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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 1, 2022 3:00am-3:31am GMT

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welcome to bbc news. i'm david eades. our top stories: will you take responsibility, prime minister? has your leadership failed? mounting pressure on britain's prime minister, borisjohnson. an initial report into parties at downing street during lockdown finds "failures of leadership and judgement" at numberio. i want to say sorry. and i'm sorry for the things we simply didn't get right. i get it and i will fix it. by routinely breaking the rules he set, the prime minister took us all for fools. he held people's sacrifice in contempt. he showed himself unfit for office. washington says moscow has responded to its proposals
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to ease tensions in ukraine, but it follows a bitter exchange of accusations during a public session of the un security council. here on the thai—burmese border is where the myanmar military —— it's a year since the military seized power in myanmar. now, the country is in the grip of a virtual civil war with no end in sight. also, making the beautiful game more inclusive: mexico tries to combat homophobic chanting at football matches. hello. thanks very much for joining us. the british prime minister, borisjohnson, has apologised to parliament after an inquiry into lockdown parties at downing street found there had been a failure of leadership. although it's a limited report at this stage, due to an ongoing police inquiry, its findings angered many mps, including some in mrjohnson�*s own conservative party.
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police say they are reviewing more than 300 photos passed to officers in relation to 12 events across government on eight different dates. our political editor laura kuenssberg reports on the report, the response from the prime minister, and the reaction from mps on all sides. it's been a long, uncomfortable wait for number 10 — an official verdict into the government itself breaking the rules. part one, at least, has now arrived. will you take responsibility, prime minister? there may be no easy downing street escape. the blond head and red box you can spot from the sky arriving for a moment borisjohnson�*s enemies believe could be a reckoning. prime minister... he started with another apology. firstly, i want to say sorry, and i'm sorry for the things we simply didn't get right and also sorry for the way that
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this matter has been handled. and it's no use saying that this or that was within the rules, and it's no use saying that people were working hard. this pandemic was hard for everyone. his penance, though — not changing his own address, but shifting others around. mr speaker, it isn't enough to say sorry. this is a moment when we must look at ourselves in the mirror and we must learn. we are making changes now to the way downing street and the cabinet office run, so that we can get on with the job i was elected to do, mr speaker, and thejob that this government was elected to do. mr speaker, i get it and i will fix it. the findings are grim for downing street. ms gray found a serious failure to observe the high standards expected, with too little thought given to what was
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happening across the country. there were failures of leadership and judgement by different parts of number 10 and the cabinet office. she found excessive consumption of alcohol that is not appropriate in a professional workplace at any time, and some staff who'd wanted to raise concerns about behaviours felt unable to do so. this may not be the full and final version, but the conclusion is clear — and, remember, this is only the initial report into what has emerged week by grisly week about what was going on behind the closed door of number 10. jokes about explaining away the rules. this fictional party was a business meeting! cheese and wine in the garden, claims of loud music and parties in the flat upstairs. birthday cake in the cabinet room. the rule—setters alleged to be rule—breakers while the rest of the
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country was locked down. in contrast to the prime minister's seeming hope to rush through the statement this afternoon, the leader of the opposition was brutal and took his time. by routinely breaking the rules he set, the prime minister took us all forfools. he held people's sacrifice in contempt, he showed himself unfit for office. prime minister, the british public aren't fools. they never believed a word of it. they think the prime minister should do the decent thing and resign. of course he won't, because he is a man without shame. some ministers hung their heads as the labour leader appealed to them, to their tory colleagues to call time on the prime minister labour claims is now simply not fit to govern. they can heap their reputations, the reputation of their party, the reputation of this country on the bonfire
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that is his leadership, or they can spare the country from a prime minister totally unworthy of his responsibilities. the eyes of the country are upon them. they will be judged by the decisions they take now. in all the sound and fury at borisjohnson, the snp breaking commons manners... he misled the house, he must now resign! ..branding him a liar. that man has misled the house. a wild ride in the commons. shut up. downing street had hoped the danger was passing. borisjohnson�*s lieutenants tried to grab control and shore up angry mps, but attacks on number 10 from the tory side were opened by none other than a withering former prime minister. either my right honourable
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friend had not read the rules or didn't understand what they meant, and others around him, or they didn't think the rules applied to number 10. which was it? i am deeply concerned by these events and very concerned indeed by some of the things he has said from that dispatch box, and i have to tell him, he no longer enjoys my support. it seems a lot of people - attended events in may 2020. the one i recall attending - was my grandmother's funeral. i didn't hug my siblings, i didn't hug my parents. j i gave a eulogy, - and then afterwards, i didn't even go to her house for a cup of tea. _ i drove back three hours i to kent from staffordshire. does the prime minister think i'm a fool? - no, mr speaker, and i want to thank my honourable friend and i want to say how deeply i sympathise with him and his family for their loss. disbelief on the faces of some of borisjohnson�*s own side. despair across much of the tory party. fatigue perhaps too at weeks and weeks of this mess, but there is not yet a resolve to see the back of the man who won an historic majority
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with a promise of change. not tonight, not yet. we will get the view from a british political expert who is currently residing in washington a little later in the programme, so stay with us for that. us officials says russia has delivered a written response to washington's proposals aimed at reducing tensions over ukraine, but they did not release any details. there are no details at this stage, though. earlier, the two countries exchanged bitter accusations over ukraine at a public session of the un security council. the russian ambassador said the us was provoking escalation by falsely accusing moscow of preparing to invade. his american counterpart said russia was trying to create an excuse to attack. russia is demanding that ukraine will never be allowed tojoin nato. the us and its allies have warned of unprecendented sanctions if russia makes
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a military move on ukraine. earlier, i asked dr alina polyakova of the center for european policy analysis in washington and i asked if she saw any sign of a peaceful way out. unfortunately, i think we're in a bit of a paralysis mode where the russian side has made quite egregious and unrealistic demands, the united states and european allies have laid out our concerns about those demands, but still, there doesn't seem to be a compromise across the horizon here. certainly, it's a positive sign that the russians did respond in written form and not public form to the us response to their demands, but unfortunately, it's not yet clear whether the russian side is actually serious about diplomacy. yeah, there's also still an oddity, isn't there, that the us ambassador — sorry, the russian ambassador says the us is fomenting hysteria, and actually, the ukrainian president
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zelensky isn't far off saying that as well, and one wonders, you know, where the balance should lie in this. well, i think for president zelensky, the concern of course is that ukraine, which is in a precarious economic position, still is going to see the flight of foreign investment as concerns about war of course increase, so i can understand perhaps why president zelensky wants to ensure there's no panic in his country, wants to produce a state of calm. i think certainly we have to be realistic about what is happening on the ground. the reality is that russia has surrounded ukraine with a well—armed military force, notjust to ukraine's east, where we've had this long—standing military build—up, over 100,000 troops, but now through belarus into ukraine's north, and down from the south from the black sea. so, ukraine increasingly looks surrounded by russian forces.
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they are still preparing for what looks like an imminent invasion. so, certainly, the risks are very, very high and we have to take them seriously. but, sorry, just to interrupt you for a moment there for the time we've got, at the same time, we look at the us essentially taking the lead on this, among its allies and its european allies as well, and yet, president macron has been making his own overtures, the french and the germans have slightly different views, as you know, on what is the best way ahead here. so mr putin is looking at something of a divided pack. unfortunately, that is exactly what we've seen emerge over the last several days. we've seen deep public divisions between the baltic states, for example, the uk's quite assertive policy i think has been very positive in this regard, but certainly, the french president's comments that the europeans should seek some sort of renewed security pact outside of the nato
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negotiations has not been helpful, and to say the very least, germany's mixed messages, especially on the nord stream 2 pipeline, are certainly benefiting mr putin's calculus instead of the calculus for europe and the united states. the next stop on a very uncertain diplomaticjourney is uncertain diplomatic journey is in uncertain diplomaticjourney is in the course of tuesday, antony blinken will be holding talks with the russian foreign minister sir calabro. —— sergey lavrov. a usjudge has rejected a plea deal between federal prosecutors and two of the three white men convicted of murdering blackjogger ahmaud arbery. the ruling comes after one of the convicted men admitted for the first time that race was his motivation behind the attack. prosecutors had reached plea agreements with travis and gregory mcmichael to the shock of mr arbery�*s family. we didn't know anything about
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it, a plea deal we did not agree with. like i said, ahmaud arbery is irreplaceable. he was killed. we want 100% justice, not know—howjustice. our correspondent peter bowes has the details. during the original trial, the actions of these three white men were characterised by prosecutors as a modern day lynching. they were all found guilty of the murder of ahmaud arbery, a black man who had beenjogging down the arbery, a black man who had been jogging down the street. they were sentenced to life in prison. they were also due to face a federal hate crime trial, which is due to staff this week, but it emerged on sunday that prosecutors had reached an agreement with two of the men, gregory and travis mcmichael. that agreement included an acknowledgement for the first time from these men that they had in part been
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chasing ahmaud arbery down the street because he was black, and the prosecutor said that this was an important step towards justice. this was an important step towardsjustice. as this was an important step towards justice. as part of this agreement, it was stipulated that they would serve some 30 years in federal prison before being transferred to a state prison to see out the rest of their life sentence. the reason that is controversial and significant is that federal prisons in this country are generally seen as an easier or softer option than the state prison system, and it outraged the family of ahmaud arbery who believed that the prosecutors and the men in reaching this agreement had essentially devised a situation where they would get an easier time in prison. well, a judge has now rejected that agreement , it will not go ahead, and it throws doubt as to the trial next week. it has given the men
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until friday next week whether they want to enter guilty pleas. they want to enter guilty leas. ., , ., ., pleas. coming up in a moment here on bbc— pleas. coming up in a moment here on bbc news... - making the beautiful game more inclusive: mexico tries to combat homophobic chanting at football matches. this is the moment that millions in iran have been waiting for. after his long years in exile, the first hesitant steps of ayatollah khomeini on iranian soil. south africa's white government has offered its black opponents concessions unparalleled in the history of apartheid, and the anc leader nelson mandela is to be set free unconditionally. mission control: three, two, one... a countdown to a critical moment — the world's most powerful rocket ignited all 27 of its engines at once. and apart from its power, it's this recycling of the rocket, slashing the cost of a launch, that makes this a breakthrough in the business of space travel.
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two americans have become the first humans to walk in space without any lifeline to their spaceship. one of them called it "a piece of cake". thousands of people have given l the yachtswoman ellen macarthur a spectacular homecoming - in the cornish port of falmouth after she smashed the world record . for sailing solo _ around the world, non—stop. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: the initial findings of the report into parties at downing street during lockdown have been published — outlining failures of leadership and judgement. let's stay with that. professor emma briant is a british media scholar and visiting research associate in human rights at bard college. she's in washington. thank you very much forjoining
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us. "i get it and i will fix it." those with the words of borisjohnson this afternoon. what you make of his response? ijust what you make of his response? i just think it what you make of his response? ijust think it is shocking. it just shows the most incredible arrogance that he thinks he can fix this. you know, people over here in the united states are looking at him and we honestly looking at him and we honestly look like a joke. he looks like a joke. they are incredulous that, you know, he has managed to survive so far with everything that has happened. with a catalogue of failures from the economy to brag is it to empty shelves in the supermarket. we get all the reporting over here of what is going on —— brexit. not to mention pandemic mismanagement. in this really is just the icing on the cake. in this really isjust the icing on the cake. those are our icing on the cake. those are your views. _ icing on the cake. those are your views, clearly, - icing on the cake. those are your views, clearly, he - icing on the cake. those are. your views, clearly, he would yourviews, clearly, he would put up an argument to say that
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it is one of the fastest countries in the world in terms of vaccinations. brexit he would perceive in many ways as a triumph, as, indeed, many people in britain do. i wonder, in a sense, about the next stage. there is a police enquiry. this needs to continue to an end, doesn't it, before we can definitively make a judgement on whether boris johnson really is in as hot water as you perhaps think he is. i water as you perhaps think he is. ~' ,., , _ is. i think the polls say otherwise. _ is. i think the polls say otherwise. and - is. i think the polls say otherwise. and i- is. i think the polls say otherwise. and i think| is. i think the polls say i otherwise. and i think the public have made a judgement themselves. you know, people are feeling this, you know, arrogance very personally. we have all been through a really hellish couple of years... i think you have yourself, you have your own personal tale of woe, frankly. have your own personal tale of woe. frankly-— woe, frankly. everyone has their personal _ woe, frankly. everyone has their personal story. - woe, frankly. everyone has their personal story. we i woe, frankly. everyone has i their personal story. we have all, as a nation, in the uk gone through a trauma and i
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think that is what makes it sting for the british public more than anything, that, you know, borisjohnson hasjust, you know, thought that he could just brush this away, like it doesn't mean anything. personally, you know, i lost my mum over the last year, over the summer. she had a heart attack and i really struggled to travel back to the uk and all of the restrictions and quarantining and things like this that i couldn't even get into the hospital to see her. they had to wait ten years, this kind of thing. people have lost their loved ones and have not been there when they had passed away... not been there when they had passed away. . .— passed away... crosstalk. it has clearly _ passed away... crosstalk. it has clearly been - passed away... crosstalk. it has clearly been a - passed away... crosstalk. it has clearly been a very . it has clearly been a very painful experience for you and for many others, which helps to appreciate the light in which you have seen borisjohnson�*s response in the course of the
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day as well. emma, thank you very much indeed. emma briant, thank you forjoining us. the un's top human rights diplomat has described the situation in myanmar as catastrophic and has said the international community has failed to prevent gross violations by the military regime. in an exclusive bbc interview, michelle bachelet, the un commissioner for human rights, admitted that the country is now in a state of civil war that threatens regional stability. she was speaking to the bbc world service asia editor rebecca henschke. the truth is that the international community has been not very affect give and has lacked maybe a sense of urgency. i know they. the international community as destruct —— act stronger. also regional actors are important, like india, china, japan, they needed to do more. amen, unfortunately i am frustrated because we had very little tools other than speaking out. so for me, first of all, i have also mentioned to many countries that maybe it would
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be good that, because they have not recognise the government, the military government of the militaryjoint. but they the military government of the military joint. but they also haven't recognised either the national unity government. would you like to see countries around the world recognise the national unity government which has ousted elected leaders? it would be useful. because it would be useful. because it would give them a feeling of support. the thing is that many of the demonstrations have been peaceful, but, of course, people have been getting that “p people have been getting that up as well of being killed. so many of them have gone into these malicious or created these malicious or created these so—called people's defence forces, —— militias. so for a long time may have been saying that all those saying we are not able to do something more strongly about it, it would echo the serious situation.— would echo the serious situation. ., ,., situation. on that point then, lookin: situation. on that point then, looking at _ situation. on that point then, looking at the _ situation. on that point then, looking at the similarities - looking at the similarities with syria, we are seeing now fighting right across the
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country, attacks from this civilian militia. do we now have a country, myanmar, in a state of civil war?— state of civil war? well, we think we — state of civil war? well, we think we are _ state of civil war? well, we think we are on _ state of civil war? well, we think we are on the - state of civil war? well, we think we are on the verge l state of civil war? well, we | think we are on the verge of state of civil war? well, we i think we are on the verge of a national civil war, because we do have, on the one hand, repression and the response of the people who do not want to be killed. so they have been organising this militia. of course, probably they have been victims of air strikes, of drones, of gillings, of massive burnings of villages, et cetera. but it is, i think, a possibility to come into a civil war —— killings. mil possibility to come into a civil war -- killings. all the elements _ civil war -- killings. all the elements of _ civil war -- killings. all the elements of a _ civil war -- killings. all the elements of a civil - civil war -- killings. all the elements of a civil war- civil war -- killings. all the elements of a civil war are | elements of a civil war are there now. the attacks spread out across the country, is it not time to call this, as it is, a civil war? not time to call this, as it is, a civilwar?_ is, a civilwar? yes, yes, indeed, _ is, a civilwar? yes, yes, indeed, they _ is, a civilwar? yes, yes, indeed, they agree. - is, a civilwar? yes, yes, | indeed, they agree. high commissioner, _ indeed, they agree. high commissioner, this - indeed, they agree. high - commissioner, this situation has been going on for a year.
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the world is watching this and what i'm hearing from you is there is no clear concrete action or even an idea of what needs to happen.— action or even an idea of what needs to happen. well, i think there are _ needs to happen. well, i think there are ideas, _ needs to happen. well, i think there are ideas, of _ needs to happen. well, i think there are ideas, of course. - needs to happen. well, i think there are ideas, of course. we do ourjob, that is more reporting, and try to convince member states that it is indispensable and it is imperative that the international community and at is recognise that as long as it prevails in the myanmar situation will not improve. people watching this in myanmar, they may feel once again that they are very much on their own. what is your message to them? i on their own. what is your message to them?- on their own. what is your message to them? i care. they know what they are _ message to them? i care. they know what they are going - know what they are going through. and i will do as much as i can do and just tell them that they are not alone.- that they are not alone. that is the un _ that they are not alone. that is the un human _ that they are not alone. that is the un human rights - is the un human rights commissioner, michelle bachelet, talking to rebecca henschke. and grabs you can ——
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few countries can match mexico for the shell of a football. all is not well stop mexico's football federation has introduced new measures to try to curb homophobic chanting. fifa had initially banned all supporters from two home games following various incidents at earlier matches. entry to stadiums has been tightened and anyone who breaks the rules could face a five—year ban. the bbc�*s tim allman has this report. football is supposed to be a sport for everyone. but that hasn't always been the case at mexico's city aztec stadium. supporters attending this world cup mollify against costa rica had to go through extra security. new measures to identify each individual. everyone having to be on their best behaviour. translation: ~ ., , ., translation: we are sick of the fi . hts, translation: we are sick of the fiahts, of translation: we are sick of the fights, of having _ translation: we are sick of the fights, of having suspensions, - fights, of having suspensions, and games without attendance.
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it is about i we start behaving properly and stop discrimination. �* ., , discrimination. all of us were mexico and — discrimination. all of us were mexico and when _ discrimination. all of us were mexico and when the - discrimination. all of us were mexico and when the team i discrimination. all of us were i mexico and when the team sees the fans— mexico and when the team sees the fans and the fili passion, it sends _ the fans and the fili passion, it sends out good energy so the players — it sends out good energy so the players can give it 100%. it players can give it 100%. [it was players can give it 100%. was that players can give it 100%. it was that there much where mexico played canada in the ayr gold cup that homophobic chanting led to the game being temporarily suspended. mexican football authorities have already been fined on several occasions or similar incidents are so they want to take action before sterner punishments are introduced. translation: ~ ., ., translation: we will have to multi -l translation: we will have to multiply the — translation: we will have to multiply the resources - translation: we will have to multiply the resources we - translation: we will have to multiply the resources we are l multiply the resources we are setting up today. right now, as you can see, we have a surplus that we would need to multiply ljy that we would need to multiply by 20, as in the case against the united states, which requires a bigger capacity within terms of access and in terms of security.— terms of security. these new measures — terms of security. these new measures will _ terms of security. these new measures will be _ terms of security. these new measures will be in - terms of security. these new measures will be in place - terms of security. these new measures will be in place for| measures will be in place for all of mexico's home welcome dollar fires. all of mexico's home welcome dollarfires. a all of mexico's home welcome dollar fires. a chance to show football can be inclusive, no
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matter who you are —— world cup qualifiers. tim allman, bbc news. you are up—to—date. that is bbc world news. hello. the week got off to a stormy start thanks to corrie. the winds have become a little lighter out there now, but for the rest of the week, it will still stay relatively windy, not perhaps as windy, though, as it was due monday. here is corrie come tuesday, menacing down in the middle of the mediterranean. another area of the pressure to the north of the uk will keep it windy here, particularly across scotland, but this weather front sinking south won't bring much in the way of rain. it will usher in quite a bit of cloud and perhaps most noticeably, it will pull in some very mild air, particularly in contrast to monday. sunshine probably most widespread, actually, for scotland and northern england. furthersouth, rather more overcast skies, some patchy light rain or drizzle, but gusts of wind across northern most scotland could still hit up to 80 mph, but what a difference in those
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temperatures for tuesday afternoon, 12—13 celsius, it willjust feel so much milder. and the milder air sticks around as we work our way into wednesday as well. further cloud flooding in from the west. our clearest skies likely to the far northeast of the uk, but because the air itself is mild, i think we will stay frost free, even though temperatures slide down into the range of single figures. and there is this big dome, if you like, of mild air sitting across the uk for wednesday. high pressure to the south, quite a lot of cloud, hopefully some breaks perhaps to the east of the brecons across the northeast of england and for eastern scotland. but despite the cloud, it will still feel considerably warmer than it has done to start the week, again, temperatures in double figures. quite a contrast then to come for the end of the week. thursday, we've got a weather front set to work its way south. some heavy rain initially for scotland and northern ireland, then the front pushing down into england and wales come the afternoon. looks like it could eventually
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bring some rain, something we haven't seen much of in a while, into southernmost england overnight, but the keen eyed amongst you will have noticed the white coming in behind that rain band, much colder airflooding in for friday, another quite deep low to the north of the uk. it's looking windy, it should be bright with a lot of sunshine, but there's the chance that we could see some fairly frequent wintry showers pushing into scotland, i think maybe a few sliding south into northern england as well. and feeling so much colder again by friday. temperatures just 5—9 celsius.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: british prime minister, borisjohnson, has promised to reform the way downing street operates after a senior civil servant leading an inquiry into lockdown parties identified a serious failure of leadership and judgement. the leader of the main opposition labour party called him a man without shame. america says russia has delivered a written response to washington's proposals aimed at reducing tensions over ukraine. us officials did not disclose any details, saying it would be unproductive to negotiate in public. earlier, the us and russia traded bitter accusations over ukraine at the un security council. the un human rights chief has acknowledged that myanmar has descended into civil war — a year after the military seized power. in a bbc interview, michelle bachelet compared the situation to syria, saying people were taking up arms because they were fed up with getting killed.

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