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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 1, 2022 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. a prime minister under pressure — borisjohnson tries to rally support among his mps, after a report into downing street parties criticises a failure of leadership. many of his colleagues are furious with him _ many of his colleagues are furious with him but of the prime minister continues— with him but of the prime minister continues in office. he has pledged to change _ continues in office. he has pledged to change how his office here works, but first, _ to change how his office here works, but first, he — to change how his office here works, but first, he is heading to ukraine to deal_ but first, he is heading to ukraine to deal with potential war with russia — the rate of take up of the mmr vaccine is the lowest for a decade — there's a warning it could lead to an outbreak of measles.
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as royal mail launches stamps with bar codes so they can track and trace deliveries. almost £300 million spent in one of the busiest transfer deadline windows. dele alli leaving tottenham for everton, just one of the big deals confirmed. good morning. today we have a band of cloud and rain pushing south and west. behind them, clearskies of cloud and rain pushing south and west. behind them, clear skies and showers. another windy day. the strongest winds in the north, but very mild. good morning. it's tuesday, the first february. borisjohnson addressed a meeting of his mps last night, to try and rally support after a highly critical report into parties held in downing street. the findings by civil servant sue grey highlighted a failure of leadership and judgement. the prime minister has apologised and vowed lessons will be learnt. a separate investigation is being carried out by the metropolitan police. our political correspondent, ben wright, reports. after apologising for lockdown
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parties that happened under his roof, borisjohnson returned to number 10 last night, hoping some of the pressure on his premiership might have eased. for now, at least. but with the police now investigating 12 separate alleged breaches of the rules, the prime minister remains in a precarious position. sue gray's probe into what happened said there were failures of leadership and judgement, there were events that should not have been allowed to take place. her verdict was brief, but damning. in the commons, the prime minister was contrite but defiant. firstly, i want to say sorry. and i'm sorry for the things we simply didn't get right, and also sorry for the way that this matter has been handled. and it's no use saying that this or that was within the rules, it's no use saying that people were working hard. this pandemic was hard for everyone. mr speaker, i get it
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and i will fix it. but labour's leader said mrjohnson was a man with no shame. by routinely breaking the rules he set, the prime minister took us all for fools. he held people's sacrifice in contempt. he showed himself unfit for office. but prime minister, the british public are not fools. they never believed a word of it. they think the prime minister should do the decent thing and resign. it was a former conservative prime minister who silenced the raucous house of commons with this. either my right honourable friend had not read the rules, _ or didn't understand - what they meant, and others | around him, or they didn't thinkl the rules applied to number 10 — which was it? but one cabinet minister dismissed the critical voices on the tories' own side. the people who are criticising him this afternoon, particularly in the chamber, are the people who were criticising him before he was elected leader of the party, who were criticising him
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as he was elected prime minister of the party, and have been criticising him ever since. number 10 has said sue gray's full report will be published when the police has finished its investigation. but some tories want the prime minister to make that promise in the commons as soon as possible. it's clear trust in borisjohnson among his own party has taken a hit. the rules were broken, that he attended events where rules were broken, and that he attended parliament and acted as if he was outraged atjust finding out the rules were broken, and we subsequently find out he already knew these parties had been taking place because he was at at least one of them, and on today's report, may have been at three, tory mps will be listening carefully to what their voters have to say about this saga in the days ahead. the culture was all wrong and i'm sure it wouldn't have happened under previous prime ministers and stuff. i don't think they would have been doing it with theresa may, put it that way! i would love to believe _ that he was sorry and he would fix it, but until the next time.
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while they wait for the police to decide if any laws have been broken, one conservative mp said the prime minister remained on probation. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. our chief political correspondent, adam fleming joins us now from downing street. adam, sue gray called this a "failure of leadership". we know there's anger, but is there any sign of mutiny on the tory backbenches? i think definitely anger. that was so clearly— i think definitely anger. that was so clearly on display yesterday in parliament, one of the most amazing afternoons _ parliament, one of the most amazing afternoons in the house of commons i think i_ afternoons in the house of commons i think i have _ afternoons in the house of commons i think i have ever seen. just filled with fury— think i have ever seen. just filled with fury and also linked with emotion— with fury and also linked with emotion as people talked about what they had _ emotion as people talked about what they had gone through during lockdown, while these parties were happening. you just saw senior conservative after a senior conservative, either massively criticising _ conservative, either massively criticising borisjohnson or conservative, either massively criticising boris johnson or saying they could — criticising boris johnson or saying they could no longer support him. the thing — they could no longer support him. the thing is — they could no longer support him.
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the thing is that has not tipped into enough of no confidence to trigger— into enough of no confidence to trigger a — into enough of no confidence to trigger a vote of confidence in the prime _ trigger a vote of confidence in the prime minister, so he is still a prime — prime minister, so he is still a prime minister, so he is still a prime minister and he prime minister, so he is still a prime ministerand he is prime minister, so he is still a prime minister and he is safe prime minister, so he is still a prime ministerand he is safe in prime minister, so he is still a prime minister and he is safe in his 'ob prime minister and he is safe in his job for— prime minister and he is safe in his job for now — prime minister and he is safe in his job for now. the story has three strands — job for now. the story has three strands. the first of them is the relationship between him and his backbenchers, which is getting increasingly tense and fractious but looks _ increasingly tense and fractious but looks kind — increasingly tense and fractious but looks kind of 0k increasingly tense and fractious but looks kind of ok for now, especially after he _ looks kind of ok for now, especially after he spoke to them all privately last night — after he spoke to them all privately last night. he got some pretty 0k reviews _ last night. he got some pretty 0k reviews. the second strand is what happens _ reviews. the second strand is what happens in — reviews. the second strand is what happens in downing street over the next couple of days, the next couple of weeks? _ next couple of days, the next couple of weeks? prime minister's big response — of weeks? prime minister's big response to one of this is to pledge an overhaul— response to one of this is to pledge an overhaul of how his operation works~ _ an overhaul of how his operation works. they are going to create an officiat— works. they are going to create an official office of the prime minister, which may sound bizarre that it _ minister, which may sound bizarre that it doesn't exist already, but it doesn't. — that it doesn't exist already, but it doesn't, technically. is going to be a trig _ it doesn't, technically. is going to be a big clear out of staff and some bil be a big clear out of staff and some trig hitters— be a big clear out of staff and some big hitters brought in to change how the tace _ big hitters brought in to change how the lace operates day—to—day? the third strand — the lace operates day—to—day? the third strand is the ongoing police investigation into this. we know the police _ investigation into this. we know the police have — investigation into this. we know the police have got 500 pages of evidence, 300 photographs. think
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much _ evidence, 300 photographs. think much damage has been done already by about 12 _ much damage has been done already by about 12 facts coming out. there are potentially _ about 12 facts coming out. there are potentially a lot more. sue gray will deliver her report, wards and all. will deliver her report, wards and ad what— will deliver her report, wards and all. what we got yesterday was just all. what we got yesterday was just a preview — a preview. wow. thank you. and we'll be hearing from the government at 07:30, when we speak to deputy prime minister dominic raab. and at ten past seven we'll be talking to the opposition leader sir keir starmer. the prime minister will travel to ukraine today, for talks with the country's president, amid continuing tensions with russia. the kremlin has denied planning to invade its neighbour, but has tens of thousands of troops massed on the border. the prime minister will promise £88 million to help ukraine tackle corruption and reduce its reliance on russian energy. police have been granted more time to question manchester united footballer mason greenwood. the 20—year—old was despised —— was arrested on suspicion of rape and assault on sunday. manchester united say the player will not return to training or matches until further
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notice. health officials are warning that more than one in ten children starting school in england are at risk of measles, because they have not been vaccinated. the number of five—year—olds that have had both doses of mmr that helps protect against measles, mumps and rubella, has dropped to the lowest for a decade. 0ur health correspondent michelle roberts has more. measles is highly contagious and can cause serious and sometimes fatal illness. as well as a distinctive rash, it can lead to pneumonia and brain inflammation. vaccination can remove almost all of this risk. but experts say since the start of the covid pandemic, there's been a concerning drop in the numbers of children getting their protective vaccines on time. latest figures reveal around 85.5% of five—year—olds have had the recommended two doses of mmr that can protect against mumps and rubella infections, as well as measles. that's the lowest for a decade, and well below the 95% target recommended to stop a resurgence of measles.
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when a high percentage of the population is protected through vaccination, it becomes harder for the disease to pass between people. although cases have plummeted in the last couple of years, largely due to social distancing and travel bans, the uk health security agency's concerned measles could make a comeback in the unvaccinated, when covid restrictions are fully lifted. even a small drop in vaccine uptake can lead to outbreaks occurring. and why the focus on mmr? it's because measles would be the first infection we would expect to see come back. it's like the canary in the coal mine. and once we have international travel opened up, and covid restrictions lifted, we expect measles to come back into this country, and for it to spread in those who are not fully protected with two doses of the mmr vaccine. young children can get the mmr vaccine for free on the nhs when they turn one, with a second dose offered at around
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the age of three and a half, before they start nursery or school. unvaccinated teenagers and adults are eligible, too. michelle roberts, bbc news. proposals have been announced to improve schools across england, including help to retain teachers and create specialist sixth forms. the measures form part of the government's levelling up gender. teaching units have questioned whether they would make up for years of funding cuts. areas identified as having the weakest educational outcomes include rochdale, walsall and the isle of wight. you outcomes include rochdale, walsall and the isle of wight.— outcomes include rochdale, walsall and the isle of wight. you know how much we love _ and the isle of wight. you know how much we love to _ and the isle of wight. you know how much we love to bring _ and the isle of wight. you know how much we love to bring you _ and the isle of wight. you know how much we love to bring you the - and the isle of wight. you know how much we love to bring you the latest breaking news here on breakfast. we also love a cute animal. we have got also love a cute animal. we have got a treat for you. look at this. this is the first _ a treat for you. look at this. this is the first southern _ a treat for you. look at this. ti 3 is the first southern koala born in europe. this is at longleat safari park. six months ago he was as high
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as a jelly bean, now he is venturing out of the old pouch. he likes nothing more than chomping on eucalyptus. his mum is called violet. i eucalyptus. his mum is called violet. ., , violet. i would stay right in there. don't aet violet. i would stay right in there. don't get out _ violet. i would stay right in there. don't get out today. _ violet. i would stay right in there. don't get out today. apparently i violet. i would stay right in there. | don't get out today. apparently we are auoin don't get out today. apparently we are going to _ don't get out today. apparently we are going to be _ don't get out today. apparently we are going to be live _ don't get out today. apparently we are going to be live at _ don't get out today. apparently we are going to be live at longleat - are going to be live at longleat later in the programme. the baby koala has not got a name yet. he might make a special appearance. it's definitely a boy. i appearance. it's definitely a boy. i wonder if we will get some suggestions? i wonder if we will get some suggestions?— wonder if we will get some su: aestions? ., , ,, suggestions? i am sure we will. send them in and — suggestions? i am sure we will. send them in and we _ suggestions? i am sure we will. send them in and we will _ suggestions? i am sure we will. send them in and we will pass _ suggestions? i am sure we will. send them in and we will pass them - suggestions? i am sure we will. send them in and we will pass them on. i suggestions? i am sure we will. send | them in and we will pass them on. we are live at longleat later. now the weather with carol. should we be hiding inside the pouch or venturing out? you can venture out. it is going to be quite a mild day. in terms of wind for the next few days it will be quite windy, but not as windy as it was at the weekend, or indeed yesterday. today the wind will be a feature across the north of scotland, across the northern isles, caithness and sutherland, 50, maybe
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65 mph, picking up for a time in the afternoon. that is not unusual at this time of year. you may find trees have been damaged over the weekend and have that will make them susceptible to further damage. a fair bit of cloud moving across northern ireland, england and wales. that is sinking towards the south—west with spots of rain. behind it, clearer skies, south—west with spots of rain. behind it, clearerskies, sunshine and showers. these black circles represent the strength of the wind. still pretty windy, especially across parts of scotland and also parts of north—eastern them. temperatures today different from yesterday. it will feel that bit milder. we are looking widely at 11 to 13 degrees. you can see as we go through the evening and overnight at this cloud and spots of rain. 0vernight this weather front will push northwards once again. further rain in the west of scotland into northern england, pushing over towards eastern england. not a particularly cold night for most. in
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prone areas where the cloud remains broken in aberdeenshire, we could see some frost and some clear skies across parts of wales. tomorrow we start off with all this cloud, spots of light rain and drizzle. it should brighten up and east wales, the midlands, towards southern england. 0nce midlands, towards southern england. once again it will be mild for most. that is not going to last. thank you. see you very soon. the family of a 21—year—old woman, who suffered life—changing injuries after being kidnapped by her ex—boyfriend, is campaigning to have his sentence increased. angel lynn was bundled into a van by chay bowskill, and was found seriously injured in the carriageway of the a6 near loughborough on 17 september, 2020. rachel stonehouse has this report. this is the moment angel lynn is kidnapped by her then boyfriend, chay bowskill, in september 2020. he grabs hold of her and forces her into a van, which is then driven off by his friend rocco sansome.
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just a few minutes later, angel falls out the back of the van, here on the a6 near loughborough, sustaining life—changing injuries. almost 18 months later, she remains in hospital. she was just so lovely, and when she got older and older, she just blossomed from a little geeky kid into this beautiful girl. she was beautiful inside. she was just always nice. i never saw her when she said anything bad. always happy, always smiley. how is angel now, and what have her long term injuries been? she can't do anything for herself. she can't talk, she can't walk, she can't eat, she can't drink. she doesn't recognise... it's kind of, there's nothing there. but obviously, as a parent, the fact that she's alive is hope for them. last week, bowskill was sentenced to seven and a half years for kidnap, controlling behaviour during the relationship,
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and pressurising his mum to withdraw her police statement. his friend, rocco sansome, was sentenced to 21 months. bowskill was found not guilty of causing angel's injuries, after he said she jumped out of the van, but the family are furious, as he could be out as early as 202a. they've now requested for his sentence to be reviewed. we're hoping that the attorney general looks at and says, that is unduly lenient. i don't think he should have been... ..his sentence should have been given as a young offender. so therefore, it would have been double what he got. angel's family are not the only ones who believe there is a wider problem in the criminaljustice system. we have a criminaljustice system in general that that doesn't fully understand the range of domestic abuse. when we think about the context of coercion and control, what is often understood to be a background of domestic abuse is often overlooked,
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because of maybe abuse not being reported, particularly to the police, or recorded in a particular way. nearly a year and a half on, jackie and herfamily are still feeling the aftermath. how has it actually impacted how you feel in terms of your safety? erm, just — ijust feel reluctant to go out. evenjust in my house, having someone come to check the boiler, erm, it shouldn't, but it makes me concerned, and i can't help feeling that way. and i've always considered myself quite a strong person, but it's, yeah, worried me a little bit. i never want this to happen to anybody else. i've seen a family destroyed in the last 16 months. angel's life changed in an instant and nobody saw it coming it. itjust came out of nowhere. and that's the scary thing. rachael stonehouse, bbc news. angel's aunt, jackie chamberlain, will be joining us here on the sofa just after eight o'clock.
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let's take a look at the papers. just gone quarter past six. they are all reacting to these two great report into parties at downing street. the mirror tells the story in numbers. 12 parties, three attended by the prime minister, one in his flat, 300 pictures handed over and still zero shame, they say. the daily mail says, now publish the thing. the paper says there is a national clamour for the report to be published in full. the national clamour for the report to be published in full.— be published in full. the daily telegraph _ be published in full. the daily telegraph reports _ be published in full. the daily telegraph reports that - be published in full. the daily telegraph reports that the - be published in full. the daily i telegraph reports that the prime minister will ask sue gray to produce a new report to quell growing anger among his own mps. find growing anger among his own mps. and if ou growing anger among his own mps. and if you thought it was impossible to link the sue gray report with a photograph of a pregnant pop star rihanna, the sun has found a way to do it.
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have you got anything inside? yes, a brilliant story- _ have you got anything inside? yes, a brilliant story. this _ have you got anything inside? yes, a brilliant story. this is _ have you got anything inside? yes, a brilliant story. this is in _ have you got anything inside? yes, a brilliant story. this is in the - brilliant story. this is in the mirror. the story about granny�*s most loyal guests, having returned to the same hotel for 80 years. and done, 82. she has been going to this hotel in melbourne. she went there first with their mum and dad when she was two. she continues to go there. she has been there recently. a three star country house hotel. basically she keeps going back because she loves it. i think that's quite nice. find somewhere you like, you go back. quite nice. find somewhere you like, you go back-— you go back. yeah, i am not a return. when _ you go back. yeah, i am not a return. when you _ you go back. yeah, i am not a return. when you stream - you go back. yeah, i am not a i return. when you stream music you go back. yeah, i am not a - return. when you stream music you listen to old stuff or new stuff? ads, listen to old stuff or new stuff? a mixture. listen to old stuff or new stuff? a mixture- i — listen to old stuff or new stuff? a mixture. i ask— listen to old stuff or new stuff? a mixture. i ask you _ listen to old stuff or new stuff? a mixture. i ask you that _ listen to old stuff or new stuff? a mixture. i ask you that because, | mixture. i ask you that because, -la it mixture. i ask you that because, play it again. — mixture. i ask you that because, play it again. says _ mixture. i ask you that because, play it again, says the _ mixture. i ask you that because, play it again, says the times. i play it again, says the times. classic tunes are music to young ears. according to this big survey, nearly 70% of stuff that we stream
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is older music, not of the newer stuff. a big rise in classic albums, stuff. a big rise in classic albums, stuff like bob dylan, bruce springsteen. and even now, this is over a year old, if it is over a year old, it is classed as older music. listening to older stuff and classic than fresh music. is music. listening to older stuff and classic than fresh music.— classic than fresh music. is that because of— classic than fresh music. is that because of the _ classic than fresh music. is that because of the way _ classic than fresh music. is that because of the way it _ classic than fresh music. is that because of the way it works, i classic than fresh music. is that because of the way it works, so j classic than fresh music. is that l because of the way it works, so it suggests other songs they think you might like? i suggests other songs they think you miaht like? ., �* ~' ., suggests other songs they think you miaht like? ., �* ,, ., ., , might like? i don't know the answer to that. i might like? i don't know the answer to that- i am — might like? i don't know the answer to that. i am going _ might like? i don't know the answer to that. i am going to _ might like? i don't know the answer to that. i am going to say _ might like? i don't know the answer to that. i am going to say yes, i to that. i am going to say yes, confidently say yes.— to that. i am going to say yes, confidently say yes. shall we say es to confidently say yes. shall we say yes to this? _ confidently say yes. shall we say yes to this? i— confidently say yes. shall we say yes to this? i think _ confidently say yes. shall we say yes to this? i think you - confidently say yes. shall we say yes to this? i think you might i confidently say yes. shall we say l yes to this? i think you might have seen this already. brilliant story. roberto carlos is due to play for a shrewsbury pub side after they won an auction. they bid for him in an auction and he is going to turn out for them. auction and he is going to turn out forthem. it auction and he is going to turn out for them. it is definitely happening. imagine how exciting that is for your sunday league game, having roberto carlos there. you are going to get a big crowd. that is next month. get
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going to get a big crowd. that is next month-— going to get a big crowd. that is next month. , ., ., , next month. get one of those big tr ands ready because _ next month. get one of those big tr ands ready because they _ next month. get one of those big tr ands ready because they would i next month. get one of those big tr ands ready because they would be . ands ready because they would be more members of the crowd. have you got a big stamp down there? yes. shall we coordinate? _ got a big stamp down there? yes. shall we coordinate? go! - got a big stamp down there? yes. shall we coordinate? go! look i got a big stamp down there? yes. shall we coordinate? go! look at| shall we coordinate? go! look at that! can you _ shall we coordinate? go! look at that! can you see _ shall we coordinate? go! look at that! can you see this _ shall we coordinate? go! look at that! can you see this lovely i shall we coordinate? go! look at that! can you see this lovely bar| that! can you see this lovely bar code here? _ that! can you see this lovely bar code here? they _ that! can you see this lovely bar code here? they will— that! can you see this lovely bar code here? they will be - that! can you see this lovely barl code here? they will be available that! can you see this lovely bar- code here? they will be available to buy from shops from today. it’s a buy from shops from today. it's a new look stamp. _ buy from shops from today. it's a new look stamp. nina _ buy from shops from today. it's a new look stamp. nina can - buy from shops from today. it's a | new look stamp. nina can explain all. the new look stamp. nina can explain all- they are _ new look stamp. nina can explain all. they are smaller— new look stamp. nina can explain all. they are smaller than - new look stamp. nina can explain all. they are smaller than this, i new look stamp. nina can explain | all. they are smaller than this, the actual stamp. all. they are smaller than this, the actual stamp-— beautifully done. not very practical for the post box. a bit of history. things are changing for stamp lovers and for all of us who use royal mail. yes, a very exciting day in the stamp world, notjust for collectors. some big changes on the way from today with a set of completely new stamps. things are
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changing. largely, we have been sending letters, very differently. 0nline shopping has become the norm but royal mail still handles nearly 8 billion items of mail every year. largely it is business mail but if you are sending a letter you will still need a stamp. and apart from special edition collections, they have been pretty much the same for years. in fact, the stamp we all know and love was launched in 1967. it features a profile of her majesty the queen created by the sculptor arnold machin, that has become a global icon. but from today, if you nip out for stamps, you could be getting one of these. spot the difference. the stamp is that bar code attached. what is the point of it? the recipients of the card will be able to use the royal mail app to watch a special video featuring shaun the sheep. long term it will help royal mail clamp down on fake stamps. and eventually it is thought
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it will digitally track the letter�*s journey. if something goes wrong, we will know where and when. if like me you have several dog—eared have stamp books around the house, they will be valid for another year. you can swap them for these new ones. from the end of this month the bar—coded stamps can be exchanged for your old ones in that the royal mail swap 0ut scheme, which starts at the end of march. so the new stamps won't cost any more. prices did go up on the 1st ofjanuary. first class went up 9p to 85 p. and second class by 1p to 66 p. what we all want most from royal mail is reliability. like many other services they have been hit hard by staff shortages. in earlyjanuary, more than 15,000, one in ten of royal mail staff, were off sick or isolating, causing delays in many areas. it comes at a time when they areas. it comes at a time when they
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are cutting management staff to streamline services. so lots going on with royal mail. we will be talking to somebody from the organisation about the new stamps and about delivery delays after eight o'clock. what we love to see this morning, if you do have stamps hanging around the house, or if you are philatelist and love collecting them, send us your photographs through the usual means, e—mail, twitter, facebook. we love to see your favourite stamp pictures because this is something that really gets people going. the more that we use online shopping, and ordering parcels and sending them directly to people, the more i actually enjoy a stamp letter coming through the post that somebody has taken the time to hand right because it is so much more unusual. it is a real treat to get a proper letter. it shows an intimacy, doesn't it? it shows an intimacy, doesn't it? i collected stamps for about four months. ~ . . i collected stamps for about four months._ about i i collected stamps for about four months._ about nine. | i collected stamps for about four| months._ about nine. i i collected stamps for about four i months._ about nine. i had months. what age? about nine. i had a stamp collecting _ months. what age? about nine. i had a stamp collecting phase. _ months. what age? about nine. i had a stamp collecting phase. i _ months. what age? about nine. i had a stamp collecting phase. i went i months. what age? about nine. i had a stamp collecting phase. i went to i a stamp collecting phase. i went to the british museum and about some
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stamps and i thought, i love stamps. a few months later there was the end of that. moved on. i put them very nicely in their proper book that i got. i am sure my mum has got it somewhere. 0nly completed about three pages, then i was back kicking a football around. 50 three pages, then i was back kicking a football around.— three pages, then i was back kicking a football around. so much coming up in the programme. _ in the programme. there will still be special edition stamps coming out but don't worry. thank you. we have got lots coming up thank you. we have got lots coming up on the programme. keir starmer, dominic raab and a baby koala. what more could you want? i did dominic raab and a baby koala. what more could you want?— more could you want? i did see some re cle more could you want? i did see some recycle more — more could you want? i did see some recycle more time _ more could you want? i did see some recycle more time as _ more could you want? i did see some recycle more time as the _ more could you want? i did see some recycle more time as the baby - more could you want? i did see somej recycle more time as the baby koala? 20 past seven. in the magic of breakfast, it is in between sir keir starmer and dominic raab. and we are back with the koalas after nine
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o'clock this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. nearly eight out of ten londoners say they've seen an increase in the cost of living since the summer. according to a report by city hall and polling by yougov, over a third of londoners questioned last week said they'd struggled to pay houshold bills, causing more than one in ten admitting to going without essentials or relying on credit. mayor of london sadiq khan is calling on the government to do more to tackle the rising cost of living. and with the rising cost of living being such a big issue at the moment, we're looking at doing more on the subject. so if you've noticed prices going up, and you're struggling to make ends meet, and you're happy to speak to us about it, e—mail us at hellolondon@bbc.co.uk. the world's first exhibition
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of vincent van gogh's self portraits spanning his entire career — is opening at the courtauld gallery at somerset house. this is the very first look at the paintings on display. the exhibition is ten years in the making, and includes these two paintings which are under the same roof for the first time since van gogh painted them nearly 130 years ago. the exhibition opens on thursday. it's on until may. today is chinese new year — the year of the tiger. celebrations will be taking place across london all week, although it will be quiter than usual due to coronavirus. however, there are celebrations online, and chinese businesses in soho will welcome the year of the tiger, which is the symbol of bravery, wisdom and strength. a look at the travel and the tube board.
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circle line has severe delays, and issues on the district line too becuase of a signal failure. the northern has major work going on until may. 0nto the weather now with naz. hello. good morning. it is looking a lot calmer today. generally speaking it is going to be quite a dull day. that's due to the fact we got a westerly airflow that is actually bringing through mild air. so it won't be as cold as it was yesterday. also quite a lot of moisture. so as a result we are seeing generally cloudy skies for today. to start off this morning, don't be surprised, quite a dull start to the day. it will be mainly dry though and fairly mild as well. going into this afternoon, we will see little change really. i think we may see the cloud break here and there, so there may be the bright or sunny spell. limited amounts of brightness expected for today. generally speaking it stays dry
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but there is risk of a little bit of light rain or drizzle as the cold front tries to work its way southwards. but it will be mild, as i mentioned. top temperatures up to around 12 celsius. so above average for the time of year. tonight staying generally cloudy, a mild one as well. we may see a few clear spells develop towards dawn. taking a look into the outlook, it does stay mild for another couple of days. friday and saturday, a tad cooler before it turns mild again into the new week and generally staying quite cloudy as well. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. coming up on breakfast this morning... we'll be live at koala creek at longleat safari park, where we've got exclusive access to the first joey to be born in europe. celebrity farmer tom pemberton will be telling us how he's hoping to pull in the viewers with his new series described as "top gear for farmers."
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and we'll be discussing what we can expect from the relaunch of bbc3 with gavin and stacey actor larry lamb. a "failure of leadership" — that's the initial findings from sue gray's inquiry into lockdown socialising in government buildings. ros atkins has been examining her report. sue gray has delivered 12 pages of findings on the lockdown parties here in downing street. and earlier, borisjohnson's predecessor, theresa may, had a question for it. either my right honourable friend had not read the rules, or didn't understand what they meant and others around him, or they didn't think the rules applied to number 10, which was it? to which borisjohnson replied... that is not what the gray report says. this is not what the report says. but if she... i suggest that she waits to see the conclusion of the inquiry. now, sue gray hasn't said whether individual events broke the rules, and it's true we will hear more from the police and from sue gray. but borisjohnson also said this. sorry.
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and i'm sorry for the things we simply didn't get right and also sorry for the way that this matter has been handled. but for the labour party, sorry isn't enough. the british public aren't fools. they never believed a word of it. they think the prime minister should do the decent thing and resign. all of this is reaction to something sue gray says is not a meaningful report. she says she's looked at 16 events, but that 12 are under criminal investigation and so, on these, she cannot release her findings. this, though, was confirmation of criminal investigations into gatherings in the prime minister's garden, in his offices, for his birthday, and even in his flat. and remember, this is what borisjohnson said after the first reports of a party. all guidance was followed completely during number 10. "all guidance was followed," said borisjohnson. well, sue gray concludes that at least some of the gatherings represent a serious failure to observe the high standards
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expected of those working at the heart of government. she goes on. a number of these gatherings should not have been allowed to take place or to develop in the way that they did. now one defence we've heard for what happened is this. a lot of these people at that time were working 18—hour days to deliver actually one of the best, if not the best vaccine programme in the world. they were exhausted. to this, sue gray says those challenges also applied to key and frontline workers across the country, who are working under equally, if not more, demanding conditions. and borisjohnson picked up on this. it's no use saying that this or that was within the rules, and it's no use saying that people were working hard. given that, given everything they've heard, conservative mps now have a decision to make. and keir starmer addressed them. they can heap their reputations, the reputation of their party, the reputation of this country on the bonfire that is his leadership, or they can spare the country
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from a prime minister totally unworthy of his responsibilities. keir starmer presented a choice, but mrjohnson's supporters reject it. the prime minister has come to the dispatch box today. he's given his apology. he has now left the report to the met and we'll wait to see what theirfindings are. there is, though, a fine line being walked by mrjohnson. in december, he told the liverpool echo, "no covid rules were broken, and there you go." today, when pushed, he said this. i do care deeply about the hurt that is felt across the country, about the suggestion that things were going on in number 10 that were in contravention of the covid rules. the prime minister talks of the suggestion rules were broken, but without explaining, given what we know about the events, how it's possible the rules weren't broken, and he says, "we must wait for the police." and sure enough, the met�*s work goes on. today, we heard from commander catherine roper, who revealed we had a bundle
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of material provided to us just friday, which is well over 500 pieces of paper and over 300 photographs. and in the middle of this tumultuous day, the prime minister turned directly to what sue gray says happened here in downing street and declared... i get it and i will fix it. the question is whether borisjohnson will get the chance because, for him, this is about learning lessons, making changes. for his opponents, it's about him, too, all of which distilled into one moment in a packed house of commons. i know what the issue is. on this, on so many aspects of this story, there is no agreement, nor is there an end because the prime minister and his rivals now wait for the police to show their hand. we'rejoined now by the leader of the liberal democrats, sir ed davey. morning the liberal democrats, sir ed davey. to you. i know the morning to you. i know you are in the house of commons yesterday and spoke very emotionally about the
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situation many people found themselves in during the various lockdown is. you have previously called for the prime minister to resign. do you think he will? i called for the prime minister to resign. do you think he will? i pray that it does — resign. do you think he will? i pray that it does not _ resign. do you think he will? i pray that it does not look _ resign. do you think he will? i pray that it does not look like _ resign. do you think he will? i pray that it does not look like he - resign. do you think he will? i pray that it does not look like he is i that it does not look like he is going — that it does not look like he is going to _ that it does not look like he is going to. even though it is in the national— going to. even though it is in the national interest. he lied and break the rules _ national interest. he lied and break the rules it— national interest. he lied and break the rules. it is not about focusing on the _ the rules. it is not about focusing on the cost — the rules. it is not about focusing on the cost of living crisis, the pandemic of the situation in ukraine. if he is not going to go, conservative mps had to do their patriotic— conservative mps had to do their patriotic duty and tell the prime minister— patriotic duty and tell the prime minister to go. they have the power to solve _ minister to go. they have the power to solve this, in the national interest, _ to solve this, in the national interest, do their patriotic duty and get — interest, do their patriotic duty and get the prime minister to resign — and get the prime minister to resin. ~ . and get the prime minister to resin. . ., ., and get the prime minister to resin. ~ ., ., and get the prime minister to resi.n_ . ., ., a, ., resign. what more can you do when ou are resign. what more can you do when you are talking. _ resign. what more can you do when you are talking, reaching _ resign. what more can you do when you are talking, reaching out - resign. what more can you do when you are talking, reaching out to i you are talking, reaching out to those conservative mps? taste you are talking, reaching out to those conservative mps? we would exlain in those conservative mps? we would explain in very _ those conservative mps? we would explain in very simple _ those conservative mps? we would explain in very simple terms - those conservative mps? we would explain in very simple terms why i those conservative mps? we would | explain in very simple terms why he must _ explain in very simple terms why he must go _ explain in very simple terms why he must go. we do face some huge
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challenges in this country. every family— challenges in this country. every family across the country is facing this cost— family across the country is facing this cost of— family across the country is facing this cost of living crisis and of course — this cost of living crisis and of course there are the millions of people — course there are the millions of people who made huge sacrifices and who feel— people who made huge sacrifices and who feel very distressed and angry that they— who feel very distressed and angry that they abide by the rules and downing — that they abide by the rules and downing street did not. one thing i am doing _ downing street did not. one thing i am doing today as i am actually going _ am doing today as i am actually going to — am doing today as i am actually going to write to the treasury solicitor— going to write to the treasury solicitor to ask if the prime minister— solicitor to ask if the prime minister doesn't resign, if tory mps don't _ minister doesn't resign, if tory mps don't do _ minister doesn't resign, if tory mps don't do that patriotically duty, i want _ don't do that patriotically duty, i want it— don't do that patriotically duty, i want it confirmed the taxpayer won't pick up _ want it confirmed the taxpayer won't pick up the _ want it confirmed the taxpayer won't pick up the bill for the prime minister's legal advice. he will be interviewed by the metropolitan police _ interviewed by the metropolitan police for his rule breaking and dishonesty and i don't think the taxpayer, — dishonesty and i don't think the taxpayer, people who are abided by the rules, _ taxpayer, people who are abided by the rules, should be paying the bill for his— the rules, should be paying the bill for his solicitor and his legal advisers _ for his solicitor and his legal advisers and i hope the government will confirm — advisers and i hope the government will confirm that won't happen. there _ will confirm that won't happen. there may— will confirm that won't happen. there may be many people watching the programme at homeless morning, thinking the prime minister is about to arrive in ukraine and we are
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approaching a cost of living crisis, this is party politics and there are bigger things to worry about, just drop it and let them get on with the job. i drop it and let them get on with the “ob. . . drop it and let them get on with the “ob. ., , , ., , , ., job. i agree but the problem is not the government, _ job. i agree but the problem is not the government, the _ job. i agree but the problem is not the government, the prime - job. i agree but the problem is not i the government, the prime minister and conservative mps. we all want to move _ and conservative mps. we all want to move on— and conservative mps. we all want to move on from this, of course we do, because _ move on from this, of course we do, because of— move on from this, of course we do, because of the reasons you have just described, _ because of the reasons you have just described, the challenges people face with— described, the challenges people face with high heating bills and so on. face with high heating bills and so on i_ face with high heating bills and so on i don't— face with high heating bills and so on. i don't think that will be possible _ on. i don't think that will be possible. the metropolitan police investigation will take months. that is not _ investigation will take months. that is not the _ investigation will take months. that is not the opposition party, it is the law— is not the opposition party, it is the law because it looks like the prime _ the law because it looks like the prime minister broke the law. it is undermining the nation's interest, undermining the nation's interest, undermining the nation's interest, undermining the government and our international reputation at a time when _ international reputation at a time when britain could be showing real leadership. this prime minister is incapable — leadership. this prime minister is incapable of doing that and that is why i_ incapable of doing that and that is why i say— incapable of doing that and that is why i say again, conservative mps must _ why i say again, conservative mps must now— why i say again, conservative mps must now do their patriotic duty and .et must now do their patriotic duty and get rid _ must now do their patriotic duty and get rid of—
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must now do their patriotic duty and get rid of this man. we must now do their patriotic duty and get rid of this man.— get rid of this man. we have had some time _ get rid of this man. we have had some time now _ get rid of this man. we have had some time now to _ get rid of this man. we have had some time now to digester- get rid of this man. we have had | some time now to digester report that arrived yesterday. having looked at it properly, is there anything in it which surprised you? it is tougher than i expected on the prime _ it is tougher than i expected on the prime minister and wrongdoings in number— prime minister and wrongdoings in number 10. prime minister and wrongdoings in number10. ithought prime minister and wrongdoings in number 10. i thought sue gray might in some— number 10. i thought sue gray might in some way hold back and there would _ in some way hold back and there would be — in some way hold back and there would be some kind of whitehall whitewash. that is not the case. i have _ whitewash. that is not the case. i have to _ whitewash. that is not the case. i have to pay — whitewash. that is not the case. i have to pay credit to sue gray. even in very— have to pay credit to sue gray. even in very severe limitations to her report— in very severe limitations to her report imposed on her by the metropolitan police because of their investigations, she still made very clear— investigations, she still made very clear there — investigations, she still made very clear there was behaviour in number 10 that _ clear there was behaviour in number 10 that was — clear there was behaviour in number 10 that was difficult to justify and fell below appropriate standards and she talked in very strong terms about— she talked in very strong terms about serious failure ofjudgment and leadership. who is the leader of number— and leadership. who is the leader of number 10? and leadership. who is the leader of number10? the prime minister. with those _ number10? the prime minister. with those short— number10? the prime minister. with those short phrases in her report, i think— those short phrases in her report, i think she _ those short phrases in her report, i think she made it clear that the prime _ think she made it clear that the prime minister should go and that is
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why conservative mps had to act. we had why conservative mps had to act. we. had the why conservative mps had to act. had the prime why conservative mps had to act. - had the prime minister again apologised yesterday, didn't we? this government has been handling one of the biggest crisis in a generation. mistakes have been made. he apologised. don't you think, at this point, it might be time to accept the apology and move forward and let him in the rest of the garment get on with the other situations that are unfolding we have just mentioned. situations that are unfolding we havejust mentioned. == situations that are unfolding we have just mentioned.— have just mentioned. -- the government. _ have just mentioned. -- the government. first _ have just mentioned. -- the government. first of - have just mentioned. -- the government. first of all, i have just mentioned. -- the government. first of all, it i have just mentioned. -- the i government. first of all, it has been _ government. first of all, it has been a — government. first of all, it has been a crisis. that is why millions of people — been a crisis. that is why millions of people in— been a crisis. that is why millions of people in the nhs, care homes and front line _ of people in the nhs, care homes and front line workers stood up and came together— front line workers stood up and came together to _ front line workers stood up and came together to take on the crisis. all of the _ together to take on the crisis. all of the people outside downing street abided _ of the people outside downing street abided by the rules that were set so we could _ abided by the rules that were set so we could defeat this horrible virus. that is— we could defeat this horrible virus. that is what — we could defeat this horrible virus. that is what this is all about, the fact the — that is what this is all about, the fact the prime minister and his cronies— fact the prime minister and his cronies didn't abide by the rules. we would — cronies didn't abide by the rules. we would love this to go on but i am
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afraid _ we would love this to go on but i am afraid that _ we would love this to go on but i am afraid that prime minister keeps tying _ afraid that prime minister keeps tying if— afraid that prime minister keeps lying. if he had originally come to parliament, to the people, and said, we have _ parliament, to the people, and said, we have got— parliament, to the people, and said, we have got it wrong, i apologise, i am really— we have got it wrong, i apologise, i am really sorry. he didn't do that. he has— am really sorry. he didn't do that. he has had — am really sorry. he didn't do that. he has had to be dragged kicking and screaming. _ he has had to be dragged kicking and screaming, he has told lie after lie after _ screaming, he has told lie after lie after tie _ screaming, he has told lie after lie after lie. that has made it worse. it is after lie. that has made it worse. it is like _ after lie. that has made it worse. it is like the — after lie. that has made it worse. it is like the nixon cover—up when he eventually was pushed out of office _ he eventually was pushed out of office i— he eventually was pushed out of office. i really think that is why action— office. i really think that is why action must be taken so we can get on with— action must be taken so we can get on with moving him on.— on with moving him on. thank you very much- _ plenty of political interviews coming your way. ian blackford will be here in about ten minutes' time. also keir starmer.— also keir starmer. dominic raab as well. jane also keir starmer. dominic raab as well- jane is — also keir starmer. dominic raab as well. jane is also _ also keir starmer. dominic raab as well. jane is also here _ also keir starmer. dominic raab as well. jane is also here talking i well. jane is also here talking about transfer deadline day. normally in january it
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normally injanuary it is quiet. it has been fantastic, especially from everton and this man going from tottenham to everton. delli ali moves from tottenham to everton. not the only club, of course. a lot of money spent in the transfer window. £295 million changed hands before it slammed shut. delli ali moves from tottenham to everton. that is on a two and a half year deal. his career has stalled at spurs in recent years. he has only played for the club six times since antonio conte took over as manager. barcelona have agreed a deal to sign arsenal striker pierre emerick aubameyang. he's only scored four goals in 1a games this season. there's no fee involved, but the transfer is likely to save arsenal around £15 milion a year in wages.
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—— £25 million. juventus and wales midfielder aaron ramsey has joined scottish premiership champions rangers. he could make his debut tomorrow in the old firm match. that is a baptism of fire, isn't it? he's at ibrox on loan until the end of the season. manchester city confirmed the £14 million signing of julian alvarez from river plate. the 22—year—old will remain at the argentine champions until the end ofjuly. after signing a six—month contract with brentford, christian eriksen will become one of the few professional athetes to return to sport after suffering a cardiac arrest. it happened while he was playing for denmark at last year's euros. erikson's been fitted with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator device, and has since spent some time training with ajax. it's a real testament to his resilience and the medical team behind him, who have been looking after him for the last few months. but the safety of knowing he has a defibrillator, which will treat him at any stage, whether he's playing or at home or sedentary,
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and perhaps the ability to treat him to try to prevent these things happening again are all important to understand when we're looking at them going out on the pitch. for all the transfer deadline day news, go to the bbc sport website. the premier league says 85% of players have now been at least partially vaccinated against coronavirus. the league revealed the figures as it announced 11 positive coronavirus tests from its latest weekly round of testing. the figure of 85% is just 4% up on october last year of those players who've had at least one dose. we have been telling you about all the big—money deals. well, the best deal of the window was done by a sunday league pub team in shropshire, who have brazil legend roberto carlos playing for them! the "bull in the barne" pub team entered a raffle on ebay for roberto carlos, who famously took
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powerful free kicks like this one for his country. he'll play one match for them next month in the shrewsbury & district league. he's 48 years old, but i'll bet he's still got a good touch. no wonder they are all smiling in that team photograph. you would be passing the ball at every opportunity, wouldn't you? i bet that much is sold out. i once played a game of six aside. remember gordon hill is to play for manchester united. he was well past his prime, hobbling around on one foot stop he said, give me the ball. at one point he said, which side of the balti you want me to score in? he was so good. —— which side of the gold do you want me to score in? when you have it, it will never leave you. we are never going to know, are we? here's carol with a look at the weather.
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i think it has got up and left actually. still window this morning, nowhere near as windy as yesterday. for the rest of the week the wind will be a feature. we have two weather fronts, will be a feature. we have two weatherfronts, this will be a feature. we have two weather fronts, this one will be a feature. we have two weatherfronts, this one bringing rain into the south—east which will clear soon. this one is sinking south. looking at the isobars you can see it will be a windy day. this one is close to the area of low pressure. the amber colours and the yellow showing you where we have mild air. for many of us it is a mild air. for many of us it is a mild style and we will continue in that vein. the cloud will sink south and west during the course of the day. on the other side there will be sunshine and showers. these are the wind gusts we are looking at as we go through the afternoon. in the northern isles, caithness and sutherland, it could be higher than that. temperatures today higher than
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yesterday. the 11 to 13 degrees widely across the uk. as we head on through the evening and overnight, the weather front sinking south flips around and starts to retreat northwards once again, taking cloud and rain with it. the rain not particularly heavy. we hang on to clear skies in aberdeenshire and temperatures could fall to two degrees, so you might see a touch of frost first thing most of us will not, we will have a mild night. here is the weather front moving north tonight and tomorrow. behind it high pressure is in charge. where we have the weather fronts draped across scotland and parts of england, there will be a fair bit of cloud with some spots of light rain and drizzle. it should brighten up in east wales, the west midlands. temperatures again up to 13 degrees. we have a weather front coming in
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from the west on thursday. the head and behind it will be windy. gale force in the far north of scotland. it will colder and we will see frequent wintry showers. ahead of it we're still in the drier conditions, some sunshine and still relatively mild. not much rain in the south of england of late. this looks like it will slip southwards and bring rain as we go through the overnight period. this is continuing its journey south. the plume of blue telling you it will be colder. friday is also going to be quite a windy day. a lot of dry weather, bright weather and a fair bit of sunshine during the course of friday. we will see frequent wintry showers, particularly across parts of scotland and into northern england. temperatures, five in aberdeen, may be down to ten towards plymouth and st helier. temperatures will go back down having gone up.
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that will continue into the weekend. they will pick up into the early part of next week. just a note on the north of scotland today. not unusual to have gusts of wind up to 65 miles an hour. a few storms in the last few days and that means cemeteries and structures might be prone to a bit more damage. something to keep an eye on. —— means some trees. it's responsible for launching shows like gavin and stacey, two pints of lager and bad education but bbc three went exclusively to iplayer as part of a cost—cutting exercise six years ago. it's returning as a full tv channel from today as our media and arts correspondent david sillito explains. bbc three is now on tv. bbc three, the bbc�*s youth channel, is returning to the tv airwaves. hi, i'm blu hydrangea. i'm from ru paul's drag race uk versus the world. i want a global superstar. blu from drag race and the rest
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of bbc3 are going to have a new broadcast home, a tv channel. do you watch old school tv? i absolutely do. i mean, it's handy having it on your phone, it's easy to access, but whenever i'm about the house, i love having the tv on in the background. and what better channel than bbc three? what about this? good. it is what you might call a bit of a reverse ferret. six years ago, the bbc closed down the tv channel, but the number of 16 to 31l—year—olds watching each week fell from 22% to 6%. the hope is returning to the schedules might bump that up a bit. the question is, is the tv channel becoming a bit of a thing of the past, especially for young people? i mean, do they even know where programmes come from that they love? because i've got a little list here of bbc three programmes. what about bbc one, bbc two? no. do you ever watch, you know, tv when it's on a schedule? the ordinary old school tv? no, i don't.
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just netflix, not tv. we don't watch channels, since no—one in our house watches it, but we like disney plus and netflix and amazon prime. however, not all young people have completely given up on traditional tv. you still watch old school tv, do you? yeah. i still like hercule poirot. i watch agatha christie, some of the old classics. they're quite interesting and fun. can i ask how old you are? i'm 20. bbc three? no. and when i started reading out my list of bbc three programmes... drag race? yeah. man like mobeen? have you seen that one? yes. i watch that. around 80% of 16 to 31l—year—olds do still use the bbc every week, but there are perception issues. however, is a tv channel really going to help?
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we believe that we have to provide a universal service to all under 35s right across the uk. not everyone has got great internet provision. not everyone lives in a house with an internet connected tv or lots of laptops, and on top of that, the content we make that's really targeted at under 355, we've got to make sure it's really easy to discover. so by having it on a channel, it's adding to the possibility of them finding it on iplayer. 7pm and i don't watch love island. so six years on, with the bbc facing renewed questions over the future of the licence fee, three returns to tv. the question is, how much of its young audience will come back with it? david sillito, bbc news. actor larry lamb from gavin and stacey willjoin us just before 9 o'clock to talk about the return of the channel. there were rowdy scenes in the house of commons yesterday as the prime minister addressed mps following the publication of the report into events at downing street during lockdown. ian blackford, the snp's westminster
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leader was ordered by the speaker, sir lindsay hoyle, to leave the chamber after accusing the prime minister of lying. let's take a look. i'll give you one more chance. as leader of the snp, i don't want to have to throw you out, i'm going to give you this chance. please. that man has lied to the house. shut up. i'm sorry it's come to this, and i'm sorry that the leader of the party has not got the decency, just to withdraw those words in order that this debate can be represented by all political leaders. it's not my fault if the prime minister can't be trusted to tell the truth. under the power given to me by standing order number 43, i order the honourable member to withdraw immediately from the house. ian blackford joins us now. thank you for being with us today.
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listening back to that, do you regret that behaviour yesterday? i regret that behaviour yesterday? i regret that behaviour yesterday? i regret the position that the speaker was in, someone i have the utmost admiration for. the real issue is we have the prime minister that has repeatedly lied to the house of commons, he has misled the house of commons, he has misled the house of commons because he stated on the 8th of december the parties have not taken place, he did that in reply to catherine west about parties on the 13th of november. i have a duty to stand up for my constituents and represent my party. to say the behaviour of the prime minister is simply unacceptable. there is widespread anger right throughout these islands that people did what they were told, made enormous sacrifices, many cases had tremendous loss, when unable to grieve or have relatives and they see this characterisation of parties taking place at westminster. 0f
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taking place at westminster. of course the sue gray report yesterday talked about the failure of leadership. they used to be an honour and dignity in politics and i regret that seems to be missing from the mind of the prime minister. quite simply he should have recognised he has lost the right to leave the united kingdom, he should have resigned as prime minister and i have the right to stand up and thatis i have the right to stand up and that is what i did yesterday in the house of commons.— that is what i did yesterday in the house of commons. people watching miaht have house of commons. people watching might have thought _ house of commons. people watching might have thought you _ house of commons. people watching might have thought you knew- house of commons. people watching might have thought you knew the i might have thought you knew the rules and it was a political stunt kite what you think about that? it was not a stunt, it was not premeditated. if i am to be in trouble because i have spoken the man who has repeatedly told lies, the man who has sought to cover up everything going on and misled parliament sits there and i am to be punished because i have stood up for my constituents and the millions of people in the united kingdom that feel real anger at the behaviour of the prime minister. i have a duty to
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do what i have been sent to westminster today. do what i have been sent to westminstertoday. it do what i have been sent to westminster today. it is about time this parliament came into the 21st—century. i led a debate a couple of months ago when i sought to censure the prime minister and in the context of that debate i was permitted to layout their charge sheet about the lying, about the fact he has broken the ministerial code. if it was why i could do that in debating november, it was right in debating november, it was right in the context of that statement yesterday that i was able to do the same. i yesterday that i was able to do the same. ~ ., i. ., ~ ., ., same. i know you talk about reaction from voters — same. i know you talk about reaction from voters and _ same. i know you talk about reaction from voters and we _ same. i know you talk about reaction from voters and we get _ same. i know you talk about reaction from voters and we get a _ same. i know you talk about reaction from voters and we get a lot - same. i know you talk about reaction from voters and we get a lot of- from voters and we get a lot of correspondence into this programme. lots of people are angry about what they have seen and are disappointed in some of the actions from the government and the failure to apologise and then subsequent apologies. there are many who get in contact and say they are fed up with the infighting at westminster and dwelling on the past and they want to focus on the cost of living crisis, energy bills and what is
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happening with russia and ukraine at the moment. what do you think about that? i the moment. what do you think about that? ., . ., ., ,, , that? i agree. we need to make sure --eole are that? i agree. we need to make sure people are properly _ that? i agree. we need to make sure people are properly supported. i that? i agree. we need to make sure| people are properly supported. there is a real threat with the russian build—up on the ukraine border. i had commended the secretary of des —— secretary of state for defence. the prime minister is a real distraction for this. yesterday he cancelled a call with vladimir putin. this is extraordinary. the prime minister is the problem. at the end of the day we are faced with a situation, the activities in 10 downing street had been referred to the metropolitan police. the prime minister is under investigation for as many as 12 events that took place in lockdown, the prime minister potentially breaking the law and being investigated for four parties he was out. when i look at some of
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the other things that have come out over the last few days, we know the prime minister has left security briefings in the downing street flat and chequers. he is not fit to be prime minister. let's get on a deal with the many challenges we face. this prime minister should be consigned to history. taste this prime minister should be consigned to history.- this prime minister should be consigned to history. we will put some of those _ consigned to history. we will put some of those points _ consigned to history. we will put some of those points to - consigned to history. we will put some of those points to dominic| some of those points to dominic raab, who will be with us this morning at half past seven. also we have sir keir starmer at about ten past seven. good morning if you are switching on your tv. lovely to have you with us. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm asad ahmad. nearly eight out of ten londoners say they've seen an increase in the cost of living since the summer. according to a report by city hall and polling by yougov, over a third of londoners questioned last week said they'd struggled
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to pay houshold bill, causing more than one in ten admitting to going withour essentials or relying on credit. mayor of london, sadiq khan is calling on the government to do more to tackle the rising cost of living. and with the rising cost of living being such a big issue at the moment, we're looking at doing more on the subject. so if you've noticed prices going up, and you're struggling to make ends meet, and you're happy to speak to us about it, email us at hellobbclondon@bbc.co.uk. the world's first exhibition of vincent van gogh's self portraits spanning his entire career, is opening at the courtauld gallery at somerset house. this is the first look at the paintings on display. the exhibition is ten years in the making, and includes these two paintings which are under the same roof for the first time since van gogh painted them nearly 130 years ago. the exhibition opens on thursday.
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it's on until may. today is chinese new year — the year of the tiger. celebrations will be taking place across london all week, although it will be quiter than usual due to coronavirus. however, there are celebrations online, and chinese businesses in soho will welcome the year of the tiger, which is the symbol of bravery, wisdom and strength. a look at the travel, and the tube board. the circle line has minor delays — and issues on the district line too because of a signal failure. the northern line has major work going on until may. 0nto the weather now with nazaneen. hello. good morning. it is looking a lot calmer today. generally speaking it is going to be quite a dull day. that's due to the fact we got a westerly airflow that is actually bringing through mild air.
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so it won't be as cold as it was yesterday. also quite a lot of moisture. so as a result we are seeing generally cloudy skies for today. to start off this morning, don't be surprised, quite a dull start to the day. it will be mainly dry though and fairly mild as well. going into this afternoon, we will see little change really. i think we may see the cloud break here and there, so there may be the bright or sunny spell. limited amounts of brightness expected for today. generally speaking it stays dry but there is risk of losing a bit of light rain or drizzle as the cold front tries to work its way southwards. but it will be mild, as i mentioned. top temperatures up to around 12 celsius. so above average for the time of year. tonight staying generally cloudy, a mild one as well. we may see a few clear spells develop towards dawn. taking a look into the outlook, it does stay mild for another couple of days. friday and saturday, a tad cooler before it turns madigan into the new week and generally staying quite cloudy as well. va nessa vanessa feltz is about to start your
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breakfast show on bbc radio london. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. 0ur headlines today. a prime minister under pressure — borisjohnson tries to rally support among his mps, after a report into downing street parties criticises a failure of leadership. more of borisjohnson plus mycolleague colleagues are getting
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furious _ mycolleague colleagues are getting furious with him but he seems to be safe for— furious with him but he seems to be safe for now — furious with him but he seems to be safe for now. the next few days are going _ safe for now. the next few days are going to _ safe for now. the next few days are going to be — safe for now. the next few days are going to be about overhauling the operation — going to be about overhauling the operation here in downing street. today— operation here in downing street. today he — operation here in downing street. today he will be dealing with a separate — today he will be dealing with a separate crisis, tension between russia _ separate crisis, tension between russia and ukraine. the rate of take up of the mmr vaccine is the lowest for a decade — there's a warning it could lead to an outbreak of measles. a few deals going down to the wire on deadline day. one of the biggest names, dalley ali, who has signed for everton from tottenham. find names, dalley ali, who has signed for everton from tottenham. and we will be finding _ for everton from tottenham. and we will be finding out _ for everton from tottenham. and we will be finding out why _ for everton from tottenham. and we will be finding out why this _ for everton from tottenham. and we will be finding out why this cute i will be finding out why this cute and cuddly koala could help to save the species. good morning. today we have a band of cloud and rain pushing south and west. behind them, clear skies and showers. the strongest winds in the north, but very mild. good morning. borisjohnson addressed a meeting of his mps last night, to try and rally support after a highly critical report
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into parties held in downing street. the findings by civil servant sue grey highlighted a failure of leadership and judgement. the prime minister has apologised and vowed lessons will be learnt. a separate investigation is being carried out by the metropolitan police. 0ur political correspondent, ben wright, reports. after apologising for lockdown parties that happened under his roof, borisjohnson returned to number 10 last night, hoping some of the pressure on his premiership might have eased. for now, at least. but with the police now investigating 12 separate alleged breaches of the rules, the prime minister remains in a precarious position. sue gray's probe into what happened said there were failures of leadership and judgement, there were events that should not have been allowed to take place. her verdict was brief, but damning. in the commons, the prime minister was contrite but defiant. firstly, i want to say sorry. and i'm sorry for the things
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we simply didn't get right, and also sorry for the way that this matter has been handled. and it's no use saying that this or that was within the rules, it's no use saying that people were working hard. this pandemic was hard for everyone. mr speaker, i get it and i will fix it. but labour's leader said mrjohnson was a man with no shame. by routinely breaking the rules he set, the prime minister took us all for fools. he held people's sacrifice in contempt. he showed himself unfit for office. it was a former conservative prime minister who silenced the raucous house of commons with this. either my right honourable friend had not read the rules, _ or didn't understand - what they meant, and others | around him, or they didn't thinkl the rules applied to number 10 — which was it? but one cabinet minister dismissed the critical voices on the tories' own side. the people who are criticising him
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this afternoon, particularly in the chamber, are the people who were criticising him before he was elected leader of the party, who were criticising him as he was elected prime minister of the party, and have been criticising him ever since. number 10 has said sue gray's full report will be published when the police has finished its investigation. but some tories want the prime minister to make that promise in the commons as soon as possible. it's clear trust in borisjohnson among his own party has taken a hit. the rules were broken, that he attended events where rules were broken, and that he attended parliament and acted as if he was outraged atjust finding out the rules were broken, and we subsequently found out he already knew these parties had been taking place because he was at at least one of them, and on today's report, may have been at three, including one at his own flat. tory mps will be listening carefully to what their voters have to say about this saga in the days ahead. the culture was all wrong and i'm sure it wouldn't have happened under previous prime ministers and stuff. i don't think they would have been doing it with theresa
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may, put it that way! i would love to believe _ that he was sorry and he would fix it, but until the next time. while they wait for the police to decide if any laws have been broken, one conservative mp said the prime minister remained on probation. ben wright, bbc news, westminster. 0ur chief political correspondent, adam fleming joins us now from downing street. context is important this morning. how significant a moment was that, what we saw in parliament yesterday? well, the fury aimed at boris johnson, _ well, the fury aimed at boris johnson, especially from his own side and — johnson, especially from his own side and all generations of the conservative party, was quite something to behold. borisjohnson's deteriorating relationship with his backbenchers is one of the big strands — backbenchers is one of the big strands of this story. although at the moment, not enough of his own side are _ the moment, not enough of his own side are prepared to put in letters of no _ side are prepared to put in letters of no confidence which would trigger the process by which he could be
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removed — the process by which he could be removed as prime minister. the second — removed as prime minister. the second strand of the story isjust what _ second strand of the story isjust what is _ second strand of the story isjust what is going to happen here in downing — what is going to happen here in downing street? his main response to this, apart _ downing street? his main response to this, apart from apologising, is to talk about— this, apart from apologising, is to talk about overhauling the number 10 operation~ _ talk about overhauling the number 10 operation. sue gray was critical of who reports— operation. sue gray was critical of who reports to who, who is responsible for what, and the fact junior— responsible for what, and the fact junior staff felt they could not raise — junior staff felt they could not raise concerns they had about what had been _ raise concerns they had about what had been going on. the third big strands — had been going on. the third big strands to— had been going on. the third big strands to all of this is the ongoing _ strands to all of this is the ongoing separate criminal investigation into parties in whitehall and downing street by the metropolitan police. we now know they have — metropolitan police. we now know they have got a 300 photos, 500 pages _ they have got a 300 photos, 500 pages of— they have got a 300 photos, 500 pages of evidence based on interviews with 70 people. and you think— interviews with 70 people. and you think the _ interviews with 70 people. and you think the trouble that has been caused — think the trouble that has been caused for the government and the pain for— caused for the government and the pain for the public by about 12 to 15 facts — pain for the public by about 12 to 15 facts coming out so far, so there could _ 15 facts coming out so far, so there could be _ 15 facts coming out so far, so there could be a — 15 facts coming out so far, so there could be a whole lot more. also, it does _ could be a whole lot more. also, it does mean — could be a whole lot more. also, it does mean borisjohnson has had a stay of— does mean borisjohnson has had a stay of execution, is on probation, whatever— stay of execution, is on probation, whatever metaphor you want, this is not the _
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whatever metaphor you want, this is not the end — whatever metaphor you want, this is not the end of this story. it is also — not the end of this story. it is also a — not the end of this story. it is also a chance for him to get on with the job— also a chance for him to get on with the job today. number 10 are focusing _ the job today. number 10 are focusing on the fact he is going to ukraine _ focusing on the fact he is going to ukraine today, to talk about a potential _ ukraine today, to talk about a potential conflict with russia, and also before he goes there will be a bog—standard meeting of the cabinet as well _ bog—standard meeting of the cabinet as well. after all the drama of yesterday, borisjohnsonjust carries— yesterday, borisjohnsonjust carries on. adam, thank you. and we'll be hearing from the government at 07:30, when we speak to deputy prime minister dominic raab. and at ten past seven we'll be talking to the opposition leader sir keir starmer. i like what adam saad, a bog—standard meeting of the cabinet. i wonder if it really will be bog—standard? the prime minister will travel to ukraine today, for talks with the country's president, amid continuing tensions with russia. the kremlin has denied planning to invade its neighbour, but has tens of thousands of troops massed on the border. james waterhouse is there this morning. what is on the prime minister's agenda today? well, there
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is alwa s a minister's agenda today? well, there is always a clue _ minister's agenda today? well, there is always a clue that _ minister's agenda today? well, there is always a clue that a _ minister's agenda today? well, there is always a clue that a world - minister's agenda today? well, there is always a clue that a world leader i is always a clue that a world leader is always a clue that a world leader is arriving — is always a clue that a world leader is arriving when you see heavily armoured — is arriving when you see heavily armoured police blocking roads in central— armoured police blocking roads in central kyiv this morning. boris johnson — central kyiv this morning. boris johnson has been in the news channels— johnson has been in the news channels recently, not because of partygate. — channels recently, not because of partygate, but because of the military— partygate, but because of the military aid to the uk has been delivering to ukraine. 0ne channel was enthusiastically covering the anti-tank— was enthusiastically covering the anti—tank missile launchers, describing them as flawless and needed — describing them as flawless and needed. what can we expect today? you will— needed. what can we expect today? you will get a renewed promise from both leaders to sort out the russian crisis _ both leaders to sort out the russian crisis diplomatically. talks to continue _ crisis diplomatically. talks to continue. the uk has been drawing up laws for— continue. the uk has been drawing up laws for new— continue. the uk has been drawing up laws for new sanctions, economic punishments for russia, for the people — punishments for russia, for the people that surround president putin to put— people that surround president putin to put off— people that surround president putin to put off an invasion. as well as an £88_ to put off an invasion. as well as an £88 million package from the uk too, in _ an £88 million package from the uk too, in the — an £88 million package from the uk too, in the words of the government, help with _ too, in the words of the government, help with stable leadership, to help the ukrainian government leader. things— the ukrainian government leader. things are — the ukrainian government leader. things are getting tense politically. there was a very angry un security council meeting
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yesterday, when the us stated that any invasion by russia would be met with decisive action, with serious consequences. russia, in turn, accused — consequences. russia, in turn, accused the _ consequences. russia, in turn, accused the west of interfering with its own _ accused the west of interfering with its own affairs. the un secretary —— the us— its own affairs. the un secretary —— the us secretary of state will meet his counterpart today on russia's demands— his counterpart today on russia's demands that russia can never demand -- join _ demands that russia can never demand -- join nato _ —— join nato. thank you very much indeed. health officials are warning that more than one in ten children starting school in england are at risk of measles, because they have not been vaccinated. the number of five—year—olds that have had both doses of mmr, that helps protect against measles, mumps and rubella, has dropped to the lowest for a decade. whoopi goldberg is facing a backlash after she set on an american talk show that the holocaust was not about race. the actress and television personality said on abc that the nazi genocide of the jewish
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people involved two groups of white people. critics pointed out that hitler had vented his hatred of jewish people in racial terms. she has since apologised. the new york times — she has since apologised. the new york times has _ she has since apologised. the new york times has purchased - she has since apologised. the new york times has purchased the i she has since apologised. the new. york times has purchased the popular word game word orfor an undisclosed seven figure sum. the word game word or for an undisclosed seven figure sum.— seven figure sum. the free for now web-based — seven figure sum. the free for now web-based games _ seven figure sum. the free for now web-based games which _ seven figure sum. the free for now web-based games which boast i seven figure sum. the free for now- web-based games which boast millions web—based games which boast millions of players was created byjosh waddle. he said the success of the game had been a little overwhelming. it has really taken over. the new owners said the game is going to remain free to play for the time being. you don't want adverts in this, do you? he being. you don't want adverts in this, do you?— being. you don't want adverts in this, do you? he invented it for his wife during — this, do you? he invented it for his wife during lockdown. _ this, do you? he invented it for his wife during lockdown. that - this, do you? he invented it for his wife during lockdown. that is i this, do you? he invented it for his wife during lockdown. that is part. wife during lockdown. that is part of the glory of it. you can or was that it of the glory of it. you can or was thatitis of the glory of it. you can or was that it is getting very popular because now there are ways of cheating. if you just type answers, sometimes there are ways around it.
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just keep it pure. you and your brain. have you done it today? i have. rattled through it earlier on. such a show. let's go to carol. such a show. let's to to carol. ., let's go to carol. good morning. if ou are let's go to carol. good morning. if you are just _ let's go to carol. good morning. if you are just stepping _ let's go to carol. good morning. if you are just stepping out, - let's go to carol. good morning. if you are just stepping out, it i let's go to carol. good morning. if you are just stepping out, it is i let's go to carol. good morning. if you are just stepping out, it is not| you arejust stepping out, it is not a cold start to the day. in fact, this is the kind of temperature you can expect when you are this morning. nine and ten quite rightly across the board. we have got a lot of cloud in northern ireland, also england and wales. a weather front is producing rain. slowly it will slip southwards and towards the west. behind it, the sky is bright, there will be a fair bit of sunshine, some showers. another windy day. not as windy as yesterday. however, having said that, across caithness and sutherland, and 0rkney in particular, we are looking at gusts of wind, as much as 65 mph, possibly more than that. temperatures this afternoon ranging from eight to 1a degrees, again feeling milder than i did yesterday. through this evening
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and overnight, a weatherfront sinking south and west turns round and started to move back towards the north and the east, taking its cloud and rain with it. the rain won't be particularly heavy. we will see some clearance in the sky across parts of wales. we could see temperatures slipping down to 2 degrees in aberdeenshire. if that happens, you might see a touch of frost. but for most of us, we won't and the winds will continue to ease. as we head through the course of wednesday, a weather front still dragged across scotland and parts of england, taking its cloud and its spots of rain. it will brighten up in wales, the west midlands and southern england. 0nce the west midlands and southern england. once again it will be a mild day. then it turns colder. thank you, carol. you're my favourite five letter word in the morning. actually, you are five letters as well, aren't you?! i can go without. that is totally fine. let's go back to our top story now,
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and the highly critical report by sue gray into gatherings held in downing street. we're joined now by the party leader, sir keir starmer. good morning. good morning. a really sitnificant good morning. good morning. a really significant day — good morning. good morning. a really significant day in _ good morning. good morning. a really significant day in parliament _ significant day in parliament yesterday. very emotional at times. you are in the middle of it all. what are the key questions do you think, the prime minister has yet to answer? taste think, the prime minister has yet to answer? ~ ., ., ., , , think, the prime minister has yet to answer? ., ., ., _ , answer? we have now obviously seen the u date answer? we have now obviously seen the update from _ answer? we have now obviously seen the update from sue _ answer? we have now obviously seen the update from sue gray. _ answer? we have now obviously seen the update from sue gray. it - answer? we have now obviously seen the update from sue gray. it was i the update from sue gray. it was about _ the update from sue gray. it was about as — the update from sue gray. it was about as damning as it could be because, — about as damning as it could be because, of course, 12 cases have been _ because, of course, 12 cases have been referred to the police for criminal— been referred to the police for criminal investigation. and a number of those _ criminal investigation. and a number of those involved the prime minister himself~ _ of those involved the prime minister himself. so, huge conclusion, that. 0bviously— himself. so, huge conclusion, that. obviously the criminal investigation will now— obviously the criminal investigation will now take place. but meanwhile, and i_ will now take place. but meanwhile, and i think— will now take place. but meanwhile, and i think this is one of the big takeaway— and i think this is one of the big takeaway is, so many people are worried — takeaway is, so many people are worried about issues such as their
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energy— worried about issues such as their energy bills, which are going through— energy bills, which are going through the roof. and the prime minister— through the roof. and the prime minister is — through the roof. and the prime minister is spending all of his time saving _ minister is spending all of his time saving his — minister is spending all of his time saving his own skin. we now know he had a _ saving his own skin. we now know he had a meeting planned with the chancellor last week to discuss energy— chancellor last week to discuss energy bills, but that was cancelled because _ energy bills, but that was cancelled because he was having meetings to save his _ because he was having meetings to save his ownjob. i think there is a real frustration that the prime minister— real frustration that the prime minister is distracted from the things— minister is distracted from the things that really are concerning people. — things that really are concerning people, and those energy bills are a real cause _ people, and those energy bills are a real cause for concern. they are likely— real cause for concern. they are likely to — real cause for concern. they are likely to go _ real cause for concern. they are likely to go up again in the next few months. what the labour party have said _ few months. what the labour party have said is — few months. what the labour party have said is we need a way to bring these _ have said is we need a way to bring these bills— have said is we need a way to bring these bills down. we have put a proposal— these bills down. we have put a proposal on the table using a windfall— proposal on the table using a windfall tax to cut those energy bills for— windfall tax to cut those energy bills for every household. and this afternoon — bills for every household. and this afternoon we are going to force a vote on— afternoon we are going to force a vote on this, to make sure that, if we can, _ vote on this, to make sure that, if we can, we — vote on this, to make sure that, if we can, we can move forward on this vital issue _ we can, we can move forward on this vital issue for— we can, we can move forward on this vital issue for people, because in the end _ vital issue for people, because in the end so— vital issue for people, because in the end so many people are paying the end so many people are paying the price _ the end so many people are paying the price of— the end so many people are paying the price of the chaos and incompetence and worse of the prime minister's _ incompetence and worse of the prime minister's behaviour. we
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incompetence and worse of the prime minister's behaviour.— minister's behaviour. we are going to talk about _ minister's behaviour. we are going to talk about the _ minister's behaviour. we are going to talk about the cost _ minister's behaviour. we are going to talk about the cost of _ minister's behaviour. we are going to talk about the cost of living i minister's behaviour. we are going to talk about the cost of living in i to talk about the cost of living in a moment. iwant to talk about the cost of living in a moment. i want to return to the events of yesterday. we did see significant scenes in the house of commons. in fact, significant scenes in the house of commons. infact, thinking significant scenes in the house of commons. in fact, thinking about your previous role as dpp, the prime minister was correct when he said he couldn't comment on a current investigation by the metropolitan police, he was right, wasn't he? he. police, he was right, wasn't he? no, he is not right _ police, he was right, wasn't he? no, he is not right about that. what happened — he is not right about that. what happened was the metropolitan police asked that the full report not be published at the moment. but the idea that — published at the moment. but the idea that that prevents the prime minister— idea that that prevents the prime minister from saying whether he was at a party— minister from saying whether he was at a party on a particular day is absolute nonsense. absolute nonsense. and i think, you know, the spectacle _ nonsense. and i think, you know, the spectacle of— nonsense. and i think, you know, the spectacle of the prime minister standing — spectacle of the prime minister standing at the dispatch box and being _ standing at the dispatch box and being asked, were you at this party on the _ being asked, were you at this party on the 13th — being asked, were you at this party on the 13th of november in your own flat, and _ on the 13th of november in your own flat, and he — on the 13th of november in your own flat, and he says i can't answer that _ flat, and he says i can't answer that because of the investigation, he knows — that because of the investigation, he knows very well whether using the flat. he knows very well whether using the flat he _ he knows very well whether using the flat he is— he knows very well whether using the flat. he is taking us for. full stop one of— flat. he is taking us for. full stop one of the — flat. he is taking us for. full stop one of the features of this particular set of circumstances is
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not only— particular set of circumstances is not only did the prime minister and others _ not only did the prime minister and others break the rules, but they have _ others break the rules, but they have taken the country for fulls by insulting _ have taken the country for fulls by insulting our intelligence in the cover-up — insulting our intelligence in the cover—up that has gone on since. what _ cover—up that has gone on since. what more — cover—up that has gone on since. what more could you do to convince the prime minister to stand down? he is clearly refusing to resign. what else is left for you to try now? in the end it is going to have to be for his— the end it is going to have to be for his own _ the end it is going to have to be for his own members of parliament to decide _ for his own members of parliament to decide whether they want to remove him. decide whether they want to remove him and _ decide whether they want to remove him and i_ decide whether they want to remove him. and i think he should resign. i expressed. — him. and i think he should resign. i expressed, ortried him. and i think he should resign. i expressed, or tried to express, what ithink— expressed, or tried to express, what i think is— expressed, or tried to express, what i think is the — expressed, or tried to express, what i think is the emotion of the country— i think is the emotion of the country yesterday, because what the last few _ country yesterday, because what the last few weeks have cause for so many _ last few weeks have cause for so many people is a sort of reliving of some _ many people is a sort of reliving of some of— many people is a sort of reliving of some of the — many people is a sort of reliving of some of the dark moments, and there's— some of the dark moments, and there's been anger, there's been grief— there's been anger, there's been grief and — there's been anger, there's been grief and there's been guilt. i have spoken— grief and there's been guilt. i have spoken to — grief and there's been guilt. i have spoken to summery people who say to me, spoken to summery people who say to me. look— spoken to summery people who say to me, look here, i feel guilty that i followed — me, look here, i feel guilty that i followed the rules because i should have done — followed the rules because i should have done this for my dad and i
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didn't — have done this for my dad and i didn't i— have done this for my dad and i didn't. i should have done that for my elderly— didn't. i should have done that for my elderly parent but i didn't because _ my elderly parent but i didn't because i followed the rules. and now i_ because i followed the rules. and now i feel— because i followed the rules. and now i feel like a mug because the prime _ now i feel like a mug because the prime minister broke the rules and he is _ prime minister broke the rules and he is pretending he didn't. i think that emotion is very important. one of the _ that emotion is very important. one of the things i try to get across yesterday, it's very important, this, _ yesterday, it's very important, this, members of the public who are the rules— this, members of the public who are the rules should not feel guilty. they— the rules should not feel guilty. they should feel proud, the pride of knowing _ they should feel proud, the pride of knowing that what they did saved the lives of _ knowing that what they did saved the lives of the people they will probably never meet. gk. lives of the people they will probably never meet. lives of the people they will robabl never meet. ~ ., , ., probably never meet. 0k. would you force a vote — probably never meet. 0k. would you force a vote of _ probably never meet. 0k. would you force a vote of confidence _ probably never meet. 0k. would you force a vote of confidence at - probably never meet. 0k. would you force a vote of confidence at this i force a vote of confidence at this point? can you?— force a vote of confidence at this point? can you? well, in the end it is ttoin point? can you? well, in the end it is going to — point? can you? well, in the end it is going to have — point? can you? well, in the end it is going to have to _ point? can you? well, in the end it is going to have to be _ point? can you? well, in the end it is going to have to be members i point? can you? well, in the end it is going to have to be members of| is going to have to be members of parliament on the prime minister's own side _ parliament on the prime minister's own side that take the decision on this _ own side that take the decision on this. �* , ., ., a, ., this. and when you quoted margaret thatcher yesterday, _ this. and when you quoted margaret thatcher yesterday, are _ this. and when you quoted margaret thatcher yesterday, are they - this. and when you quoted margaret thatcher yesterday, are they the i thatcher yesterday, are they the people you are talking to? yes. thatcher yesterday, are they the people you are talking to? yes, i was. i people you are talking to? yes, i was- i was _ people you are talking to? yes, i was. i was imploring _ people you are talking to? yes, i was. i was imploring them i people you are talking to? yes, i was. i was imploring them to do | people you are talking to? yes, i i was. i was imploring them to do the ri-ht was. i was imploring them to do the right thing — was. i was imploring them to do the right thing. the longer this goes on, right thing. the longer this goes on. the — right thing. the longer this goes on, the longer we are obscuring and not getting — on, the longer we are obscuring and
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not getting on with the issues that matter— not getting on with the issues that matter most to people. the question of the _ matter most to people. the question of the energy bills is a huge worry for millions of families. and instead _ for millions of families. and instead of getting on with dealing with it. _ instead of getting on with dealing with it. as— instead of getting on with dealing with it, as we have suggested, we put a _ with it, as we have suggested, we put a concrete proposal on the table. — put a concrete proposal on the table. the _ put a concrete proposal on the table, the labour party have put that alternative on the table, we are asking — that alternative on the table, we are asking parliament to vote on it, we are _ are asking parliament to vote on it, we are saying to the prime minister, .et we are saying to the prime minister, get on _ we are saying to the prime minister, get on with— we are saying to the prime minister, get on with it, but he is distracted saving _ get on with it, but he is distracted saving his — get on with it, but he is distracted saving his own skin. we are trying to build _ saving his own skin. we are trying to build a — saving his own skin. we are trying to build a new britain coming out of the pandemic based on security, prosperity— the pandemic based on security, prosperity and respect. and we will focus _ prosperity and respect. and we will focus on _ prosperity and respect. and we will focus on that this afternoon when we put to— focus on that this afternoon when we put to a _ focus on that this afternoon when we put to a vote — focus on that this afternoon when we put to a vote this very simple pr0posat. _ put to a vote this very simple proposal, which says a windfall tax on gas _ proposal, which says a windfall tax on gas and — proposal, which says a windfall tax on gas and oil in the north sea in order— on gas and oil in the north sea in order to — on gas and oil in the north sea in order to reduce the energy bills of mittions— order to reduce the energy bills of millions of— order to reduce the energy bills of millions of families across the country — millions of families across the count . �* , ., ., millions of families across the count . �* ., ., ,, country. and while you are talking about these _ country. and while you are talking about these plans _ country. and while you are talking about these plans you _ country. and while you are talking about these plans you are - country. and while you are talking | about these plans you are speaking about these plans you are speaking about this afternoon, the long term plans, what would you do in the short—term to help people in crisis now? short-term to help people in crisis now? ~ , , ., , ., now? well, this is a short-term lan, it now? well, this is a short-term plan. it is _ now? well, this is a short-term plan. it is a _ now? well, this is a short-term plan, it is a windfall _ now? well, this is a short-term plan, it is a windfall tax - now? well, this is a short-terml plan, it is a windfall tax intended to bring —
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plan, it is a windfall tax intended to bring those bills down by £200 for every— to bring those bills down by £200 for every family and up to £600 for a tower— for every family and up to £600 for a tower and — for every family and up to £600 for a lower and middle income families. so it a lower and middle income families. 50 it is— a lower and middle income families. so it is intended to have immediate effect _ so it is intended to have immediate effect we — so it is intended to have immediate effect. we put the proposal on the table _ effect. we put the proposal on the table some weeks ago now. if the government had picked it up and run with it. _ government had picked it up and run with it, those bills would have started — with it, those bills would have started to come down because i think most families are aware that their bills going — most families are aware that their bills going up is a real cause for concern, — bills going up is a real cause for concern, and they know they're going to go— concern, and they know they're going to go up— concern, and they know they're going to go up again because the government going to whack them for more _ government going to whack them for more tax _ government going to whack them for more tax in — government going to whack them for more tax in april. you have inflation _ more tax in april. you have inflation going up to possibly 6%, the highest since the days ofjohn major _ the highest since the days ofjohn major you — the highest since the days ofjohn major. you have got fuel bills, energy— major. you have got fuel bills, energy bills, food bills going up. and then — energy bills, food bills going up. and then the government as decided to whack— and then the government as decided to whack people for more tax in a few weeks— to whack people for more tax in a few weeks in april. it is the worst of all— few weeks in april. it is the worst of all circumstances were so many families — of all circumstances were so many families. there is the frustration of the _ families. there is the frustration of the government isjust not getting — of the government isjust not getting on with the job. you of the government isjust not getting on with the job. getting on with the 'ob. you would sa cut getting on with the 'ob. you would say cut wn _ getting on with the 'ob. you would say cut wn on —
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getting on with the job. you would say out vat on energy _ getting on with the job. you would say out vat on energy bills. - getting on with the job. you would say out vat on energy bills. how l say cut vat on energy bills. how would the treasury recoup those losses? ~ ., would the treasury recoup those losses? ~ . ,_ would the treasury recoup those losses? ~ . ., ~ losses? what we say about the vat, cut the vat — losses? what we say about the vat, cut the vat using, _ losses? what we say about the vat, cut the vat using, there's _ losses? what we say about the vat, cut the vat using, there's been - losses? what we say about the vat, cut the vat using, there's been a . cut the vat using, there's been a surplus— cut the vat using, there's been a surplus of— cut the vat using, there's been a surplus of vat that is coming, using that to _ surplus of vat that is coming, using that to fund — surplus of vat that is coming, using that to fund it. the proposal we have _ that to fund it. the proposal we have put— that to fund it. the proposal we have put on the table is you have a windfall— have put on the table is you have a windfall tax — have put on the table is you have a windfall tax on oil and gas companies in the north sea in relation — companies in the north sea in relation to profits they weren't expecting to make. you also cut you vat using _ expecting to make. you also cut you vat using the vat receipts that were higher— vat using the vat receipts that were higher than— vat using the vat receipts that were higher than they were expected. we have not— higher than they were expected. we have not only got a concrete proposal— have not only got a concrete proposal on the table, we have said how it _ proposal on the table, we have said how it can— proposal on the table, we have said how it can be costed. we want a vote this afternoon. and frankly, i say to any— this afternoon. and frankly, i say to any tory— this afternoon. and frankly, i say to any tory mps, if you want to move this forward, — to any tory mps, if you want to move this forward, if you want to get on with the _ this forward, if you want to get on with the job, vote with us this afternoon _ with the job, vote with us this afternoon and we can make some progress — afternoon and we can make some progress in — afternoon and we can make some progress in reducing the energy bills are — progress in reducing the energy bills are so many people across the country _ bills are so many people across the count . ., ., ., , ., ., . country. for all of us who watch westminster, _ country. for all of us who watch westminster, i'm _ country. for all of us who watch westminster, i'm sure - country. for all of us who watch westminster, i'm sure for- country. for all of us who watch - westminster, i'm sure for everybody involved, this past few weeks have been a moment of political theatre, but do you understand that lots of people watching this programme from home this morning probably they are fed up with politicians, fed up of the whole situation and perhaps one
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of the government to be left alone to get on with the job that we have been talking about, the cost of living crisis, the crisis in ukraine? what would you say to them? look, i do understand that. what i would _ look, i do understand that. what i would say— look, i do understand that. what i would say in — look, i do understand that. what i would say in relation to that is very— would say in relation to that is very straightforward. the prime minister— very straightforward. the prime minister broke the rules. he lied about— minister broke the rules. he lied about having broken the rules. he had to— about having broken the rules. he had to start an investigation by sue gray~ _ had to start an investigation by sue gray~ and _ had to start an investigation by sue gray. and the prime minister has trrought— gray. and the prime minister has brought a — gray. and the prime minister has brought a criminal investigation on hinrself _ brought a criminal investigation on himself. it's no good him trying to blame _ himself. it's no good him trying to blame politicians in general. there is one _ blame politicians in general. there is one person at the centre of the issue _ is one person at the centre of the issue has— is one person at the centre of the issue has caused all of those problems. he is subject to a criminal— problems. he is subject to a criminal investigation because of his own — criminal investigation because of his own behaviour. that is why i genuinely— his own behaviour. that is why i genuinely think that the time has come _ genuinely think that the time has come for— genuinely think that the time has come for him to go. i have resisted the temptation over the past two years— the temptation over the past two years simply to call for him to resign— years simply to call for him to resign every time something goes wrong _ resign every time something goes wrong. but i genuinely think now it is in the _ wrong. but i genuinely think now it is in the national interest that he goes _ is in the national interest that he goes and — is in the national interest that he goes and we can all focus on the things— goes and we can all focus on the things like — goes and we can all focus on the things like energy bills, what is happening in ukraine, and get on with the — happening in ukraine, and get on with the job. sir happening in ukraine, and get on
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with the job-— with the 'ob. sir keir starmer, thank with the job. sir keir starmer, thank you _ with the job. sir keir starmer, thank you very _ with the job. sir keir starmer, thank you very much - with the job. sir keir starmer, thank you very much indeed. l thank you very much indeed. some very special news now about a koala. ,., ., it some very special news now about a koala-- it is — some very special news now about a koala.- n is the _ some very special news now about a koala.- it is the first _ some very special news now about a koala.- it is the first to - some very special news now about a koala. good. it is the first to be born in europe. _ our environment correspondent jonah fisher has exclusive access. he's at longleat safari park, where we're hoping to catch a glimpse of the newjoey. any signs yet, jonah? we all want to see the koala. good nrorning _ we all want to see the koala. good morning. we have rather gate—crashed the bedroom of violets, the mummy koala~ _ the bedroom of violets, the mummy koala~ you _ the bedroom of violets, the mummy koala. you can see her there. we were _ koala. you can see her there. we were rather— koala. you can see her there. we were rather worried that her baby would _ were rather worried that her baby would not — were rather worried that her baby would not make an appearance this morning _ would not make an appearance this morning because koala is sleeper so much _ morning because koala is sleeper so much but— morning because koala is sleeper so much. but you can see that he or she isjust— much. but you can see that he or she isjust popping its head out now. we are in— isjust popping its head out now. we are in luck — isjust popping its head out now. we are in luck. this is the first southern _ are in luck. this is the first southern koala. there are northern and southern koalas. this is the first— and southern koalas. this is the first southern koala to be born in europe — first southern koala to be born in europe a— first southern koala to be born in europe. a really exciting day here. we are _ europe. a really exciting day here. we are going to speak tojohn, one
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of violets— we are going to speak tojohn, one of violets plasma keepers, injust a minute _ of violets plasma keepers, injust a minute i_ of violets plasma keepers, injust a minute. i spent day here at longleat a week— minute. i spent day here at longleat a week or— minute. i spent day here at longleat a week or so — minute. i spent day here at longleat a week or so ago. here is my report on the _ a week or so ago. here is my report on the extraordinaryjourney to get to this _ on the extraordinaryjourney to get to this point. i have got a little bit of news for you. james, a keeper at longleat safari park, is on a zoom with chris... oh, well, let's hear it! ..a koala expert in southern australia. so, i'd like to introduce you to — obviously, you know, violet, one of your lovely adelaide koalas, but she also has a joey. oh, that's fantastic news, james. well done — congratulations, you're an uncle. absolutely brilliant. yeah, it's a little overwhelming. it's been quite a journey to get here. three and a half years ago, violet was a koala pioneer, making the long journey from chris' park in australia, to start england's only koala colony at longleat. when it was first born, violet's joey was the size of a jelly bean, and spent all of its time in its mother's pouch.
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now, six months on, the park and the koala are going public, and the joey is also starting to snack on more than just milk. so what the little joey is eating is called pap. it's recycled koala poo from violet, which means that it's gone through her, which takes the toxin levels out of the leaf, meaning that it's safe for the joey, but it gets used to the leaves that it will eat in its future life. so there are two subspecies of koala — the northern koala and what violet is, which is a southern koala, which is a bit bigger and hairier than its northern cousins. oh, look — it'sjust popping out there. and this little joey, there... ..well, he or she is the first southern koala ever to be born in europe. james was one of the longleat keepers who went out to australia to help out in the aftermath of the bushfires two years ago,
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when tens of thousands of koalas died. with rising global temperatures, it's likely to be just a matter of time before it happens again. koalas are particularly badly affected by fires, because they are up in the trees. they are really, really vulnerable to fires. so climate change could be really bad news for koalas? yeah, i don't think there's much debate about that. it will affect them badly. the question — i mean, they're not going to die out in the next five years, but they are seriously at risk. they're probably the fussiest animal that we have. keeping the koalas happy so far from home is a major undertaking. if they don't like it, they will let you know very, very quickly. they only eat eucalyptus, some of which is grown specially for them on site. i can see why it's good on a business level to have a cute baby koala born here. but is there a really good conservation reason for having a breeding group of koalas here in the uk, so so far away from australia?
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koalas are under threat. they're very complex creatures, and not very well understood. it's only recently that research in earnest has begun into the various conditions they face, both in australia and over here. and so by having this diverse pool of koalas in a controlled environment, we can contribute very substantially to the research that's taking place. this with the new baby at the park, this male is sounding out his partner to see if she fancies making another. you don't have to be an expert in koala body language to recognise a polite no. summer, the baby is stilljust about peeking _ summer, the baby is stilljust about peeking out. i am withjohn, one of the keepers — peeking out. i am withjohn, one of the keepers. instead of asking you
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troring _ the keepers. instead of asking you boring grown—up questions, i am going _ boring grown—up questions, i am going to — boring grown—up questions, i am going to ask you questions which my daughter— going to ask you questions which my daughter wanted to know about this koala~ _ daughter wanted to know about this koala. firstly, this baby koala has been _ koala. firstly, this baby koala has been living — koala. firstly, this baby koala has been living in the pouch. has it been _ been living in the pouch. has it been pulling in the pouch? it sounds disgusting — been pulling in the pouch? it sounds disauustin. ., been pulling in the pouch? it sounds disauustin. . . , ,, disgusting. yeah, the pouch is like a bab 's disgusting. yeah, the pouch is like a baby's nursery- _ disgusting. yeah, the pouch is like a baby's nursery. there _ disgusting. yeah, the pouch is like a baby's nursery. there is - a baby's nursery. there is everything _ a baby's nursery. there is everything in _ a baby's nursery. there is everything in there. - a baby's nursery. there is everything in there. the i a baby's nursery. there is - everything in there. the baby a baby's nursery. there is _ everything in there. the baby spends a lot of— everything in there. the baby spends a lot of time — everything in there. the baby spends a lot of time being _ everything in there. the baby spends a lot of time being cleaned _ everything in there. the baby spends a lot of time being cleaned up - a lot of time being cleaned up after — a lot of time being cleaned up after we _ a lot of time being cleaned up after. we have _ a lot of time being cleaned up after. we have to _ a lot of time being cleaned up after. we have to make - a lot of time being cleaned up after. we have to make sure i a lot of time being cleaned up . after. we have to make sure it's house _ after. we have to make sure it's house is— after. we have to make sure it's house is clean. _ after. we have to make sure it's house is clean.— after. we have to make sure it's house is clean. where is the dad? koalas aren't _ house is clean. where is the dad? koalas aren't particularly - house is clean. where is the dad? | koalas aren't particularly sociable. they don't — koalas aren't particularly sociable. they don't spend _ koalas aren't particularly sociable. they don't spend a _ koalas aren't particularly sociable. they don't spend a lot _ koalas aren't particularly sociable. they don't spend a lot of- koalas aren't particularly sociable. they don't spend a lot of time - they don't spend a lot of time together _ they don't spend a lot of time together the _ they don't spend a lot of time together. the dad _ they don't spend a lot of time together. the dad has - they don't spend a lot of time together. the dad has done . they don't spend a lot of timel together. the dad has done his they don't spend a lot of time - together. the dad has done his part. he has— together. the dad has done his part. he has no— together. the dad has done his part. he has no other— together. the dad has done his part. he has no other part— together. the dad has done his part. he has no other part of— together. the dad has done his part. he has no other part of the - he has no other part of the upbringing _ he has no other part of the upbringing of— he has no other part of the upbringing of the _ he has no other part of the upbringing of the baby. - he has no other part of the upbringing of the baby. he| he has no other part of the l upbringing of the baby. he is he has no other part of the - upbringing of the baby. he is now away— upbringing of the baby. he is now away with— upbringing of the baby. he is now away with the _ upbringing of the baby. he is now away with the other _ upbringing of the baby. he is now away with the other koalas. - upbringing of the baby. he is now away with the other koalas. the l upbringing of the baby. he is now- away with the other koalas. the baby doesn't _ away with the other koalas. the baby doesn't even — away with the other koalas. the baby doesn't even know— away with the other koalas. the baby doesn't even know his _ away with the other koalas. the baby doesn't even know his dad, - away with the other koalas. the baby doesn't even know his dad, i- doesn't even know his dad, i suppose. _ doesn't even know his dad, i suppose. really~ _ doesn't even know his dad, i suppose, really.— doesn't even know his dad, i suppose, really. what is the plan from here on _ suppose, really. what is the plan from here on then? _ suppose, really. what is the plan from here on then? this - suppose, really. what is the plan from here on then? this baby - suppose, really. what is the plan from here on then? this baby is. suppose, really. what is the plan l from here on then? this baby is six months _ from here on then? this baby is six months old. — from here on then? this baby is six months old, or so. is he or she going _ months old, or so. is he or she going to — months old, or so. is he or she going to carry on living with the mum? — going to carry on living with the mum? do— going to carry on living with the mum? do they live as a family? how does it— mum? do they live as a family? how does it work? — mum? do they live as a family? how does it work?— does it work? again, not particularly _ does it work? again, not particularly sociable. - does it work? again, not| particularly sociable. the does it work? again, not - particularly sociable. the baby will cement _ particularly sociable. the baby will cement six —
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particularly sociable. the baby will cement six months— particularly sociable. the baby will cement six months with _ particularly sociable. the baby will cement six months with mum. - particularly sociable. the baby will cement six months with mum. ——| particularly sociable. the baby will. cement six months with mum. —— will spend _ cement six months with mum. —— will spend six— cement six months with mum. —— will spend six months— cement six months with mum. —— will spend six months with _ cement six months with mum. —— will spend six months with mum. - cement six months with mum. —— will spend six months with mum. it - cement six months with mum. —— will spend six months with mum. it will. spend six months with mum. it will .et spend six months with mum. it will get more _ spend six months with mum. it will get more confident— spend six months with mum. it will get more confident and _ spend six months with mum. it will get more confident and brave - spend six months with mum. it will get more confident and brave and i get more confident and brave and start bouncing _ get more confident and brave and start bouncing around _ get more confident and brave and start bouncing around in - get more confident and brave and start bouncing around in the - get more confident and brave andj start bouncing around in the trees and grow— start bouncing around in the trees and grow up— start bouncing around in the trees and grow up to _ start bouncing around in the trees and grow up to be _ start bouncing around in the trees and grow up to be a _ start bouncing around in the trees and grow up to be a proper- start bouncing around in the trees and grow up to be a proper little i and grow up to be a proper little bouncy— and grow up to be a proper little bouncy koala~ _ and grow up to be a proper little bouncy koala-— and grow up to be a proper little bouncy koala. obviously it's great news for the _ bouncy koala. obviously it's great news for the part _ bouncy koala. obviously it's great news for the part that _ bouncy koala. obviously it's great news for the part that you - bouncy koala. obviously it's great news for the part that you have i bouncy koala. obviously it's great news for the part that you have a | news for the part that you have a baby— news for the part that you have a baby koala, it will attract lots of people — baby koala, it will attract lots of people. there is some science involved — people. there is some science involved as well, isn't there? yeah. koalas are — involved as well, isn't there? yeah. koalas are such _ involved as well, isn't there? yeah. koalas are such an _ involved as well, isn't there? yeah. koalas are such an iconic— involved as well, isn't there? yeah. koalas are such an iconic animal. i koalas are such an iconic animal. you shout — koalas are such an iconic animal. you shout somebody— koalas are such an iconic animal. you shout somebody a _ koalas are such an iconic animal. you shout somebody a photo - koalas are such an iconic animal. you shout somebody a photo of. koalas are such an iconic animal. | you shout somebody a photo of a koala, _ you shout somebody a photo of a koala, they — you shout somebody a photo of a koala, they know— you shout somebody a photo of a koala, they know what _ you shout somebody a photo of a koala, they know what it - you shout somebody a photo of a koala, they know what it is. - you shout somebody a photo of al koala, they know what it is. there is so _ koala, they know what it is. there is so little — koala, they know what it is. there is so little known _ koala, they know what it is. there is so little known about _ koala, they know what it is. there is so little known about them. - koala, they know what it is. there . is so little known about them. doing research _ is so little known about them. doing research on — is so little known about them. doing research on wild _ is so little known about them. doing research on wild quality— is so little known about them. doing research on wild quality is _ is so little known about them. doing research on wild quality is quite - research on wild quality is quite difficult — research on wild quality is quite difficult. they _ research on wild quality is quite difficult. they spend _ research on wild quality is quite difficult. they spend 20 - research on wild quality is quite difficult. they spend 20 hours l difficult. they spend 20 hours asleep — difficult. they spend 20 hours asleep. there _ difficult. they spend 20 hours asleep. there is _ difficult. they spend 20 hours asleep. there is not - difficult. they spend 20 hours asleep. there is not a - difficult. they spend 20 hours asleep. there is not a logic. difficult. they spend 20 hours. asleep. there is not a logic and learn — asleep. there is not a logic and learn the _ asleep. there is not a logic and learn. the other— asleep. there is not a logic and learn. the other side _ asleep. there is not a logic and learn. the other side of- asleep. there is not a logic and learn. the other side of the - asleep. there is not a logic andi learn. the other side of the coin that research. _ learn. the other side of the coin that research.— learn. the other side of the coin that research. great. john, thank ou ve that research. great. john, thank you very much- — that research. great. john, thank you very much. it _ that research. great. john, thank you very much. it has _ that research. great. john, thank you very much. it has been - that research. great. john, thank you very much. it has been really amazing — you very much. it has been really amazing for— you very much. it has been really amazing for us to come here and see this. amazing for us to come here and see this from _ amazing for us to come here and see this. from violet's by tremendous joey. _ this. from violet's by tremendous joey, back— this. from violet's by tremendous joey, back to you. brilliant.— joey, back to you. brilliant. . ., ., ,, . ., brilliant. a gorgeous slice of tell . brilliant. a gorgeous slice of telly. violet _ brilliant. a gorgeous slice of
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telly. violet knows - brilliant. a gorgeous slice of telly. violet knows her- brilliant. a gorgeous slice of telly. violet knows her own l brilliant. a gorgeous slice of - telly. violet knows her own mind. she does. i enjoyed that shot of her saying, not now. keeping a safe distance. on top of a tree. you stay down there, son. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. nearly eight out of ten londoners say they've seen an increase in the cost of living — since the summer. according to a report by city hall, and polling by yougov, over a third of londoners questioned last week said they'd struggled to pay houshold bills, causing more than one in ten admitting to going without essentials or relying on credit. mayor of london sadiq khan is calling on the government to do more to tackle the rising cost of living. and with the rising cost of living being such a big issue at the moment, we're looking at doing
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more on the subject. so if you've noticed prices going up — and you're struggling to make ends meet, and you're happy to speak to us about it, e—mail us at hellobbclondon@bbc.co.uk. the world's first exhibition of vincent van gogh's self portraits spanning his entire career is opening at the courtauld gallery at somerset house. this is the first look at the paintings on display. the exhibition is ten years in the making, and includes these two paintings which are under the same roof for the first time, since van gogh painted them nearly 130 years ago. the exhibition opens on thursday. it's on until may. today is chinese new year — the year of the tiger. celebrations will be taking place across london all week, although it will be quiter than usual due to coronavirus. however there are celebrations online — and chinese businesses in soho will welcome the year of the tiger —
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which is the symbol of bravery, wisdom and strength. a look at the travel — and the tube board. the district line has delays becuase of a signal failure. tfl rail is part suspended between west drayton and reading. the northern has major work going on until may. onto the weather now with nazaneen. hello. good morning. it is looking a lot calmer today. generally speaking it is going to be quite a dull day. that's due to the fact we got a westerly airflow that is actually bringing through mild air. so it won't be as cold as it was yesterday. also quite a lot of moisture. so as a result we are seeing generally cloudy skies for today. to start off this morning, don't be surprised, quite a dull start to the day. it will be mainly dry though and fairly mild as well. going into this afternoon, we will see little change really. i think we may see the cloud break here and there, so there may be
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the bright or sunny spell. limited amounts of brightness expected for today. generally speaking it stays dry but there is risk of a little bit of light rain or drizzle as the cold front tries to work its way southwards. but it will be mild, as i mentioned. top temperatures up to around 12 celsius. so above average for the time of year. tonight staying generally cloudy, a mild one as well. we may see a few clear spells develop towards dawn. taking a look into the outlook, it does stay mild for another couple of days. friday and saturday, a tad cooler before it turns mild again into the new week and generally staying quite cloudy as well. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. jane is here with all the sport.
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tra nsfer transfer deadline day, quite exciting. quite a few deals went right to the wire. did you stay up? don't worry, i did. one of the biggest deals was kelly ali. how will he fare under the new manager at everton. —— delle ali. a lot of money spent in this transfer window — £295 million pounds changed hands before it closed last night. among the big names delli ali, who'll move from tottenham to everton on a two—and—a—half—year dealfor a fee that could reach £40 million. ali has played 37 times for england, but his career has stalled at spurs in recent years, and he's only played for the club six times
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since antonio conte took over as he will bring a different style of football than we had under benitez. he liked to sit back and hit on the counter. lampard likes to be on the front that and played a high pressing game. fans will give him patients and i hope the board will give him patience there has been constant talk of getting a manager to take us to the new stadium and building a long—term project. he is a young and hungry manager who will want to prove himself. barcelona have agreed a deal to sign arsenal striker pierre emerick aubameyang. he wasn't on the greatest of terms with manager mikel arteta and he's only scored 4 goals in ia games this season. there's no fee involved, but the transfer will reportedly save arsenal around £25 million a year in wages. one of the surprise moves of the window — juventus and wales midfielder aaron ramsey has joined scottish premiership champions rangers. he could make his debut tomorrow in the old firm match.
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he's at ibrox on loan until the end of the season. for all the transfer deadline day news. go to the bbc sport website. we've been telling you about all the big money deals, well the best bit of business in the transfer window was done by a sunday league pub team in shropshire who have the brazilian legend roberto carlos playing for them for a fee of £5.00! the "bull in the barne" pub team entered a raffle on ebay for the world cup winner roberto carlos, who famously took powerful free kicks like this one for his country. he'll play one match for them next month in the shrewsbury & district league. he's 48 years old, but i'll bet he will get a star ahead of anyone in team photo. i will be a queue all the way around the pub to get tickets. —— i bet
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there will be a queue. all this morning we've been reflecting on the fall out from sue gray's report into gatherings held in downing street. so let's look at some of those findings from the initial report. sue gray revealed she investigated 16 separate gatherings — including three that were not previously known about. 12 of those events — on eight separate dates — are now being investigated by the metropolitan police for alleged covid—rule breaking. it's claimed that the prime minister attended three of these. these include the 20 may 2020 "bring your own booze" event in the downing street garden, which the prime minister has apologised for attending. also, borisjohnson's birthday party on i9june 2020. no 10 staff said they'd "gathered briefly" "for less than ten minutes". and the police are also investigating a gathering on 13th november 2020 at mrjohnson's downing street flat. scotland yard say they've got more than 500 pieces of paper and
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300 photos and will progress the investigation "at pace". we're joined now by the deputy prime minister dominic raab. good morning. thank you for being with us this morning. irate good morning. thank you for being with us this morning.— good morning. thank you for being with us this morning. we have heard a lot about the _ with us this morning. we have heard a lot about the sue _ with us this morning. we have heard a lot about the sue gray _ with us this morning. we have heard a lot about the sue gray report - a lot about the sue gray report finding failures and leadership and judgment. haifa finding failures and leadership and 'udument. ., . , ,, , judgment. how much pressure is the prime minister _ judgment. how much pressure is the prime minister boris _ judgment. how much pressure is the prime minister boris john _ judgment. how much pressure is the prime minister boris john the -- - prime minister borisjohn the —— johnson under? h prime minister boris john the -- johnson under?— johnson under? i think it was important — johnson under? i think it was important the _ johnson under? i think it was important the sue _ johnson under? i think it was important the sue gray - johnson under? i think it was | important the sue gray report johnson under? i think it was - important the sue gray report was published in full, the way many people had been calling for. it was important that we looked and learned the lessons that she has highlighted and also the prime minister has come back and said, ok, i want to address and fix this. he has talked about setting up an office of the prime minister because effectively the
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role has evolved over many, many years but the combination of being the place where the prime minister has his office but also the place where the rest of government is directed needs to be addressed, so that will take place with a bespoke permanent secretary. the rules. a and special advisers, the codes of conduct, we will be advised to look at gaps identified in the gray report and how they are in full. a much wider piece about the cabinet and government and accountability to parliament. the right thing to do with contrition, as demonstrated by the prime minister yesterday, apologise and deal with the allegation such as he can. as you said individual claims have gone to the police and we must respect that. hopefully it will be done at pace. what the prime minister ultimately wants, what we'll won and i suspect the public want is for us to get back on with the job. the economy is
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growing the fastest in the g7 and the vaccine roll—out has been fastest in europe. he is going out to ukraine to deal with the situation on the border. having sanctions in place to pose a penalty if vladimir putin invades. that sanctions in place to pose a penalty if vladimir putin invades.— if vladimir putin invades. that is where we want _ if vladimir putin invades. that is where we want to _ if vladimir putin invades. that is where we want to be. _ if vladimir putin invades. that is where we want to be. lots - if vladimir putin invades. that is where we want to be. lots of. if vladimir putin invades. that is . where we want to be. lots of things to pick up in your answer. on vaccines, you say it is the fastest in europe. actually melted my denmark and italy all have better vaccine rates. that is one point, just to clarify. he mentioned about the full report maya happy to say this is the full report? many people are calling for the full sue gray report to be published and this is only a 12 page version. fin report to be published and this is only a 12 page version. on vaccines, if ou only a 12 page version. on vaccines, if you look— only a 12 page version. on vaccines, if you look across _ only a 12 page version. on vaccines, if you look across the _ only a 12 page version. on vaccines, if you look across the that _ only a 12 page version. on vaccines, if you look across the that the - if you look across the that the scale of the vaccinations here and the pace of the vaccine roll—out, we had been unrivalled amongst our european partners. that
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had been unrivalled amongst our european partners.— european partners. that is particularly _ european partners. that is particularly what _ european partners. that is particularly what i - european partners. that is particularly what i am - european partners. that is i particularly what i am looking european partners. that is - particularly what i am looking at, i am just looking at the doses of vaccines per hundred of the population in malta, denmark and italy all have better rates and it is not right to say it is the best. i am saying that visitors can if you take overall numbers, the speed of the booster roll—out and the reason that was important for us, we know if you get this to you at 88% more effective against omicron which has everyone so concerned. that is why we have opened up and been able to open up in the way we have. forgive me, your second question was in relation to... me, your second question was in relation to. . .— me, your second question was in relation to... the full report. many are calling — relation to... the full report. many are calling for _ relation to... the full report. many are calling for the _ relation to... the full report. many are calling for the full _ relation to... the full report. many are calling for the full report - relation to... the full report. many are calling for the full report but i are calling for the full report but you seem to suggest this is the full report from sue gray.— you seem to suggest this is the full report from sue gray. there are two se arate report from sue gray. there are two separate investigations _ report from sue gray. there are two separate investigations going - report from sue gray. there are two separate investigations going on, i separate investigations going on, the police and see gray's. see gray has given the report subjective individual claims that had gone to
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the police to investigate. if she comes back with any further findings, she will publish that in full. precisely because both tracks are independent, sue gray and the metropolitan police, he has been clear that any findings will be published in full as the interim one was. in published in full as the interim one was. ' , , ., , published in full as the interim one was. ' ,, ., ~ was. in the 12 pages she has talked about a failure _ was. in the 12 pages she has talked about a failure of— was. in the 12 pages she has talked about a failure of leadership. - was. in the 12 pages she has talked about a failure of leadership. has l about a failure of leadership. has pointed at the man who is your boss. he must take full responsibility for that kind which he has done. she is talking about the organisational and structural leadership within number 10, because it combines two things, it is the office for the prime minister and the nerve centre for the rest of government, their links with the cabinet office ritual viewers may not particularly familiar, then directs and coordinates the work of government
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across—the—board. in relation to that he has very squarely address the challenge and the problems that have been identified in the way i described. the office of the prime minister led by the permanent secretary, reviews of the code of conduct forcible savants and special advisers, and action to reinforce links which make number 10 notjust a better place for cabinet government to take place but also parliament. if it government to take place but also parliament-— parliament. if it were required for ou to parliament. if it were required for you to stand _ parliament. if it were required for you to stand aside _ parliament. if it were required for you to stand aside as _ parliament. if it were required for you to stand aside as deputy - parliament. if it were required for. you to stand aside as deputy prime minister, would you do that? i will minister, would you do that? i will do whatever _ minister, would you do that? i will do whatever is _ minister, would you do that? i will do whatever is necessary - minister, would you do that? in it do whatever is necessary to fulfil any reforms the prime minister brings forward.— any reforms the prime minister brings forward. that is fine. a lot of eo - le brings forward. that is fine. a lot of people saw — brings forward. that is fine. a lot of people saw yesterday - brings forward. that is fine. a lot of people saw yesterday theresa | brings forward. that is fine. a lot - of people saw yesterday theresa may saying this in parliament. what of people saw yesterday theresa may saying this in parliament.— saying this in parliament. what they sue gray report _ saying this in parliament. what they sue gray report does _ saying this in parliament. what they sue gray report does show - saying this in parliament. what they sue gray report does show is - saying this in parliament. what they. sue gray report does show is number 10 downing _ sue gray report does show is number 10 downing street was not observing the regulations they had imposed on members _ the regulations they had imposed on members of the public. i do my right honourable _ members of the public. i do my right honourable friend had not read the rules _ honourable friend had not read the rules or— honourable friend had not read the rules or did — honourable friend had not read the rules or did not understand what they meant and those around them or they meant and those around them or they did _ they meant and those around them or they did not _
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they meant and those around them or they did not think there will supply to number 10, which was it? how they did not think there will supply to number10, which was it? how much ofthe to number10, which was it? how much of the problem — to number10, which was it? how much of the problem is _ to number10, which was it? how much of the problem is that _ to number10, which was it? how much of the problem is that for _ to number10, which was it? how much of the problem is that for prime - of the problem is that for prime minister borisjohnson this morning? the former leader of the party saying, does the prime ministerfeel the rules do not apply to him? the prime the rules do not apply to him? tue: prime minister the rules do not apply to him? tte: prime minister has the rules do not apply to him? tt9 prime minister has been the rules do not apply to him? tt9: prime minister has been clear the rules do not apply to him? tt9 prime minister has been clear that the rules did apply to him. i do not think theresa may was quite right saying number 10 did not live up to the standards expected that in relation to specific breaches of coronavirus regulations and there have been a series of claims may have been a series of claims may have been a series of claims may have been sent to the police to ascertain precisely the facts. precisely because we and the prime minister taking this so seriously, festival that the sue gray review was commissioned and published in full, what he has received, and why it is quite right she has the prerogative to refer any issues to the police. no one wants this result and facts ascertained as swiftly and effectively as we do in government.
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we want to continue to be delivering on—the—job of the vaccine roll—out, the economy growing fastest in the g7, wages are up, jobs are up and employment is —— unemployment is at a record low. the prime minister is in ukraine speaking to the president about the bellicose behaviour on the border with russia. we are getting on with the job but we recognise theseissues on with the job but we recognise these issues are serious and need to be dealt with. t these issues are serious and need to be dealt with-— be dealt with. i want to talk to you about the fastest growing - be dealt with. i want to talk to you | about the fastest growing economy. the uk economy has experienced the second worst grace among the g7 over the course of the pandemic. are you comparing a different set of figures to get that? we comparing a different set of figures to net that? ~ ., comparing a different set of figures to net that? ~ . . comparing a different set of figures to get that?— to get that? we are citing what has been cited very _ to get that? we are citing what has been cited very regularly, - to get that? we are citing what has been cited very regularly, the - been cited very regularly, the forecast for annual growth. there is no doubt that the economy took a massive contraction. we were very clear about it, left contraction to
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the economy in i think 300 years. precisely why it is such good news we are bouncing back, with unemployment below pre—pandemic levels youth unemployment at lows, wages rising and on the annual statistic, the fastest—growing economy in the g7. none of that would happen had it not been for vaccine roll—out and the big calls made by the prime minister to esat out of lockdown when he decided and the government decided to do all of the government decided to do all of the things that were opposed by keir starmer and many others, in fairness. :, ., starmer and many others, in fairness-— starmer and many others, in fairness. :, ., ., , fairness. you have said a few times in this interview _ fairness. you have said a few times in this interview that _ fairness. you have said a few times in this interview that nobody - fairness. you have said a few times in this interview that nobody wants | in this interview that nobody wants to get to the bottom of this more than the conservative party at the moment. if that is the case, why can't the prime minister answered clearly whether he at that event was meant to have taken place in the downing street flat? the meant to have taken place in the downing street flat?— meant to have taken place in the downing street flat? the minute you start commenting _ downing street flat? the minute you start commenting on _ downing street flat? the minute you start commenting on something - downing street flat? the minute you start commenting on something thatj start commenting on something that is subject to a police investigation, you will be accused
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of prejudging it, prejudicing it. this is a factual question. we are sir keir starmer and he said the prime minister saying he cannot say whether he was there, he said it is absolute nonsense and once again he is insulting the intelligence of the country. is insulting the intelligence of the count . :, :, �* is insulting the intelligence of the count . :, :, ., country. you don't comment on a olice country. you don't comment on a police investigation _ country. you don't comment on a police investigation once - country. you don't comment on a police investigation once it - country. you don't comment on a police investigation once it is - police investigation once it is under— police investigation once it is under way and police investigation once it is underway and if police investigation once it is under way and if he did he would be roundly— under way and if he did he would be roundly criticised probably again by sir keir— roundly criticised probably again by sir keir starmerfor roundly criticised probably again by sir keir starmer for interfering and pre—empting and trying to meddle in an investigation which is quite rightly— an investigation which is quite rightly conducted independently. you talked rightly conducted independently. talked this rightly conducted independently. gm. talked this morning and i asked you about the position prime finds himself in. i have a new poll which says 66% do not accept the apology of the prime minister and 68% do not trust the prime minister and your government to deliver. t do trust the prime minister and your government to deliver.— trust the prime minister and your government to deliver. i do not deny we have had —
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government to deliver. i do not deny we have had a _ government to deliver. i do not deny we have had a rough _ government to deliver. i do not deny we have had a rough patch. - government to deliver. i do not deny we have had a rough patch. i - government to deliver. i do not deny we have had a rough patch. i am - government to deliver. i do not deny we have had a rough patch. i am not| we have had a rough patch. i am not denying _ we have had a rough patch. i am not denying it _ we have had a rough patch. i am not denying it has been a difficult period — denying it has been a difficult period. polls are a snapshot of opinion— period. polls are a snapshot of opinion at— period. polls are a snapshot of opinion at any one particular time, particularly — opinion at any one particular time, particularly at the moment. frankly we're _ particularly at the moment. frankly we're getting on with the job which, come _ we're getting on with the job which, come the _ we're getting on with the job which, come the election people will expect — come the election people will expect. the vaccine roll—out has been _ expect. the vaccine roll—out has been an— expect. the vaccine roll—out has been an unparalleled success. the economic— been an unparalleled success. the economic recovery has been so impressive. we are dealing with this week. _ impressive. we are dealing with this week, government and cabinet will be considering _ week, government and cabinet will be considering the levelling up agenda, expanding opportunities for the most disadvantaged parts of the uk so we are firing _ disadvantaged parts of the uk so we are firing on all cylinders and ultimately they are the things we will be _ ultimately they are the things we will be judged by. | ultimately they are the things we will be judged by.— will bejudged by. i am looking throuuh will bejudged by. i am looking through the — will bejudged by. i am looking through the sue _ will bejudged by. i am looking through the sue gray - will bejudged by. i am looking through the sue gray report. l will bejudged by. i am looking. through the sue gray report. on will bejudged by. i am looking - through the sue gray report. on page five, she says it is not at present to provide a full report. she points towards the metropolitan police investigation as you have this morning. i know you are trying to move on today but the met police are
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investigating a prime minister for possible breach of coronavirus rules. if he is found to have breached the rules in that investigation you keep pointing to, is his position then untenable? t is his position then untenable? i have been asked this question many times _ have been asked this question many times i'm _ have been asked this question many times. i'm not going to comment on the facts _ times. i'm not going to comment on the facts of— times. i'm not going to comment on the facts of the investigation. i am not askin: the facts of the investigation. i am rrot asking you _ the facts of the investigation. i am not asking you to _ the facts of the investigation. i am not asking you to do _ the facts of the investigation. t —n not asking you to do that. i am saying to me if they do find that is his position untenable? taste saying to me if they do find that is his position untenable?— saying to me if they do find that is his position untenable? we will wait and see what _ his position untenable? we will wait and see what the _ his position untenable? we will wait and see what the police _ his position untenable? we will wait and see what the police determine. | and see what the police determine. the prime — and see what the police determine. the prime minister has been clear and i_ the prime minister has been clear and i have — the prime minister has been clear and i have been clear that the ministerial code needs to be upheld in full _ ministerial code needs to be upheld in full i_ ministerial code needs to be upheld in full i am — ministerial code needs to be upheld in full. i am not going to get ahead of the _ in full. i am not going to get ahead of the investigation, it would not be appropriate to do so. two more cuick be appropriate to do so. two more quick questions. _ be appropriate to do so. two more quick questions. another- be appropriate to do so. two more quick questions. another thing - be appropriate to do so. two more | quick questions. another thing sue gray pointed towards was the drinking culture at parliament. is that a problem and what needs to be done? ~ .h that a problem and what needs to be done? ~ :, , ~ done? think it was the drinking in number 10 _ done? think it was the drinking in number 10 rather— done? think it was the drinking in number 10 rather than _ done? think it was the drinking in number 10 rather than in - done? think it was the drinking in - number10 rather than in parliament, number 10 rather than in parliament, dan. number10 rather than in parliament, dan. ~ .., , number10 rather than in parliament, dan. . , :, number10 rather than in parliament, dan. ~ , ., ,
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number10 rather than in parliament, dan.~ , :, , number10 rather than in parliament, dan. ~ , :, , ihad dan. welcome is it a problem? i had to be honest. _ dan. welcome is it a problem? i had to be honest, you _ dan. welcome is it a problem? i had to be honest, you ask— dan. welcome is it a problem? i had to be honest, you ask me _ dan. welcome is it a problem? i had to be honest, you ask me a - dan. welcome is it a problem? i had to be honest, you ask me a straight| to be honest, you ask me a straight guestion. _ to be honest, you ask me a straight question, my experience of the number— question, my experience of the number 10 staff throughout the pandemic has been at the nerve centre. — pandemic has been at the nerve centre, the cockpit of the government response, a huge amount of dedication, determination and incredible — of dedication, determination and incredible hard work. i have not personally— incredible hard work. i have not personally come across the drinking culture _ personally come across the drinking culture that has been referred to. that is— culture that has been referred to. that is why — culture that has been referred to. that is why you have the sue gray report _ that is why you have the sue gray report and — that is why you have the sue gray report and i— that is why you have the sue gray report and i think it does need to be addressed. i report and i think it does need to be addressed.— report and i think it does need to be addressed. . , , . ., be addressed. i appreciate your time this morning- — be addressed. i appreciate your time this morning. thank _ be addressed. i appreciate your time this morning. thank you _ be addressed. i appreciate your time this morning. thank you very - be addressed. i appreciate your time this morning. thank you very much. | this morning. thank you very much. good to talk— this morning. thank you very much. good to talk to _ this morning. thank you very much. good to talk to you. _ let's go straight to carol. some of us are waking up to lovely sunrises this morning. this is in haddington. some of us are waking up to light rain, like in staffordshire. weather front is producing all this cloud in
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northern ireland, parts of northern england and wales. light rain. as it sinks southwards and westward sky behind it will brighten up. there will be sunshine and a few showers. in orkney, caithness and sutherland we could have gusts 65 miles an hour, possibly more stock temperatures milder than yesterday, most of us in double figures. you can see where the weather front is. instead of continuing to me southwest, it will flip and move north—east, taking the cloud and patchy rain with it. under clear skies in aberdeenshire, temperatures could fall away to 2 degrees. you might see a touch of frost. tomorrow most of us waking up to a cloudy start. tomorrow will be fairly cloudy with splashes of light rain here and there. it should right now. once again a mate for the time of
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year. —— it should brighten up and once again a mild day for the time of year. if you've ever driven down a country lane stuck behind a tractor you could be forgiven for thinking they don't go that fast. think again, a new show described as "top gear for farmers" sees teams battle it out to be crowned the uk's best tractor driver. he's already ahead! oh, he's ahead. go on. it is so close, there is smoke everywhere. go on! get on, son. come on.
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this is unbelievable! laughing hejust wins. that was unbelievable, so good. that was intense. that was intense. we saw you very excited. we're joined now by farmer torn pemberton who presents 'the fast and the farmer—ish'. who knew tractors could be so exciting? tt who knew tractors could be so excitin: ? , ., who knew tractors could be so excitin: ? , . ., , who knew tractors could be so excitin. ? , ., ., , . exciting? it is unreal. iwas lucky to be asked _ exciting? it is unreal. iwas lucky to be asked to _ exciting? it is unreal. iwas lucky to be asked to present _ exciting? it is unreal. iwas lucky to be asked to present this - to be asked to present this programme, something never seen before. , ., , :, programme, something never seen l before-— four before. tell us about the show. four nations going _ before. tell us about the show. four nations going head _ before. tell us about the show. four nations going head qualifiers, - before. tell us about the show. four nations going head qualifiers, the i nations going head qualifiers, the heats, semifinals and finals. england, scotland, wales and northern ireland go up against each other and issue showing what young farmers can do, driving track is
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fast and what a skill they have. just showing what they can do and how they can form in a tractor. t how they can form in a tractor. i would imagine, as we saw from the clip from anyone who is going to watch this will see, it is highly competitive, isn't it?- watch this will see, it is highly competitive, isn't it? they want to win. competitive, isn't it? they want to win- every — competitive, isn't it? they want to win. every farmer _ competitive, isn't it? they want to win. every farmer is _ competitive, isn't it? they want to win. every farmer is competitive. l win. every farmer is competitive. every year on the farm you want to do better. these guys showing how improvements can be made and i want to beat other competitors. tett improvements can be made and i want to beat other competitors.— to beat other competitors. tell us about the courses. _ to beat other competitors. tell us about the courses. do _ to beat other competitors. tell us about the courses. do these - to beat other competitors. tell us | about the courses. do these reflect things farmers might do in their real life. :, .. :, things farmers might do in their real life. :, :, .«r things farmers might do in their reallife. :, :, ., ., real life. you cannot make a farming channel without _ real life. you cannot make a farming channel without a _ real life. you cannot make a farming channel without a bit _ real life. you cannot make a farming channel without a bit of— real life. you cannot make a farming channel without a bit of mud - real life. you cannot make a farming channel without a bit of mud and - channel without a bit of mud and dirt. the hairstyles are unreal! we do not see a lot of people for maybe months. it is fine, you can grow it out. we are trying to drive tractors as fast as we can. like i say commit their skill. you have to know each
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corner of your tractor and these guys are really showing it. we did sa in the guys are really showing it. we did say in the introduction _ guys are really showing it. we did say in the introduction about - guys are really showing it. we did say in the introduction about the l say in the introduction about the slow tractors you get on country roads at times.— roads at times. this gets called fast track for _ roads at times. this gets called fast track for a _ roads at times. this gets called fast track for a reason. - roads at times. this gets called fast track for a reason. it - roads at times. this gets called fast track for a reason. it does| fast track for a reason. it does show on this channel it is just amazing, really diverse. we have young farmers and males, females guide to all, small, it does not matter who you are. you can do it whoever you are. you can go into it as a first generation farmer. speaking to these people, it really shows. ,, :, speaking to these people, it really shows. ,, . ., , :, , ., shows. quite a few farming shows all of a sudden- — shows. quite a few farming shows all of a sudden- lt _ shows. quite a few farming shows all of a sudden. it is _ shows. quite a few farming shows all of a sudden. it is super— shows. quite a few farming shows all of a sudden. it is super cool- shows. quite a few farming shows all of a sudden. it is super cool and - of a sudden. it is super cool and you have hit it at the right time. why do we love watching stuff like this? ,, :, .,, why do we love watching stuff like this? :, , .,,._ , this? knockdown has probably helped m --eole this? knockdown has probably helped my people have _ this? knockdown has probably helped my people have been _ this? knockdown has probably helped my people have been stuck— this? knockdown has probably helped my people have been stuck inside. i my people have been stuck inside. when lockdown hit, for us at nothing
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stopped. if you have a meal, if it is neat or no need to thank a farmer. it is the sense of being outside and being free at 12 to 16 hours minimum. you are having a great time, there is always a smile on yourface. everything great time, there is always a smile on your face. everything you put into farming you get back. they see this of the big green fields of being in a tractor and having that sense of freedom is great. i love it, i am mad forfarming, sense of freedom is great. i love it, lam mad forfarming, it sense of freedom is great. i love it, i am mad forfarming, it is the bestjob ever. it, i am mad for farming, it is the best job ever-— it, i am mad for farming, it is the best job ever. best 'ob ever. that is why you have such best job ever. that is why you have such a popular— best job ever. that is why you have such a popular following _ best job ever. that is why you have such a popular following on - best job ever. that is why you have such a popular following on social. such a popular following on social media. does that level of engagement surprise you, how interested people are on occasion? t surprise you, how interested people are on occasion?— are on occasion? i am like a small father from _ are on occasion? i am like a small father from with _ are on occasion? i am like a small father from with sane _ are on occasion? i am like a small father from with sane and - are on occasion? i am like a small father from with sane and is - are on occasion? i am like a smallj father from with sane and is doing what i do. i showed it to a local community. this is what we do. fathers get —— farmers get a bad rap. i make videos twice a week. you
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either like it or you do not end you can make your own decisions about this. that is just how i have grown and it does not make sense. we are hitting hundreds of thousands of subscribers, which is nuts. i am a small farmer in a small town at home. the popularity has grown. i started six years ago and it seems to be growing and growing, which is unreal. tett to be growing and growing, which is unreal. ., :, , unreal. tell me about the tractors, can they be — unreal. tell me about the tractors, can they be modified? _ unreal. tell me about the tractors, can they be modified? what - unreal. tell me about the tractors, can they be modified? what do - unreal. tell me about the tractors, | can they be modified? what do you unreal. tell me about the tractors, - can they be modified? what do you do to make your tractor go faster? you can ut to make your tractor go faster? you can put on — to make your tractor go faster? gm. can put on bigger tires. a tractor, you can screw them up, put more power into it and get more torc out of it. we do have a pink tractor. the power these things have is mental. what these guys have done to
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tractors, young farmers are having a good time. share tractors, young farmers are having a aood time. : , , :, ,, good time. are they still work vehicle is _ good time. are they still work vehicle is best _ good time. are they still work vehicle is best mate _ good time. are they still work vehicle is best mate you - good time. are they still workj vehicle is best mate you could good time. are they still work - vehicle is best mate you could take it back to the farm and use it for normal stuff.— it back to the farm and use it for normal stuff. every farmer here is workin: normal stuff. every farmer here is working on _ normal stuff. every farmer here is working on farm. _ normal stuff. every farmer here is working on farm. the _ normal stuff. every farmer here is working on farm. the brand-newl working on farm. the brand—new tractors and then tractors that are 30, 40 years old. they will go back home and then go to work. what is the point of having a tractor and sticking it in a garage? that the point of having a tractor and sticking it in a garage?— sticking it in a garage? that is a very good _ sticking it in a garage? that is a very good point- _ sticking it in a garage? that is a very good point. this _ sticking it in a garage? that is a very good point. this comes - sticking it in a garage? that is a | very good point. this comes with sticking it in a garage? that is a - very good point. this comes with the return of bbc three which is today. what is it like to be part of the refresh of the channel? t what is it like to be part of the refresh of the channel?- what is it like to be part of the refresh of the channel? i am a small farmer, it refresh of the channel? i am a small farmer. it is — refresh of the channel? i am a small farmer. it is my _ refresh of the channel? i am a small farmer, it is my first _ refresh of the channel? i am a small farmer, it is my first role _ refresh of the channel? i am a small farmer, it is my first role as - farmer, it is my first role as presenter. i did a pilot and they said we done a pretty good job, we were due seven episodes. amazing they have asked someone like me to be part of this, be part of bbc coming back on terrestrial tv. a real honour. fingers crossed it works well and we can go forward and grow with it. this works well and we can go forward and grow with it—
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grow with it. this family had told ou ou grow with it. this family had told you you needed _ grow with it. this family had told you you needed to _ grow with it. this family had told you you needed to start - grow with it. this family had told you you needed to start doing i grow with it. this family had told i you you needed to start doing videos six years ago you would have your own show, what would you have said to them? ,, :, :, , , ., , own show, what would you have said to them? ,, :, :, , , ., :, to them? sumitomo six years ago i would be doing _ to them? sumitomo six years ago i would be doing what _ to them? sumitomo six years ago i would be doing what i _ to them? sumitomo six years ago i would be doing what i am - to them? sumitomo six years ago i would be doing what i am doing i to them? sumitomo six years ago i l would be doing what i am doing now and how i would be doing it, no way. —— if somebody told me years ago step keep saying yes to everything and hopefully keep growing. fight! step keep saying yes to everything and hopefully keep growing. and keep doin: the and hopefully keep growing. and keep doing the day — and hopefully keep growing. and keep doing the day job _ and hopefully keep growing. and keep doing the day job as _ and hopefully keep growing. and keep doing the day job as well. _ and hopefully keep growing. and keep doing the day job as well. what i and hopefully keep growing. and keep doing the day job as well. what is i doing the dayjob as well. what is on your list to do today? t will]! doing the day job as well. what is on your list to do today?— on your list to do today? i will go back home _ on your list to do today? i will go back home and _ on your list to do today? i will go back home and buy _ on your list to do today? i will go back home and buy some - on your list to do today? i will go back home and buy some stuff i on your list to do today? i will goj back home and buy some stuff to on your list to do today? i will go i back home and buy some stuff to fix some stuff. on a farm there is always stuff to fix. my dad is covering me this morning, he is milking at the moment. milk cards and feed the cows. make sure everything is going smoothly. i struggled. she loved to escape. i will try to get that done in the next couple of days. —— cheap love to escape. it never stops through
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social media, it adds hours on. without the hard work i would not be where i am so i will have to keep doing it. it might be long hours but it is like my hobby and my work, it is great. taste it is like my hobby and my work, it is areat. ~ :, it is like my hobby and my work, it is areat. ~ . :, ., ,, :, is great. we have led to talking to ou on is great. we have led to talking to you on the — is great. we have led to talking to you on the sofa. _ is great. we have led to talking to you on the sofa. -- _ is great. we have led to talking to you on the sofa. -- loved - is great. we have led to talking to you on the sofa. -- loved talking l is great. we have led to talking to. you on the sofa. -- loved talking to you on the sofa. —— loved talking to you. the fast and the farmer—ish airs on the bbc three channel next wednesday at 9pm. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today. a prime minister under pressure — borisjohnson tries to rally support among his mps, after a report into downing street parties criticises a failure of leadership. the rate of take up of the mmr vaccine is the lowest for a decade — there's a warning it could lead to an outbreak of measles. no more blaming things getting lost in the post, as royal mail launches stamps with bar codes so they can track and trace deliveries. almost £300 million spent in the second busiest january transfer window.
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dele alli leaving tottenham for everton, just one of the big deals confirmed. bbc three is back on terrestrial tv. larry lamb will be here to tell us what he thinks about it. good morning. a band of cloud and rain pushing southwards and westwards today. behind it, sunshine, showers and winds on the far north of scotland. details later in the programme. good morning. it's tuesday, the 1st of february. borisjohnson addressed a meeting of his mps last night, to try to rally support after a highly critical report into parties held in downing street. the findings by civil servant sue gray highlighted a failure of leadership and judgment. the prime minister has apologised and vowed lessons will be learnt. a separate investigation is being carried out by the metropolitan police. our chief political correspondent, adam fleming, joins us now from downing street.
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adam, is there any sign of mutiny on the tory backbenches? well, there is a sign of the government trying to get on with business — government trying to get on with business as usual this morning because — business as usual this morning because they will be a cabinet meeting — because they will be a cabinet meeting in about half an hour, narrow. — meeting in about half an hour, narrow, and later this morning, the prime _ narrow, and later this morning, the prime minister will travel to ukraine _ prime minister will travel to ukraine to deal with the rising tensions— ukraine to deal with the rising tensions with russia on the border. very much— tensions with russia on the border. very much trying to send out the vibe they— very much trying to send out the vibe they are putting sue gray behind — vibe they are putting sue gray behind them and getting on with things _ behind them and getting on with things. the next few weeks we are probably— things. the next few weeks we are probably going to see a big overhaul of the _ probably going to see a big overhaul of the operation in number 10. just how the _ of the operation in number 10. just how the prime minister's office is organised — how the prime minister's office is organised. that was criticised by sue gray— organised. that was criticised by sue gray in— organised. that was criticised by sue gray in their interim report yesterday _ sue gray in their interim report yesterday. last night, the prime minister— yesterday. last night, the prime minister spoke to conservative backbenchers in private. he emerged from that— backbenchers in private. he emerged from that meeting effectively on probation. not enough of them are angry— probation. not enough of them are angry enough with him yet to trigger the process where he could be replaced — the process where he could be replaced as leader of the conservative party and prime minister~ _ conservative party and prime minister. but this is not over yet, because —
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minister. but this is not over yet, because we — minister. but this is not over yet, because we have still got the separate met police inquiry, into whether— separate met police inquiry, into whether people broke the law. because — whether people broke the law. because of that inquiry, sue gray, the senior— because of that inquiry, sue gray, the senior civil servant, was not able _ the senior civil servant, was not able to— the senior civil servant, was not able to hand over all her findings and publish all the details of everything that went on. the government has now committed to publish _ government has now committed to publish that when they get it. here is the _ publish that when they get it. here is the deppa deeper minister dominic raab _ raab. look, there raab. - look, there are raab. — look, there are two separate investigations— look, there are two separate investigations going - look, there are two separate investigations going on, i look, there are two separate investigations going on, thel look, there are two separate i investigations going on, the police and sue _ investigations going on, the police and sue gray's _ investigations going on, the police and sue gray's. sue _ investigations going on, the police and sue gray's. sue gray- investigations going on, the police and sue gray's. sue gray has- investigations going on, the police| and sue gray's. sue gray has given us the _ and sue gray's. sue gray has given us the report— and sue gray's. sue gray has given us the report are _ and sue gray's. sue gray has given us the report are subject _ and sue gray's. sue gray has given us the report are subject to - and sue gray's. sue gray has given us the report are subject to the i us the report are subject to the individual— us the report are subject to the individual claims _ us the report are subject to the individual claims that— us the report are subject to the individual claims that have i us the report are subject to the i individual claims that have gone to the police — individual claims that have gone to the police investigation. _ individual claims that have gone to the police investigation. that i individual claims that have gone to the police investigation. that has i the police investigation. that has been _ the police investigation. that has been published _ the police investigation. that has been published in _ the police investigation. that has been published in full. _ the police investigation. that has been published in full. the - the police investigation. that has been published in full. the prime minister— been published in full. the prime minister has _ been published in full. the prime minister has been _ been published in full. the prime minister has been clear— been published in full. the prime minister has been clear that i been published in full. the prime minister has been clear that if. been published in full. the primel minister has been clear that if sue gray comes— minister has been clear that if sue gray comes back _ minister has been clear that if sue gray comes back with _ minister has been clear that if sue gray comes back with any- minister has been clear that if sue gray comes back with any further. gray comes back with any further findings — gray comes back with any further findings he — gray comes back with any further findings he will— gray comes back with any further findings he will publish _ gray comes back with any further findings he will publish it- gray comes back with any further findings he will publish it in- gray comes back with any further findings he will publish it in full. i findings he will publish it in full. we can't — findings he will publish it in full. we can't precisely, _ findings he will publish it in full. we can't precisely, because i findings he will publish it in full. | we can't precisely, because both tracks— we can't precisely, because both tracks are — we can't precisely, because both tracks are independent, - we can't precisely, because both tracks are independent, we i we can't precisely, because both tracks are independent, we can'tj tracks are independent, we can't control— tracks are independent, we can't control what _ tracks are independent, we can't control what they— tracks are independent, we can't control what they give _ tracks are independent, we can't control what they give to - tracks are independent, we can't control what they give to us, i tracks are independent, we can't control what they give to us, butj tracks are independent, we can't i control what they give to us, but he has been _ control what they give to us, but he has been clear— control what they give to us, but he has been clear that _ control what they give to us, but he has been clear that any _ control what they give to us, but he has been clear that any further i has been clear that any further report— has been clear that any further report from _ has been clear that any further report from sue _ has been clear that any further report from sue gray - has been clear that any further report from sue gray will - has been clear that any further report from sue gray will be i report from sue gray will be published _ report from sue gray will be published in _ report from sue gray will be published in full— report from sue gray will be published in full as - report from sue gray will be published in full as indeed i report from sue gray will be i published in full as indeed the interim — published in full as indeed the interim report— published in full as indeed the interim report was. _ interim report was. the _ interim report was. the labour- interim report was. the labour leader. interim report was. i the labour leader keir
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interim report was. _ the labour leader keir starmer says there _ the labour leader keir starmer says there is— the labour leader keir starmer says there is no— the labour leader keir starmer says there is no need for this waiting because — there is no need for this waiting because he says the prime minister, other— because he says the prime minister, other ministers and officials could 'ust other ministers and officials could just front — other ministers and officials could just front up about what is happening. the metropolitan police asked the full report not be published at the moment, but the idea that that prevents the prime minister from saying whether he was at a party on a particular day, is absolute nonsense. absolute nonsense. and i think, you know, the spectacle of the pm expanding at the dispatch box being asked, you out of this party on the 13th of may —— november in your own flat, and he says, i can't answer that because of the investigation, he knows very well whether he was in the flat and he is taking us for fool two. and we heard from another opposition leader. _ and we heard from another opposition leader. sir— and we heard from another opposition leader, sir ed davey of the liberal democrats, who has written to the government's lawyers demanding that borisjohnson does not get government's lawyers demanding that boris johnson does not get any publicly— boris johnson does not get any publicly funded legal advice or legal— publicly funded legal advice or legal help as part of that met police — legal help as part of that met police investigation. we now know, thanks—
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police investigation. we now know, thanks to _ police investigation. we now know, thanks to the sue gray investigation, the met police are looking — investigation, the met police are looking at events on eight different days _ looking at events on eight different days. they are looking at interviews with 70 _ days. they are looking at interviews with 70 people, 300 photographs and 500 pages of written evidence. you have seen— 500 pages of written evidence. you have seen the damage to the government and the anger amongst the public that— government and the anger amongst the public that has been caused by ten facts already. there could still be a lot more — facts already. there could still be a lot more to come out and a lot of road _ a lot more to come out and a lot of road for— a lot more to come out and a lot of road for this — a lot more to come out and a lot of road for this story still to run. adam, — road for this story still to run. adam, thank you very much indeed. borisjohnson is to travel to ukraine today, for talks with the country's president, and to stress diplomatic unity as tensions rise with russia. the kremlin has denied planning to invade its neighbour, but has tens of thousands of troops massed on the border. the prime minister will promise £88 million to help ukraine tackle corruption and reduce its reliance on russian energy. police have been granted more time to question manchester united footballer mason greenwood. the 20—year—old was was arrested on suspicion of rape and assault on sunday. manchester united say the player will not return to training or matches
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until further notice. the sportswear company nike have suspended their deal with him. ministers will consult on ending a legal requirement for front—line nhs staff in england to be vaccinated against covid. our health editor, hugh pym, is with us now. hugh, what's the reaction been like to the u—turn? morning. relief amongst those nhs staff who, from thursday, would have either— staff who, from thursday, would have either had _ staff who, from thursday, would have either had to — staff who, from thursday, would have either had to leave their front line jobs, _ either had to leave their front line jobs. or— either had to leave their front line jobs, orwould either had to leave their front line jobs, or would have either had to leave their front line jobs, orwould have been either had to leave their front line jobs, or would have been given dismissal— jobs, or would have been given dismissal notices because they had refused _ dismissal notices because they had refused to— dismissal notices because they had refused to be vaccinated. thursday was the _ refused to be vaccinated. thursday was the deadline for the first dose. it is was the deadline for the first dose. it is 77,000 — was the deadline for the first dose. it is 77,000 people in the nhs in england — it is 77,000 people in the nhs in england who hadn't beenjabbed as of last week _ england who hadn't beenjabbed as of last week. that is 5%. 95% have been vaccinated _ last week. that is 5%. 95% have been vaccinated. but there was a risk the nhs, _ vaccinated. but there was a risk the nhs, just— vaccinated. but there was a risk the nhs, just when it needed maximum staffing _ nhs, just when it needed maximum staffing potential, would lose key people _ staffing potential, would lose key people. that was one of the reasons
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why ministers changed their tune on this compulsory vaccination policy for england. they also argued that 0micron _ for england. they also argued that 0micron is — for england. they also argued that omicron is less severe than delta. it omicron is less severe than delta. it was _ omicron is less severe than delta. it was the — omicron is less severe than delta. it was the delta wave when the policy — it was the delta wave when the policy was first announced. more people _ policy was first announced. more people have been vaccinated. so relief— people have been vaccinated. so relief amongst staff who will hold onto theirjobs, relief among social care staff, — onto theirjobs, relief among social care staff, although frustration because — care staff, although frustration because it was introduced for social care in— because it was introduced for social care in november last year. some social— care in november last year. some social care — care in november last year. some social care staff left. now the ban has ended, in theory they could come back _ has ended, in theory they could come back social— has ended, in theory they could come back. social care providers are frustrated _ back. social care providers are frustrated that a change in tune. why do— frustrated that a change in tune. why do it — frustrated that a change in tune. why do it in the first place, they argue? — why do it in the first place, they argue? there is frustration among nhs bosses in england. they feel they have — nhs bosses in england. they feel they have tried to push on with this policy. _ they have tried to push on with this policy, suddenly there is a change of heart. — policy, suddenly there is a change of heart, there have been difficult discussions with staff. and they are wondering — discussions with staff. and they are wondering whether it just undermines the overall— wondering whether it just undermines the overall message about vaccines and the _ the overall message about vaccines and the need to get a chapter for the general population. consultation to start _ the general population. consultation to start now, but i'm told this is really— to start now, but i'm told this is really what _ to start now, but i'm told this is really what the government wants to do in terms —
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really what the government wants to do in terms of its policy on vaccination of staff. thank _ vaccination of staff. thank you. health officials are warning that more than one in ten children starting school in england are at risk of measles, because they have not been vaccinated. the number of five—year—olds that have had both doses of mmr that helps protect against measles, mumps and rubella, has dropped to the lowest for a decade. our health correspondent michelle roberts has more. measles is highly contagious and can cause serious and sometimes fatal illness. as well as a distinctive rash, it can lead to pneumonia and brain inflammation. vaccination can remove almost all of this risk. but experts say since the start of the covid pandemic, there's been a concerning drop in the numbers of children getting their protective vaccines on time. latest figures reveal around 85.5% of five—year—olds have had the recommended two doses of mmr that can protect against mumps and rubella infections, as well as measles. that's the lowest for a decade,
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and well below the 95% target recommended to stop a resurgence of measles. when a high percentage of the population is protected through vaccination, it becomes harder for the disease to pass between people. although cases have plummeted in the last couple of years, largely due to social distancing and travel bans, the uk health security agency's concerned measles could make a comeback in the unvaccinated, when covid restrictions are fully lifted. even a small drop in vaccine uptake can lead to outbreaks occurring. and why the focus on mmr? it's because measles would be the first infection we would expect to see come back. it's like the canary in the coal mine. and once we have international travel opened up, and covid restrictions lifted, we expect measles to come back into this country, and for it to spread in those who are not fully protected with two doses of the mmr vaccine. young children can get the mmr vaccine for free on the nhs when they turn one,
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with a second dose offered at around the age of three and a half, before they start nursery or school. unvaccinated teenagers and adults are eligible, too. michelle roberts, bbc news. whoopi goldberg is facing a backlash after she said on an american talk show that the holocaust "was not about race". the actress and television personality said on abc's 'the view�* that the nazi genocide of the jews involved "two groups of white people". critics pointed out that hitler himself had vented his hatred of thejews in racial terms. she later apologised. the new york times has purchased the popular word game 'wordle' for an undisclosed seven—figure sum. the free, web—based game which now boasts millions of players, was created by software
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engineerjosh wardle. he said the game's success had been "a little overwhelming." the new owners said the game would remain free to play for the time being. yeah. change is afoot. i am very proud of myself today. my fastest success today. under a minute. it is good to keep your brain ticking over. always. ii good to keep your brain ticking over. always. 11 minutes past eight. the family of a 21—year—old woman, who suffered life—changing injuries after being kidnapped by her ex—boyfriend, is campaigning to have his sentence increased. angel lynn was bundled into a van by chay bowskill, and was found seriously injured in the carriageway of the a6 near loughborough on 17 september, 2020. the attorney general has agreed to review the sentence. rachel stonehouse has this report.
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this is the moment angel lynn is kidnapped by her then boyfriend, chay bowskill, in september 2020. he grabs hold of her and forces her into a van, which is then driven off by his friend rocco sansome. just a few minutes later, angel falls out the back of the van, here on the a6 near loughborough, sustaining life—changing injuries. almost 18 months later, she remains in hospital. she was just so lovely, and when she got older and older, she just blossomed from a little geeky kid into this beautiful girl. she was beautiful inside. she was just always nice. i never saw her when she said anything bad. always happy, always smiley. how is angel now, and what have her long term injuries been? she can't do anything for herself. she can't talk, she can't walk, she can't eat, she can't drink. she doesn't recognise... it's kind of, there's nothing there. but obviously, as a parent, the fact
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that she's alive is hope for them. last week, bowskill was sentenced to seven and a half years for kidnap, controlling behaviour during the relationship, and pressurising his mum to withdraw her police statement. his friend, rocco sansome, was sentenced to 21 months. bowskill was found not guilty of causing angel's injuries, after he said she jumped out of the van, but the family are furious, as he could be out as early as 202a. they've now requested for his sentence to be reviewed. we're hoping that the attorney general looks at it and says, that is unduly lenient. i don't think he should have been... ..his sentence should have been given as a young offender. so therefore, it would have been double what he got. angel's family are not the only ones who believe there is a wider problem in the criminaljustice system. we have a criminaljustice system in general that that doesn't fully understand the range of domestic abuse. when we think about the context
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of coercion and control, what is often understood to be a background of domestic abuse is often overlooked, because of maybe abuse not being reported, particularly to the police, or recorded in a particular way. nearly a year and a half on, jackie and herfamily are still feeling the aftermath. how has it actually impacted how you feel in terms of your safety? erm, just — ijust feel reluctant to go out. evenjust in my house, having someone come to check the boiler, erm, it shouldn't, but it makes me concerned, and i can't help feeling that way. and i've always considered myself quite a strong person, but it's, yeah, worried me a little bit. i never want this to happen to anybody else. i've seen a family destroyed in the last 16 months. angel's life changed in an instant and nobody saw it coming it. itjust came out of nowhere. and that's the scary thing.
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rachael stonehouse, bbc news. we can speak now to jackie chamberlain, angel's aunt, who you saw in that report. and farah nazeer, who's the chief executive of women's aid. morning. jackie, if we could come to you first of all. it is just the most unbearably upsetting story, isn't it? we can see from the peace we have just showed how devastating this has been for you and your family. how important is it to you now to speak up for angel? she has now to speak up for angel? she has no voice. now to speak up for angel? she has no voice- i — now to speak up for angel? she has no voice- i am _ now to speak up for angel? she has no voice. i am not _ now to speak up for angel? she has no voice. i am notjust _ now to speak up for angel? she has no voice. i am notjust talking i no voice. i am not just talking figuratively. she literally has no voice _ figuratively. she literally has no voice i— figuratively. she literally has no voice. i think the wider issue has been _ voice. i think the wider issue has been completely overlooked with her. my mission, my children and all older_ my mission, my children and all older now. _ my mission, my children and all older now, i am used to speaking,
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her parents — older now, i am used to speaking, her parents did an interview yesterday and they went to pieces, they never— yesterday and they went to pieces, they never got out what they wanted to saw _ they never got out what they wanted to saw i _ they never got out what they wanted to say. i think it's important that two things— to say. i think it's important that two things are raised here today. one, _ two things are raised here today. one. while — two things are raised here today. one, while we are fundraising and what _ one, while we are fundraising and what it_ one, while we are fundraising and what it is— one, while we are fundraising and what it is for. and two, so this doesn't — what it is for. and two, so this doesn't happen to anybody else and they notice those red flags. what were the red _ they notice those red flags. what were the red flags? _ they notice those red flags. what were the red flags? well, - they notice those red flags. what were the red flags? well, we - they notice those red flags. what l were the red flags? well, we didn't reall see were the red flags? well, we didn't really see them _ were the red flags? well, we didn't really see them except _ were the red flags? well, we didn't really see them except that - were the red flags? well, we didn't really see them except that she - were the red flags? well, we didn't i really see them except that she used to hang _ really see them except that she used to hang around with that micro she was very— to hang around with that micro she was very bubbly, she was very happy. they only— was very bubbly, she was very happy. they only had a year—long relationship. part of that time he was in _ relationship. part of that time he was in prison. and while he was in prison— was in prison. and while he was in prison he — was in prison. and while he was in prison he made sure that he rang her house _ prison he made sure that he rang her house every— prison he made sure that he rang her house every evening and made sure she was— house every evening and made sure she was in_ house every evening and made sure she was in by six o'clock. and also, when _ she was in by six o'clock. and also, when he _ she was in by six o'clock. and also, when he came out he was on tag and he was _ when he came out he was on tag and he was in _ when he came out he was on tag and he was in by— when he came out he was on tag and he was in by six. she had to be in by six _ he was in by six. she had to be in by six as— he was in by six. she had to be in by six. as coercive people generally do, by six. as coercive people generally do. people — by six. as coercive people generally do, people change the way they
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dress. _ do, people change the way they dress. as— do, people change the way they dress, as you can see there are lots of photographs out there in the media, — of photographs out there in the media, there is a beautiful photograph of her next to a photo of what she _ photograph of her next to a photo of what she looks like now. anyone can google _ what she looks like now. anyone can googte that — what she looks like now. anyone can google that photo and have a look at it. google that photo and have a look at it he _ google that photo and have a look at it. he changed her from a bubbly, beautiful— it. he changed her from a bubbly, beautiful girl to suddenly, being so coerced, _ beautiful girl to suddenly, being so coerced, herfriends beautiful girl to suddenly, being so coerced, her friends literally... beautiful girl to suddenly, being so coerced, herfriends literally... i said— coerced, herfriends literally... i said to— coerced, herfriends literally... i said to my— coerced, herfriends literally... i said to my knees, don't you hang around _ said to my knees, don't you hang around with— said to my knees, don't you hang around with angel any more? she kept very quiet _ around with angel any more? she kept very quiet. and her sister said, she doesn't _ very quiet. and her sister said, she doesn't hang — very quiet. and her sister said, she doesn't hang around with some very nice people — doesn't hang around with some very nice people any more. that was a red fla- nice people any more. that was a red flag for— nice people any more. that was a red flag for me _ nice people any more. that was a red flag for me i— nice people any more. that was a red flag for me. i didn't think too much of it at— flag for me. i didn't think too much of it at the — flag for me. i didn't think too much of it at the time. i know when you io of it at the time. i know when you go out _ of it at the time. i know when you go out with— of it at the time. i know when you go out with somebody, its normal teenage _ go out with somebody, its normal teenage behaviour. but when all of those _ teenage behaviour. but when all of those red _ teenage behaviour. but when all of those red flags, you look at them in hindsight. _ those red flags, you look at them in hindsight, they add up. wearing less make-up. _ hindsight, they add up. wearing less make—up, dressing down, not going out, not _ make—up, dressing down, not going out, not meeting with your friends. i out, not meeting with your friends. i mean. _ out, not meeting with your friends. i mean, there is a beautiful photo of her— i mean, there is a beautiful photo of her that— i mean, there is a beautiful photo of her that has been shown all over the media — of her that has been shown all over the media with the colourful background where she looks very pretty _ background where she looks very pretty. she is laughing. that photo
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was taken — pretty. she is laughing. that photo was taken because he demanded to know— was taken because he demanded to know where she was. he said, where are you? _ know where she was. he said, where are you? and — know where she was. he said, where are you? and she went, i am having lunch— are you? and she went, i am having lunch with _ are you? and she went, i am having lunch with my friend. he didn't believe — lunch with my friend. he didn't believe her so she had to send him a photograph— believe her so she had to send him a photograph to prove she was in that restaurant — photograph to prove she was in that restaurant. hindsight is a massively wonderful— restaurant. hindsight is a massively wonderful thing. restaurant. hindsight is a massively wonderfulthing. but in restaurant. hindsight is a massively wonderful thing. but in her case, a lot of— wonderful thing. but in her case, a lot of it _ wonderful thing. but in her case, a lot of it was — wonderful thing. but in her case, a lot of it was during covid. she stayed — lot of it was during covid. she stayed at _ lot of it was during covid. she stayed at her house for a little bit. stayed at her house for a little bit so. — stayed at her house for a little bit so. his _ stayed at her house for a little bit. so, his motherwrote stayed at her house for a little bit. so, his mother wrote a statement saying how toxic their relationship was. and from prison he found _ relationship was. and from prison he found her _ relationship was. and from prison he found her it — relationship was. and from prison he found her. it was a very abusive phone _ found her. it was a very abusive phone catt _ found her. it was a very abusive phone call. it was played in court. it phone call. it was played in court. it said. _ phone call. it was played in court. it said, retract your statement. she periured _ it said, retract your statement. she perjured herself in court and so did he. perjured herself in court and so did he the _ perjured herself in court and so did he. the worst thing is the part of the sentence he got for kidnap, i'm sure pretty— the sentence he got for kidnap, i'm sure pretty much everybody has seen that kidnap _ sure pretty much everybody has seen that kidnap video, he says, i was helping _ that kidnap video, he says, i was helping her— that kidnap video, he says, i was helping her because i didn't want to walk home — helping her because i didn't want to walk home on her own. it was the
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middle _ walk home on her own. it was the middle of— walk home on her own. it was the middle of the morning. it was not the middle — middle of the morning. it was not the middle of the night. she walked purposely— the middle of the night. she walked purposely past that fan. she didn't make _ purposely past that fan. she didn't make eye — purposely past that fan. she didn't make eye contact with him. so clearly. — make eye contact with him. so dearly, he _ make eye contact with him. so clearly, he put her in that position into that _ clearly, he put her in that position into that man. and for that, he got a three-year — into that man. and for that, he got a three—year sentence. people keep saying. _ a three—year sentence. people keep saying, seven and a half years is not enough. and i say, no, for that video— not enough. and i say, no, for that video that — not enough. and i say, no, for that video that you are showing, he got three _ video that you are showing, he got three years — video that you are showing, he got three years. then he will get a third _ three years. then he will get a third off— three years. then he will get a third off for that. he is directly responsible. whatever happened in the van, _ responsible. whatever happened in the van, we accept. nobody will ever know _ the van, we accept. nobody will ever know. however, he put her in that a van _ know. however, he put her in that a van you _ know. however, he put her in that a van you can — know. however, he put her in that a van. you can see she is purposely watking~ — van. you can see she is purposely walking. she doesn't even look at him _ walking. she doesn't even look at him she — walking. she doesn't even look at him. she doesn't see him coming. if you slowly— him. she doesn't see him coming. if you slowly video down, you will see she doesn't— you slowly video down, you will see she doesn't see until the last minute _ she doesn't see until the last minute. she literally turns and he grabs _ minute. she literally turns and he grabs it's — minute. she literally turns and he grabs. it's horrific. | minute. she literally turns and he grabs. it's horrific.— minute. she literally turns and he grabs. it's horrific. i am sure, you are talking _ grabs. it's horrific. i am sure, you are talking about _ grabs. it's horrific. i am sure, you are talking about the _ grabs. it's horrific. i am sure, you are talking about the red - grabs. it's horrific. i am sure, you are talking about the red flags, i are talking about the red flags, jacking, there will be many people recognise those little chips away at someone's personality, at their
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confidence, which over a period of time is exactly what this is about? absolutely. i think when people think— absolutely. i think when people think about _ absolutely. i think when people think about domestic— absolutely. i think when people think about domestic abuse - absolutely. i think when people think about domestic abuse and absolutely. i think when people - think about domestic abuse and those kinds of— think about domestic abuse and those kinds of settings _ think about domestic abuse and those kinds of settings and _ think about domestic abuse and those kinds of settings and situations, - kinds of settings and situations, they think— kinds of settings and situations, they think it _ kinds of settings and situations, they think it is _ kinds of settings and situations, they think it is physical. - kinds of settings and situations, they think it is physical. and - kinds of settings and situations, they think it is physical. and it. they think it is physical. and it often — they think it is physical. and it often is — they think it is physical. and it often is but— they think it is physical. and it often is. but as _ they think it is physical. and it often is. but as often - they think it is physical. and it often is. but as often it- they think it is physical. and it often is. but as often it is- often is. but as often it is coercive _ often is. but as often it is coercive control. - often is. but as often it is coercive control. that - often is. but as often it is- coercive control. that manifests often is. but as often it is— coercive control. that manifests and plays _ coercive control. that manifests and plays out _ coercive control. that manifests and plays out in — coercive control. that manifests and plays out in a — coercive control. that manifests and plays out in a number— coercive control. that manifests and plays out in a number of— coercive control. that manifests and plays out in a number of different i plays out in a number of different ways. _ plays out in a number of different ways. e>
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begin to see these signs, there are a lot of organisations _ begin to see these signs, there are a lot of organisations out _ begin to see these signs, there are a lot of organisations out there - a lot of organisations out there like women's _ a lot of organisations out there like women's aid _ a lot of organisations out there like women's aid they- a lot of organisations out there like women's aid they can - a lot of organisations out there like women's aid they can turn| a lot of organisations out there . like women's aid they can turn to a lot of organisations out there - like women's aid they can turn to to ask for— like women's aid they can turn to to ask for advice _ like women's aid they can turn to to ask for advice. i— like women's aid they can turn to to ask for advice.— ask for advice. i imagine one of the difficulties says, _ ask for advice. i imagine one of the difficulties says, if _ ask for advice. i imagine one of the difficulties says, if you _ ask for advice. i imagine one of the difficulties says, if you are - ask for advice. i imagine one of the difficulties says, if you are the - difficulties says, if you are the person in the controlling relationship, you don't see it and may be people around you do, maybe you don't want to be told what is happening. how should we approach those types of conversations? what do you do? i those types of conversations? what do ou do? ~ , do you do? i think the first thing to bear in mind _ do you do? i think the first thing to bear in mind as— do you do? i think the first thing to bear in mind as you _ do you do? i think the first thing to bear in mind as you don't - do you do? i think the first thing l to bear in mind as you don't need do you do? i think the first thing - to bear in mind as you don't need to be an— to bear in mind as you don't need to be an expert — to bear in mind as you don't need to be an expert you _ to bear in mind as you don't need to be an expert. you are _ to bear in mind as you don't need to be an expert. you are a _ to bear in mind as you don't need to be an expert. you are a friend, - to bear in mind as you don't need to be an expert. you are a friend, you i be an expert. you are a friend, you are an— be an expert. you are a friend, you are an ally — be an expert. you are a friend, you are anatty be— be an expert. you are a friend, you are an ally. be there _ be an expert. you are a friend, you are an ally. be there for— be an expert. you are a friend, you are an ally. be there for the - are an ally. be there for the person. _ are an ally. be there for the person. ask— are an ally. be there for the person, ask them _ are an ally. be there for the person, ask them how- are an ally. be there for the person, ask them how they| are an ally. be there for the i person, ask them how they are are an ally. be there for the _ person, ask them how they are doing, don't _ person, ask them how they are doing, don't judge, _ person, ask them how they are doing, don'tiudge, reach— person, ask them how they are doing, don't judge, reach out _ person, ask them how they are doing, don't judge, reach out through - person, ask them how they are doing, don't judge, reach out through the - don't judge, reach out through the organisations— don't judge, reach out through the organisations like _ don't judge, reach out through the organisations like women's - don't judge, reach out through the organisations like women's aid, . don't judge, reach out through the i organisations like women's aid, the nationat— organisations like women's aid, the national domestic— organisations like women's aid, the national domestic abuse _ organisations like women's aid, the national domestic abuse helpline, l national domestic abuse helpline, and check— national domestic abuse helpline, and check in — national domestic abuse helpline, and check in with _ national domestic abuse helpline, and check in with them. _ national domestic abuse helpline, and check in with them. what - national domestic abuse helpline, and check in with them. what canl and check in with them. what can they do? — and check in with them. what can they do? i— and check in with them. what can they do? i am _ and check in with them. what can they do? i am seeing _ and check in with them. what can they do? i am seeing these - and check in with them. what can. they do? i am seeing these things. what _ they do? i am seeing these things. what do _ they do? i am seeing these things. what do you — they do? i am seeing these things. what do you suggest? _ they do? i am seeing these things. what do you suggest? you - they do? i am seeing these things. what do you suggest? you can - they do? i am seeing these things. i what do you suggest? you can slowly build a _ what do you suggest? you can slowly build a way _ what do you suggest? you can slowly build a way that — what do you suggest? you can slowly build a way that you _ what do you suggest? you can slowly build a way that you can _ what do you suggest? you can slowly build a way that you can support - build a way that you can support this individual. _ build a way that you can support this individual. i— build a way that you can support this individual. ithink— build a way that you can support this individual. i think it - build a way that you can support this individual. i think it is - build a way that you can support this individual. i think it is so . this individual. i think it is so important _ this individual. i think it is so important to _ this individual. i think it is so important to recognise - this individual. i think it is so important to recognise it - this individual. i think it is so important to recognise it is. this individual. i think it is so l important to recognise it is not 'ust important to recognise it is not just physicat _ important to recognise it is not just physical. these _ important to recognise it is not just physical. these are - important to recognise it is not| just physical. these are already serious — just physical. these are already serious indicators _ just physical. these are already serious indicators of _ just physical. these are already serious indicators of an - just physical. these are already serious indicators of an abusivej serious indicators of an abusive relationship _ serious indicators of an abusive relationship. and _ serious indicators of an abusive relationship. and abusive - relationship. and abusive relationships— relationship. and abusive relationships don't- relationship. and abusive | relationships don't always relationship. and abusive - relationships don't always end like this. relationships don't always end like this but _
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relationships don't always end like this but they— relationships don't always end like this. but they are _ relationships don't always end like this. but they are horrific- relationships don't always end like this. but they are horrific and - this. but they are horrific and reatty— this. but they are horrific and really difficult _ this. but they are horrific and really difficult for— this. but they are horrific and really difficult for the - this. but they are horrific and i really difficult for the individual, their— really difficult for the individual, theirfamilies, _ really difficult for the individual, theirfamilies, their— really difficult for the individual, their families, their children. . really difficult for the individual, i their families, their children. and we need — their families, their children. and we need to— their families, their children. and we need to stop _ their families, their children. and we need to stop this. _ their families, their children. and we need to stop this. we - their families, their children. and we need to stop this. we need i their families, their children. and we need to stop this. we need to| we need to stop this. we need to absolutely— we need to stop this. we need to absolutely recognise _ we need to stop this. we need to absolutely recognise that - we need to stop this. we need to absolutely recognise that it - we need to stop this. we need to| absolutely recognise that it needs to move _ absolutely recognise that it needs to move from _ absolutely recognise that it needs to move from being _ absolutely recognise that it needs to move from being tolerated - absolutely recognise that it needs to move from being tolerated andj to move from being tolerated and accepted — to move from being tolerated and accepted as— to move from being tolerated and accepted as a _ to move from being tolerated and accepted as a private _ to move from being tolerated and accepted as a private matter, - to move from being tolerated and accepted as a private matter, a l accepted as a private matter, a family— accepted as a private matter, a family matter. _ accepted as a private matter, a family matter, to _ accepted as a private matter, a family matter, to being - accepted as a private matter, a family matter, to being utterlyl family matter, to being utterly intoterabte _ family matter, to being utterly intolerable and _ family matter, to being utterly intolerable and that _ family matter, to being utterly intolerable and that when - family matter, to being utterly intolerable and that when we i family matter, to being utterly. intolerable and that when we see sentences — intolerable and that when we see sentences like _ intolerable and that when we see sentences like this, _ intolerable and that when we see sentences like this, i _ intolerable and that when we see sentences like this, ithink- intolerable and that when we see sentences like this, i think it - sentences like this, i think it reatty— sentences like this, i think it really begins _ sentences like this, i think it really begins to _ sentences like this, i think it really begins to bring - sentences like this, i think it really begins to bring home i sentences like this, i think it. really begins to bring home that sentences like this, i think it - really begins to bring home that we are not— really begins to bring home that we are not yet— really begins to bring home that we are not yet there _ really begins to bring home that we are not yet there when _ really begins to bring home that we are not yet there when a _ really begins to bring home that we are not yet there when a judge - really begins to bring home that we are not yet there when a judge canl are not yet there when a judge can .ive are not yet there when a judge can give a _ are not yet there when a judge can give a sentence _ are not yet there when a judge can give a sentence like _ are not yet there when a judge can give a sentence like that, - are not yet there when a judge can give a sentence like that, what - are not yet there when a judge canl give a sentence like that, what they are actually— give a sentence like that, what they are actually saying _ give a sentence like that, what they are actually saying is, _ give a sentence like that, what they are actually saying is, ok, - give a sentence like that, what they are actually saying is, ok, it's - are actually saying is, ok, it's tolerated, _ are actually saying is, ok, it's tolerated, it's— are actually saying is, ok, it's tolerated, it's not— are actually saying is, ok, it's tolerated, it's not too - are actually saying is, ok, it's| tolerated, it's not too serious. are actually saying is, ok, it's - tolerated, it's not too serious. and the message — tolerated, it's not too serious. and the message it _ tolerated, it's not too serious. and the message it sends— tolerated, it's not too serious. and the message it sends two - the message it sends two perpetrators, _ the message it sends two perpetrators, and - the message it sends two perpetrators, and the - the message it sends two - perpetrators, and the message it sends— perpetrators, and the message it sends two— perpetrators, and the message it sends two survivors, _ perpetrators, and the message it sends two survivors, is _ perpetrators, and the message it sends two survivors, is awful. - perpetrators, and the message it sends two survivors, is awful. if. perpetrators, and the message it sends two survivors, is awful. if ij sends two survivors, is awful. if i ma add sends two survivors, is awful. may add to that, ijust want to sends two survivors, is awful.“ may add to that, ijust want to say that a _ may add to that, ijust want to say that a lot — may add to that, ijust want to say that a lot of— may add to that, ijust want to say that a lot of teenage girls, especially, mistake jealousy that a lot of teenage girls, especially, mistakejealousy for especially, mistake jealousy for love _ especially, mistake jealousy for love that — especially, mistakejealousy for love. that is difficult because they also, _ love. that is difficult because they also, sometimes when you are 18, i have _ also, sometimes when you are18, i have got— also, sometimes when you are 18, i have got four children myself, when they were _ have got four children myself, when they were in their teens they didn't also want _ they were in their teens they didn't also want to come and tell you these things _ also want to come and tell you these things if— also want to come and tell you these things. if you reach out to one of
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your— things. if you reach out to one of your friends. angel did reach out to one of— your friends. angel did reach out to one of her— your friends. angel did reach out to one of her friends in the park. she met her— one of her friends in the park. she met her in— one of her friends in the park. she met her in the park secretly. she said. _ met her in the park secretly. she said. what's— met her in the park secretly. she said, what's the matter? she had a bruise _ said, what's the matter? she had a bruise on— said, what's the matter? she had a bruise on her hand. she lifted up her top _ bruise on her hand. she lifted up her top and — bruise on her hand. she lifted up her top and she was bruised, covered _ her top and she was bruised, covered. but by then, within a very short— covered. but by then, within a very short time. — covered. but by then, within a very short time, these events unfolded. the family— short time, these events unfolded. the family really had no idea. and i think— the family really had no idea. and i think a _ the family really had no idea. and i think a lot — the family really had no idea. and i think a lot of that was down to the fact that _ think a lot of that was down to the fact that covid, she was staying there _ fact that covid, she was staying there and — fact that covid, she was staying there and stuff like that. there were _ there and stuff like that. there were a — there and stuff like that. there were a lot _ there and stuff like that. there were a lot of factors involved. it was only— were a lot of factors involved. it was onty a — were a lot of factors involved. it was only a year long relationship, which _ was only a year long relationship, which is _ was only a year long relationship, which is nothing, really, when you factor— which is nothing, really, when you factor in _ which is nothing, really, when you factor in he — which is nothing, really, when you factor in he was in prison for four months — factor in he was in prison for four months the _ factor in he was in prison for four months. the family have been... i can't _ months. the family have been... i can't even — months. the family have been... i can't even describe it. if you did see the — can't even describe it. if you did see the interview yesterday, they couldn't _ see the interview yesterday, they couldn't speak. they are still like that _ couldn't speak. they are still like that i_ couldn't speak. they are still like that i want — couldn't speak. they are still like that. i want to make it clear. we .et that. i want to make it clear. we get asked — that. i want to make it clear. we get asked all the time, the question, what is angel like now? anget— question, what is angel like now? angel is _ question, what is angel like now? angel is no — question, what is angel like now? angel is no different now from the day she _ angel is no different now from the day she went into hospital. other than the — day she went into hospital. other than the fact she has had a brain operation — than the fact she has had a brain operation and her scars have healed.
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she is— operation and her scars have healed. she is not— operation and her scars have healed. she is not here. she is never, ever going _ she is not here. she is never, ever going to _ she is not here. she is never, ever going to be — she is not here. she is never, ever going to be the same again. she can't _ going to be the same again. she can't walk. — going to be the same again. she can't walk, she can't talk, she can't — can't walk, she can't talk, she can't feed _ can't walk, she can't talk, she can't feed herself, anything like that _ can't feed herself, anything like that. . . can't feed herself, anything like that. , , ., ., can't feed herself, anything like that. , ., , can't feed herself, anything like that. ., , that. this is one of the reasons why ou are that. this is one of the reasons why you are trying _ that. this is one of the reasons why you are trying to — that. this is one of the reasons why you are trying to raise _ that. this is one of the reasons why you are trying to raise money, - you are trying to raise money, because you would like the family to look after her at home?— look after her at home? yeah, they are not a rich _ look after her at home? yeah, they are not a rich family. _ look after her at home? yeah, they are not a rich family. they - look after her at home? yeah, they are not a rich family. they live - look after her at home? yeah, they are not a rich family. they live in i are not a rich family. they live in are not a rich family. they live in a tiny— are not a rich family. they live in a tiny house~ _ are not a rich family. they live in a tiny house. they need a hospital grade _ a tiny house. they need a hospital grade room — a tiny house. they need a hospital grade room just so they can bring their— grade room just so they can bring their daughter home, because in the last, their daughter home, because in the last. since _ their daughter home, because in the last, since she had a brain operation _ last, since she had a brain operation to reconstruct her school, and that— operation to reconstruct her school, and that is— operation to reconstruct her school, and that is the famous photo, if anybody— and that is the famous photo, if anybody wants to google that photo, it shows _ anybody wants to google that photo, it shows her lying in bed and then she is— it shows her lying in bed and then she is looking in the other photo pretty. _ she is looking in the other photo pretty, that is after she had a brain— pretty, that is after she had a brain operation. prior to that, her head _ brain operation. prior to that, her head is— brain operation. prior to that, her head is partly missing. she fell on her head — head is partly missing. she fell on her head. and actually, there is a photograph of her holding her hand. she had _ photograph of her holding her hand. she had had her nails done the day before _ she had had her nails done the day before the — she had had her nails done the day before. the nails are intact. she took— before. the nails are intact. she took to— before. the nails are intact. she took to the _ before. the nails are intact. she took to the impact on her head. people —
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took to the impact on her head. people say, how is she now? they presume _ people say, how is she now? they presume after 16 months she has made an improvement. ok, the scars on her head have _ an improvement. ok, the scars on her head have healed. her mum wouldn't let her— head have healed. her mum wouldn't let her shave all her lovely blonde hair~ _ let her shave all her lovely blonde hair~ she — let her shave all her lovely blonde hair. she put it in a little plaid. now— hair. she put it in a little plaid. now she — hair. she put it in a little plaid. now she has got this hairdo that's like one _ now she has got this hairdo that's like one side and the other. the ignore _ like one side and the other. the ignore mistake —— make no mistake, she needs _ ignore mistake —— make no mistake, she needs around the care help. to build _ she needs around the care help. to build a _ she needs around the care help. to build a hospital grade room in a tiny. _ build a hospital grade room in a tiny. tiny— build a hospital grade room in a tiny, tiny house is a massive, massive — tiny, tiny house is a massive, massive thing. it is a massive deal. i do massive thing. it is a massive deal. i do want _ massive thing. it is a massive deal. i do want to— massive thing. it is a massive deal. i do want to say thank you because of highlighting these things, the public— of highlighting these things, the public have donated massively. and believe _ public have donated massively. and believe me, every single pound is appreciated and it is going exactly towards _ appreciated and it is going exactly towards the fund. one appreciated and it is going exactly towards the fund.— appreciated and it is going exactly towards the fund. one of the reasons ou are towards the fund. one of the reasons you are here — towards the fund. one of the reasons you are here today _ towards the fund. one of the reasons you are here today is _ towards the fund. one of the reasons you are here today is because - towards the fund. one of the reasons you are here today is because you - you are here today is because you don't want other people to go through what your family is going through. that is an important point, farah, because there might be summary watching this who recognises
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that some of that. what do they do? they can contact women's aid. we have _ they can contact women's aid. we have a _ they can contact women's aid. we have a live — they can contact women's aid. we have a live chat. _ they can contact women's aid. we have a live chat. they— they can contact women's aid. we have a live chat. they can - they can contact women's aid. we have a live chat. they can talk - have a live chat. they can talk through — have a live chat. they can talk through what _ have a live chat. they can talk through what they _ have a live chat. they can talk through what they are - have a live chat. they can talk through what they are going i have a live chat. they can talk - through what they are going through. it is through what they are going through. it is reatiy— through what they are going through. it is really important. _ through what they are going through. it is really important. if— through what they are going through. it is really important. if you _ through what they are going through. it is really important. if you feel- it is really important. if you feel you might — it is really important. if you feel you might be _ it is really important. if you feel you might be experiencing - it is really important. if you feel you might be experiencing any. it is really important. if you feell you might be experiencing any of this. _ you might be experiencing any of this. or— you might be experiencing any of this, or someone _ you might be experiencing any of this, or someone you _ you might be experiencing any of this, or someone you know- you might be experiencing any of| this, or someone you know might you might be experiencing any of- this, or someone you know might be experiencing — this, or someone you know might be experiencing this, _ this, or someone you know might be experiencing this, do _ this, or someone you know might be experiencing this, do reach - this, or someone you know might be experiencing this, do reach out. - experiencing this, do reach out. there _ experiencing this, do reach out. there is— experiencing this, do reach out. there is help _ experiencing this, do reach out. there is help out _ experiencing this, do reach out. there is help out there. - experiencing this, do reach out. there is help out there. there i experiencing this, do reach out. | there is help out there. there is experiencing this, do reach out. . there is help out there. there is a nationat— there is help out there. there is a national domestic— there is help out there. there is a national domestic abuse - there is help out there. there is aj national domestic abuse helpline. there is help out there. there is a . national domestic abuse helpline. do reach out _ national domestic abuse helpline. do reach out don't— national domestic abuse helpline. do reach out. don't ever _ national domestic abuse helpline. do reach out. don't ever feel— national domestic abuse helpline. do reach out. don't ever feel ashamed, i reach out. don't ever feel ashamed, or ever— reach out. don't ever feel ashamed, or ever feel— reach out. don't ever feel ashamed, or ever feel you _ reach out. don't ever feel ashamed, or ever feel you can't _ reach out. don't ever feel ashamed, or ever feel you can't talk. - reach out. don't ever feel ashamed, or ever feel you can't talk. we - reach out. don't ever feel ashamed, or ever feel you can't talk. we will. or ever feel you can't talk. we will support— or ever feel you can't talk. we will support you — or ever feel you can't talk. we will support you and _ or ever feel you can't talk. we will support you and we _ or ever feel you can't talk. we will support you and we will _ or ever feel you can't talk. we will support you and we will believe i or ever feel you can't talk. we will. support you and we will believe you. that is _ support you and we will believe you. that is the _ support you and we will believe you. that is the first _ support you and we will believe you. that is the first point. _ support you and we will believe you. that is the first point. that - support you and we will believe you. that is the first point. that is - support you and we will believe you. that is the first point. that is the - that is the first point. that is the starting — that is the first point. that is the starting point _ that is the first point. that is the starting point to _ that is the first point. that is the starting point to recovery, - that is the first point. that is the starting point to recovery, to- starting point to recovery, to heating. _ starting point to recovery, to heating. to _ starting point to recovery, to healing, to moving _ starting point to recovery, to healing, to moving away- starting point to recovery, tol healing, to moving away from difficutt — healing, to moving away from difficult relationships. - healing, to moving away from difficult relationships. it- healing, to moving away from difficult relationships. ii is - healing, to moving away from difficult relationships. it is not 'ust difficult relationships. it is not just young _ difficult relationships. it is not just young girls _ difficult relationships. it is not just young girls. it _ difficult relationships. it is not just young girls. it is - difficult relationships. it is not just young girls. it is women, | difficult relationships. it is not. just young girls. it is women, and men. _ just young girls. it is women, and men. men— just young girls. it is women, and men, men can also be coerced, teenage — men, men can also be coerced, teenage boys can be caused by girls. men can _ teenage boys can be caused by girls. men can be — teenage boys can be caused by girls. men can be coerced by women. older women _ men can be coerced by women. older women might think, actually, my husband — women might think, actually, my husband doesn't let me wear make up when we _ husband doesn't let me wear make up when we go _ husband doesn't let me wear make up when we go out, he tells me what to wear~ _ when we go out, he tells me what to wear~ that _ when we go out, he tells me what to wear~ that is — when we go out, he tells me what to wear. that is not a normal thing. especiatty— wear. that is not a normal thing. especially in a teenage girl, they should _ especially in a teenage girl, they should be — especially in a teenage girl, they should be allowed to express themselves however they wish. today i themselves however they wish. today i want _ themselves however they wish. today i want everyone to go and look at every—
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i want everyone to go and look at every picture in the media and say, did that _ every picture in the media and say, did that deserve two years? and also. _ did that deserve two years? and also, thank everybody for their donations— also, thank everybody for their donations on the angel's gofundme page _ donations on the angel's gofundme page. that is going to help her get home _ page. that is going to help her get home and — page. that is going to help her get home and ultimately, her mum and dad want normality. her sister wants to sit on _ want normality. her sister wants to sit on her— want normality. her sister wants to sit on her bed, paint her toenails, her mum— sit on her bed, paint her toenails, her mum wants to be the one to wash her mum wants to be the one to wash her hair. _ her mum wants to be the one to wash her hair. wash— her mum wants to be the one to wash her hair, wash her feet and look after— her hair, wash her feet and look after her~ — her hair, wash her feet and look after her. that is very, very important _ after her. that is very, very important-— after her. that is very, very imortant. ., ,, . ., important. thank you so much for extendin: important. thank you so much for extending all— important. thank you so much for extending all that. _ important. thank you so much for extending all that. farah, - important. thank you so much for extending all that. farah, really i extending all that. farah, really nice to see you as well. i know you have mentioned a few things which will put on the bbc action line. you can find lots of information on there as well.— can find lots of information on there as well. ., ,, . ., there as well. thank you so much for havin: us there as well. thank you so much for having us and — there as well. thank you so much for having us and we _ there as well. thank you so much for having us and we really _ there as well. thank you so much for having us and we really do _ having us and we really do appreciate it. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. nearly eight out of ten londoners say they've seen an increase in the cost
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of living since the summer. according to a report by city hall, and polling by yougov, over a third of londoners questioned last week said they'd struggled to pay houshold bills, causing more than one in ten admitting to going without essentials or relying on credit. mayor of london, sadiq khan is calling on the government to do more to tackle the rising cost of living. and with the rising cost of living being such a big issue at the moment, we're looking at doing more on the subject. so if you've noticed prices going up — and you're struggling to make ends meet — and you're happy to speak to us about it, e—mail us at hellobbclondon@bbc.co.uk. the world's first exhibition of vincent van gogh's self portraits spanning his entire career is opening at the courtauld gallery at somerset house. this is the first look at the paintings on display. the exhibition is ten years in the making, and includes these two paintings which are under the same roof
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for the first time, since van gogh painted them nearly 130 years ago. the exhibition opens on thursday. it's on until may. today is chinese new year — the year of the tiger. celebrations will be taking place across london all week, although it will be quiter than usual due to coronavirus. however, there are celebrations online, and chinese businesses in soho will welcome the year of the tiger, which is the symbol of bravery, wisdom and strength. a look at the travel. and the tube board... the district line has delays because of a signal failure. tfl rail is part suspended between west drayton and reading. the northern has major work going on until may. onto the weather now with nazaneen. hello. good morning. it is looking a lot calmer today. generally speaking it is going
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to be quite a dull day. that's due to the fact we got a westerly airflow that is actually bringing through mild air. so it won't be as cold as it was yesterday. also quite a lot of moisture. so as a result we are seeing generally cloudy skies for today. to start off this morning, don't be surprised, quite a dull start to the day. it will be mainly dry though and fairly mild as well. going into this afternoon, we will see little change really. i think we may see the cloud break here and there, so there may be the odd bright or sunny spell. limited amounts of brightness expected for today. generally speaking it stays dry but there is risk of a little bit of light rain or drizzle as the cold front tries to work its way southwards. but it will be mild, as i mentioned. top temperatures up to around 12 celsius. so above average for the time of year. tonight staying generally cloudy, a mild one as well. we may see a few clear spells develop towards dawn. taking a look into the outlook, it does stay mild for another couple of days. friday and saturday, a tad cooler before it turns mild again into the new week and generally staying
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quite cloudy as well. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. 'rip off britain live' follows breakfast on bbc one — let's find out what's coming up on today's programme withjulia, angela and gloria. good morning. thank you so much. very good morning to all your viewers. we had a great response to the programme yesterday. so much you cannot afford to miss. particularly if you're a driver, as we're looking at petrol prices and in particular, which retailer's charging the least and which the most for their fuel.
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plus, how much can you trust online reviews? well, not as much as you might hope, it appears, as we've found some worrying trends when it comes to both what other shoppers post about the products they've supposedly bought, through the world's biggest retaiter~ _ through the world's biggest retailer. | through the world's biggest retailer. ., . retailer. i noticed there were reviews that _ retailer. i noticed there were reviews that did _ retailer. i noticed there were reviews that did not - retailer. i noticed there were reviews that did not relate i retailer. i noticed there were j reviews that did not relate to retailer. i noticed there were - reviews that did not relate to that product _ reviews that did not relate to that product battte~ _ reviews that did not relate to that product battle. they— reviews that did not relate to that product battle. they were - reviews that did not relate to that - product battle. they were mentioning a fantastic— product battle. they were mentioning a fantastic set — product battle. they were mentioning a fantastic set of _ product battle. they were mentioning a fantastic set of kitchen _ product battle. they were mentioning a fantastic set of kitchen knives! - product battle. they were mentioning a fantastic set of kitchen knives! i - a fantastic set of kitchen knives! i thought. — a fantastic set of kitchen knives! i thought. what— a fantastic set of kitchen knives! i thought, what has— a fantastic set of kitchen knives! i thought, what has that _ a fantastic set of kitchen knives! i thought, what has that got - a fantastic set of kitchen knives! i thought, what has that got to - a fantastic set of kitchen knives! i | thought, what has that got to with the headphones? _ and what amazon really means when it labels something 'amazon's choice.�* if you also thought it was amazon's seal of approval, then you might be surprised. on top of that, we're looking at fly tipping and what you can do to report it when you see it. plus, in our advice clinic, our experts are trying to help one woman get her money back from her now insolvent energy company. and if you have anything you'd like their help with, do get in touch — e—mail ripoffbritain@bbc.co.uk,
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or send us a message through facebook. and we look forward to seeing you right here, at 9:15am. see you then. thank you very much. have ou see you then. thank you very much. have you been _ see you then. thank you very much. have you been hiding _ see you then. thank you very much. have you been hiding something i have you been hiding something behind the safer? i have. look at this little beauty! you might not recognise this thing. stamps have bar codes or or codes now. do you have one? i have one as well. why do i have second class and you have first class? don't you think it is obvious! ouryearforthis? i am obvious! our year for this? i am second class — obvious! our year for this? i am second class as _ obvious! our year for this? i am second class as well. _ obvious! our year for this? i am second class as well. look, - obvious! our year for this? i am second class as well. look, i i obvious! ouryearforthis? ia�*n second class as well. look, i know there are a lot of important things happening at the moment that it is a big day in the world of philately, in stamps. we would not want to miss it. things have been changing pretty
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fast in terms of sending stuff to the post. 0nline fast in terms of sending stuff to the post. online shopping might been the post. online shopping might been the normal but royal mail still handles 8 billion items every year. the iconic royal mail stamp, featuring a profile of her majesty the queen has been a staple part of life since its creation by sculptor arnold makin in 1967. the queen is staying back from today if you nip out for stamps that you could be buying one like this. there is a bar code attached. what new features will it allow? for now the recipient of the card will be able to use the royal mail app to watch a special video featuring shaun the sheep. long—term it will help crack down on the fake stamps. what else? the question for david gold, director of external affairs and policy at royal mail. shaun the sheep very cute. presumably the bar codes will also
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be used long—term to make sure things are sent more precisely and we can track them every step of the way. we can track them every step of the wa . . . we can track them every step of the wa , , , ., ., we can track them every step of the wa . , , ., ., ., way. this is a new era for the humble stamp _ way. this is a new era for the humble stamp which - way. this is a new era for the humble stamp which started | way. this is a new era for the l humble stamp which started in way. this is a new era for the - humble stamp which started in the uk in 1840 _ humble stamp which started in the uk in 1840 with the penny black. as you say, in 1840 with the penny black. as you say. the _ in 1840 with the penny black. as you say, the definitive stamp has not really _ say, the definitive stamp has not really changed since 1967. this is reatiy— really changed since 1967. this is really bringing technology into help us move _ really bringing technology into help us move the humble standard into a new age _ us move the humble standard into a new age as — us move the humble standard into a new age. as you say, from today, bar-coded — new age. as you say, from today, bar—coded stamps will mean that shaun _ bar—coded stamps will mean that shaun the — bar—coded stamps will mean that shaun the sheep will become a familiar— shaun the sheep will become a familiar sight in many homes across the country. — familiar sight in many homes across the country, if they use the royal mail app — the country, if they use the royal mail app to the country, if they use the royal mailapp to scan the country, if they use the royal mail app to scan the code, they will .et mail app to scan the code, they will get a _ mail app to scan the code, they will get a really, i think in a great video— get a really, i think in a great video from our friends. this isjust the start— video from our friends. this isjust the start that many more initiatives ptanned _ the start that many more initiatives planned for the future. it is about keeping _ planned for the future. it is about keeping stamps relevant and making sure going _ keeping stamps relevant and making sure going forward we give customers more _ sure going forward we give customers more of— sure going forward we give customers more of what they want. more services. _ more of what they want. more services, more benefits to come.
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this is— services, more benefits to come. this isi'ust — services, more benefits to come. this isjust the start. long—term, this is just the start. long—term, will it help with the precision? if i track the bar code and send something to somebody in london, can ifollow it's something to somebody in london, can i follow it's journey along the way? will the bar code help? we have been usin- will the bar code help? we have been using bar— will the bar code help? we have been using bar codes on many products for a long _ using bar codes on many products for a long time _ using bar codes on many products for a long time now. customers will know you can _ a long time now. customers will know you can pay— a long time now. customers will know you can pay for tracked services. at the moment— you can pay for tracked services. at the moment regulation does not allow us to track— the moment regulation does not allow us to track what is called usa mail, the mail— us to track what is called usa mail, the mail going through our system like these — the mail going through our system like these stamps will allow. that is something that perhaps the regulator will consider in the future — regulator will consider in the future in _ regulator will consider in the future. in the future we very much hope _ future. in the future we very much hope this— future. in the future we very much hope this will allow us to become more _ hope this will allow us to become more efficient and certainly will make _ more efficient and certainly will make sure the security of your post is enhanced — make sure the security of your post is enhanced-— make sure the security of your post is enhanced. many of us, i am guilty of this, i is enhanced. many of us, i am guilty of this. i have _ is enhanced. many of us, i am guilty of this, i have a _ is enhanced. many of us, i am guilty of this, i have a few— is enhanced. many of us, i am guilty of this, i have a few half— is enhanced. many of us, i am guilty of this, i have a few half books - is enhanced. many of us, i am guilty of this, i have a few half books of. of this, i have a few half books of stamps scattered around the house, will they still be valid once the bar codes come in? absolutely. for
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now we encourage _ bar codes come in? absolutely. for now we encourage you _ bar codes come in? absolutely. for now we encourage you to _ bar codes come in? absolutely. for now we encourage you to continue l now we encourage you to continue using — now we encourage you to continue using the _ now we encourage you to continue using the stamps. they will be valued — using the stamps. they will be valued tilljanuary next year. after that the _ valued tilljanuary next year. after that the bar code stamps will become the norm _ that the bar code stamps will become the norm and you will need to use them _ the norm and you will need to use them unless you are using a special issue _ them unless you are using a special issue stamp, which will remain without— issue stamp, which will remain without a — issue stamp, which will remain without a bar code. if by next january— without a bar code. if by next january you have not used at the half books — january you have not used at the half books of stamps in a draw perhaps— half books of stamps in a draw perhaps then we will swap them over. the prices _ perhaps then we will swap them over. the prices are staying the same, aren't they? staff shortages. let's talk about that at royal mail. some people told us they sent christmas cards which still have not arrived. like many businesses we understand you were unlucky when it came to staff having to isolate. are you out of the woods with that now? certainly things are much improved. i certainly things are much improved. i would _ certainly things are much improved. i would like — certainly things are much improved. i would like to say in really so for anybody — i would like to say in really so for anybody who has been inconvenienced by the _ anybody who has been inconvenienced by the large—scale absences. it may be worth— by the large—scale absences. it may be worth knowing that at one in seven _ be worth knowing that at one in
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seven royal mail staff are either unwett _ seven royal mail staff are either unwett or— seven royal mail staff are either unwell or having to isolate at home. there _ unwell or having to isolate at home. there is— unwell or having to isolate at home. there is no— unwell or having to isolate at home. there is no way can even with 20,000 extra _ there is no way can even with 20,000 extra staff— there is no way can even with 20,000 extra staff that we brought in over the festive period that we can maintain _ the festive period that we can maintain their normal service that people _ maintain their normal service that people are — maintain their normal service that people are used to. certainly now, things— people are used to. certainly now, things are — people are used to. certainly now, things are much improved in most parts _ things are much improved in most parts of— things are much improved in most parts of the — things are much improved in most parts of the country are seeing a normal— parts of the country are seeing a normal postage delivery. there are still pockets and details on the website — still pockets and details on the website of those areas. i want to pay tribute — website of those areas. i want to pay tribute to everyone at royal mail. _ pay tribute to everyone at royal mail. att — pay tribute to everyone at royal mail, all my colleagues who have been _ mail, all my colleagues who have been out — mail, all my colleagues who have been out in all weathers to make sure _ been out in all weathers to make sure the — been out in all weathers to make sure the post continues to go out. for the _ sure the post continues to go out. for the vast— sure the post continues to go out. for the vast majority of people christmas was delivered as it ought to have _ christmas was delivered as it ought to have been. christmas was delivered as it ought to have been-— to have been. things slowly returning — to have been. things slowly returning to _ to have been. things slowly returning to normal. - to have been. things slowly returning to normal. thank| to have been. things slowly - returning to normal. thank you. we can safely say stamps have a special place in our hearts. thank you for sending in your pictures. and has a few from the london 2012 games. these are sent in from ten and 12—year—old brothers. he says there
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are lots of different pictures and he loves looking at them and that is why he collect sent. philip does like the queen and queen on his stamps. thank you for sending theirs. the bar code is being attached. reassuringly the queen is staying and prices are staying the same and you can swap out your old stamps tell next year. do not put a big ones in the post! let's return to our top story now and the findings of that much anticipated report by sue gray, into lockdown parties at westminster. our chief political correspondent adam fleming is live in downing street for us, adam, the reaction continuing this morning. there is much happening in downing street right now. you have the photographers and a cabinet arriving for their usual tuesday meeting. also two excellent genus, the whitehall correspondent for the
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financial times and the political editor for the mirror which broke the first story about the parties. do you think it will be business as usual or will they be talking about this? if. usual or will they be talking about this? , , ., ., . this? is the strange thing. not much has really changed, _ this? is the strange thing. not much has really changed, despite - this? is the strange thing. not much has really changed, despite the - has really changed, despite the initial— has really changed, despite the initial findings and the fact the police — initial findings and the fact the police are going to start interviewing people in this building to find _ interviewing people in this building to find out what happened in the many— to find out what happened in the many gatherings during knockdown. the prime _ many gatherings during knockdown. the prime minister has gone to ukraine — the prime minister has gone to ukraine and is trying to get back on the front— ukraine and is trying to get back on the front third. this whole process has brought him some time to do that _ has brought him some time to do that. people in this building will be scrabbling around trying to find out what _ be scrabbling around trying to find out what happened next. what do the changes _ out what happened next. what do the changes mean? how will they improve communications between number 10 and mps, communications between number 10 and mps. tory— communications between number 10 and mps, tory backbench mps, as he promised — mps, tory backbench mps, as he promised them yesterday? that was the thing _ promised them yesterday? that was the thing that finally convinced many— the thing that finally convinced many of— the thing that finally convinced many of them they would back him for now. many of them they would back him for now he _ many of them they would back him for now he is— many of them they would back him for now. he is not out of the woods yet but he _
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now. he is not out of the woods yet but he has — now. he is not out of the woods yet but he has managed to buy himself some _ but he has managed to buy himself some time. the but he has managed to buy himself some time-— but he has managed to buy himself some time. ., , ~ ., some time. the only thing we know for definite — some time. the only thing we know for definite is _ some time. the only thing we know for definite is the _ some time. the only thing we know for definite is the reorganisation i for definite is the reorganisation of downing street. what do you reckon it will end up looking like? what will they change? this reckon it will end up looking like? what will they change?— reckon it will end up looking like? what will they change? this is a big matter of debate _ what will they change? this is a big matter of debate at _ what will they change? this is a big matter of debate at the _ what will they change? this is a big matter of debate at the moment. i matter of debate at the moment. boris _ matter of debate at the moment. borisjohnson's _ matter of debate at the moment. borisjohnson's loyal— matter of debate at the moment. boris johnson's loyal mps - matter of debate at the moment. boris johnson's loyal mps have i matter of debate at the moment. boris johnson's loyal mps have told conservative — boris johnson's loyal mps have told conservative colleagues _ boris johnson's loyal mps have told conservative colleagues there - boris johnson's loyal mps have told conservative colleagues there will. conservative colleagues there will be whotesate _ conservative colleagues there will be wholesale change _ conservative colleagues there will be wholesale change in _ conservative colleagues there will be wholesale change in downing i be wholesale change in downing street _ be wholesale change in downing street with _ be wholesale change in downing street with a _ be wholesale change in downing street with a new— be wholesale change in downing street with a new chief- be wholesale change in downing street with a new chief of- be wholesale change in downing street with a new chief of staff, | be wholesale change in downingl street with a new chief of staff, a new cumbes— street with a new chief of staff, a new cumbes operation, - street with a new chief of staff, a new cumbes operation, a - street with a new chief of staff, a new cumbes operation, a new. street with a new chief of staff, a i new cumbes operation, a new way street with a new chief of staff, a - new cumbes operation, a new way to interact— new cumbes operation, a new way to interact with — new cumbes operation, a new way to interact with parliamentary _ interact with parliamentary cotteagues _ interact with parliamentary colleagues and _ interact with parliamentary colleagues and mps - interact with parliamentary colleagues and mps will i interact with parliamentary colleagues and mps will be interact with parliamentary - colleagues and mps will be able to put their— colleagues and mps will be able to put their policies _ colleagues and mps will be able to put their policies directed - colleagues and mps will be able to put their policies directed downing street _ put their policies directed downing street none — put their policies directed downing street. none of— put their policies directed downing street. none of it— put their policies directed downing street. none of it has— put their policies directed downing street. none of it has worked - put their policies directed downing street. none of it has worked out. j street. none of it has worked out. boris _ street. none of it has worked out. borisjohnson _ street. none of it has worked out. borisjohnson made _ street. none of it has worked out. borisjohnson made grand - street. none of it has worked out. j borisjohnson made grand pledges street. none of it has worked out. i borisjohnson made grand pledges in the house _ borisjohnson made grand pledges in the house of— borisjohnson made grand pledges in the house of commons _ borisjohnson made grand pledges in the house of commons but - borisjohnson made grand pledges in the house of commons but has - borisjohnson made grand pledges in the house of commons but has not i the house of commons but has not figured _ the house of commons but has not figured out — the house of commons but has not figured out who— the house of commons but has not figured out who will— the house of commons but has not figured out who will do _ the house of commons but has not figured out who will do what. - the house of commons but has notj figured out who will do what. there are also— figured out who will do what. there are also rumours— figured out who will do what. there are also rumours around _ figured out who will do what. there are also rumours around have - figured out who will do what. there are also rumours around have a - are also rumours around have a cabinet — are also rumours around have a cabinet reshuffle, _ are also rumours around have a cabinet reshuffle, the _ are also rumours around have a cabinet reshuffle, the whipping| cabinet reshuffle, the whipping operation — cabinet reshuffle, the whipping operation within— cabinet reshuffle, the whipping operation within the _ cabinet reshuffle, the whipping i operation within the conservative party— operation within the conservative party seems— operation within the conservative party seems to _ operation within the conservative party seems to be _ operation within the conservative party seems to be a _ operation within the conservative party seems to be a bit _ operation within the conservative party seems to be a bit below - operation within the conservativej party seems to be a bit below par operation within the conservative i party seems to be a bit below par at the moment. — party seems to be a bit below par at the moment, hence— party seems to be a bit below par at the moment, hence why— party seems to be a bit below par at the moment, hence why boris - party seems to be a bit below par at. the moment, hence why borisjohnson has been _ the moment, hence why borisjohnson has been trying — the moment, hence why borisjohnson has been trying to— the moment, hence why borisjohnson has been trying to convince _ the moment, hence why borisjohnson has been trying to convince mps. - has been trying to convince mps. that was— has been trying to convince mps. that was working _ has been trying to convince mps. that was working very— has been trying to convince mps. that was working very effectivelyj that was working very effectively yesterday — that was working very effectively yesterday. the _ that was working very effectively yesterday. the fact _ that was working very effectively yesterday. the fact there - that was working very effectively yesterday. the fact there is - that was working very effectivelyj yesterday. the fact there is more
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changes— yesterday. the fact there is more changes coming _ yesterday. the fact there is more changes coming has— yesterday. the fact there is more changes coming has prevented i yesterday. the fact there is more - changes coming has prevented people putting _ changes coming has prevented people putting in— changes coming has prevented people putting in letters _ changes coming has prevented people putting in letters of _ changes coming has prevented people putting in letters of no _ changes coming has prevented people putting in letters of no confidence. - putting in letters of no confidence. when _ putting in letters of no confidence. when it _ putting in letters of no confidence. when it be — putting in letters of no confidence. when it be significant— putting in letters of no confidence. when it be significant enough- putting in letters of no confidence. when it be significant enough to i when it be significant enough to convince — when it be significant enough to convince those _ when it be significant enough to convince those mps _ when it be significant enough to convince those mps question - when it be significant enough to. convince those mps question that when it be significant enough to - convince those mps question that we are not— convince those mps question that we are not confident _ convince those mps question that we are not confident enough... - convince those mps question that we are not confident enough... [it- convince those mps question that we are not confident enough. . .— are not confident enough... it was funny when _ are not confident enough... it was funny when the — are not confident enough... it was funny when the man _ are not confident enough... it was funny when the man in _ are not confident enough... it was funny when the man in charge - are not confident enough... it was funny when the man in charge of. funny when the man in charge of party discipline arrived and i asked him, you still going to be around in yourjob? he said, i hope so. what do you think is the mood among the tory troops? figs do you think is the mood among the tory troops? ibis i do you think is the mood among the tory troops?— tory troops? as i say, that they decided to _ tory troops? as i say, that they decided to rally _ tory troops? as i say, that they decided to rally behind - tory troops? as i say, that they decided to rally behind him - tory troops? as i say, that they decided to rally behind him forl tory troops? as i say, that they - decided to rally behind him for now. it is decided to rally behind him for now. it is not _ decided to rally behind him for now. it is not over— decided to rally behind him for now. it is not over yet. there is a distinction _ it is not over yet. there is a distinction between the mps i spoke to after— distinction between the mps i spoke to after the statement from the prime _ to after the statement from the prime minister and the mood of mps across— prime minister and the mood of mps across the _ prime minister and the mood of mps across the party, including those toyat _ across the party, including those loyal to — across the party, including those loyal to the prime minister, thinking _ loyal to the prime minister, thinking he misjudged it, came across— thinking he misjudged it, came across as — thinking he misjudged it, came across as to aggressive, too political. — across as to aggressive, too political, he was not sufficiently genuine — political, he was not sufficiently genuine in his remorse and was outshone — genuine in his remorse and was outshone by keir starmer, he gave a
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statesman—like and very subdued speech— statesman—like and very subdued speech about how people had felt and survive _ speech about how people had felt and survive during the pandemic. a lot of anger— survive during the pandemic. a lot ofangeraround survive during the pandemic. a lot of anger around that point. mp after mp standing up to criticise the prime — mp standing up to criticise the prime minister and the handling once it'll became public. compared after the 1922— it'll became public. compared after the 1922 committee when the prime minister— the 1922 committee when the prime minister went the 1922 committee when the prime ministerwent in the 1922 committee when the prime minister went in knowing the mps... he was— minister went in knowing the mps... he was on— minister went in knowing the mps... he was on the back that with mps, lots of— he was on the back that with mps, lots of them talking about putting in letters — lots of them talking about putting in letters to try to trigger a vote of no—confidence in the realisation he needed — of no—confidence in the realisation he needed to win them over and give them _ he needed to win them over and give them the _ he needed to win them over and give them the red meat to convince them he should _ them the red meat to convince them he should be given more time. one way he _ he should be given more time. one way he did — he should be given more time. one way he did that was, as we discuss, promising _ way he did that was, as we discuss, promising to — way he did that was, as we discuss, promising to improve communications with dan _ promising to improve communications with dan. he mentioned lynton crosby. — with dan. he mentioned lynton crosby, election strategist the prime — crosby, election strategist the prime minister's external adviser. he managed to convince enough of them _ he managed to convince enough of them to— he managed to convince enough of them to crack on and concentrate on things— them to crack on and concentrate on things like _ them to crack on and concentrate on things like levelling up and
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delivering on the promises from brexit— delivering on the promises from brexit and — delivering on the promises from brexit and dealing with the conflict in the _ brexit and dealing with the conflict in the ukraine and to give him the chance— in the ukraine and to give him the chance to— in the ukraine and to give him the chance to do that. there is not a danger— chance to do that. there is not a danger point immediately for him but the findings when they come and the sue gray— the findings when they come and the sue gray report when it is published in full. _ sue gray report when it is published in full. they— sue gray report when it is published in full, they are the moments of highest — in full, they are the moments of highest payroll. an in full, they are the moments of highest payroll-— in full, they are the moments of highest payroll. an mp called nigel adams has walked _ highest payroll. an mp called nigel adams has walked into _ highest payroll. an mp called nigel adams has walked into number- highest payroll. an mp called nigel adams has walked into number 10 | adams has walked into number 10 downing street. he is a shadow whip, a friend borisjohnson who has been going round trying to organise things. what do you think their significance is of a person like that walking into a like that? he is known as the _ that walking into a like that? he is known as the minister _ that walking into a like that? he is known as the minister without portfotio. _ known as the minister without portfolio, which _ known as the minister without portfolio, which means - known as the minister without - portfolio, which means absolutely nothing _ portfolio, which means absolutely nothing. michael— portfolio, which means absolutely nothing. michael has— portfolio, which means absolutely nothing. michael has all— portfolio, which means absolutely nothing. michael has all time - portfolio, which means absolutelyl nothing. michael has all time joked it meant— nothing. michael has all time joked it meant a — nothing. michael has all time joked it meant a minister— nothing. michael has all time joked it meant a minister without - nothing. michael has all time joked it meant a minister withoutjob. - nothing. michael has all time joked it meant a minister withoutjob. he was one _ it meant a minister withoutjob. he was one of— it meant a minister withoutjob. he was one of the _ it meant a minister withoutjob. he was one of the people _ it meant a minister withoutjob. he was one of the people behind - it meant a minister withoutjob. he was one of the people behind this. was one of the people behind this 2019 leadership _ was one of the people behind this 2019 leadership bid. _ was one of the people behind this 2019 leadership bid. he _ was one of the people behind this 2019 leadership bid. he has- was one of the people behind this 2019 leadership bid. he has been| 2019 leadership bid. he has been making _ 2019 leadership bid. he has been making all— 2019 leadership bid. he has been making all these _ 2019 leadership bid. he has been making all these pledges - 2019 leadership bid. he has been making all these pledges we - 2019 leadership bid. he has been| making all these pledges we have been talking — making all these pledges we have been talking about _ making all these pledges we have been talking about to _ making all these pledges we have been talking about to make - making all these pledges we have - been talking about to make wholesale change _ been talking about to make wholesale change as _
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been talking about to make wholesale change as to _ been talking about to make wholesale change as to how— been talking about to make wholesale change as to how government - been talking about to make wholesale change as to how government will - change as to how government will work _ change as to how government will work those — change as to how government will work. those most— change as to how government will work. those most loyalty - change as to how government will work. those most loyalty boris i work. those most loyalty boris johnson. — work. those most loyalty boris johnson, there _ work. those most loyalty boris johnson, there is— work. those most loyalty boris johnson, there is a _ work. those most loyalty boris johnson, there is a cabinet- johnson, there is a cabinet reshuffle _ johnson, there is a cabinet reshuffle and _ johnson, there is a cabinet reshuffle and there's - johnson, there is a cabinet reshuffle and there's other johnson, there is a cabinet- reshuffle and there's other kinds of people _ reshuffle and there's other kinds of people who — reshuffle and there's other kinds of people who will _ reshuffle and there's other kinds of people who will get _ reshuffle and there's other kinds of people who will get more - reshuffle and there's other kinds of people who will get more roles. i reshuffle and there's other kinds of. people who will get more roles. they had essentially— people who will get more roles. they had essentially saved _ people who will get more roles. they had essentially saved his _ people who will get more roles. they had essentially saved his skin - people who will get more roles. they had essentially saved his skin over. had essentially saved his skin over the past _ had essentially saved his skin over the past couple _ had essentially saved his skin over the past couple of _ had essentially saved his skin over the past couple of weeks. - had essentially saved his skin over the past couple of weeks. going i had essentially saved his skin over. the past couple of weeks. going back to the _ the past couple of weeks. going back to the town. — the past couple of weeks. going back to the town. a — the past couple of weeks. going back to the town, a statement _ the past couple of weeks. going back to the town, a statement from - the past couple of weeks. going back to the town, a statement from borisi to the town, a statement from boris johnson _ to the town, a statement from boris johnson in _ to the town, a statement from boris johnson in the — to the town, a statement from boris johnson in the house _ to the town, a statement from boris johnson in the house of— to the town, a statement from boris johnson in the house of commons i to the town, a statement from boris i johnson in the house of commons got it badly— johnson in the house of commons got it badty wrong — johnson in the house of commons got it badty wrong mps— johnson in the house of commons got it badly wrong. mps feel _ johnson in the house of commons got it badly wrong. mps feel he _ johnson in the house of commons got it badly wrong. mps feel he did - johnson in the house of commons got it badly wrong. mps feel he did not. it badly wrong. mps feel he did not rise to _ it badly wrong. mps feel he did not rise to the — it badly wrong. mps feel he did not rise to the moment _ it badly wrong. mps feel he did not rise to the moment and _ it badly wrong. mps feel he did not rise to the moment and his - it badly wrong. mps feel he did not rise to the moment and his tempol it badly wrong. mps feel he did not. rise to the moment and his tempo and anger. _ rise to the moment and his tempo and anger. he _ rise to the moment and his tempo and anger. he got— rise to the moment and his tempo and anger. he got a— rise to the moment and his tempo and anger. he got a bite _ rise to the moment and his tempo and anger, he got a bite keir— rise to the moment and his tempo and anger, he got a bite keir starmer- rise to the moment and his tempo and anger, he got a bite keir starmer he i anger, he got a bite keir starmer he .ave anger, he got a bite keir starmer he gave a _ anger, he got a bite keir starmer he gave a lawyer — anger, he got a bite keir starmer he gave a lawyer a _ anger, he got a bite keir starmer he gave a lawyer a legalistic— anger, he got a bite keir starmer he gave a lawyer a legalistic approach i gave a lawyer a legalistic approach as you _ gave a lawyer a legalistic approach as you might— gave a lawyer a legalistic approach as you might expect _ gave a lawyer a legalistic approach as you might expect from - gave a lawyer a legalistic approach as you might expect from the - gave a lawyer a legalistic approach i as you might expect from the former director— as you might expect from the former director of— as you might expect from the former director of public— as you might expect from the former director of public prosecutions. - director of public prosecutions. bennett— director of public prosecutions. bennett switched _ director of public prosecutions. bennett switched round - director of public prosecutions. bennett switched round again. i director of public prosecutions. - bennett switched round again. boris johnson _ bennett switched round again. boris johnson got — bennett switched round again. boris johnson got a — bennett switched round again. boris johnson got a reprieve _ bennett switched round again. boris johnson got a reprieve for _ bennett switched round again. boris johnson got a reprieve for the - johnson got a reprieve for the couple — johnson got a reprieve for the couple of— johnson got a reprieve for the couple of weeks. _ johnson got a reprieve for the couple of weeks. —— - johnson got a reprieve for the couple of weeks. —— then - johnson got a reprieve for the couple of weeks. —— then it. johnson got a reprieve for the - couple of weeks. —— then it switched around _ couple of weeks. —— then it switched around the — couple of weeks. —— then it switched around the two _ couple of weeks. —— then it switched around. the two events _ couple of weeks. —— then it switched around. the two events in _ couple of weeks. —— then it switched around. the two events in downing i around. the two events in downing street _ around. the two events in downing street were — around. the two events in downing street were attended _ around. the two events in downing street were attended by— around. the two events in downing street were attended by the - around. the two events in downing street were attended by the prime| street were attended by the prime minister— street were attended by the prime minister and — street were attended by the prime ministerand an— street were attended by the prime minister and an investigation- street were attended by the prime minister and an investigation by. street were attended by the prime| minister and an investigation by the police _ minister and an investigation by the police it— minister and an investigation by the police. it seems— minister and an investigation by the police. it seems likely _ minister and an investigation by the police. it seems likely the - minister and an investigation by the police. it seems likely the prime i police. it seems likely the prime minister— police. it seems likely the prime minister will— police. it seems likely the prime minister will be _ police. it seems likely the prime minister will be interviewed - police. it seems likely the prime minister will be interviewed by. police. it seems likely the prime i minister will be interviewed by the met and _ minister will be interviewed by the met and that— minister will be interviewed by the met and that is _ minister will be interviewed by the met and that is not— minister will be interviewed by the met and that is not a _ minister will be interviewed by the met and that is not a good - minister will be interviewed by the met and that is not a good place i minister will be interviewed by the| met and that is not a good place to be. met and that is not a good place to be it— met and that is not a good place to be. . . ~ met and that is not a good place to be. , ., ,, ., ., be. it might be talking about a world where _ be. it might be talking about a world where 54 _ be. it might be talking about a world where 54 tory _ be. it might be talking about a world where 54 tory mps - be. it might be talking about a | world where 54 tory mps wrote
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letters of no confidence and a leadership challenge but what we are all obsessed about is basically some technical changes about how this building operates, which some may think is not the best response in terms of public anger around the whole issue. abs. terms of public anger around the whole issue-— terms of public anger around the whole issue. a fascinating chat in downina whole issue. a fascinating chat in downing street. _ whole issue. a fascinating chat in downing street. it _ whole issue. a fascinating chat in downing street. it will— whole issue. a fascinating chat in downing street. it will be - whole issue. a fascinating chat in downing street. it will be a - whole issue. a fascinating chat in downing street. it will be a long | downing street. it will be a long day and a long week in politics. now for the weather. morning, day and a long week in politics. now forthe weather. morning, both. good morning everyone. we are looking at a mixed picture over the next few days. it will stay windy, not as windy as it was yesterday. today their wins will be strong enough far north of scotland in particular. some of us have opened up to blue skies and lovely sunrises. you can see on the picture from a weather watcher in north lincolnshire. others have woken up to more clad in spots of rain. this weather front has been sinking south. looking at the isobars, we have windy conditions, not as windy as
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yesterday. the other thing you will notice is where there are yellows and ambers, it will be mild, and mile day and a mild start and that will continue. here is the cloud associated with the weather front. sinking south and west say behind it is brightening up quite nicely. we'll see a fair of sunshine. in the north of the country some showers coming in across the north west. we have gusty wind sceptically so in the north of the country and especially caithness, sutherland and orkney with gas of up to 65 miles an hour, possibly a little bit more. not unusual for this hour, possibly a little bit more. not unusualfor this time hour, possibly a little bit more. not unusual for this time of year. bearin not unusual for this time of year. bear in mind we have had two storms recently which may well have weakened structural buildings and also some trees. something just to be aware of year. bear in mind we have had two storms recently which may well have weakened structural buildings and also some trees. something just to be aware of. temperature wise, ten to 14 degrees and a feeling mild. this evening and overnight you can see the weather front continuing to push towards the
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south—west. bennett lips and starts to push north and is again taking cloud and rain with it. there will be some clear skies in wales and aberdeenshire. in aberdeenshire, temperatures could get down to 2 degrees make you might well see a touch of frost but the rest of us will not and the winds will ease. tomorrow, he is a weather front that has flipped and moved north. behind it high—pressure is in charge. all the yellow means once again it will be mild day. with the weather front across the is giving [and and scotland there will be a fair bit of cloud around and spots of rain. it will brighten up quite nicely. as we saw with the yellows in the charts, it will be mild. then it all changes. a weather front coming in bringing the rain. a cold front. all around it will be windy, gusting to gale force in the north of scotland. it will turn colder with frequent wintry showers can increasingly down
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to lower levels. on the other side, the southern side, we are looking at dry weather with sunshine and still mild. not much rain in the south of england. while. tonight the rain will sink south taking rain with it. by will sink south taking rain with it. by friday we are all in colder air with frequent wintry showers in the north. you need to be prepared. thank you very much indeed. it's responsible for launching shows like gavin and stacey, two pints of lager and bad education but bbc three went exclusively to iplayer as part of a cost—cutting exercise six years ago. it's returning as a full tv channel from today as our media and arts correspondent david sillito explains. bbc three is now on tv. bbc three, the bbc�*s youth channel, is returning to the tv airwaves. hi, i'm blu hydrangea. i'm from ru paul's drag race uk versus the world. i want a global superstar. blu from drag race and the rest of bbc3 are going to have a new broadcast
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home, a tv channel. do you watch old school tv? i absolutely do. i mean, it's handy having it on your phone, it's easy to access, but whenever i'm about the house, i love having the tv on in the background. and what better channel than bbc three? what about this? good. it is what you might call a bit of a reverse ferret. six years ago, the bbc closed down the tv channel, but the number of 16 to 34—year—olds watching each week fell from 22% to 6%. the hope is returning to the schedules might bump that up a bit. the question is, is the tv channel becoming a bit of a thing of the past, especially for young people? i mean, do they even know where programmes come from that they love? because i've got a little list here of bbc three programmes. what about bbc one, bbc two? no. do you ever watch, you know, tv when it's on a schedule? the ordinary old school tv?
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no, i don't. just netflix, not tv. we don't watch channels, sincel no—one in our house watches it, but we like disney plus - and netflix and amazon prime. however, not all young people have completely given up on traditional tv. you still watch old school tv, do you? yeah. i still like hercule poirot. i watch agatha christie, some of the old classics. they're quite interesting and fun. can i ask how old you are? i'm 20. bbc three? no. and when i started reading out my list of bbc three programmes... drag race? yeah. man like mobeen? have you seen that one? yes. i watch that. around 80% of 16 to 34—year—olds do still use the bbc every week, but there are perception issues. however, is a tv channel really going to help? we believe that we have to provide a universal service to all under 35s
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right across the uk. not everyone has got great internet provision. not everyone lives in a house with an internet connected tv or lots of laptops, and on top of that, the content we make that's really targeted at under 35s, we've got to make sure it's really easy to discover. so by having it on a channel, it's adding to the possibility of them finding it on iplayer. 7pm and i don't watch love island. so six years on, with the bbc facing renewed questions over the future of the licence fee, three returns to tv. the question is, how much of its young audience will come back with it? david sillito, bbc news. we're nowjoined by gavin and stacey star, larry lamb. good morning. lovely to have you with us. i don't know whether that brought back some memories of gauges and inspiration but this is a big part of you, isn't it? what do you think of the relaunch. figs
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part of you, isn't it? what do you think of the relaunch. $5 a part of you, isn't it? what do you think of the relaunch.- think of the relaunch. as a young erson i think of the relaunch. as a young person i have _ think of the relaunch. as a young person i have always _ think of the relaunch. as a young person i have always enjoyed - think of the relaunch. as a young | person i have always enjoyed bbc three. when you consider the internet has turned out, iconic programmes, things i really love. not a bad track record. it is fantastic to bring it back. i didn't like the idea of itjust disappearing anyway, particularly if kids are not watching it, they are not picking up. so good, i am pleased. the bbc has got to hang onto whatever it can because there are moves of that to commit you know, privatise it effectively. i don't agree with that title. as far as i am concerned, if you have a potential smaller station with not a general remit in terms of audience, thatis general remit in terms of audience, that is how they got gavin and stacey off the ground, they knew
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they had to get it out to a younger audience. there it was, it started on bbc three, moved up to bbc two and all of a sudden it was under bbc one. if you go to the national theatre you can often see players that star in a small space and work their way up to the big stage. it is a great addition back to the bbc arsenal. i a great addition back to the bbc arsenal. ~ ., ., , ., , arsenal. i know lots of people watch gavin and stacey _ arsenal. i know lots of people watch gavin and stacey able _ arsenal. i know lots of people watch gavin and stacey able ages. - arsenal. i know lots of people watch gavin and stacey able ages. how- gavin and stacey able ages. how important is it there is a channel that may be more targeted towards younger people, how important is that for the bbc, do you think? for the bbc to that for the bbc, do you think? fr?" the bbc to stay relevant, if he had questions like david sillitoe was asking, do they watch? no. if they do not you must do something about it. the bbc is fair to say the audience, that is the remit. you have to find them. i am sure if you do it the right way, directed at
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them and get the right programmes can get the right people, the right presenters, the right package gradual than in. you know, they are there. they are definitely watching stuff. —— draw then in. everyone has been bounding by this massive organisations that are streaming things. you have to do something. you cannot get into budget wars with the big operators. if you have a smaller station and you can get things off the ground with smaller budgets, there is a chance you can break into the big time, from small beginnings. break into the big time, from small beuuinnins. , ., break into the big time, from small beaiannins. , . beginnings. exactly what you did with gavin and _ beginnings. exactly what you did with gavin and stacey. _ beginnings. exactly what you did with gavin and stacey. can - beginnings. exactly what you did with gavin and stacey. can you i beginnings. exactly what you did i with gavin and stacey. can you cast your mind back to when it was first commissioned and put on bbc three? was there ever a discussion about it going on bbc one or bbc two? it was kind of experimental. _ going on bbc one or bbc two? it was kind of experimental. it _ going on bbc one or bbc two? it was
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kind of experimental. it was - going on bbc one or bbc two? it "in—3 kind of experimental. it was written by two people no one had ever heard of at the time. they did a lot of work to get the thing passed. everybody went into it with the thought, this is really good. in the end it didn't work out. this one really ran the course. we already along with it. certainly there it was on bbc three to begin with and a pan along it went. irate was on bbc three to begin with and a pan along it went.— pan along it went. we have already s-oken, pan along it went. we have already spoken. we — pan along it went. we have already spoken. we had — pan along it went. we have already spoken, we had a _ pan along it went. we have already spoken, we had a guest _ pan along it went. we have already spoken, we had a guest on - pan along it went. we have already spoken, we had a guest on this - spoken, we had a guest on this morning of one show that will be on bbc three about tractor racing, how important is that there is a place for experimental new things? trier?r for experimental new things? very im aortant. for experimental new things? 7 important. everything is being privatised. the bbc as part of our heritage, as far as i am concerned. i went to do an interview when i was running a radio show, i interviewed sir david attenborough. i said to
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him, this is one of the most extraordinary experiences in my life, i have been following you around the world since i was a nine—year old boy. you have got to do whatever you can to hold onto your audience and build your audience for the future. people grow up, you get old. i was a kid and now i up, you get old. i was a kid and now lam an up, you get old. i was a kid and now i am an old geezer, that is it. during the importance of television and good television is really apparent that wasn't it, for so many of us who really needed to watch things and get a bit of a lift? do you think coming out of the pandemic television is in quite a healthy spot? television is in quite a healthy s-ot? ., ., , ., television is in quite a healthy sot? ., ., spot? for me, all sorts of positive thin a s spot? for me, all sorts of positive things came _ spot? for me, all sorts of positive things came out — spot? for me, all sorts of positive things came out of _ spot? for me, all sorts of positive things came out of it. _ spot? for me, all sorts of positive things came out of it. people - things came out of it. people learned to be on their own, relationships got closer, friends became more important, things that you watch became more of a topic of conversation, much more interchange between people, discussions about
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what people liked. for me there are all sorts of positives for what happened in the midst of our horrendous mess of a pandemic. i know everybody watching will want me to ask about the gavin and stacey christmas special. it is against the law not to ask! it ended on the better the cliffhanger, didn't it? what will happen? what can we expect? i what will happen? what can we ex-ect? ., ,.,,.,_ what will happen? what can we exect? ., , , ., what will happen? what can we exeect? ., , , ., ., expect? i am probably one of the worst people _ expect? i am probably one of the worst people to _ expect? i am probably one of the worst people to ask. _ expect? i am probably one of the worst people to ask. super- worst people to ask. super hush—hush. like trying to find out what went on in number 10, i don't know. sooner or later something will happen, i reckon, that is about it. that is a good answer. when you have something to many people talk about that you have to do something with it, expectation is huge. he that you have to do something with it, expectation is huge.— it, expectation is huge. he whined eve bod it, expectation is huge. he whined everybody pp _ it, expectation is huge. he whined everybody up a — it, expectation is huge. he whined everybody up a 17 _ it, expectation is huge. he whined everybody up a 17 million - it, expectation is huge. he whined everybody up a 17 million people. | everybody up a 17 million people.
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who knows how many... 17 million people watched and lord knows how many have watch subsequently? i spoke to james corden after we had done it telling people i did not know if there was going to be any more gavin and stacey and now it looks like i am going to start all over again. the demand is insatiable. it is extraordinary. it is a wonderfuljewel in the bbc�*s crown that came out of bbc three, so let's hope they get a few more like that. . ~ let's hope they get a few more like that. ., ,, , ., let's hope they get a few more like that. . ~' , ., , let's hope they get a few more like that. ., ,, i. , . ., let's hope they get a few more like that. ., ,, , ., , . ., ., ,, that. thank you very much and thank ou for that. thank you very much and thank you for putting _ that. thank you very much and thank you for putting so — that. thank you very much and thank you for putting so much _ that. thank you very much and thank you for putting so much effort - that. thank you very much and thank you for putting so much effort into i you for putting so much effort into your background today, it is lovely. you wouldn't believe what that hurt! i would much rather see your bookcase. the bbc three channel will be available on your tv screens from 7pm this evening. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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good morning, welcome to bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire live at downing street. the prime minister tries to rally support from mps after that damning report into parties held at downing street. the deputy pm says it's important for the government to reflect on the initialfindings. it was important the sue gray report was published in full, the way many people have been calling for, and it was important that we looked at and learnt the lessons that she has highlighted, and also the prime minister has come back and said, "ok, i want to address and fix this." so many people are worried about issues _ so many people are worried about issues such— so many people are worried about issues such as their energy bills, which _ issues such as their energy bills, which are — issues such as their energy bills, which are going through the roof, and the _ which are going through the roof, and the prime minister is spending
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all of— and the prime minister is spending all of this— and the prime minister is spending all of this time saving his own skin —

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