank in writing that, no, that's the — point—blank in writing that, no, that's the answer to their demand —— try to _ that's the answer to their demand —— try to get _ that's the answer to their demand —— try to get them. for any formal bar on the _ try to get them. for any formal bar on the expansion of nato, exclusion of ukraine _ on the expansion of nato, exclusion of ukraine and the withdrawal of certain— of ukraine and the withdrawal of certain forces and equipment from the eastern europe. is that what this says? — the eastern europe. is that what this says? is there anything different in this document than what we have _ different in this document than what we have heard publicly over the course — we have heard publicly over the
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course of — we have heard publicly over the course of the last couple weeks? again. _ course of the last couple weeks? again, without going into specifics of the document, i can tell you that it reiterates what we've said publicly for many weeks, and for many years in a sense. that we will uphold the principle of nato's open door, and that's, as i said repeatedly, a commitment that we're bound to, so the document, as i said, makes very clear some of the basic principles that we are standing by, committed to and will uphold. much of which has been stated in public, including by me, and that goes to nato's open door policy. and that goes to nato's open door oli . .. and that goes to nato's open door oli . ., ., and that goes to nato's open door oli . ., . policy. there are no concessions? this isn't about _ policy. there are no concessions? this isn't about concessions. - policy. there are no concessions? | this isn't about concessions. there is no chain — this isn't about concessions. there is no chain in _ this isn't about concessions. there is no chain in their _ this isn't about concessions. there is no chain in their position - this isn't about concessions. there is no chain in their position in - is no chain in their position in this—
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is no chain in their position in this document.— is no chain in their position in this document. first of all, there is no change- _ this document. first of all, there is no change. there _ this document. first of all, there is no change. there will - this document. first of all, there is no change. there will be - this document. first of all, there is no change. there will be no i is no change. there will be no chains. we reiterate that principle. of course, it is for nato, not the united states, to discuss the open door policy. these are decisions that nato makes as a —— and alliance. but i can't be more clear. nato's door is open, remains open, and that is our commitment. studio: we're auoin and that is our commitment. studio: we're going to _ and that is our commitment. studio: we're going to leave _ and that is our commitment. studio: we're going to leave that _ and that is our commitment. studio: we're going to leave that congress i we're going to leave that congress now. antony blinken outlining measures that the us has taken, along with its allies, and saying it now remains up to russia to decide how to respond on ukraine, and he said we are ready either way. let's ta ke let's take a look at the weather now.
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good evening. we got sunshine on the way, and it was certainly nice to see some sunshine across more of england and wales today. a lot of that low—grade cloud got pushed away. further north, things are turning windy and we've got some rain that's been mainly affecting highland scotland. that rain is moving its way southwards. it's all on that weather front there. closer to the high pressure, the weather front will weaken and the rain will become much lighter and more patchy. we're trying off as that band of cloud moves southwards, some rain pushing down into northwest england and wales, very windy weather for a while across orkney and into caithness. should be a milder night than last night through northern england, wales and the midlands. it should be frost free at this coming night. there that weak weather front by this stage, continuing to move its
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way southwards, northwesterly wind following in his wake. there's not much rain left by the time we get to thursday morning. it's more a band of cloud and rain, that will push into the english channel. sunshine follows in that northwesterly wind, which will be quite strong for a while. some showers mainly for northern and western parts of scotland. it will be a chillier day than of late across northern scotland, but it's not a cold day on thursday. temperatures io—i2 scotland, but it's not a cold day on thursday. temperatures 10—12 degrees widely. that weather front out of the way will find winds easing overnight as high pressure builds in, so a bit of a chilly start to friday. these systems are coming in from the atlantic, and they will bring milder air as well. we start chilly, cloud will increase across much of the country with rain across northern parts of scotland in particular. the best of the sunshine hanging on. it's here we will have lowest temperatures, 8—9 . likely to make 11 in scotland in northern
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ireland. those of strong winds continue. he weak weather front moves southwards, and things calmed down for the second half of the weekend. bringing most of the rain into the northwest. a bit of a mixed picture this weekend, very mild for most. but it will be quite windy, not much rain around, northern areas turn wetter and windier later on sunday, but otherwise, most places will be dry but a little bit cooler.
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at six — westminster waits for the report that could determine the prime minister's future, amid more calls for him to resign. at prime minister's questions, borisjohnson said he was getting on with thejob amid more questions. the ministerial code says that ministers who knowingly to mislead parliament will be expected to offer their resignation. does the prime minister believe that applies to him? prime minister. mr speaker, of course, - but let me tell the house that i think he's inviting a question about an investigation - which, as you know, - mr speaker, ican't comment. also on the programme tonight... the numbers are falling — just under three million people had covid in the uk last week, but infections among schoolchildren are on the rise.
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russia carries out military exercises close to the ukrainian

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